NZPhotographer, Issue 14, Dec 2018

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ISSUE 14, December 2018

INTERVIEW

WITH ANGELA JURY

HOW TO CAPTURE:

MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

FESTIVE SQUIRRELS

BY GEERT WEGGEN

PORTS OF QUAIL

BY BRENDON GILCHRIST

December 2018

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WELCOME TO ISSUE 14 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

This issue is a mixed bag

of goodness with animals,

babies, and nature all gracing

the following pages – A little

something for everyone!

With Christmas right around the

corner we wanted to inject some

festivity into December's issue and

Geert Weggen's squirrels certainly

do that – Cuteness overload for

the animal lovers amongst us!

Continuing with the cuteness, we've

interviewed the award-winning

baby portrait photographer,

Angela Jury. Find out how she's

grown her business and what

actually goes in to getting those ohso-cute

shots of baby.

Kids and animals aren't everyone's cup of tea so if you just want to get

outdoors and photograph nature, let Richard give you some tips on taking

macro shots and allow Brendon to take you on an overnight tour of Quail

Island as he captures the boat graveyard.

When we sent the email out asking if you wanted to get your photos

in the last issue of 2018 you really responded, we were overwhelmed

with readers' submissions this month! We tried to include 1 photo from

everyone, including our international readers, flick to the back of the mag

to see if your photo was included... If we couldn't fit you in, don't be upset,

submit again in 2019.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 14

December 2018

Cover Photo

by Angela Jury

www.angelajury.com

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

ana@excio.io

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone 04 889 29 25

or Email hello@excio.io

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REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man behind ESB

Photography. He treks from sea to

mountain, and back again, capturing

the uniqueness of New Zealand’s

unforgiving landscape.

Richard Young

Richard is an award-winning

landscape and wildlife photographer

who teaches photography workshops

and runs photography tours. He is the

founder of New Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2018 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

December 2018

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CONTENTS

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6

INTERVIEW WITH ANGELA JURY

BEHIND THE SHOT

6 WITH TE RAWHITIROA BOSCH

GEERT WEGGEN’S

8 FESTIVE SQUIRRELS

BEHIND THE SHOT

HOW TO CAPTURE: MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY

19 with Richard Young

WITH TE RAWHITIROA BOSCH

INTERVIEW WITH

20 ANGELA JURY

30

PORTS OF QUAIL

30 by Brendon Gilchrist

37 BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

HOW TO CAPTURE:

MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY

19

PORTS OF QUAIL

by Brendon Gilchrist


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F3.5, 1/100s, ISO640


Behind The Shot With

Te Rawhitiroa Bosch

TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF AND YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY…

As a self-taught photographer growing up in beautiful

Whaingaroa, Aotearoa NZ, my love of photography stems

from a passion for capturing moments of connection.

Pūrākau – storytelling is for me one of the most

powerful connecting forces in the world. Through the

lens, I like to harness this force, this power of storytelling

to capture not only the subject but also the deeper

story, the magic, the heart, the emotion behind every

moment caught.

I’m passionate about Te Ao Māori and about

reclaiming our narratives and telling our own stories

so that the beauty, passion, talent, generosity, and

strength of our people is highlighted instead of the

negative and racial stereotypes that are so often

sensationalised and reinforced in the media. This

portrait is a perfect example of the beauty of our

people and of the world we want to carry on into the

future for our descendants.

WHO IS THE LADY IN THE PHOTOGRAPH?

This is my auntie: Kōkā Neria Mataira – Ngāti Porou

and Ngāti Kahungunu.

She is the epitome of beauty – inside and out –

and has dedicated her life to embodying her love

for our people, for our language and our culture

through awakening the gift of Te Reo Māori – the

Māori language within the hearts of many through

Te Ātaarangi, one of the foundational language

revitalisation initiatives that was established to bring

the Māori language back from the brink of extinction.

She proudly wears her moko kauae (traditional Māori

chin tattoo), another cultural treasure in renaissance.

It speaks to her grounding in Te Ao Māori – in our Māori

worldview, to her whakapapa – her genealogy, and

to the way she raises her children and grandchildren

in her loving, gentle and dignified way.

I captured her in the heart of Te Ihorangi, the meeting

house of Aratiatia Marae at Fairfield College in Hamilton

which was carved by Master Carver Kereti Rautangata.

WHY IS THIS PORTRAIT SO SPECIAL TO YOU –

ASIDE FROM IT BEING YOUR AUNTIE.

This portrait holds a special place in my heart because it

not only encapsulates Kōkā, but also the legacy left by

my Nan. Kōkā Neria teaches Māori language through

Te Ātaarangi, a methodology developed by her mother

(my Nan) Dame Kāterina Te Heikōkō Mataira and

Ngoingoi Pēwhairangi in the 70’s. This initiative has been

a part of my life since I was born. My Nan, my mother,

and my aunties were all teachers of Te Ātaarangi and

I’ve seen first-hand the life changing impact it’s had for

thousands of people over the years. This was reflected

in the many comments and messages posted by past

students in response to this photograph on my social

feeds, acknowledging and thanking Kōkā for the

identity affirming contribution she had made in their lives.

WAS THIS A PLANNED PORTRAIT SHOT?

This was literally a spur of the moment shot. We were

filming video resources for Poutiria Te Aroha – a

parenting with non-violence programme informed by

Māori concepts and designed for whanau Māori. The

Te Ātaarangi rākau methodology (the colourful rākau/

Cuisenaire rods in the foreground) is used to teach

core concepts of the programme.

We were about to take a break when I saw the

opportunity to capture her in her element. I lay low

on the ground to get the rākau in the foreground,

framed her in the centre of the designs on the back

wall of the wharenui meeting house and asked her to

look at me briefly, then I took the shot. It all happened

naturally and in a matter of seconds.

It was a real and special moment, not a posed portrait

and I feel that the realness is what people feel when

they see the image.

WHAT CAMERA EQUIPMENT DO YOU USE?

I like a light kit so usually roll with one camera (Canon

5D MkIV) and 2 lenses (Canon EF 24–70mm f/.28 &

Canon EF 70–200mm f/2.8 L II USM), but I’ve recently

picked up the Sigma Art Series 50mm f/1.4 lens which

is a dream for portraits!

I don’t really use flash or tripods, and I like to be free

of bags, straps, and slings. At a shoot I’ll have my

camera on a Spider holster on my right – my lenses on

the TriLens holster on my left – a spare battery and CF

card in my pocket, keeping me free and ready to get

the job done.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.facebook.com/RawhitiroaPhotography

www.instagram.com/rawhitiroa

www.rawhitiroa.com

December 2018

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Geert Weggen’s

Festive Squirrels

Geert Weggen is a Dutch/Swedish awardwinning

photographer who specialises in

photographing red squirrels with props, you

may have seen his work around the web.

He creates scenes so that it looks like the squirrels are

riding horses, playing pool, skating, skiing and many

other things which put a smile on peoples faces.

Geert’s journey with photography started with black

and white photography in 1986 when he did some

photo workshops and had a dark room. He became

the photographer of a youth magazine but then put

away his camera and stopped with photography until

the digital age.

His animal photography started about 5-6 years ago

when Geert finished building his house in a Swedish

village called: Bispgården. Located next to the forest,

he built a large balcony pointing to the south with a

half open roof to allow the snow and rain to come in

and also the animals.

The moment there was a fox standing before his

door was really the catalyst for what was to come.

The fox visited daily to get food and during that

time Geert took photos of it. At the end of 2 weeks,

the fox started to go onto the balcony and began

interacting with props. Not long after that, a Russian

bird began visiting Geert for some weeks and then the

red squirrels and more birds – The balcony was now a

studio with props and natural material like mushrooms,

along with cameras, mirrors etc.

The red squirrels have built up a special relationship

with Geert over the years and visit on a daily basis

looking for food. They climb on him, the props, and

have become used to the noises of the camera and

the camera flash. Some of the props Geert makes

himself, others come from flea markets and online –

He’s searching daily for new ideas and new props!

In 2013 Geert became a full time photographer.

His work is published internationally in newspapers,

books, television programs, and magazines. He has

been featured in National Geographic magazine 3

times and had a 10 page article in Nphoto magazine

about his squirrel photo workshops which began last

year and allow a maximum of 3 people to join his 5

day workshops to see the squirrels and capture them

on camera. Geert has also published 8 books in 4

languages and has a line of postcards, puzzles, and

calendars featuring his furry and feathered friends.

www.facebook.com/geertweggen

www.instagram.com/geertweggen

geertweggen.com

albums.excio.io/profile/Geert Weggen

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HOW TO CAPTURE: MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY

Macro Photography Tips with Richard Young

Fern Koru, Tongariro National Park

F4, 1/4s, ISO400

CONTROL THE DEPTH OF FIELD:

You want the person looking at the photograph to

be easily able to see what your subject is, not be

distracted by other things in the photograph. Use a

large aperture (eg f2.8 or f4) to give you a shallow

depth of field, keeping your subject in focus and the

background out of focus.

GET CLOSE:

Get close to your subject but also at the same height

- If you are photographing something on the ground

that is where you need to be; on the ground with it!

Photographing your subject from up high will often

result in a flat image.

ADD A BACKGROUND:

Find a background that complements or is a contrast

to the subject you are shooting. Position yourself

so that you can line up that pleasing background

behind the subject.

FILL THE FRAME:

For good close up photographs you will want a lens

of 50-200mm so that your subject fills the frame. Most

longer lenses can be used for close up work but for

true macro photography you will need a macro

lens with a close focusing ability or macro extension

tubes/filters.

IMPROVE YOUR MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY ON A PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP WITH

NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


Interview with

Angela Jury

HI ANGELA, TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

AND YOUR JOURNEY INTO PHOTOGRAPHY.

Hey! I am located on Auckland’s beautiful North Shore,

and I am a full time baby portrait photographer.

I live with my husband and two gorgeous children

Jasper and Sienna and our lovely boxer Enzo. Jasper

is 5 and has just started his school adventure, he is an

old soul, fierce and loving in equal measures, he flows

through life like he has done it all before and he is so

clever and not afraid to test the boundaries! Sienna is

7 and shows a level of compassion and understanding

that seems beyond her, she is a collector of treasures

and a lover of animals, she was born on my birthday

and as a Taurus, it is fair to say we lock horns

occasionally!

Becoming a mother has been my greatest

achievement, I know people often say this, but in

having them I really found myself. The selfless devotion

of motherhood taught me how to dig deep, gain

perspective over what is really important and set an

example in my own life that I hope my children will one

day be proud of. Life with kiddies as any parent would

attest is full and interesting and experiencing it firsthand

really provoked my journey into capturing these

precious milestones for other families.

My family directly inspired my journey into

photography. My husband was a wedding

photographer with quite an impressive portfolio and

I reluctantly joined him on many weddings as a second

shooter and always found myself with a macro lens

capturing the rings and little details of the day.

I would say my real journey into photography began

once my babies were born though. I wanted to

capture each heart melting moment, the expressions

and details that made them uniquely beautiful, so

that in the moment of looking at that capture I could

be transported back to this amazing time anytime

I wanted just by looking at a single image.

I know in watching childhood unfold in front of me

with my own babies how important each milestone is,

how quickly tiny fingers become hands that will fill your

palm. Each step is so treasured and it is such an honour

to be able to document some of this experience for

my clients. Tiny toes, folding skin, soft lashes on cheeks,

curly bodies and chubby hands.. heaven!

My business has become its own entity, in connecting

with my clients and working from my heart and

producing work I genuinely like it has found its own

groove. I don’t purposely advertise so find the clients

who I work with fit seamlessly with my style and services.

DO YOU HAVE A PREFERENCE OVER MATERNITY

SHOOTS, NEWBORN, OR TODDLERS?

I must say, though newborn photography seems to

be my niche, the career path really found me. As I

continued to capture these amazing babies, they

continued to come! I truly feel inspired by each baby

I have in my studio. Everywhere I go, if it is walking the

dog in nature, in a homewares store, or at markets

in other countries, I am thinking ‘can I put a baby in

that?’ It really is an organic motivation, and more often

than not I have the props in the studio long before I use

them. It is such an industry specific skill set within these

sessions, each individual session has its own before and

after process to enable the finished image.

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Often enough I will follow the same family through

this whole journey and I feel so incredibly blessed

to both witness it, and be entrusted to do it service.

I watch my families grow and unfold, babies

become siblings and a couple becomes a family,

wow! Every time a previous client touches base

about a new session my heart leaps like it is a family

member announcing their amazing news. I do really

take the privilege seriously.

CAN YOU TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOUR STUDIO

SETUP?

I am so lucky with my studio as I operate from my

own home in Birkenhead. We have a beautifully

restored 1920’s villa with a lovely high stud and

traditional features and mouldings. Our villa was

originally a certified childcare centre in the heart of

Birkenhead before it was relocated and refurbished

in the 1960’s.

The space works perfectly for sessions as it has

a double lounge, providing ample comfort for

parents to relax with a cup of tea and a magazine

or to just watch the session unfold. Session times

can be lengthy as we move at babies pace so it is

important to me that my clients are comfortable.

My space evolves depending on who I am

shooting. I have a series of permanently fixed

backdrops and a large sun room which is like a

huge walk-in wardrobe for photography props. It is

literally heaven in there! I shoot primarily with studio

light for optimum control and will use my strobes on

portable wheels so I can move around the space

capturing a variety of set up’s for each session.

Everything is designed for comfort and to enable

me to maximise each session. I want the best results

for the duration of time I have with my clients… If

baby is fussing; I have a plan. If the parents only

want purple, I have a plan. If there is a new big

sister who doesn’t want to go near the baby, I have

a plan!

SO HOW DO YOU GET THE BABIES TO LOOK

SO CUTE ALL OF THE TIME?!

Haha! They ARE cute all the time!! I mean how

lucky am I? Really all I do is capture babies looking

as gorgeous as they really are! I would have had

sooo many babies if the opportunity presented, so

the next best thing is to enjoy my client’s gorgeous

miracles!

I have a passion for emotive images, and with

newborns it really comes through in expression.

Traditionally newborns are captured asleep, as

many mothers will know it can be tricky when new

babies are awake to have them not fuss. However,

I really love those beautiful stares, probably

because they can be so tricky. Expressions like kissy

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faces, smiles, frowns, yawns and stares all take the

image to the next level for me.

One image can be the result of an hour of

posing baby, lots of dirty laundry, a pile of fresh

flowers and props strewn around the studio and

hours of post-production. My goal is always to

capture the essence of baby, how they really

look, how they naturally want to move and be,

what styling suits them best; simple or elaborate

or a combination, and then I gently move in

that direction. There is a real beautiful rawness

following those first few days of babies arrival,

birth hormones make baby naturally curly and

womb-like and my job is purely to enhance the

natural beauty in front of me.

TELL US ABOUT THE AWARDS YOU’VE WON.

I have struggled a bit with the award system,

feeling that validation for my work should really

come from within and from making my clients

happy. However, it is a natural progression in

the industry to become a part of professional

photography associations.

I am really lucky to have received numerous

awards over the past couple of years, both

nationally and internationally. I love being able to

give my clients the gift of an award winning image.

This year (2018) I won a gold at the New Zealand

photography awards in Wellington and that was

such a thrill. I think the judges’ comments were my

favourite part. Storytelling within an image opens

up to so many different perceptions, and to have

such esteemed professionals comment on their

perspective of both technical skill and emotion

was seriously a career highlight. As a sole trader

it can be an isolating career and to see my work

sit alongside so many other industry professionals

who I admire was breath-taking in itself. It was also

a privilege to be a finalist for photographer of the

year 2018, so humbling.

HOW DO YOU JUGGLE FAMILY LIFE AND

YOUR BUSINESS?

Great question!! It truly is a juggle. Being the best

for everyone is a mother’s greatest hardship. It

really is a work in progress. I allow myself time for

yoga and meditation practice most days and other

than this it is fairly non-stop until well after midnight.

My ultimate goal is to achieve balance, although

I can’t complain it is such a blessing that I am

able to spend my days doing something I love.

The energy and personal reward I receive from

this career path actually far surpasses the output

of energy, it really comes full circle in such a

rewarding and self-fulfilling way.

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CAN YOU SHARE SOME TIPS FOR

PHOTOGRAPHING NEWBORNS FOR OUR READERS?

Oh sure! My top tip would have to be safety. If you do not

know about newborn safety or the behind the scene set’s

to enable posing and prop usage then please, please hire

a professional. I can recommend numerous photographers

nationwide who have years of experience and knowledge

and it is an investment to utilise skills and safety to get the

results you want. Newborns are so precious, their safety

and comfort must be the greatest priority.

If I was to start my career over, some things I would like to

have been told are:

• Keep the room nice and warm with warm blankets

and wheat bags for baby as they find it hard to regulate

their body temperature.

• Have some white noise – my baby shusher is one of my

best investments!

• Invest in a good bean bag posing system. I would avoid

any makeshift type arrangements and when posing,

never leave baby unattended, even just for a second.

• Invest in your education. There are so many workshops

that can teach you safe techniques, a smooth workflow,

and editing techniques.

• Charge, learn and evolve your practice so that you

can charge adequately or don’t charge at all. Give

yourself the space to learn with friends and relatives and

through organised workshops before you sell work that is

substandard.

• Keep going, when you feel like giving up, when you hate

your work, when you have a baby who has colic, when you

don’t feel like you will ever know enough… keep going.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU?

Mentoring has been on my mind a lot lately, I would love

to do it and have requests from people regularly. But life

is so busy right now, and whilst I do not resent a minute of

energy I put into the business, I know my own children are

also deserving of my best. I really feel at this stage I could

not do mentoring justice, it is a long-term goal when I can

give it my best. Until then, I hope we can all continue to

inspire growth in each other.

WHAT ELSE SHOULD WE KNOW?

I am really a firm believer in sharing knowledge and

inspiring growth in others. I have people contact me often

asking for advice, what techniques I used, or even simply

where did I get that prop, and I always answer them. It

costs nothing and I know from having to learn the hard

way with limited available workshops back then, and

nobody willing to answer any questions, how important it is

to pool knowledge. I don’t know everything or even most

things but I am happy to share what I do know.

I don’t see this as a competitive industry, we each have

our own style and flow, and my greatest hope is that

clients will look around and compare photographers to

find the style that represents them the best.

It does us all a service to support and build each other

up into our own unique selves, as sole operators and as

women in business. We no longer have to be small or

fit into a certain shaped box we can be our authentic

selves and be successful at it.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.facebook.com/angelajuryphotography

www.instagram.com/angelajuryphotography

www.angelajury.com

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FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

ENTER

The competition is split into four quarterly competitions based on each of

the four seasons.

Submissions for Spring season are now OPEN

To submit your image and see T&Cs please go to: www.excio.io/freshshoots

CATEGORIES

NATURE PEOPLE CREATIVE EVENTS

PRIZES

SENIOR - overall winner

Voucher from Nikon NZ worth $400 &

WPS Society membership valued at $84

JUNIOR - overall winner

A place on a New Zealand Photography

Workshop in Wellington

View category prizes here: www.excio.io/freshshoots

PARTNERS

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Ports

of Quail

by Brendon Gilchrist

F16, 1/5s, ISO64

December 2018

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Ahoy, me hearties, welcome aboard my latest article to Quail Island aka Otamahua.

I hope you enjoy what I am about to write and I hope you, your family or friends will

consider a visit to this block of land that is closer to home than you might think.

Otamahua or Quail Island as it’s known is

Canterbury’s biggest island and is located in

the harbour of Lyttelton, a short boat trip on

the Black Cats Catamaran or a short Kayak

journey if you’re game! The island has plenty to see

and lots of history to enrich the mind. It is so named due

to its birds, the local Maori using the name Otamahua

meaning ‘A place to gather sea-bird eggs’ and Captain

William Mein Smith naming it Quail Island due to the now

extinct Quail (Koreke) that were found here.

As many of you will have realised by now, I love hiking as

much as I love photography and I enjoy “Hut Bagging” –

Discovering and then staying in different hiking huts!

The new hut on Quail Island is family-friendly and only a

15-minute walk from the jetty making this a great place

to stay for those who are new to hiking and hut stays,

I highly recommend visiting with the kids or grandkids to

introduce them to tramping and nature.

The Department of Conservation transformed the hut

on Quail from an old quarantine station caretaker hut

into an official 12 bunk hiking hut with 2 separate rooms

containing 6 bunks in each, a fireplace with plenty of

firewood, tables and chairs to sit and play cards at or

swap tales from the tramping tracks, and information

about the hut and the island.

It was busy when I arrived at the hut on the Sunday

morning, and I was amazed to meet a lady who had

visited Iguacu Falls last year! This is what I love about

hiking and staying in the huts, it’s not just about the

location, it’s about the people you can meet and

connect with. Saying this, I also enjoy the solitude – By

3.30pm on the Sunday afternoon, when the last boat

leaves the island, I had the hut and indeed the island

to myself with a body of water separating me from the

world.

The views are great but the history is what makes this

island special as it has had so many different uses over

the last 150 years. It’s well known for having been a

quarantine station and from 1906–1925 housed a small

leper colony of up to 9 individuals. The leper’s, all men,

were confined to one little corner of the island that is now

a popular swimming beach but the old foundations can

still be found in this area with a replica hut in place to

show what it would have been like living here as a leper.

Only one man died from the disease and his grave can

be visited on the island.

A different part of the island was used by famous Antartic

explorers for quarantining their Siberian Huskies and

ponies. People from Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s 1901–

1904 Expedition, as well as the famous Ernest Shackleton

who accompanied Scott on his 1904 expedition used the

island to prepare the animals for the journey to the ice.

F5.6, 1/125s, ISO64

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F16, 30s, ISO64

December 2018

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I could go on for day’s in regards to the history of Quail Island

as it’s so interesting but let’s turn our minds to photography.

If you love wildlife and bird photography then you might be

lucky and get some great photos of the local inhabitants.

You will see Quail running around (not the native one),

native wood pigeons right by the hut and you will be able to

hear Tui if not see them.

I was excited for 2 things before I visited; photographing

the ships graveyard and photographing the old jetty. Only

the first lived up to expectations as the weather conditions

weren’t right for me to do any long exposure shots of the

rustic ruined jetty (of which only a few poles remain).

The ships graveyard on the western side of the island

lived up to my photography expectations though and is

well worthy of visiting. Apparently, there are 8 old boats

located here but I could only make out 6, maybe the rest

are underwater? The biggest skeleton ship is an old Dan

measuring 58 meters long. Built for the Orient Line in 1865,

this old boat was one of the finest and fastest ships of its

time. Originally used to ship tea in the 19th century it was

later turned into an immigrant ship moving people between

England and Australia and holds a record voyage time of 70

days between the 2 countries.

This island would make a good location for some

astrophotography. It is not the darkest of night skies, but

still, the location will allow you to capture some unique

photos. The hut has a clearing behind it out towards

the harbour and with the old wrecks, not forgetting the

buildings at swimmers beach too, you could get some great

compositions.

Sunset shots can also be magical here, but the day I visited

it was stormy. I got an awesome shot of a storm coming

through but I had to bail on the hoped-for sunset shot as the

wind picked up so much that I was thinking, I’m an hours

walk from any shelter, I’m on the Island alone and I don’t

think sunset is going to do anything – Sensible to leave now!

I was pleased to capture the stormy boat graveyard but

already want to go back and capture some bucketlist

shots, those being a beautiful sunset, the Aurora, and

some Astrophotography. How many years it will take me

to achieve this I do not know but one day I will return with

a fresh mind to take another step back into history and to

enrich my mind further on an experience only Quail will give.

3 TIPS FOR AN ENJOYABLE QUAIL ISLAND

EXPERIENCE

• If you are staying in the family-friendly hut, make the most

of what’s on offer; the people, the charm of the building

and its history but be sure to book if staying at the weekend.

• Stop to read the billboards dotted around the Island that

detail the history. Learning the history can help you to create

a story that will enhance your photos.

• Stop to look in the old quarantine building – It’s like a

museum but don’t miss your 3.30pm boat back!

34 NZPhotographer


F16, 74s, ISO64

December 2018

35


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


SNOW WALKER

F16, 250s, IS0100

PORT AU PORT PENINSULA, NEWFOUNDLAND AND

LABRADOR, CANADA

Snowshoeing on Pine Tree Mountain with a friend the

day after a snowstorm passed through our area.

Aiden Mahoney


SPARKS UNDER BRIDGE

F5.6, 8s, ISO160

EDMONTON, ALBERTA, CANADA

Snow has arrived making steel wool burning safer on a little

used road under a bridge. In the background, the building

with the crane became the tallest building in western Canada

at 60 stories tall on the day I took this photo.

Al Popil


FOG BANK

F6.3, 1/1600s, ISO400

CARMEL, CALIFORNIA, USA

Late afternoon fog enveloping California's Point

Lobos State Reserve.

Andy Popadiuk


LAKE WAKATIPU REFLECTION

F16, 1-50s, ISO400

Perfect reflection of Lake Wakatipu with beautiful

clouds and colours.

Bernd Kupka


DO YOU WANT LEG OR BREAST?

F8, 1/1250s

GIBBS FARM, KAIPARA HARBOUR

Have never been this close to an ostrich without a fence between it and

me. I couldn't get over how its leg looked like a giant chicken drumstick,

hence the title. The beautiful view was an added bonus.

Carole Garside


TAIRUA SUNSET

F9, 1/500s, ISO100

We spent the night freedom camping at Tairua

and were rewarded with this beautiful sunset.

Diane Beguely


HOAR FROST

F5.6, 1/160s, ISO100

CONROY'S DAM, ALEXANDRA

The first stop on a day out looking to capture this winter's Hoar Fost

was at Conroy's Dam. The temperature was -3C

Geoff Perry


WEST COAST DREAMING

F11,2.5s, ISO100

HAAST, WEST COAST NZ

Photographed while on tour with the NZ Photography crew.

Graham Jones


DANCER

F4, 1/125s, IS0100

STUDIO SHOOT, QUEENSTOWN

Dancing with the feet is one thing but

dancing with the heart is another.

Rhonda Stove


PEDAL POWER

Penny Farthings are a regular sight in

Oamaru, a quirky little South Island town

which celebrates its Victorian heritage.

Liz Cadogan


RED FUGUE

F1.6, 1/45s, IS0100

Red roses that I couldn't resist buying. I love the way the Lensbaby

Velvet 56 wide open gives a glow and atmospheric colour bleed.

Heather Maree Owens


SMITHY

F5.6, 1/30s, ISO1600

TAUHERENIKAU RACECOURSE, FEATHERTSON

".....once Man discovered how to shape iron, a new age began."

Greg Arnold


SANDS OF TIME

F14, 15s, ISO50

WHARARIKI BEACH, CAPE FAREWELL, TASMAN

This was my first visit to the wild and vast Wharariki beach and I knew it was going to be an adventurous

afternoon of photography. I knew the weather and clouds were clearing up quick so I wanted to get in a

long exposure and noticed these ripples in the sand and that there were no foot marks in this particular area.

I set up my tripod and camera pointing down low to the ground so the ripples were pulling the viewer into

the image and really wanted to bring out the textures. Only about 10 minutes after this shot the clouds had

cleared up from the fast flowing wind that the west coast is notorious for and all of a sudden blank clear skies.

I managed to do a lot of scouting but this was the only ''portfolio image" for the day. As always though, it was

amazing being at such a vast piece of coastline being out exploring and having fun with the camera.

Jesse (Tilden) Hebberd


MT TARANAKI FROM THE FORGOTTEN HIGHWAY

A last minute decision to drive to Taranaki along the

Forgotten Highway became unforgettable!

The light hit the green hills beautifully.

Jo Mohi


MAGNOLIA

F14, 1/60s, ISO200

ROLAND'S WOOD, KERIKERI

Using canon 400d this photo was taken late afternoon

using the setting sun as backlight to illuminate the petals.

Judy Klaus


HIGH COUNTRY DEER

F10, 1/125s, ISO200

TUI STATION, RANGITATA GORGE

This photo was taken at a farm in

Rangitata Valley, New Zealand

Kathleen Seaward


HOUSE ON THE MARINA

AUCKLAND

The cold, clear and incredibly still night proved to

create the spectacular reflection of the magnificent

property on the banks of Milford Marina.

Kelly Vivian


HARBOUR BRIDGE LIGHTS

F16, 30s, ISO200

NORTHCOTE POINT

The Auckland Harbour Bridge lights lit up for Diwali.

Kunal Kumar


ARMISTICE COMMEMORATION

F20, 25s, ISO500

Some of the thousands of crosses covering the lawn in front

of the Auckland War Memorial Museum during the Armistice

commemoration.

Lawrence Ames


LAKE SERENITY

F5.6, 1/640s, ISO200

LAKE ROTOMA, BAY OF PLENTY

Finally got the image I was after! The perfectly

serene water reflecting the pontoon just the

way I wanted. Patience is its own reward.

Lorri Adams


PORORARI SEASTACK

F8, 111s, 70mm, 6 Stop ND

PORORARI RIVER

Long exposure at the mouth of the Pororari

River on a rather cloudy sunset.

Lyle Pethig


PRUDENCE

F5.6, 1/400s, ISO100

Pink Roses covered in water drops

after a late rain shower.

Marina De wit


BLACKBIRD CHICK

F5, 1/1500s, ISO640

A blackbird chick on my backyard fence and sufficiently naive to let me

approach within a few meters with my telephoto zoom. No photoshop

trickery with the background – I had to use +3EV compensation to open the

silhouetted shape against a bright cloudy sky.

Mark Hoffman


POUTO LIGHTHOUSE

F9, 1/3s, ISO200

POUTO PENINSULA

Pouto Lighthouse overlooking the Tasman

Sea. Built in 1884, it's one of the few signs of

civilisation in the remote wilderness of sand,

sea and sky.

Olga Macagon


WHANGAREI TOWN BASIN

F5.6, 1/160s

Late afternoon reflections at the

Whangarei Town Basin, Whangarei.

Paul Erceg


SPOROPHYTE SENTINALS

F2.8, 1/5s, ISO100

Macro of moss sporophytes in my backyard.

Paul Robertson


STONY PATH TO AN OLD FRIEND

F10, 1/60s, ISO640

MOTUEKA

The sun is taking its time, colouring its moods on the way up. We are

back together, exactly ten years since 'The Return of Helios', the glorious

morning which blessed us with that epiphany moment under a spectacular

red dome. The excitement is as good as ever, our romance is still on.

Peter Kurdulija


NO MOON TONIGHT

F11, 1/400s, IS0400

WELLINGTON

I was all set up to capture a full moon rising over these houses as the

sun was setting in the west but the dark clouds wouldn't clear. So no

moon tonight and one of vagaries of photography. Never mind, I think

the resulting photo is pretty dramatic.

Peter Maiden


MIST ON MURIWAI

F14, 1/2000s, IS0160

MURIWAI BEACH

Muriwai... caught over the winter where the

swell of the waves meet the roll of the mist off

the landscape.

Rachel Elder


WORKING FOR BREAKFAST

F8, 1/200s, ISO160

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA, USA

Bees are my favorite macro subjects. They are difficult to catch

because they rarely sit still for more than a second or two which

makes a successful shot that much more rewarding.

Joshua Sommerfeldt


THE ROOSTER

F6.3, 1/800s, ISO800

CORNWALL PARK

A mostly unwanted guest who

dropped in on us, crowing started

sharply at 5am.

Steve Harper


BIRDS IN THE DARK

F1.8, 1/50s, 85mm

A recent fashion shoot at Patuna Chasm for

The Fashion Creative.

Richard Brooker


A NEW DAY

F4.5, 1/30s, IS0200

Sunrise at the Atea a Rangi Star Compass

Waitangi regional park Hawkes bay.

Ruth Boere


ORETI HORIZON

F32, 1/5s

ORETI BEACH, LNVERCARGILL

Abstract sunset at Oreti Beach in lnvercargill using

intentional camera movement technique.

Shelley Edhouse


TOKAANU WHARF SUNRISE

F11, 10s, ISO250

TOKAANU WHARF, LAKE TAUPO

I was lucky as the morning sky exploded over Lake Taupo. The light

and colour changed so fast initially I couldn't decide on my settings.

There was a short window of opportunity where the light settled so I

managed to capture the old wharf in all its glory.

Simon Wills


AFRICAN GREY FEATHER

1s, ISO200

Feather from an African Grey parrot from the

"Parrot Place" in Kerikeri bay of Islands.

Ward Jameson


WATER DROPLETS

Zhenya Philip


WHAT MAKES PHOTOGRAPHY A

STRANGE INVENTION IS THAT

ITS PRIMARY RAW MATERIALS

ARE LIGHT AND TIME.

JOHN BERGER

106 NZPhotographer

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