NZPhotographer Issue 16, Feb 2019

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

Brought to you by

ISSUE 16, February 2019

INTERVIEW WITH

PETRA LEARY

THE MAGIC OF

MOERAKI BOULDERS

BY BRENDON GILCHRIST

BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH ALAN BLUNDELL

HOW TO CAPTURE:

LONG EXPOSURE LANDSCAPE

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

February 2019

1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 16 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

In this issue, we take to the air to

interview award-winning drone

photographer Petra Leary and

look down on her unique view of

New Zealand. Brendon takes us

on a Summer trip down memory

lane to photograph the iconic

Moeraki Boulders, and we go

to the Rodeo with Alan Blundell

in Behind The Shot. Meanwhile,

Richard shows us how to capture

the best long exposure shots,

get out there and give it a go

whilst the weather is good in the

Southern hemisphere!

On our quest to inspire 20,000

photographers by 2020, Ana

shares some inspiring words and

encourages you to always think

outside the box and be brave,

putting your work out there for critique in order to improve. This leads me

to mention the return of our revamped Expert Critique section, now called

the Photo Review Session which will be appearing periodically here in the

magazine but also over on the blog.

We know you're all out enjoying yourselves in the sunshine (camera in

hand, of course!) from how few readers' submissions we received this

month! Next month we'll be taking a look at the Love competition entries

(there's still time to enter!) but we look forward to seeing how and where

you all spent your Summer in future editions.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 16

February 2019

Cover Photo

by Petra Leary

www.petraleary.com

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

ana@excio.io

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone 04 889 29 25

or Email hello@excio.io

2 NZPhotographer


REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He is an avid tramper

who treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio,

Ana's photography

journey started many

years ago with one of the

first Kodak film cameras.

She loves exploring the

unseen macro world and

capturing genuine people's

emotions.

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer who

teaches photography

workshops and runs

photography tours. He

is the founder of New

Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2019 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

February 2019

3


CONTENTS

14

INTERVIEW WITH PETRA LEARY

25

6

8

10

14

25

29

MIND GAME: OUR COMFORT ZONE

by Ana Lyubich

HOW TO CAPTURE: LONG EXPOSURES

with Richard Young

IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

INTERVIEW WITH PETRA LEARY

BEHIND THE SHOT

With Alan Blundell

THE MAGIC OF MOERAKI BOULDERS

by Brendon Gilchrist

BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH ALAN BLUNDELL

THE MAGIC OF MOERAKI

BOULDERS

BY BRENDON GILCHRIST

10

IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

29

32 BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

We’re inviting photographers to highlight all the wonderful things that make the Wellington

Botanic Garden much more than a garden, while encouraging photographers to focus on

the garden season by season.

For prizes and full Terms & Conditions see: www.excio.io/freshshoots

The competition is split into quarterly competitions based on each of the seasons:

Summer Autumn Winter

15 December -

22 March 2019

23 March -

21 June 2019

22 June -

20 September 2019

CATEGORIES

NATURE

PEOPLE &

EVENTS

CREATIVE

PARTNERS


Mind Game: Our Comfort Zone

by Ana Lyubich

“To see, we must forget the name of the things we are looking at.“

Claude Monet

We all know that excited feeling we get when

we capture a great image – it’s a feeling of

achievement, accomplishment and success.

Everyone experiences that buzz, no matter what

their goals or aspirations are, whether you’re an

amateur photographer taking photos in your back

yard or a pro who thinks he just got an award-winning

documentary shot.

Many of us get so consumed in our photography that

the end result, the photo itself, carries a tiny piece of

ourselves within it. We treat our shots as “our babies”

and when we hear people discussing them, critiquing

them, or giving us feedback (whether we asked for

it or not!) we can start to feel anxious, feeling the

need to defend and protect our work. In a worst

case scenario, we might even hang up our camera

altogether for a few weeks or even months, taking

negative critique too much to heart.

Of course, everyone wants to hear good things about

their work, no one want’s to hear someone say that

they wouldn’t hang it on their wall, that it’s too dark,

not sharp enough etc but at the end of the day

by subconsciously lingering in the places (online or

offline) where our photos are as appreciated as we

allow them to be, we limit ourselves.

For example, when you post a new photo onto your

personal Facebook page it’s very likely that you’re

only going to receive positive comments plus a variety

of likes and hearts, no one who is a friend is going to

tell you how terrible a shot it is! But whilst receiving

positive feedback makes you feel good, it also makes

you think that you are good enough as you are and

that there is no need to push yourself further to seek

out new challenges that help you learn, improve, and

grow as a photographer.

6 NZPhotographer


NEVER UNDERESTIMATE YOUR BAD SHOTS.

They may not be your pride and joy, never seeing the

light of day on your website or social media feeds but

they are good enough for you to base your opinion

on, enabling you to see what works and what doesn’t.

Remember, you are not building your personal brand,

you are building your portfolio – Your photography is

not about you as a person, it’s about your work. Your

images are your ambassadors. Trust and respect will

come. Listen to what people say, select the most

useful feedback from what you hear and focus on

improving next time. It applies to everything you

do and everything you hear about your work. The

exchange of controversial ideas is necessary for the

intellectual and spiritual development of not just

photographers, but pretty much everyone.

PRACTICE TAKES TIME AND PATIENCE.

When you start taking photos without consciously

seeking the approval of others i.e not only taking

photos that will get you more likes on social media,

you will start seeing things through your viewfinder

differently. You will no longer be bound by certain

trends, tastes, or techniques. You won’t need to

oversaturate your photographs or only take photos

with bright colours because that is what people like

more on Instagram. The person who is not afraid of

public opinion and judgement has more chance

of becoming a leader in our modern overcrowded

photography space.

So let your mind wander. Our expectations and

beliefs filter the way we see the world, constricting our

awareness to the known and expected and that is a

killer when it comes to photography and creativity as

a whole.

KEEP YOUR MIND AND EYES OPEN.

Being a good photographer is not just about being

open to breaking the rules, but about the way you see

things. Use your imagination and let your eyes roam

over the shapes, colours, lines and textures. Break

the rules. Once you start making a habit of thinking

outside of the box, it will become your natural way of

seeing things. Remember that the best thing about

photography is that there are no bounds, anything is

possible and the unexpected is welcome.

February 2019

7


HOW TO CAPTURE: LONG EXPOSURES

Long Exposure Landscape Photography Tips with Richard Young

Sunset over Rangitoto Island, Auckland

LONG EXPOSURE LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

By using longer shutter speeds you can capture

movement within the landscape. Long exposures

are best suited to landscapes with dynamic

movement (e.g. the coast, waterfalls and rivers),

however, you can also capture movement in the

sky and foliage.

DARK SKY

To create a long exposure without overexposing the

image, you either need to work in low light (after

sunset) or use Neutral Density (ND) filters. Using strong

ND filters (10 stop) will allow you to create long

exposures even on a bight sunny day. Lighter, less

powerful ND filters (4 & 6 stop) are better suited to

shooting in lower light or overcast days.

F11, 30s, ISO64

SUBJECT FOR LONG EXPOSURES

Look for compositions that include stationary objects

(eg. rocks on the beach) as the primary focal point of

the image, so you don't just end up with a whole picture

of blurred water with no clear subject or focal point.

Consider how much movement you want in your image

and the direction of its flow - is it complimentary to your

subject?

SIMPLIFY THE COMPOSITION

One reason for using long exposures in landscape

photography is to simplify the composition. Although

shooting moving water with faster shutter speeds

can result in some brilliant images, working with long

exposures can remove all the detail from the water

which allows the subject to become highly defined,

creating depth within the image.

MASTER LONG EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHY AND GET TO TRY OUT THE LATEST BENRO ND FILTERS

ON A 1-DAY LONG EXPOSURE WORKSHOP IN AUCKLAND OR WELLINGTON WITH NEW ZEALAND

PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


WHAT IS

LOVE?

Photo Competition

W W W . E X C I O . I O / L O V E

WE WANT TO SEE

YOUR LOVE STORY

Whether that's romantic

love, parents' love, the

love and trust between

animals and humans or

even the heartache, that

love causes.

NZ$ 150 CASH PRIZE

1 JAN 2019 - 20 FEB 2019

T&Cs apply. See www.excio.io/love.

February 2019

9


Improving Your Photography

Photo Review Session

by Excio

LARGER THAN LIFE BY AMOL NAKVE

REVIEW BY:

Almin Vranac

2013 Winner of Sony’s ‘Record Your Move’.

INITIAL THOUGHTS

The shallow depth of field in this photo is really on

point, making the main object in this frame really

stand out which is the main purpose for nature/macro

photography. One little bit of advice would be to shift

the focus a little more to be on the droplets (as they’re

the most intriguing part of the photo), but this is a

personal taste thing, it’s good as it is too.

The second thing that is really nice in this photo is the

idea of the main object itself. I think a bitten out leaf

with a morning rose droplet hanging from it makes a

really nice and interesting artistic composure. I also

like the vibrant and rustic looking colours, they add a

special touch to the photo.

10 NZPhotographer


TAKING THIS PHOTO

TO THE NEXT LEVEL;

IMPROVEMENTS

The first thing that instantly

catches my eye is the

composition and angle of

this photo.

The rule of thirds means

we should always divide

our shot, placing our main

objects on the lines or where

the lines meet.

IMAGE 1

For this particular photo,

the main object is the leaf

that is mainly in focus, but

we have to keep in mind

that the leaf is located

on the branch and that

branch has another leaf

that is behind it. If we view

the branch as a base for

our main object, it means

that we have to capture

its other elements too (the

other leaf that is cropped

out). That means the

correct positioning would

be placing the branch on

the second line (making

the line ‘cut’ through the

center of the branch) and

keeping all of its elements

in the frame. You could

do this simply by looking

for a better angle when

shooting but at the same

time, keeping the same

DOF and main leaf in

focus.

IMAGE 2


IMAGE 3

For the sake of aesthetics, a

shot always looks better and

more appealing to the eye if

it’s symmetrical. What does

that mean here? It means

that the second leaf should

have been in the frame.

That does not mean that the

main focused leaf should

not, by any means, be less in

the focus, it just means that

we should never crop out

the elements of the base of

our shot (in this photo, the

branch).

IMAGE 4

Last but not least - the

background. While the

shallow DOF does a pretty

good job of masking out

the distracting objects in

our scene, there are still

some objects that are not

far enough away from

our main focused object

to be completely blurred

out, but yet they’re not

close enough (or important

enough) to be focused

crisply and to be the main

part of our scenery. These

objects almost always are a

distraction and interfere with

the harmony of the scene.

In this particular photo.

12 NZPhotographer


IMAGE 5

HOW TO AVOID OR FIX

THESE MISTAKES

NEXT TIME:

The basic way is simply to

take a shot without these

distracting objects in the

scene. This is the easiest way,

but some times it can be

very limiting and there will be

some times that you just can’t

keep everything in a scene

(the composition, good focus,

symmetry etc.) while still trying

to keep unwanted objects

out of the scene.

This is where photo editing

software comes into play to

‘save’ a photo. I have started

removing the distracting

objects as you can see here.

IMAGE 6

In my opinion the photo

looks more straightforward,

direct and professional after

removing the unwanted

items. It makes not only the

main object stand out, but

makes the background be in

perfect harmony also.

Visit our blog to see how

other photographers

thought this photo could be

improved.

IF YOU LIKE TO TAKE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY TO THE NEXT LEVEL, YOU CAN GET

FRIENDLY ADVICE AND SUPPORT WITH EXCIO: WWW.EXCIO.IO


Interview

with Drone Photographer

Petra Leary


Interview with Petra Leary

HI PETRA, CAN YOU TELL US WHO YOU ARE

AND WHAT YOU DO?!

I’m an Auckland based freelance Drone / Aerial

photographer which I absolutely love and feel very

lucky to do as I’m obsessed with anything drone

related! Other than drones, I like to skateboard, build

Lego, and hang out with my dog Kodak.

I was born in a barn in Grey Lynn and have lived in the

Auckland area my whole life but I often travel to other

areas of New Zealand or around the world, as I write

this I’m making my way across Japan.

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH?

Up in the air, I’m shooting on the DJI Phantom 4 Pro

and the DJI Mavic Pro 2. I generally keep my drones

pretty basic but do use the Polar Pro ND and PL Filters.

And then if I’m shooting something like my Lego

Courts or studio work I shoot on my Sony A7Rii + Zeiss

16–35mm or Zeiss 50mm.

WHEN DID YOU GET STARTED IN

PHOTOGRAPHY AND HOW DID THAT LEAD TO

DRONE PHOTOGRAPHY?

I really got into photography about 5 or 6 years ago,

I’ve always loved views from heights so originally

I would just scale whatever was around (cranes,

buildings etc.) to get as high as possible and capture

images looking down. That was a lot of fun but was

definitely restricting in terms of framing an image well

due to the risk of being caught and/or arrested.

My first experience with drones was thanks to a friend

who gave me a turn on his, once I flew it I knew

straight away I had to get one. I literally bought one

the same day!! I think my love for video games also

had something to do with the instant addiction to

drones, it’s really a pretty similar concept in terms of

controlling and operating the aircraft, but with the

added bonus of being able to capture what you see.

16 NZPhotographer


February 2019

17


HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY STYLE?

I think I tend to focus largely on a sense of minimalism

and geometry in my work, My background is in

graphic design so I feel that really translates into my

photos.

I also have a real obsession with things being straight

and balanced which you can see in the majority of

my photography. Things that are bold, bright, simple

or symmetrical definitely catch my eye when I’m out

shooting!

I also like to play with combining traditional

photography with digital illustration or 3d rendering

occasionally, you’ll notice it in some of my work.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION FOR

CREATING YOUR UNIQUE SHOTS?

I like to try and keep progressing with my work, I don’t

think every image I create is completely unique but

I like to try and find something that makes it stand out,

sometimes it’s just an interesting colour or pattern tied into

the photo or placing a strange object into the frame.

I’m always looking for weird and different shapes in

the everyday landscapes and think I really just draw

inspiration from what I experience daily. To me, the

ugly and dated architecture can sometimes be my

favourite subjects or the road markings, or public

space designs being added to the cities.

COURTS OR POOLS, WHICH CAME FIRST AND

WHICH DO YOU PREFER CAPTURING?

From memory, I’m pretty sure courts came first! I think

one of the first courts I shot was on north shore in

Auckland.

As for a preference, that’s a super hard one! I love

shooting both, there’s something extremely satisfying

for me seeing the geometry and simplicity of a court,

and the fact that even though they all follow a very

basic formula, I’ve never found 2 that are identical.

With pools, it’s a similar feeling, they can be brand

new and sparkling or completely empty and cracked

and worn but still look awesome.

TELL US MORE ABOUT TAKING PHOTOS WITH A

DRONE – WHAT SHOULD PEOPLE KNOW, WHERE

SHOULD THEY START?!

I think first off you want to get a hang of actually flying

the drone. I jumped in head first and had some close

calls with crashes, give the simulator a go as it will

make things a lot easier to understand.

18 NZPhotographer


February 2019

19


20 NZPhotographer


Once you’ve got that hang of controlling it I’d say just

play. I’ve said it before most probably, but I really feel

like people tend to go straight for the stock standard

drone photo of a person and a beach, use your

drone as you would a normal camera but as if you’re

walking on the roof, you don’t necessarily need to be

shooting from super high up, try playing with lots of

subjects and shooting from all sorts of heights.

WHAT AWARDS HAVE YOU WON WITH YOUR

WORK AND WHICH ONE ARE YOU MOST

PROUD OF?

DJI Skypixel Photo Contest 2017–1st place Portrait

Category

Auckland Camera Centre 2018 Photo Contest – 1st

Place Abstract Category

NZ Geo Photographer of the year 2018 – Honourable

Mention Aerial Category

The DJI Skypixel is really the main one for me, it

opened up some incredible opportunities globally

and I think it’s probably got a lot to do with where I’m

at now.

YOU SEEM TO GET YOUR WORK FEATURED IN

A LOT OF PUBLICATIONS, CAN YOU TELL US

HOW YOU PROMOTE YOUR WORK AND SHARE

SOME TIPS?

I’ve had some great opportunities the last couple of

years and have recently been working on some really

fun projects including the new campaign for Love

Taupo with Osborne Shiwan and DGLT, plus my year

long project with Metro Magazine which you can see

in their December issue, a project which I was super

excited to see come together :)

I’d have to say Instagram has been a huge factor in

the majority of features and publications I have been

in, I tend mostly to just focus on building my portfolio

of work on Instagram and my website and I think

that’s where people come across it. To date, all the

publications and features I’ve been in have been all

from people contacting me, including this interview,

I’ve never asked or gone looking for them.

So my main piece of advice would be just keep at it

and work on creating your own unique style. If you

have something different your are more likely to stand

out from everyone else!

CAN YOU CHOOSE A FAVOURITE PHOTO?

That would probably have to be one of the photos

I’m most known for, even though it’s pretty played out

now. It's the close up of the Potters Park Basketball Half

Court (page 19). There's something about the colours

and the symmetry that I love.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THIS YEAR?

2019 is going to be packed with travel for me.

Once I’m done in Japan I’ll be heading to Australia

to work with Ford AU for a couple of weeks. I’m also

working towards another solo show this year, dates

to be confirmed, as well as some other very exciting

projects but those are to be announced later so stay

tuned!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/petraleary

www.petraleary.com

February 2019

21


22 NZPhotographer


F7.1, 1/320s, ISO200

24 NZPhotographer


Behind The Shot

With Alan Blundell

February 2019

25


Behind The Shot With Alan Blundell

HI ALAN, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF, LETTING

US KNOW WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU DO!

My name is Alan Blundell and I’m a 53-year old father

of 4. I “grew up” in Wainuiomata, and now reside in

Wellington city. I have worked in Architecture for most

of my career, aside from a 10-year sabbatical I took to

design, build and run a hotel in Oriental Parade. Since

the sale of that venture, I have returned to work in the

construction sector, while spending as much time as

possible learning how to take photos.

I have been shooting with some intent since 2016,

mostly ‘street’ style photography – the candid capture

of unmediated or chance encounters in public spaces

that throw up some interesting type of juxtaposition,

event or behaviour. I love the challenge of anticipating a

person’s expression or movement in a particular situation

or scene and freezing that moment and find that it’s the

smallest (sometimes unexpected) detail that makes the

shot but I am quite a shy person and still battle between

moving around in a crowd observing and capturing

‘candid’ moments, vs the value of the right amount of

engagement in order to learn more about my subjects.

TELL US ABOUT THE EVENT YOU WERE AT AND

THIS PHOTO…

My wife and I were holidaying in the Far North at a place

called Coopers Beach when we spotted a little A4 flyer

advertising the Xmas Rodeo programme for that region.

Oruru, basically a stock and station yard 10km down the

road from Taipa, was hosting the next round.

Given the ongoing publicity around animal welfare

in Rodeo, I was keen to see first-hand how those

organising and competing in such an event ensured

their own and their animals’ safety. There was a lot of

referencing (by the venue announcer) of the reasons

behind each type of contest as a practical skill, and

how the rider, horse and cattle were tested and

responded. It was very interesting. The dedication of

the Rodeo community to their animals, the way they

dressed and ran the very family-oriented event was

fascinating.

I was conscious of the fact there have been a lot of

animal rights protestors at some of the bigger city events

and roving around with a camera attracted a few

sideways looks. I tried to engage where possible with

the locals – mainly family members of those involved,

to learn more about the circuit, and reassure them we

were just tourists coming to have a look at something

we don’t see every day. They were really friendly and

talkative.

For the contest that I caught here, a cowboy has to try

to stay on a bucking bull. This capture shows the rider

falling from the bull and being dragged as his hand was

wedged in the rope he was initially using to hold on to.

There was a rush by the support staff on foot to the right

of the bull, (rodeo clowns), to free the rider somehow

and protect him from the bull after dismount, this is done

by running a distraction until the riders on horses can

corral the bull back into the enclosure.

WHAT WERE YOU SHOOTING WITH?

I shot with two lenses that day on my Fuji X-T20: the

56mm f1.2 with ND filter, and the 55–200mm f3.5–4.8

which is what I took this particular photo with. Both have

a crop factor of 1.4 so the full-frame equivalents were

around 85mm and 80–300mm.

I was actually testing out the variable ND filter that

my kids bought me for Xmas. The 62mm ND2-ND400

Marumi was picked out to fit on my f1.2mm 56mm FUJI

lens. It was needed as shooting wide open on bright

sunny days such as this means there is just too much

light which causes over exposed images. Using the filter

acted like a pair of sunglasses allowing preservation of

the depth of field in shots.

WHAT WAS HAPPENING BEHIND THE CAMERA?

The weather was bright and sunny, with lots of dust

being kicked up by the events. Getting close-up meant

dealing with this dust whilst also shooting through or

around heavy timber and wire mesh safety railings set

up around the perimeter of the arena.

I had to pick a hole to shoot through and hope that

as the rapidly moving riders and action came into

frame, something interesting would happen! My set up/

positioning was initially to look for a good backdrop for

shots of the action, interesting structures/fences and

some spectators to help build the scene.

Then it was a question of tracking the subject with all

the jumps, twists and turns, waiting for that “decisive

moment” to snap the action. I used the continuous

tracking focus feature on the camera to give myself the

best chance of capturing something meaningful.

This shot has some great detail, the dust being thrown

up by the falling rider, the facial expressions of the

clowns realising he is in trouble etc. I was really pleased

with the results of the day and pretty happy with my kit

selection and the quality/hit-rate of shots for the 3 hours

we were there.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.facebook.com/bokehstreet

www.instagram.com/bokehstreet

www.bokehstreet.com

albums.excio.io/profile/Bokeh Street


MORE

THAN A

WORLDWIDE

GALLERY

GET AN INSTANT PORTFOLIO

RECEIVE EXPERT FEEDBACK

CURATE YOUR OWN GALLERY

ENJOY EXCLUSIVE

DISCOUNTS & OFFERS

JOIN NOW

Membership only $49/year

Learn Grow Exhibit

www.excio.io

February 2019

27


The Magic of Moeraki Boulders

by Brendon Gilchrist

28 NZPhotographer


F16, 1.6s, ISO100

February 2019

29


F4.5, 10s, ISO3200

Have you ever had that experience where one

particular place keeps drawing you back

over and over again due to how unique and

special it is?

The Moeraki Boulders on Koekohe Beach in Coastal

Otago do that to me.

Formed 60 million years ago, the spherical balllike

boulders lie on a small part of the beach, some

together and some apart, some small, some as big

as 2 meters wide. They are an interesting subject to

photography but they’re also interesting in themselves

when you consider how amazing nature is.

When I was growing up my Dads Grandparents lived

in Hampden, a short 10-minute drive from this beach

and I spend many nights here visiting from Dunedin

where I once lived. I never had a camera as a child

but I always remember our trips here, they were

always special being with Grandma and Grandad

collecting firewood, walking and running on the

beach, talking, and enjoying these moments.

Fast forward 20 years and this beach attracts me for

the memories but also for the boulders to photograph

whether captured at sunrise, sunset, or even the dead

of night thanks to Astrophotography. There are so

many options and sometimes, if you’re lucky, you get

the beach to yourself though not for sunrise, this being

one of New Zealand’s Top 10 Beaches and a hot spot

with photographers!

SHOOTING DAY OR NIGHT

I have found that the best sunrise shots happen when

the tide is either coming in or going out, about halfway

through the 6-hour cycle between high and low. I have

yet to capture a really epic sunrise here but I have

had some pleasing average ones, often having to

use my imagination and think fast. One time, the sun

was coming up and there were no clouds in the sky so

the sun was like a big ball. Since the boulders are also

big balls I decided why not capture the sun halfway

over the horizon looking like another big boulder in the

distance. During another sunrise, the clouds were too

thick and the tide was out but the patterns in the sand

were too perfect not to capture.

Night time photography is also a pleasure here, very

often you will find you have the beach to yourself and

you can create so many different compositions with

so many different results, it is endless. It’s even possible

to see the Aurora from here if you are lucky. The last

time I was here at night I set up a time lapse and then

walked away and enjoyed observing the night sky.

It’s so beautiful even with the full moon, the waves

crashing around the boulders, the stars moving and

the peacefulness of the place.

30 NZPhotographer


BEYOND THE BOULDERS

Moeraki is not only well known for its boulders, but

it’s also a very popular place to go out on a fishing

charter which opens up wildlife photography

opportunities. On a fishing trip with my Dad and

Brother, we caught many Blue Cods and Red Cods

and I also had the chance to photograph Albatross

at close range as they were following our boat

for an easy feed. It was incredible to see these

huge birds so close. As we moved from location

to location searching for fish they would follow us,

gliding so effortlessly as they soared that their wings

would gently touch the wave. It is a known fact that

the Albatross can fly for many many miles without

flapping its wings, the only known bird to do so, but

it was a pleasure to witness it up close. The coast

from the water looks so different looking back in and

sometimes dolphins are in the area so it’s well worth

grabbing a boat and heading out with your camera,

even if you have no interest in fishing!

At Katiki Point, the southern point of the Moeraki

Peninsula, you will find the endangered and rare

yellow-eyed penguins plus the common New Zealand

fur seals. These two species live side by side and are

not predator or prey to each other. The location near

the lighthouse is where you can get up and close to

see the penguins, the best time is a few hours after

sunrise and a few hours before sunset when you will

see them enter or exit the ocean. I have been here

a number of times and never left unsatisfied, always

able to capture the birds walking or climbing.

If you pick the seasons right you will also get to

photograph baby seals playing in the pools below,

but don’t forget your telephoto lens as I don’t think

you can get very close to them without the mothers

getting upset.

4 TIPS FOR CAPTURING MOERAKI

• Get to the boulders early before everyone else

does, at sunrise you’ll need to claim your spot.

• For the best seascape shot, get your feet wet and

shoot a long exposure with the water rushing past.

Watch the water to see how it moves before wading

in and pressing the shutter, you might be able to

create a leading line.

• An 80–200mm 2.8 lens is good for most wildlife

photography at Moeraki but for capturing the

albatross on the water, a wider lens will likely be

needed.

• When choosing between sunrise or sunset, I would

personally capture the wildlife in the evening as whilst

the reverse sunsets at the boulders are good, the

sunrises are much much better.

February 2019

31

F9, 1/800s, ISO125


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


A TEAR

Photographer, Retoucher: Tanya Mishchuk

Model: Beatrys Ponzoni

Makeup Artist: Heather Newcombe

Tanya Mishchuk


GHOST TREE

F4.8, 1/500s, IS0720

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA, USA

I went out in the rain to photograph the leaves floating in a black

bottomed swimming pool, then inverted the image to bring the

reflected tree upright.

Andy Popadiuk


MATAI FALLS

F4.5, 1/6s, ISO100

THE CATLINS NATIONAL PARK

One of the beautiful falls in The Catlins,

a 30 min walk through native bush.

Hilary Lakeman


LATTE BREAKERS

F7.1, 1/400s, ISO250

CARMEL RIVER STATE BEACH, CALIFORNIA, USA

An overnight storm forced the lagoon to breach the sandbar and

dump volumes of silt and sand into the bay (an annual event). In

the afternoon large swells rolled in and churned it all up, while turkey

buzzards patrolled for anything edible that might have washed up.

Andy Popadiuk


TUI FEEDING ON FLAX

F6.3, 1/160s, ISO160

WAIRAKEI RESORT, TAUPO

I was lucky enough to play golf at the Wairakei resort.

I actually took this shot in the car park even before we

entered into the predator proof fenced area.

Carole Garside


QUEENSTOWN TRIP

F18, 1/320s, IS0200

WAIRAKEI RESORT, TAUPO

This picture of Lake Wakatipu was taken during

our trip from Queenstown to Glenorchy.

Gary Reid


LEVITATION

F4, 1/3000s, ISO200

FEATHERSTON

A 2 week old fawn watches the

photographer as she floats in canter.

Greg Arnold


IN SHE COMES

F14, 1/13s, ISO50

CABLE BAY, NELSON

Some of the best water movements & textures I have captured. Taken an

hour or so before sunset with some nice warm and dark light, It was the first set

up I did on this afternoon shoot and ended up being the only good shot out of 2

hours of non stop shooting along this coastline.

Jesse Hebberd


STRETCH UP YOUR LONG NECK

F11, 1/500s, ISO250

FALKIRK, SCOTLAND

"Stretch up your long necks to greet the sun" says a sign at The

Kelpies in Falkirk, Scotland. That was the inspiration for this shot.

The Kelpies are amazing sculptures by Andy Scott, a must see if

in Scotland.

Peter Maiden


NIKSEDELIC GLENORCHY

F14, 1/13s, ISO50

We were on a trip to Milford Sound, camped at Twenty Five Mile Stream

Glenorchy. We reached the campsite at midnight and settled down

asap to wake up early for the dawn. I clicked a few interesting pictures of

snowcapped mountains with the dawn sky, testing my friend as a subject.

Nihad Mahamood


THE RESTORATIVE POWER

OF A TRANQUIL HOUR

F7.1, 1/80s, ISO100

DUNEDIN

Kayakers are gliding on the still surface of Otago Harbour.

The great city of Dunedin is visible in the distance.

Peter Kurdulija


SURF SUNDAY

F14, 1/5000s, ISO160

MURIWAI BEACH

Early Sunday morning, the beach fills with silhouettes of

surfers and boards as they make their entry into the west

coast waves of Muriwai Beach.

Rachel Elder


PHOTOGRAPHERS MAY OR MAY NOT

MAKE A LIVING BY PHOTOGRAPHY,

BUT THEY ARE ALIVE BY IT.

52 NZPhotographer

ROBERT ADAMS

More magazines by this user