NZPhotographer Issue 13, November 2018

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Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

ISSUE 13, November 2018

INTERVIEW

WITH WERNER KAFFL

CAPTURING

IGUACU'S WONDER

WITH BRENDON GILCHRIST

NIKON Z7

REVIEW

HOW PHOTOGRAPHY CAN

CONTRIBUTE TO

MEETING EACH OF OUR

EMOTIONAL NEEDS

HOW TO CAPTURE:

RIVER LANDSCAPES

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

November 2018

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WELCOME TO ISSUE 13 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

In this issue, we're thrilled to

bring you a review of the

Nikon Z7, Nikon's flagship full

frame mirrorless camera. Astro

photographer Mark Gee took

it out for a spin and shares

his findings with us. We also

learn how photography can

contribute to meeting each of

our emotional needs, a thoughtprovoking

piece from Tony Yuille

that gives us even more reason

to pick up the camera, get

out there to take some shots,

and connect with like-minded

people.

For our regular features, we're

off on world travels once again

as Brendon Gilchrist takes us to Iguazu Falls on the Brazil/Argentina border

and Parmeet Sahni whisks us off to Nepal as we learn about her favourite

capture from her recent Gathering of Life exhibition in Behind The Shot.

These features might give you itchy feet but no matter where you are

in the world you can use Richard Young's river landscape tips in How To

Capture.

Last but never least we have readers submissions towards the back of the

magazine. We're always thrilled to see your submissions but it doesn't have

to stop there - If you would like to contribute an article, take part in Behind

The Shot, or be interviewed do let us know.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 13

November 2018

Cover Photo

by Werner Kafl

www.wernerkaffl.com

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

ana@excio.io

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone 04 889 29 25

or Email hello@excio.io

2 NZPhotographer


REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man behind ESB

Photography. He treks from sea to

mountain, and back again, capturing

the uniqueness of New Zealand’s

unforgiving landscape.

Richard Young

Richard is an award-winning

landscape and wildlife photographer

who teaches photography workshops

and runs photography tours. He is the

founder of New Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2018 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

November 2018

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CONTENTS

32

6

INTERVIEW WITH WERNER KAFFL

BEHIND THE SHOT

6 WITH PARMEET SAHNI

IGUACU’S WONDER

8 by Brendon Gilchrist

HOW PHOTOGRAPHY CAN CONTRIBUTE TO

MEETING EACH OF OUR EMOTIONAL NEEDS

14 BEHIND THE SHOT

by Tony Yuile

WITH PARMEET SAHNI

HOW TO CAPTURE: RIVER LANDSCAPES

18 with Richard Young

REVIEW OF THE NIKON Z7

20 14

by Mark Gee

43 BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

32

INTERVIEW WITH WERNER KAFFL

18

HOW TO CAPTURE:

RIVER LANDSCAPES

HOW PHOTOGRAPHY CAN

CONTRIBUTE TO

MEETING EACH OF OUR

EMOTIONAL NEEDS


A new era of Nikon imaging has arrived. A system born from our

unending quest for perfection. A system that opens a new dimension of

possibilities. A system inspired by our past but designed for tomorrow.

A system only Nikon could create.

FIND OUT MORE

November 2018

5


6 NZPhotographer

F6.3, 1/30s, ISO800


Behind The Shot

With Parmeet Sahni

HI PARMEET, TELL US ABOUT YOUR RECENT TRIP

TO NEPAL WHERE YOU CAPTURED THIS PORTRAIT.

I have a great appreciation for street photography

and as a travel photographer too, I really wanted

to visit a country with a rich culture, vibrant colours,

and spiritual energy. Therefore, I took a five day solo

trip to Nepal in June of this year with my Canon 6D to

celebrate my birthday by doing what I love.

When I was in Nepal, I visited Kathmandu, Bhaktapur,

Nagarkot, and Sankhu Village. Everywhere I went,

I found myself surrounded by a thousand stories, all

of which I tried my best to capture through my lens.

I took well over three to four thousand photos on this

trip, and I was ecstatic to bring them back to share

with my family and friends.

SO WHO IS THE MAN IN THE PHOTO?

This man is a Sadhu; a holy man, sage or ascetic.

I saw this sadhu outside Pashupatinath Temple, which

is located on the banks of Bagmati River about 5km

from Kathmandu, Nepal’s capital city.

When I asked him if I could take a photo of him,

he happily posed for the camera. He talked about

experiences he has had with many other tourists too,

who were also eager to click photos of him as they

walked past.

The sadhus situated around this temple are a

common attraction for tourists from around the world

and are quite famous on social media, I was able to

see faces that I saw in Nepal on Google Images when

I got back home!

WHAT’S THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS POSE?

The pose he is making with his hands is called “Gyan

Mudra” or “Chin Mudra”. A Mudra is a symbolic or

spiritual gesture in Hinduism and Buddhism.

In Sanskrit, Chin means consciousness and Mudra

means seal or gesture, therefore, the Chin Mudra is

the gesture of consciousness, it symbolises the union of

Self with the universe.

The Gyan Mudra is the hand gesture which is used

during meditation and also while practicing breathing

exercises during Yoga. Along with the Gyan Mudra,

the Sadhu also taught me how to do a few other

mudras and the symbolism behind them.

WHAT WAS HAPPENING BEHIND THE CAMERA

THAT WE CAN’T SEE?

This image was taken right before sunset. At the temple,

the Bagmati Aarti (evening prayer by the riverbank)

was about to start. Behind me, thousands of devotees

were roaming around the temple. I could hear the

prayers from inside Pashupatinath temple, which

created an extremely relaxing and peaceful aura.

The Bagmati Aarti is one of the most mesmerizing

rituals that take place in Nepal. All devotees

collectively pray for all of humanity. This Aarti is famous

all around the world and attracts a huge number of

tourists each day.

SINCE RETURNING HOME TO NZ HOW HAS THIS

IMAGE BEEN RECEIVED?

This was one of my favourite photos that I took on my

trip. When I showed it to people around me, everyone

was struck by all the colour in the image. Many were

intrigued by the way he was dressed, the way he

was posing and the significance of the image. I got

a similar reaction to my other work from Nepal too,

especially from my colleagues, who encouraged me

to display these photos at an exhibition.

I got in touch with the New Zealand Nepalese Association,

and was able to hold two rounds of a fundraising

photographic exhibition named “The Gathering Of Life:

Capturing the Culture & Streets of Nepal” where more

than 200 of my photos were displayed.

The event was free entry but prints were for sale

and we collected donations. The full sum of money

accumulated was for a charity which provides

underprivileged children in Nepal study materials. For

me, the best feeling was seeing around 300 people

from different communities and cultures coming

together to support a noble cause and appreciate

the photos as well as the country.

www.instagram.com/soulfulmemoriesbyps

www.facebook.com/SoulfulMemoriesByParmeetSahni

You can read more about Parmeet and learn about her photography business Soulful Memories as well as her

Gathering Of Life series and exhibition on our blog.

November 2018

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Iguacu’s Wonder

By Brendon Gilchrist

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ARGENTINEAN UPPER TRAIL

F16, 20s, ISO64

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IGUACU PLANK

F16, 20s, ISO64

Continuing on my South American journey, in

this issue I want to introduce you to the natural

wonder of Iguacu Falls aka Iguazu Falls – The

first spelling if you’re standing on the Brazilian side, the

second spelling if you’re standing on the Argentinian

side.

A FEW FACTS FIRST

• There are 275 separate waterfalls which cascade over

the same shelf from the same river also called Iguazu.

• The falls stretch around a horseshoe shape that

measures 2.7 km in length.

• The Iguazu river is a branch of the Parana River,

the second biggest in South America spanning

4,880km.

To put some scale to the size let’s compare it to home.

To drive from the tip of the North Island to the very

bottom it’s only 2083km. The Parana river is just under

twice the size of the length of New Zealand! The

longest river in New Zealand is the Tongariro, a tiny

604km long in comparison.

THE BRAZILIAN SIDE

The Brazilian side has the most panoramic views of the

2 sides and is the closest side for being able to touch

the waterfall. Maybe not so much in terms of you

touching it, but it touching you – the spray soaks you

to the bone when you walk the plank to the edge of

one very big drop!

It is hard to describe the feeling you get when you’re

in such a place.

Surrounded by water, surrounded by people

chattering away happily in many different languages,

the pitter patter of feet walking around as you lean on

the railings taking in the majestic view, capturing an

internal photograph and video of Iguacu’s tumbling

water.

The wildlife at the falls is special to watch, it reminded

me how amazing nature is at adapting to its

environment. At first I thought I was seeing things but

birds called the Great Dusky Swift really do fly through

the water to reach their nests. The water is so powerful

I don’t know how they manage to fly through it. The

Vultures, aka nature’s clean up crew, were also out,

gliding so gracefully around the falls for hours (they

do not circle their prey like some say). I was in envy

of their view, it must be even more amazing than the

one I was getting at ground level.

Other wildlife at the falls included monkeys, Toucan’s

and other colourful birds, butterflies, giant ants, and

many, many Coati. The Coati is a member of the

raccoon family but reminded me of a small feisty yet

friendly dog, aggressive at times.

I found this location to be a difficult one to

photograph as it’s all been done before – Every

angle, every style. I knew it would be impossible to

take something completely fresh since over 1 million

people visit this place every year, many of whom are

professional photographers along with amateurs plus

the cell phone snapper’s but sometimes you have to

go somewhere and see it with your own eyes, hoping

that you are capturing something fresh through your

own perspective.

THE ARGENTINEAN SIDE

If you want to visit over 100 different waterfalls in one

day, and can manage 10km of walking, head over to

the Argentinean side as I did as part of an organized

tour.

The reported highlight of the trip within Iguacu

National Park on the Argentinean side is getting to

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see the giant horseshoe-shaped cascade that is

Garganta del Diablo. It required a long train journey

followed by a long walk of 1.1km which went across

the river on a suspended walkway. This place was the

most powerful but also the most difficult place to take

any good photos because you’re standing on top of

a waterfall that is pouring thousands of liters of water

every second, the spray of the water as intense as the

sheer number of people.

Personally, I believe the best section of the

Argentinian side is not the Diablo, but the Upper and

Lower Circuits, each one measuring in at 1.7km long.

Why do I think this? Because there are so many more

individual waterfalls to see and photography, not

just the main falls that are seen from Brazil or from the

Diablo.

The Upper Circuit has magical panoramic views

towards the Diablo and towards Salto San Martin. So

magical that you have to pinch yourself to make sure

it’s real and you’re not dreaming.

It was here that I could get my telephoto lens out

and capture some long exposures of some of the

waterfalls. I managed to get 12 in one photo, that’s

right 12 waterfalls in one frame. After capturing one

lookout, packing up my gear, walking through the

bush, listening to the birds, taking in this magical

place, I kept asking myself what more can this place

offer, can it get any better than this?

It did! I was not disappointed and despite the 30

degree heat (in their Winter time!) it was well worth the

suffering to be able to witness the magic of the Upper

Circuit. The lower Circuit had more what I might call

‘intimate falls’, smaller in size and surrounded in bush

with smaller drops with less water, but still impressive.

The magic of this place is something that will last

forever. Places like this, you visit once for a small

amount of time, but the memories never fade away

unlike so many other fleeting moments in our lifetime.

3 TIPS FOR CAPTURING A WONDER OF THE

WATER WORLD

• Understand that you will be surrounded by many

people who will push and shove so having a tripod

is not always possible.

• The best time to visit is late in the day as there are

less people around, all the tourist buses having

been and gone.

• Due to the amount of water that is sprayed around,

it is very hard to do long exposures. A short 10

second exposure is better then a long 30 second

exposure as you won’t get as many water droplets

on your lens and therefore in your photo.

On the Brazilian side looking towards

the Garganta del Diablo.

F11, 1/125s, ISO200

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12 FALLS IN ONE SHOT

F16, 30s, ISO64

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November 2018

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How Photography Can Contribute To

Meeting Each Of Our Emotional Needs

As well as the obvious ‘basic needs’ for water,

food, and shelter, humans have a set of 9

emotional needs, which are not so obvious but

are just as essential to our wellbeing and happiness.

In fact, our moment to moment decisions and actions

are almost ALWAYS driven by our need to meet one

or more of our emotional needs.

Unfortunately, all too often in modern western culture,

our emotional needs are not well understood or

treated with the attention they deserve, and this is

reflected in the current high levels of stress, anxiety,

and depression within the population. The good news

is, that once we understand our emotional needs,

and how well we are currently meeting them, we can

take action. In this way, people are able to create

breakthrough changes in their behaviours leading to

more fulfilling happier, healthier lives.

Let’s take a look at those 9 needs and how

photography is already helping us to meet them.

OUR 9 EMOTIONAL NEEDS

Achievement: In order to maintain our self-esteem,

we need to have a sense that we are accomplishing

things of value. Photography enables us to recognise,

and use, our existing competencies, skills, and

resources. It also provides us with an opportunity

to develop new skills and knowledge. Every photo

we take increases our skill and capabilities as a

photographer and provides us with an opportunity

to extend ourselves beyond our comfort zone. We

can set, and achieve, ever more challenging goals

for ourselves (e. g. take a photo a day, get a photo

published in NZP or the local paper, win a prize). And

when we achieve our goal(s) we get a wonderful

‘feel-good’ sense of achievement.

Security: We all need to feel a sense of security that

things will be okay and we can lead our lives without

experiencing undue fear. Routine and predictability

are things that give us a sense of control, assurance

and safety. If we are lacking a sense of security in our

lives, even a small sense of predictability can give us

something to hold onto. The process of taking a photo

is predictable as is the outcome (most of the time!).

Often when we are feeling stressed, anxious, or

depressed we may find it difficult to express our

thoughts and feelings verbally. We may feel ashamed,

afraid, or embarrassed. Photography acts as

by Tony Yuile

non-verbal communication through which we can

express our fears and feelings, in a way that feels safe.

Community: We need to feel connected to a

community and have a sense that we contribute.

Photography provides an opportunity for us to

connect and interact more with people, especially

fellow photographers, for example by joining a

photography club/group, whether a local group or an

online community. Belonging to part of a community

means that there are likely to be opportunities to

contribute whether to a project, a competition, or

simply help others to learn their camera and improve

their skills.

Status / Respect: It’s not enough to just be part of a

group, we need to have a sense of our value within

the group dynamics we’re a part of. We need to feel

that we have something worthwhile to contribute, we

need to feel we are respected and acknowledged

and that others appreciate our talents. By creating

photos that we are proud of, we can start to build a

reputation amongst family, friends, and others, as a

good or even expert photographer. People may start

approaching us for tips and advice. When others start

to pay attention to us and appreciate and respect

us, this appreciation and recognition helps establish

and maintain our sense of self-esteem and self-worth.

When we say “I am a photographer” or “I am a visual

artist” we are expressing an identity, having a positive

identity is essential to good mental health.

Privacy: The need and right to obtain privacy,

time and space to reflect on and learn from our

experiences. With so many things vying for our

attention 24/7 nowadays it’s easy to become

overstimulated and/or overwhelmed. Photography

provides a reason and the motivation to get outside

and connect with nature and enjoy some alone time.

When we are in nature we can clear our minds, be

grounded in the present moment, and reconnect to

how beautiful and diverse our world is. This gives our

brain a welcome, and much needed, break from

negative thoughts and worries.

Purpose & Meaning: In the same vein of feeling that

we’re accomplishing things of value, we all need to

have a sense that we’re part of something greater

than ourselves that has purpose, meaning and value.

Each of us has a reason why we take photographs,

and each photograph we take is created for a

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particular reason whether we consciously know it

or not. Photography gives us a voice; we can bring

attention to issues big or small and inspire people to

take action, creating positive change in the world. We

can enrich other people’s lives.

Attention: We need to receive attention from those

we care about and also give them our attention in

return. Images are able to grab our attention easily,

and we are immediately drawn to them. By showing

our photography to family, friends, and the public we

can receive positive attention and positive feedback.

The very act of taking a photograph provides a

shift in perspective (we’re literally looking through a

different lens, seeing the world in a new way). We can

‘reframe’ how we perceive the world, our problems,

and our lives.

Control: We all need a sense of autonomy and

control, to feel like we have the power to direct our

own lives and exist autonomously. For people whose

life seems to be spiralling out of control, photography

can provide a vital sense of autonomy and control.

As photographers, we are in total control of the whole

creative process. With a camera in hand, we control

what the lens captures, we decide whether to keep

that image or not, whether to edit it and how to

display it, if at all.

Emotional Connection: To be emotionally fulfilled

we need to feel connected to other people. We

need to experience friendship, love, and intimacy. We

need to feel a sense of intimacy with at least 1 other

person, someone who accepts us totally for who we

are, ‘warts n all’. Photography can be a wonderful

catalyst for creating friendships, as we meet fellow

photographers and people who are interested in

our work. The value of friendship is incalculable, it is

not the number of friends that counts but the quality

of the friendship. True friends share one another’s

interests and successes as well as failures. With a true

friend, you can express yourself and be accepted for

what and who you are.

See some of Tony’s photos on the following pages where he’s paired an

emotional need with one of his images.

BIO

Tony Yuile qualified as a life coach and

clinical hypnotherapist 6 years ago, a

redundancy in the financial services industry

followed by the recommendation of an

NLP course, being the catalyst for personal

transformation and a subsequent career

change which lead to him forming

TY Coaching.

Today, Tony specialises in helping people

manage stress, avoid anxiety and lift

depression, he also helps people overcome

a range of common problems such as fear

of public speaking, weight management

issues, phobias, breaking unhealthy/

unwanted habits, building self-esteem

and goal achievement. His approach to

coaching is solution-focused, practical,

and evidence based. He focuses on giving

people the skills and support they need to

manage their own well-being and success.

As a keen photographer, Tony understands

only too well the benefits a hobby such as

photography can have on our mental well

being. He bought his first camera a Canon

AE‐1 Program in 1986 on arrival in NZ from the

UK. He’s been an avid Canon user ever since

and currently owns a EOS700D. We look at

some of his photos on the following pages.

November 2018

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PRIVACY

The garden in which this statue was located

in Vietnam was one of the most serene

places I’ve ever visited

COMMUNITY

The glass ball on the right looks like it has

been cast out of the group by the two balls

on the left and is now alone.

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ACHIEVEMENT

To satisfy their need for achievement

humans like to challenge themselves even if

it sometimes means taking risks.

ATTENTION

When it comes to paying attention, the Eagle

is an expert. I got this shot of a carved eagle

in Vancouver, Canada.

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HOW TO CAPTURE: RIVER LANDSCAPES

River Photography Tips with Richard Young

Tasman River, Mt Cook

CAPTURE MOVEMENT:

Using a longer shutter speed will allow you to capture

the movement of the river but you'll need to use a

tripod. Look for an area of fast flowing or white water

to capture. Including some foreground rocks will also

help to add some depth to the image.

FIND A SUBJECT:

Decide if you want to capture the whole river or

isolate a part of it. If only a small part of the river is

interesting then a tele-zoom lens will pick this out. For

wide sweeping river vistas you will likely need to use a

wide lens to include everything. If using a wide angle

lens, move around to find some foreground interest,

otherwise an image can easily become boring. Also,

think about your height above the river, as this will

dramatically change the view.

GET YOUR FEET WET:

Often, you'll get the best view and photo of a river

by standing in the middle of it! Try to fill the frame

with water, a large rock, or a bridge. These can also

provide an excellent viewpoint, as can a bend in the

river which may offer an open view upstream.

SHOOT UPSTREAM:

F11, 5s, ISO64, 35mm

Photographing upstream with the water coming

towards you normally works best, as it draws your

attention into the photograph, not out of the

photograph which can happen with a downstream

view. Use the shape and flow of the river to lead you

into a background subject. This can be a distant peak

or a prominent feature such as an overhanging tree.

Shooting directly across the river to a subject on the

opposite bank can also work well sometimes.

LEARN HOW TO CREATE FINE ART BLACK & WHITE LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHS ON A 4-DAY LONG EXPOSURE

MASTERCLASS IN THE HOKIANGA & BAY OF ISLANDS WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


REVIEW OF THE NIKON Z7

by Mark Gee

The Nikon Z7 is the flagship model of Nikon’s first full

frame mirrorless camera range equipped with a

45.7MP full frame CMOS sensor. As an owner of a

Nikon D850, I was quite keen to get my hands on the

Z7 to test out its capabilities.

My main focus in photography is astrophotography

so I was especially interested to see how it performed

in low light situations. I received the Nikon Z7 just in

time for the new moon period and lucked out with

perfectly fine weather in Wellington, which can

certainly be a rare combination in this part of the

country!

The test camera came with the new Z Mount 24–

70mm f/4 lens. I was eager to test this lens as I had

heard how sharp, from corner to corner, the quality

of the images are when shot with the Z Mount lenses.

However, for my astro shoot I was going to use the FTZ

converter so that I could use my Nikon 14–24mm f/2.8

lens. One thing to note with using the converter is that

you don’t have any autofocus capabilities but for me,

that’s not an issue as I only use manual focus for astro.

Before I headed out to Wellington’s south coast in the

dark for the astro shoot, I spent some time at home

familiarising myself with the camera. The first thing

I noticed was the obvious size and weight difference

compared to other DSLR cameras. At first, it felt a little

awkward for me to hold as I was so used to my Nikon

D850, but it didn’t take long to get comfortable with.

The camera itself is really well built and weather

sealed as with the Nikon DSLR range. It didn’t take me

long to work out all the controls even though some

of them are different from what I’m used to with the

D850. In the end, I found I navigated the menus and

changed most of the settings on the LCD screen,

which was really intuitive and easy to use.

20 NZPhotographer


The electronic viewfinder on the Z7 is top notch! It’s so

sharp that you don’t see any granularity, and if felt like

I was just looking through a regular optical viewfinder.

The really useful thing I found with the EVF was that

you could review the photos you’ve taken through it,

this is great in situations where you have a lot of light

around which would usually make for difficult viewing

on the LCD screen.

For the astro shoot, I decided to shoot with both the

Nikon Z7 and the Nikon D850 for comparison of image

quality. After I shot the first few frames, I was super

impressed with the quality I got out of the Z7. Even

when I was shooting with an ISO of 10,000 the amount

of noise in the image wasn’t bad at all compared to

shooting with other brands of cameras.

I ended up sticking with my typical exposure settings

for astro which is a 30 second shutter at f/4.0 and an

ISO of 6400. After getting home and having a close

look at the images, I would say that the Z7 had slightly

less noise and a slightly better dynamic range than

what I had shot on the D850, that could be the result

of the Z7’s newer Expeed 6 image processor.

This was really great for me and I’m now confident

that the Z7 would be a great astro camera. It

would even be better for shooting astro timelapse

compared to the DSLRs, since you don’t have to worry

about shutter wear and tear, and you have an inbuilt

intervalometer just like the other Nikon DSLR models.

I wanted to further test the camera’s dynamic range

capabilities, so I headed down to my local beach

for a sunrise shoot. I went with the Z Mount 24–70mm

f/4 lens for this session, wanting to try a combination

of longer and shorter exposures. On this particular

morning, there was some great light and interesting

cloud formations so it was the perfect day for it. I shot

both handheld and on a tripod for some of the longer

exposures, although I was surprised at how sharp I was

able to get a shot when I did a 1 second exposure

handheld. This was most likely due to the Z7’s 5-axis

optical image stabilisation which is built into the body.

After getting home and doing a processing session on

the images I shot that morning, I was really impressed

with the dynamic range of the Z7. Even on some of

my underexposed images, I was able to pull out good

clear detail from the shadows and blacks. And on

some of the more overexposed images, I was able

to rein in some of the extreme highlights. But the

thing that excited me most was the sharpness of the

images, even in the corners, when using the Z Mount

24–70mm lens.

The Nikon Z7 full frame mirrorless camera has certainly

wowed me with its performance. The build and

handling of the camera are second to none, and

the image quality, especially when using the native Z

Mount lenses, is some of the best quality I’ve seen. The

biggest gripe I’ve heard with this camera is the single

memory card slot, but for me personally, that doesn’t

even factor when there are so many other great

things about this camera.

So if you have a chance, go check it out for yourself –

I believe Nikon has done a great job with their first full

frame mirrorless camera.

See the post-processed images I took on the following

pages.

Nikon Z7

November 2018

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F4, 30s, ISO6400

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F22, 1s, ISO64

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F16, 1/8s, ISO64

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F16, 1/8s, ISO64

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November 2018

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FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

ENTER

The competition is split into four quarterly competitions based on each of

the four seasons.

Submissions for Spring season are now OPEN

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30 NZPhotographer


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November 2018

31


Interview with Werner Kaffl

HI WERNER, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF

LETTING US KNOW WHO YOU ARE AND

WHAT YOU DO!

I was born and raised close to Munich, Germany

and came to Wellington in 2010. I became

a NZ citizen a few weeks ago! I have always

been interested in technical stuff and artwork

in general. I like doing creative things with my

own hands – or with the help of a camera and

computer to edit images and from the age of 15

worked with airbrushes, doing this at a hobby level

for quite some time. I enjoy leaving the beaten

track behind and experimenting with things that

most others don’t even try. I love challenges,

going to the limit, and beyond.

I started my professional career as an electrician,

then studied and switched to IT as a systems

engineer. In 2016 I had a breakdown and couldn’t

handle the IT environment anymore. Running out

of options, I thought of what other talents I had,

trying photography as a profession was the next

natural thing to do. I started a business, did some

part time study about business management,

and now I do a wide range of photography and

related services. Those services range from fine art

photography to portrait photography to business

related photos, product photos, and family or

event photography.

I also started using my IT experience in different

ways, offering social media management, content

production, website design (to a certain degree).

Some of my clients simply don’t have the time to

do their social media posts or don’t want stock

images on their websites. In such an environment,

borders are pretty blurred. Taking photos of an

event and then posting them in an album on a

Facebook page for the client, is actually three

different jobs in one – event photography, content

production, social media management.

Generally, I’m open to any ideas my clients

may have, from plain photos of their real estate

property to elaborate compositions for their

lounge or office wall or a campaign to raise

awareness for certain causes.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

My mum was an educated photographer, my

dad was an SLR enthusiast, and I was always

good at drawing. In 2000 I bought my first digital

camera, followed by better and better point-andshoot

cameras. Finally, around 2013, I got my first

DSLR camera. I saw some astro photographs and

started to try astro myself, asked accomplished

photographers for their settings, and learned

by doing (and reading occasional articles).

Everything I do is self-taught, from my beginnings

in drawing and airbrush, to my most elaborate

digital compositions.

YOU COVER A WIDE RANGE OF GENRES –

IS THERE ONE THAT’S CLOSEST TO YOUR

HEART?

Generally, I prefer soft light and darkness. So I

love the golden and blue hours, as well as the

dead of night. Photography is an Ancient Greek

expression, which means “drawing with light”.

The best way to draw with lights is in a dark

environment. For the most part I prefer landscapes

and panoramas, but I also enjoy doing working

with people (some are models), in the same

context.

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November 2018

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WHAT’S YOUR ALL-TIME FAVOURITE

CAPTURE?

I think it’s my first milky way panorama, with the

moon in the center. When I got to my planned

location, I discovered the Moon was out too.

The Moon should have spoiled the whole thing,

but I decided to try anyway – You’ve nothing

to lose after a one hour drive. The result is my

first (and favourite) astro panorama – and an

encouragement for me to ignore boundaries set

by others.

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU USE?

I have 3 camera bodies; Canon EOS6D, 5D M2

and 5D M3 plus a variety of lenses:

Canon 24–104mm f4

Sigma 15mm f2.8

Sigma 24mm and 50mm f1.4 ART lenses

Tamron 24–70mm f2.8

Tamron 70–300mm

Tamron 150–600mm

TELL US ABOUT YOUR RECENT VIP PHOTO

SHOOT…

I met a good friend of mine in Cuba Street by

chance for the first time in ages. We had a quick

chat and she told me their company would have

a VIP going to their offices for a visit. So she asked

me if I were free for a general shooting, and if

I could also get staff images of the visit. I agreed,

got a shooting date confirmed, and just 2 days

before the shoot, learned that the VIP in question

was our Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern. I felt

incredibly honoured and got pretty nervous, but

all went extremely well. I’m pretty proud of this

accomplishment!

TELL US ABOUT THE FASHION CREATIVE…

The Fashion Creative is a group of very

enthusiastic and extremely talented people. As

the name suggests, we are very interested in

fashion and related photography. For me that

means, everything involving models, make-up

artists, designers, hair stylists, photographers, and

the creativity we all share, to make incredible

things happen.

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Once a year we all come together (in 2018 it was roughly

100 people), to do creative photo shoots. Everyone

has people assigned to their projects, and for a whole

weekend, we are all working on our ideas. None of us

gets paid for this, we do it just because we love what we

do. For any readers who are interested in learning more

and perhaps joining us, click on the Fashion Creative link

or get in contact with me for more information.

WHAT TIPS CAN YOU SHARE WITH OUR

READERS WHO WANT TO MAKE A LIVING

FROM THEIR PHOTOGRAPHY?

Making a living from photography is quite hard. I think

you need a big amount of optimism and to start as

a side business first. What I found most important is

developing one’s personal style, experimenting a lot,

and not believing in limits!

ANYTHING ELSE WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

YOU?

I work on both sides of the lens. Sometimes I’m a

model for portrait shoots and I have also been an

extra in a few movies and commercials.

I’ve been extra in “Wellington Paranormal”, “Mortal

Engines” (coming to cinemas in December), “Palisades”

(for the History Channel). I also did BTS and still photos

for “Stolen Senses”, a not yet published short film, which

gave me my first taste for the movie business, and

another short film called “The way it is”. I also had the

opportunity to do the lighting for a special short film “The

Phone Awakens”, which was filmed in super 8x8, and

had to be filmed in the final sequence, no cuts. I even

make my own props for some of my shoots!

Away from the camera, I’m passionate about raising

awareness of invisible illnesses. I run a Facebook

page concerning invisible illnesses such as cancer,

depression, etc. and one Facebook page just around

depression. I’m currently working on a project with the

Wellington Multiple Sclerosis Society, raising awareness

for MS.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.facebook.com/wernerkafflphotography

www.instagram.com/werner_kaffl_photography

www.wernerkaffl.com

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November 2018

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42 NZPhotographer


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


DRAGONFLIGHT

F5.6, 1/3200s, ISO1000

CARMEL, CALIFORNIA, U.S.A

Dragonfly flying in sunlight with the

background in shadow.

Andy Popadiuk

44 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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46 NZPhotographer


ZEN PELICANS

F5.6, 1/1000s, ISO100

CARMEL, CALIFORNIA, U.S.A

Gliding pelicans in a smoky sunset

thanks to numerous forest fires.

Andy Popadiuk

November 2018

47


48 NZPhotographer


LAKE HAYES SPRING SNOW

F20, 1/125s, ISO400

LAKE HAYES, QUEENSTOWN

The heaviest snow fall of the year, in September,

bought so many photo opportunities.

Ann Kilpatrick

November 2018

49


50 NZPhotographer


ENGAGEMENT

F1.4, 1/8000s

RAGLAN, NEW ZEALAND

A beautiful sunset engagement

photo with a fun and happy couple.

Anthony Morris

November 2018

51


52 NZPhotographer


NUGGET POINT SUNRISE

NUGGET POINT, OTAGO

My first time visiting the eastern part of the South Island

and witnessing a beautiful sunrise at the infamous Nugget

Point Lighthouse.

Ayla Matencio

November 2018

53


54 NZPhotographer


LAKE REFLECTIONS TWIZEL

A beautiful and calm morning in Twizel with a display of

autumn colours and Jake reflections.

Ayla Matencio

November 2018

55


HOLLYFORD RIVER

REFLECTION PANORAMA

F11, 1-180s, ISO200

MILFORD ROAD

The Hollyford River in strong mid-morning light and

reflecting the surrounding mountains, allowing me to

create this 10-image panorama.

Bernd Kupka

56 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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KAKANUI MOUNTAINS PANORAMA

F11, 1-80s, ISO100

CATLINS, NZ

The Kakanui Mountains snow covered and

with beautiful clouds creating a spectacular

scenery for this 12-image panorama.

Bernd Kupka

58 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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MANUKAU INFINITY

F4, 1/5s, ISO800

MANUKAU HARBOUR

An image with light, water, mist and sunrise all

combining for a brief minute.

Bruce Simons

60 NZPhotographer


November 2018

61


SALEN WRECKS

F11, 1/60s, IS0200

SALEN, ISLE OF MULL, SCOTLAND

Had a trip to the Isle of Mull in August. These are two of three

wrecks just on the outskirts of the village of Salen. Had to

wait a while to make sure my shot was clear of people, the

rain clouds rolled in.

Carole Garside

62 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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GRAND CANYON

F13,1/125s, ISO100

GRAND CANYON, ARIZONA, USA

Bright Angle Point can be seen in the far distance. Mule

teams regularly carry passengers down these slopes.

Chick Piper

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DREAMY WAIAU

Playing with my 10 stop filter on the river near home... I saw

this branch and thought it would be a good subject looking

down on it high up the river bank.

Chris Watson

66 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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CURIOUS KEA

F8, 1/750s, ISO320

I am a leader at Scouts here in Te Anau - We were on a winter camp for the

weekend recently and I took a group of kids and parents up Key Summit on the

Milford Road for a walk. It was a stunning clear frosty chilly beautiful day.... We

were sitting on Key Summit enjoying the vista around us when a Kea decided

to join us for about 30min. It climbed all around us and over our bags, having a

wee tug at anything shiny to see if it could take anything away.

Chris Watson

68 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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WHITE HERON

F8, ISO500

LAKE HOOD

A White Heron flying gracefully away

on a sunny afternoon.

David Oakley

70 NZPhotographer


November 2018

71


KOOKABURRA

F5.6, 1/1000s, IS0400

BAROON POCKET DAM,

QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA

We took a little trip to Australia a couple of weeks

ago and found some great spots to photograph. This

is from a dam on the Sunshine Coast.

Dominic Stove

72 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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MAPLETON SUNSET

F16, 1/50s, IS0100

MAPLETON, QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA

Another stunning sunset taken while on

holiday in the Sunshine Coast.

Dominic Stove

74 NZPhotographer


November 2018

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SILK VENDOR

F5, 1/100s, ISO200

URUMCHI BAZAAR, XINJIANG,CHINA.

A sadness in contrast to the bright silk she sells.

Greg Arnold

76 NZPhotographer


O'CONNELL ST REFLECTIONS

F5.6, 1/100s, ISO100

O'CONNELL ST., AUCKLAND CBD

A lane-way in Auckland CBD has a disk suspended between

the buildings that turns in the breeze. The mirror on one side

creating a contrast with the surrounding buildings.

Ian Bray

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78 NZPhotographer


NOT JUST AN OLD SHED

DUNEDIN

This old shed is beloved by NZ photographers.

It got damaged by one of the storms this year,

and everyone hopes it can be fixed soon.

Jana Luo

November 2018

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80 NZPhotographer


OHAKUNE TOWN AT NIGHT

F11, 6s, IS0100

OHAKUNE

While shooting some night scenes in Ohakune town

centre I was experimenting with long exposures of vehicles

passing to give the image a surreal look.

Jason Langman

November 2018

81


ON TOP OF THE WORLD

F10, 70/1s, ISO100

ROYS PEAK

These are the moments I live for. Waking up at 3am, dragging your sick friend out of

bed to go on a hike in almost 0 degree conditions. I had been wanting to climb this

mountain for a while. It took under 3 hours to reach the peak, arriving just in time for

the sunrise. I felt so alive being here. This was definitely one of the most rewarding

sunrise missions, as the views were literally breathtaking.

Jinal Govind

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November 2018

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THAT TAUPO TREE

LAKE TAUPO

An early morning mission to find this spot. I was greeted

with a beautiful pink sky as the sun was rising.

Jo Mohi

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November 2018

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SUNSET PETONE BEACH

A wonderful unplanned afternoon spent at the

beach. I decided to stick around for sunset and

was not disappointed with this beauty.

Jo Mohi

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BROKEN BITS AND PIECES

iPhone 7 Plus

NORTH SHEEN, LONDON

I liked the vivid and vibrant colour on this driveway!

John Kelly

88 NZPhotographer


HUKA FALLS

Panorama from my OJI Mavic Pro

HUKA FALLS, TAUPO

My first trip to Huka falls, a cold morning and a misty

sunrise but a beautiful, peaceful moment before the

morning tourists arrived.

Joshua Goodey

November 2018

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90 NZPhotographer


PINK PORT

F14, 2.5s, ISO50

PORT CHALMERS, DUNEDIN

Back Beach in Port Chalmers is bathed in

pink during golden hour.

Kerensa Clark

November 2018

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92 NZPhotographer


MOUNT COOK BLUES

F4.5, 20s, ISO50

MOUNT COOK NATIONAL PARK

Mount Cook in hues of blue with Hooker Lake in the

foreground. This was actually taken in the evening

under a darkening sky.

Kerensa Clark

November 2018 93


RUNNING FREE

Horses enjoy the freedom to run in a large meadow

without halters. This is a composite image, the horses

transplanted to a more interesting meadow!

Kim Falconer

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96 NZPhotographer


BURNING RIVER

F5.6, 1/125s, ISO200

EPUPA FALLS, NAMIBIA

Getting up early while on vacation is never easy, but when I

have a specific shot in mind, I often find myself lying awake

way before my alarm goes off. It was the last day at Epupa

and even the clouds played along with my idea of a shot.

Mariette Du Tait

November 2018

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98 NZPhotographer

SPARROW

Despite generous feeding over the last few

years the local sparrows keep a respectful

distance, hence the need for a good telephoto

lens even in the backyard. The bird was heavily

backlit, so I had override the exposure by 4

stops to get the shadow to open up.

Mark Hoffman


PEACH BLOSSOM

F4, 1/250s, ISO200

Close up of new peach blossom taken with

telephoto zoom to create minimal depth of field

and smooth bokeh.

Mark Hoffman

November 2018

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100 NZPhotographer


JUMPER

F8, 1/200s, ISO400

Tiny jumping spider only about 5mm long sitting

on a flower. Photo taken at 4:1 magnification,

and focus stacked from 4 images, creating a

greater depth of field.

Murray McCulloch

November 2018 101


102 NZPhotographer


CLOUDSET

F11, 1/150s

BETHELL'S BEACH, AUCKLAND

Auckland's West coast beaches are fantastic places to

watch the sunset over the ocean. The serene landscapes and

dramatic skies there are fascinating.

Olga Macagon

November 2018 103


104 NZPhotographer


INNER SPACE

MANAWATU GORGE

On the centre of the road with frame. Model: Kelley

Paul Robertson

November 2018 105


MOERAKI BOULDERS

F13, 1.6s

Sunrise on a beautiful clear spring day

at the Moeraki Boulders

Peter Ambrose

106 NZPhotographer


KAREKARE FALLS BACKWATER

F14, 10s, ISO200

I originally visited Karekare Beach to capture the Karekare

Falls. It was mid morning by the time I arrived and the light was

not great. The sun had already placed itself directly on the

crest of the falls meaning I had to shoot directly into it. Looking

for alternatives I ventured into the adjacent waterway and

found a multitude of smaller falls cascading through the bush.

Simon Wills

November 2018 107


SUNRISE AT CALTON HILL

EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND

A famous monument in Edinburgh and a beautiful sunrise.

Prashant Joshi

108 NZPhotographer


November 2018 109


110 NZPhotographer


SEAPLANES

LAKE TAUPO

Two seaplanes berthing on Lake Taupo.

Robert Hsiao

November 2018

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112 NZPhotographer


TE HENGA WALKWAY

F16, 8s, ISO100

TE HENGA WALKWAY, AUCKLAND'S WEST COAST

The Te Henga walkway is a pristine peace of real

estate on Auckland's west coast. Although it was a fairly bleak

day I tried to find a composition that represented its rugged

beauty regardless of the weather conditions.

Simon Wills

November 2018

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114 NZPhotographer


SONG THRUSH

F6.3, 1/640s, ISO1000

CORNWALL PARK

Head shot of one of our frequent visitors as we walk

through the park.

Steve Harper

November 2018 115


GREAT PHOTOGRAPHY

IS ABOUT DEPTH OF

FEELING, NOT DEPTH

OF FIELD

116 NZPhotographer

PETER ADAMS

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