World 02_06_19

coolvt

The World
World Publications
Barre-Montpelier VT

BOB DYLAN WANNABE CONTEST

SAT., FEB. 9 - 7:30PM - SEE PAGE 27 FOR DETAILS

MINGLE NIGHTCLUB - DOWNTOWN BARRE

Power CALENDAR brunch. OF Blues EVENTS: brunch.

Tues., Every Sept. 25 Sunday • 6PM - 2AM

Tequila 10:00am-2:00pm

Tuesday ~ $5 Margaritas

Wed., Sept. 26 • 6PM - 7PM

Ham eggs Zumba toast ~ coffee public • $8.99 invited • Sundays

Wed., Sept. 26 • 7PM

Open Bloody Mic Marys, ~ anyone Mimosas come and Red play/dance/sing

Eyes!! Raise

your celery to blues brunch at Mingle Night Club.

Friday, Sept. 28 • 6PM to 11PM

214 NORTH Hot MAIN Rod STREET, & Rock DOWNTOWN & Roll BARRE

car 802-249-4550 show & dance, • 802-793-8819 $5 cover

Friday, OPEN Sept. TUES-SAT 28 •11PM 6PM-CLOSE - 2AM

Today’sSUN Hits 10AM-2PM with DJ• CLOSED Stevie B, MON $5 cover

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 47, No. 40 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 February 6, 2019

On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

AG Proposes Enhanced

Protective Measures for

Immigrant Communities

page 2

VT Students Selected for

US Senate Youth Program

Headed to D. C. to Receive

$10,000 College Scholarship

page 11



House Gives Final Approval

to Ethnic Studies Bill

page 15

CVHHH Goes Red for

Women in Honor

of American Heart Month

in February

page 19

VALENTINES

DAY

pages 20-23

& OUTDOORS

pages 30 & 31

Tremont Family Collects

Top Honors at Devil’s

Bowl Speedway Banquet

of Champions

page 31

Limited-time Special Offer

Corporate Rates for Every Body!

Club $55 ∙ Tennis $85

Additional Discounts for Family Members

Kids under 10 FREE Pool Membership

Membership Includes Group Exercise Classes

First in



Fitness 652


Offer good for new Members. Contract Terms Apply. Enrollment fee waived

with 12-month contract. Offer ends February 15, 2019.

Granger Rd., Berlin 802-223-6161 FirstInFitness.com


37 TH Annual Central Vermont

GUN SHOW

Barre Civic Center

(Barre Auditorium)

Sat., Feb. 9 • 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sun., Feb. 10 • 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

SEE US AT THE

SHOW & STOP

BY OUR STORE

on the corner of Rte 62

(I-89 access) & Smith Street

R&L ARCHERY

Inc.

70 SMITH ST., BARRE, VT

802-479-9151

www.RLarchery.com

Gear Up For

Your Adventures

359 N Main St,

Barre, VT 05641

476-7446

SHOP ONLINE

LennyShoe.com

2 FLOORS

200 TABLES

New, Used & Antique Guns;

Amateur & Professional Gunsmiths;

Gun, Knife & Ammo Collectors;

Gun Dealers & More

REFRESHMENTS

Adults $8 • Children 12 & Under $1

SPONSOR:

BARRE FISH & GAME CLUB

AMM

WAREHOUSE

SEE YOU AT THE SHOW

WAREHOUSE PRICES

GUNS - AMMO

MILITARY SURPLUS

“WE ALSO BUY GUNS”

EXPERT ON GUNS & AMMO

323 E. Montpelier Rd., Barre, Vt

www.vtammowarehouse.com

802-498-5292

Tues.-Sat 12-6; Sun. 2-5

Main St., Williamstown, VT

Chris Dessureau

• Full Service • Used Cars

Station

• In-House

• VT State Financing

Inspection

802-455-2200

cell (802)279-3709

www.grnmtnauto.com

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

•TIRE CHAINS•

•INDUSTRIAL CHAIN•

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641

1-800-464-4971 • 1-802-476-4971

SOUP ’N’

GREENS

FINE DINING

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

American Express, Discover, VISA, Mastercard

325 No. Main St., Barre

479-9862


19TH

ANNUAL

Barre Town Thunder Chickens Snowmobile Club

and The Mercy Family are sponsoring the...

SKATEPARK

FUNDRAISER

POKER RUN &

Pulled Pork & Chicken

DINNER WITH

ALL THE FIXIN'S

to benefit the Travis Mercy Skatepark, Barre Town

SNOW OR NO-SNOW - The Event Will Go On!

BEGIN: Great Energy Store, South Barre

(By sled, Cor14B WN114)

END:

Barre Town School, Websterville, VT

(By sled, Cor. Rte. 14B East of Jct. WN7)

WHEN: Saturday, February 16, 2019

Registration starts at 8:15 A.M., Leave at 9:00 A.M.

COST: $5.00 per hand, Extra cards available

Food Catered by Randy Henry & The Racing Chefs

WHERE: Barre Town School, Websterville, VT

(By sled, Cor. Rte. 14B East of Jct. WN7)

DATE: Saturday, February 16, 2019

TIME: Food to be served at 12:30 P.M.

COST: $10/adult • $5/children age 12 & under • under 5 Free

Silent Auction • Quilt Raffle

Ride there! Drive there! Even Walk there!

For More Information Call:

Linda Mercy @ 479-3405 Dave Rouleau @ 839-0533

or visit our website: www.barretownthunderchickens.com

He’s a tough competitor on the courts.

He’s even tougher on orthopedic pain.

Dr. J.P. Begly

Dr. Begly knows what it’s like to be limited by pain. And thanks

to his specialized orthopedic training and access to a network

of expertise, he can help you enjoy your favorite activities again.

Trusted local care. A network of expertise.

Barre Lions Tina Golon and Moe Fortier present Capstone Food Shelf and Nutrition Coordinator

Winona Johnson with 72 packages of Mac and cheese that will provide 422 meals. They also gave her

a large box of food. The meals were prepared at a Lions Cabinet meeting where 10,000 meals were

packaged through a company called “Outreach.” For more information on The Barre Lions Club, contact

Membership Chair Linda Mercy at lmercy@drbinsurance.com.

• • •

AG Proposes Enhanced Protective

Measures for Immigrant Communities

Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan Attorney General recommended legislation to

has issued recommendations to the Vermont empower state and local law enforcement

legislature to enable law enforcement agencies

agencies to more closely control their offi-

to better protect immigrant communities. cers’ communications with immigration

Attorney General Donovan also called for authorities. This legislation would go into

robust trainings for law enforcement in hate effect if existing federal statutes currently

crime and bias incident investigation and restricting that discretion are ruled unconstitutional

or repealed by federal legislation.

implementation of the Fair and Impartial

Policing Policy (FIP).

In addition, the Attorney General’s Office

“My mission as Attorney General is to will develop and deliver, in partnership with

increase public safety and access to justice,” the Vermont State Police FIP Unit, advanced

Attorney General Donovan said. “Vermonters training in hate crime and bias incident investigation

need to be able to trust that state and local law

and reporting. The Attorney General’s

enforcement will work hard to protect them, Office will also provide trainings in the

regardless of where they are from. We are all implementation of the FIP policy, with an

Vermonters.” To achieve this goal, the emphasis on immigration and underrepresented

Attorney General said law enforcement cannot

communities. For these trainings, rath-

be effectively deputized as federal civil er than require officers to travel to the

immigration agents.

Vermont Police Academy in Pittsford, the

The Attorney General recommended Attorney General’s Office and the Vermont

amendments to Vermont Act 54 that would State Police will instead travel to local law

allow local law enforcement agencies to enforcement agencies to make it easier for

extend additional protections to immigrant law enforcement agencies to attend trainings.

communities. In 2017 the Vermont legislature The Vermont Criminal Justice Training

CLIENT passed Act 54 requiring standardization of

CVMC Fair and Impartial Policing policies around

the state and establishing the Racial

Council, along with the Attorney General,

and working in consultation with the ACLU

of Vermont, Human Rights Commission, and

JOB Disparities NO. Panel. The Racial Disparities Migrant Justice, authored the Fair and

011607 Panel is charged with addressing systemic Impartial Policing policy to defend the rights

racial disparities in statewide systems of of all Vermonters, ban biased policing, and

DESCRIPTION

criminal and juvenile justice. In addition, the strongly protect immigrant communities.

CVMC Fall Ortho

Begly

• • •

PUB

USCIS Announces Online Case Status

The World

Feature for Asylum Applicants

MATERIAL DUE DATE

1/2/19

Citizenship and Immigration Services

INSERTION (USCIS) have DATE announced that applicants who

1/9/19 have a pending affirmative asylum application

with USCIS can now check the status of

SIZE their applications online at uscis.gov/casestatus.

Page Only asylum applicants with an applica-

1/4

4.68”w tion pending x 7.75”h with USCIS will be able to use

this new feature to check their case status

COLOR online. It will not cover defensive asylum

4C

applicants whose cases are pending in immigration

court.

QUESTIONS CALL

Amanda “The Peacock new capability increases transparency

and assures applicants that they have the

251.476.2507

most up-to-date and accurate information

about their case, 24 hours a day, seven days a

week,” said USCIS Director L. Francis

Cissna. “We strive to adjudicate all applications

and petitions in a timely manner and are

working to reduce the impact on processing

times by aligning resources appropriately.”

Previously, asylum applicants could only

check their case status through an asylum

office in person or by phone, fax, or email.

Non-governmental organizations and stakeholders

within the legal community informed

USCIS that asylum applicants have found

this process is very difficult. Furthermore,

giving asylum applicants the ability to check

their case status online allows asylum office

staff to better focus their resources on scheduling

interviews and adjudicating pending

cases.

This enhancement is a part of our overall

modernization efforts to provide a more efficient

and effective user experience.

For more information on USCIS and its

programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow us

on Twitter (@uscis), Instagram (/uscis),

YouTube (/uscis), and Facebook(/uscis).

Mid- Winter

FOOTWEAR

OTWEA

and CLOTHING

ORTHOPEDIC CENTER

Diagnosis, treatment and rehab in one convenient location.

Call (802) 521-0126 for a consult. | UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Ortho

page 2 The WORLD February 6, 2019

011607-CVMC-FallOrtho2018-Print-TheWorld.indd 1

12/21/18 2:21 PM

286 Waits River Road

Bradford, VT

802-222-9316

Open Mon.-Sat. 8:30 AM-5:30 PM

Friday Nights until 8:00 PM

Closed Sundays & Major Holidays

Sale!

Save

20%-50% OFF

MOST WINTER BOOTS AND CLOTHING


Vermont Mutual Designated A+ Superior by A.M. Best Company

A.M. Best Company, the global rating agency for the insurance

industry, has once again affirmed the Financial Strength

Rating of A+ (Superior) for Vermont Mutual Insurance

Group®.

A.M. Best’s Financial Strength Rating is an independent

opinion of an insurer’s financial strength and ability to meet

its ongoing insurance policy and contract obligations. A.M.

Best noted that Vermont Mutual’s Enterprise Risk Management

capabilities are appropriate for their size, their Business

Profile is favorable and Operating Performance is strong.

Vermont Mutual’s Balance Sheet and Capitalization were

noted to be very strong. Given these results, which have consistently

outperformed the industry composite, Vermont

Mutual’s outlook is categorized as stable.

Vermont Mutual’s President and CEO, Dan Bridge, stated

“The A+ “Superior” rating represents a comprehensive evaluation

of our company and reflects Vermont Mutual’s favorable

underwriting and operating results. This year’s evaluation

was particularly rewarding as A.M. Best’s rating methodology

had changed, requiring additional analysis and presentation

to most effectively communicate our strategy, results

and financial strength.” Bridge continued “The recognition is

further testament to the positive collaboration we enjoy with

our Independent Agency Partners.”

Executive Vice President & COO, Mark McDonnell added

“We could not be more proud of the dedication and efforts of

both our employees and our Independent Agents for their

contributions in making Vermont Mutual a financially stable

and predictable company.”

This is the fourth consecutive year that A.M. Best has

awarded the A+ (Superior) rating to Vermont Mutual and its

two fully reinsured subsidiaries, Northern Security Insurance

Company, Inc. and Granite Mutual Insurance Company.

Gift Ideas

See Pages 20-23

F is for

February,

FAFSA, and

Financial Aid

Vermont Student

Assistance Corp. is reminding

students to file their annual

FAFSA application – the

crucial first step to receiving

financial aid.

And VSAC has an additional

incentive: Every high

school in Vermont with 70

percent or more of their

seniors finishing the FAFSA

will be entered into a drawing

to win $1,000 for a schoolapproved

senior activity.

The FAFSA, or Free

Application for Federal

Student Aid, is the basis for

determining eligibility for

federal Pell grants, VSAC’s

Vermont State Grant, financial

aid from the school that

the student attends and for

student loans.

In Vermont, about 40 percent

of high school seniors

don’t file a FAFSA.

According to NerdWallet,

Vermonters are leaving about

$4.6 million on the table each

year, which works out to

about $5,400 per year for eligible

students. That’s over

$21,000 in four years.

When it comes to financial

aid for education and training

after high school, the sooner

you apply the better, said

Marilyn Cargill, vice president

of financial aid services

at VSAC.

“Simply put, no FAFSA,

no financial aid,” Cargill

said. “Vermonters know the

cost of continuing their education

is a big investment.

Every student should file the

FAFSA and a Vermont Grant

application to get all the

financial aid that they are

eligible for.”

Students can learn more

about the FAFSA and file

online by visiting www.vsac.

org. VSAC also has links to

the online applications for the

Vermont State Grant, available

to Vermont students

enrolled full-time or parttime.

The earlier students apply,

the better, Cargill said,

because many schools and

colleges have deadlines for

submitting financial aid

applications – some as early

as February or March. And,

some student aid is only

available on a first-come,

first-served basis until the

money runs out.

For those students interested

in applying for a scholarship,

VSAC has an online

link to the available programs

and an online application.

Deadline for scholarship

applications is February 15.

VSAC awards $5 million a

year from 150 scholarship

programs – all are available

only to Vermonters.

WITH

V-PLOW

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2016 Ford Super

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2014 Ford F-150

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2015 Ford Super

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at

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2015 Volkswagen

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2014 Ford

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2015 Ford

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2017 Ford Escape SE

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Pre-Season Maintenance Includes:

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2014 Ford • Mounting points inspection

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2016 Ford Focus SE

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2010 MINI Cooper

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265 River Street, Montpelier, VT • 802-223-5201

www.formulafordvt.com

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 3


SHELTER DRIVE



One Stop Country Pet Supply

would like YOUR help in gathering

items for our local humane societies.

Bring an item in to donate, or purchase

one here & we will add a commemorative morative

heart to our window with your pet’s name

on it.

A wish list from each shelter is available in

each of our stores or on our website:

www.OneStopCountryPetSupply.compply.coom

On February 9th and 10th your purchases will

have greater impact because we are donating

of our total sales to help care for pets

waiting to be adopted.

3%

WHAT’S NEW IN BUSINESS

Welcome Mary

D’Agostio

“We are so excited to welcome

Mary D’Agostino to the Central

Vermont Dental Center family.

Mary is an amazing hygienist

who has been practicing her trade

in both Barre and Montpelier for

29 years! Mary has appointments

available immediately, call to

schedule yours today!”

Newly Expanded Services!

page 4 The WORLD February 6, 2019

When pets talk we listen

802-479-4307

OPEN 7 DAYS

1284 U.S. Route 302

In The Twin City Plaza

Berlin, VT

f

Find

Us On

Facebook

Our Berlin store will be donating to:

Dr. Michael Adler, DDS

Full Service Filling, Extractions,

Root Canals, Crowns, etc.

Also offering Dental Hygiene

417 US Route 302

Berlin, VT 05641

622-0801

February Is

National Pet Dental Health Month

By the Vermont Veterinary Medical

Association

Erin Forbes, DVM

Mountain View Animal Hospital

The VVMA would like to remind all pet

owners that February is National Pet Dental

Health Month. Sponsored by the American

Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA),

National Pet Dental Health Month message

reminds pet owners that dental health is a

very important part of your pet’s overall

health. Your pet’s teeth and gums should be

checked at least once a year by your veterinarian

to check for early signs of a problem

and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.

Veterinary dentistry includes the scaling,

polishing, extraction, or repair of your pet’s

teeth and all other aspects of oral health care.

These procedures must be performed by a

veterinarian and begins with an oral exam of

your pet’s mouth. If there is dental disease

present, dental work will be recommended.

Most dental disease occurs below the gumline,

where you can’t see it, so dental work is

all performed under anesthesia in order to be

safe and effective. Signs of dental disease

include bad breath, broken or loose teeth,

abnormal chewing or drooling. One may also

notice bleeding from the mouth, reduced

appetite, and swelling around the mouth. If

you notice any of these signs, schedule an

exam for your pet.

Periodontal disease is the most common

dental condition in dogs and cats, in fact by

the time your pet is 3 years old there is an

estimated 70 percent chance they will have

periodontal disease. The earlier it is detected,

the faster treatment can be recommended,

which is important as advanced periodontal

disease can cause severe problems and pain

for your pet. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory

condition of the gum and bone support

(periodontal tissues) surrounding the

teeth. It starts with plaque that hardens into

calculus. Calculus above the gumline can

often easily be seen and removed, but below

the gumline it is damaging and can cause

infections and damage to the tissues or bone.

This can cause loose teeth, bone loss, pain

around the tooth, and fractured teeth.

Prevention of periodontal disease in pets

consists of frequent removal of the dental

calculus that forms on teeth that are not kept

clean. Regularly brushing your pet’s teeth is

the single most effective thing you can do to

keep their teeth healthy between dental cleanings

and may reduce the frequency or even

eliminate the need for periodic dental cleaning

by your veterinarian. Daily brushing is

best, but it’s not always possible and brushing

several times a week can be effective. Most

dogs accept brushing, but cats can be a bit

more resistant – patience and training are

important. There are many pet products marketed

with claims that they improve dental

health, but not all of them are effective. Look

for a seal of approval from the Veterinary

Oral Health Council (VOHC) and make sure

to discuss any dental products/diets you are

considering with your veterinarian. If you

have any questions or concerns about your

pet’s dental health, please contact your veterinarian.

February is National Pet Dental

Health Month

Brush Up on Oral Hygiene for Pets

It is not just what a pet puts

inside his or her mouth that can

make a difference in comfort and

health, but the way pet owners take

care of pets’ teeth, gums and more.

Oral hygiene, this oft-overlooked

component of pet care, can mean

the difference between a happy,

healthy pet and one that may be

suffering in silence.

The American Veterinary Dental

College says brushing an animal’s

teeth is the single most effective

means to maintain oral health

between professional vet examinations.

Bacteria that forms naturally

in an animal’s mouth will contribute

to the formation of plaque

which, left untreated, can lead to

periodontal disease. By brushing

away the precursors to plaque, pet

owners can achieve optimal dental

health for their pets.

Oral hygiene doesn’t begin and

end with regular brushing. The

American Veterinary Medical

Association also suggests pet lovers

work with a veterinary dentist

to evaluate the health of teeth, the jaws and

the roots below the gum line. These professionals

are invested in all aspects of oral

healthcare and can be called on for routine

cleaning, filing, extraction, or tooth repairs if

need be.

The AVMA says that periodontal disease is

the most common dental condition in dogs

and cats, and by the time the animal reaches

three years of age, it may have some early

evidence of periodontal disease, which can

only worsen if preventative measures are not

taken.

Pet dental problems are similar to those that

occur in people. While dental caries (cavities)

are less likely, abscesses, infections, broken

teeth, and palate defects can occur. Signs of

potential oral problems include bad breath,

abnormal chewing, disinterest in eating,

Dog Owners Reminded to Keep Dogs Under Control

• • •

• • •

swelling in the gums, tenderness when the

mouth is touched, or bleeding. Pets may

become irritable if their mouths are bothering

them, so if behavior changes are observed,

dogs or cats should be seen by a veterinarian

to find out if a dental issue is at the root of the

problem.

Some pet owners are reticent to handle oral

healthcare for their companion animals

because they fear the pet may bite if uncomfortable.

Although this is always a possibility,

dogs and cats can grow accustomed to teeth

being brushed or wiped with patience, says

AVDC. Oral rinses and special chews also can

reduce plaque formation.

Dental health is an important component of

responsible pet ownership. Home oral hygiene

and professional cleanings and examinations

can help pets remain healthy.

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

reminds dog owners that they must keep their

dogs under control to prevent them from

chasing deer or moose.

Vermont law prohibits letting your dog run

deer or moose and provides that a State Game

Warden or other law enforcement officers

may shoot a dog that is running deer. In addition,

a dog owner may be fined up to $200 for

allowing his or her dog to run deer.

“Dogs will instinctively chase and kill deer

and usually once they start, they will continue

doing so, especially in winters with much

snow,” said Chief Game Warden Col. Jason

Batchelder. “In almost all cases, these are

wonderful family pets and their owners cannot

comprehend that their dog would kill a

deer.”

Deer survive during the winter by browsing

on low-growing hardwood and softwood

vegetation, which has little nutrition compared

to the lush vegetation they can eat during

the rest of the year. Their energy reserves

are at their lowest, leaving them vulnerable to

starvation, especially if they are chased by

dogs.

“We are issuing this reminder to make dog

owners aware of the law and to urge them to

keep their dogs under control so they won’t

chase deer,” added Batchelder. “We responded

to about 60 incidents of dogs chasing deer

during each of the last five years.”


Pet Poisons That May Be

Lurking in Your Home

One of the best things prospective pet owners

can do before welcoming new pets into

their families is to conduct a poison audit

throughout their homes. Pets are often vulnerable to

common household items that may not pose a threat

to adults. That’s especially true for curious pets anxious to explore

their new surroundings.

The Pet Poison Helpline, a licensed animal poison control

center dedicated to preventing poison-related injuries,

illnesses and fatalities to pets, offers this room-by-room

breakdown to help existing and potential pet owners find

items around the house that could pose a threat to their furry

friends.

ATTICS AND

BASEMENTS

• Mothballs

• Rodenticides

• Insecticides

• Paint

BATHROOMS

• Medications, including

prescription drugs and overthe-counter

drugs

• Caffeine pills

• Drain and toilet cleaners

• Ammonia

• Bleach

• Inhalers

• Lime and rust removers

• Cough drops

GARAGES AND

GARDEN SHEDS

• Automotive uids,

including antifreeze,

windshield washer uid,

motor oil, and gasoline

• Ice melt products

• Lawn and garden products,

including weed killer,

grub and snail bait and

rodenticides

• Paint

• Glue

• Mothballs

• Fertilizers

• Bone, blood and feather

meal

• Plants

• Insecticides

• Compost

• • •

KITCHEN

• Chocolate

• Macadamia nuts

• Grapes, raisins and currants

• Onions, garlic and chives

• Caffeinated products, such

as coffee and tea

• Chicken bones

• Fatty scraps

• Unbaked yeast bread

dough

• Alcohol

• Table salt

• Kitchen cleaning products

Various products around

the house can pose a threat

to the health of pets. Make

products as inaccessible

to curious pets as possible

by keeping them locked

away when not in use. More

information about protecting

pets is available at www.

petpoisonhelpline.com.

LAUNDRY ROOMS

• Fabric softener

• Bleach

• Detergents, including

detergent pods

• Dryer sheets

LIVING ROOM

• Plants

• Liquid potpourri

• Devices, including

smartphones

• Batteries, such as those

inside remote controls

Helping Injured or Abandoned

Pets and Wildlife

WILD ANIMALS

Animals that are stressed or injured can become defensive

and aggressive. Even if you are intending to help them, the

animal may not understand this. As a result, it’s always best

to seek the advice and assistance of a professional wildlife/

animal control organization before approaching or touching

a wild animal. Professional wildlife rehabbers understand

what various species of animals need, what is appropriate

behavior and how they can be assisted and returned to their

natural environments as soon as possible. Even well-meaning

individuals without such knowledge may end up doing more

harm than good.

Veterinarians also may be able to house and stabilize an

injured or sick wild animal for a small period of time before

it can be transferred to a proper facility.

It can be challenging to determine whether baby animals

have been abandoned or they are lost and need help. Visit

www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/injured_orphaned_wildlife.html

to learn more about helping baby

animals.

STRAY OR INJURED PETS

Always put your safety first when approaching a lost or

injured pet. Again, even docile pets may act out of sorts if in

pain or frightened. If the pet acts or even looks threatening,

do not approach it and animal control instead. Otherwise,

exercise caution and approach the animal slowly while

speaking in a reassuring tone.

Some people take animals home before attempting to find

their owners, while others drive directly to a local animal

shelter or veterinarian. Either option can work if the authorities

are notified promptly.

The Red Bank Veterinary Hospital says lost animals have a

greater chance of being reunited with their owners if they are

kept in the county in which they were found. Always contact

your local police department and animal control officer if

you find a lost or injured pet. Also, spread the word on social

media if you think that might be effective.

Helping animals in need is rewarding, but it must be done

safely and smartly.

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How to Make the Post-Maternity Leave

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The average length of maternity leave varies depending on

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their babies at daycare, with a nanny or with • Take the full leave. A 2013 study published

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online in the Journal of Health Politics,

women also face the task of diving back Policy and Law found a direct link between

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of postpartum depression. Researchers folficult,

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arrangement permanent or temporary, explaining

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Vermont Launches Infants

in The Workplace Program

Governor Phil Scott, Secretary of

Administration Susanne Young and

Human Resources Commissioner

Beth Fastiggi announced an

“Infants in the Workplace” program

for state employees. The policy will

allow a state employee the option to

bring their infant children up to the

age of six months to work. The

program launched on Friday,

February 1.

The program is available to State

employees who are parents or legal

guardians to infants between the ages of six weeks and six

months. Eligible parents must apply to participate and receive

approval from their supervisor and the Commissioners of

Human Resources and Buildings and General Services, to

insure the work site is appropriate and all safety and health

measures are in place.

“In conjunction with my proposed bi-state voluntary paid

family leave program, this initiative can provide working

families with options to give their kids the healthiest possible

start to life while allowing them to remain in the workforce if

they choose to,” said Governor Phil Scott. “I want to thank

Secretary Young and Commissioner Fastiggi for their work to

provide this opportunity for state employees. This is important,

as we work to retain and recruit talented employees for

the State.”

“We’re excited to make this available for our employees,”

said Secretary Young. “As we’ve learned from other states

and private employers who have adopted similar policies, this

can result in increased employee retention, boosted morale,

increased teamwork and greater capacity among participating

parents.”

“Research shows that allowing parents to remain with their

infants in the earliest stage of life supports critical bonding,

healthy infant brain development, and parental well-being,”

said Commissioner Fastiggi. “This program promotes these

benefits, while allowing employees to remain engaged in their

work, save on child care costs, and increase their job satisfaction

and positive work-life balance.”

To ensure the health and well-being of infants, parents and

all employees, there are safety measures in place, including

safety checks of parents’ work spaces, proper health procedures,

designating a “care provider” who can assist if needed,

and more.

The Agencies of Administration, Agriculture, Digital

Services, Education, Natural Resources and Transportation

and the Department of Labor will be the first to adopt the

program, while other State agencies and departments are

encouraged to opt in.

To view more on the new policy, visit https://humanresources.vermont.gov/labor-relations/labor-relations-policies/

infants-work.

• • •

Governors Phil Scott and

Chris Sununu Take Next Step

in Support of Their Twin

State Voluntary Leave Plan

Last week, the Vermont Department of Human Resources

and the New Hampshire Department of Insurance issued coordinated

Requests for Information (RFI) in connection with

Governor Phil Scott’s and Governor Chris Sununu’s proposed

Twin State Voluntary Leave Plan.

The Governors’ plan proposes incentivizing the development

of an insurance product for paid family and medical

leave that is not currently offered in either state. To launch the

initiative, each state would cover the full costs of providing

Family and Medical Leave Insurance (FMLI) coverage to its

state employees through an insurance carrier.

Combined, this represents 18,500 Vermont and New

Hampshire state employees to anchor this public-private partnership,

diversify risk and bring down costs. Participation

would also be available to all businesses, as well as individuals,

and is designed to encourage employers to opt-in and

provides more favorable rates for those employers who cover

all employees.

In a joint statement, the Governors said: “Our plan provides

universal access to all employers and citizens of our two

states. By working together and with a private insurer we will

be able to start this program more quickly, effectively and

reliably than if each state government had to start from

scratch.”

The Vermont RFI, issued Tuesday, seeks to receive input

and gather information that would be used to refine enabling

legislation and to develop the Request for Proposals (RFP) to

create and implement the proposed plan.

The RFI solicits responses and information from insurance

carriers and financial professionals regarding rate development,

benefit structure and pricing for state employees,

employers and individuals. The RFI specifically requests pricing

information regarding higher wage replacement for lower

wage earners and progressively pricing individual premiums.

The RFI follows up, and seeks to expand on, introductory

conversations the State of New Hampshire had with a number

of insurance carriers to initially determine the proposal’s viability

and estimate costs.

Questions relating to the RFI are due on February 13 and

final responses are due on February 27. It is not necessary for

insurance carriers interested in bidding on the request for

proposals to participate in the RFI.

For more information, contact Kevin Gaffney, Director at

the Department of Financial Regulation at Kevin.Gaffney@

vermont.gov. To view the Vermont RFI, visit: http://www.bgs.

state.vt.us/pca/bids/pdf/RFI%20FMLI%20FINALdate.pdf.

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The Revenants Bluegrass at the

Music Box, February 9

Bluegrass Gospel Project alums Taylor

Armerding, Andy Greene, and Kirk Lord

have come together to present original, timehonored,

and contemporary Americana music

to venues throughout New England. They

will be bringing their high-energy expertise to

the Music Box in Craftsbury on Saturday,

February 9 at 7:30 PM.

Showcasing compelling, intricately braided

vocals, richly textured instrumental work,

and solid, innovative rhythm, the three band

members bring decades of performing experience

to the stage. Through their many years

of musical collaboration, they speak soulfully

with one voice.

Taylor Amerding has been a member of

Northern Lights, the Bluegrass Gospel Project

and has toured with folk legend Jonathan

Edwards. In addition to the Revenants he is

part of the acoustic supergroup Barnstar with

Bryan Memorial Gallery Presents Eric Tobin

Winter Painting Demonstration

On Saturday, February 9, 1 – 3PM, the

Bryan Memorial Gallery will present an Oil

Painting Demonstration by award-winning

Johnson, VT artist Eric Tobin as part of its

Cabin Fever Series. Tobin will complete a

large format painting from start to finish,

including commentary about composition and

palette, as he works.

There is no charge for this event and

advanced registration is not required. Seating

is first come, first served. Bryan Memorial

Gallery is at 180 Main Street, Jeffersonville,

VT 05464. 802-644-5100, info@bryangallery.org.

www.bryangallery.org. For further

information, contact the gallery.

Auditions for Footloose at Chandler!

“Close to the Cloth,”

a Textile Exhibit at T.W. Wood

The T. W. Wood Gallery at 46 Barre Street

in Montpelier, Vermont, at the Center for Arts

and Learning, is pleased to announce the

opening of “Close to the Cloth”, a textile

exhibit featuring the work of Barbara Bendix,

Karen Henderson, Stephanie Krauss, Skye

Livingston, Kate Ruddle and Neysa Russo.

The Gallery has assembled a varied group of

Vermont fiber artists that showcase a range of

techniques and sensibilities toward textiles.

The work ranges from pieces seated firmly in

traditional craft to conceptual work that uses

fiber as a vehicle, and work that straddles the

• • •

• • •

• • •

his son Jake Armerding.

Andy Greene is a singer, songwriter, multiinstrumentalist,

and one of Vermont’s most

versatile acoustic musicians. Performing with

Up the Creek and Break-away, the Bluegrass

Gospel Project and then forming the Modern

Grass Quintet, and hopped on with Northern

Flyer.

Kirk Lord is a sought-after bassist and a

well-respected member of the New England

bluegrass community. In his early years he

played with rock bands, then went on to join

the Bluegrass Gospel project followed by the

Modern Grass Quintet and Northern Flyer.

Kirk has shared the stage with numerous New

England folk and Americana musicians,

including Patti Casey and Colin McCaffrey.

Find out more at https://revenantsband.com.

For more information call 802-586-7533 or

www.themusicboxcraftsbury.org

Chandler Center for the Arts announces

auditions for their 21st annual summer youth

musical: Footloose! Auditions are scheduled

for Sunday, March 10 for teen lead roles and

Sunday, March 17 for elementary and teen

chorus roles. Performances will be held on

the main stage at Chandler Music Hall in

Randolph on July 4-7. On- and off-stage

opportunities are available to students ages 7

through 18.

Registration forms and audition material

are available on Chandler’s website at www.

chandler-arts.org/youth. Deadline for registration

is March 8 for leads, March 15 for

choruses. Registration and audition fees will

be charged and partial scholarship assistance

is available.

The directing team for this production

includes Kim Nowlan Hathaway as director

and choreographer and Molly Clark as music

director.

When Ren and his mother move from

Chicago to a small farming town, Ren is prepared

for the inevitable adjustment period at

his new high school. What he isn’t prepared

for are the rigorous local edicts, including a

ban on dancing instituted by the local preacher,

determined to exercise the control over the

town’s youth that he cannot command in his

own home. When the reverend’s rebellious

daughter sets her sights on Ren, her roughneck

boyfriend tries to sabotage Ren’s reputation,

with many of the locals eager to believe

the worst about the new kid. The heartfelt

story that emerges is of a father longing for

the son he lost and of a young man aching for

the father who walked out on him. To the

rockin’ rhythm of its Oscar and Tonynominated

top 40 score, Footloose celebrates

the wisdom of listening to young people,

guiding them with a warm heart and an open

mind.

Chandler’s annual musical production

presents plenty of creative opportunities,

including costumes, sets, and more! For

information about auditioning or about helping

out behind the scenes, please contact

Emily Crosby at outreach@chandler-arts.org

or 802-728-9878 extension 3.

For more information about youth offerings

at Chandler, please visit www.chandlerarts.org.

Footloose is presented through special

arrangement with R & H Theatricals:

www.rnh.com.

divide. “Close to the Cloth” will be on view

in the Group Exhibitions Hall.

We invite you to visit the gallery and enjoy

the work of these diverse textile artists!

Opening Reception: Thursday, March 7th,

5:00-7:00 pm. Demo Day: Saturday, March

23rdth, 1-3pm. Gallery hours are Tuesday-

Saturday 12:00-4:00 pm and by appointment.

All shows are free and open to the public. For

More Information, Contact: Ginny Callan,

Executive Director - 802-262-6035. www.

twwoodgallery.org.


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Deborah Feingold with illustration by Ben Warren.

Scrag Mountain Music Presents Musical Storytelling

Scrag Mountain Music’s 2018-19 season continues with a

delightful program of music inspired by popular tales. In

Musical Storytelling for All Ages, Scrag co-Artistic Directors

Evan Premo (double bass) and Mary Bonhag (soprano), will

be joined by the award-winning Aeolus Quartet and acclaimed

Montpelier-based theater artist Kim Bent (narrator) for concerts

that showcase how chamber music can bring our most

memorable storybook fables to life. This program is appropriate

and entertaining all ages 0-100. Concerts are on Saturday,

February 9, 2019 at 10 am (Bread & Butter Farm, 200 Leduc

Farm Rd., Shelburne, VT), Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 4

pm (Lost Nation Theater / City Hall Auditorium Arts Center

39 Main St., Montpelier, VT), and Sunday, February 10, 2019

at 4 pm (Middlebury Community Music Center, 6 Main St.,

Middlebury, VT).

Musical Storytelling for All Ages features four dynamic

pieces of music all inspired by stories. The concert’s centerpiece

presentation, Jon Deak’s The Ugly Duckling (“…a

piece of music both accessible and intelligent, hilarious and

touching, and — best of all — one that appeals to adults,

children and poultry lovers alike. - The Washington Post),

performed by string quartet, double bass, and soprano, takes

the listener on a complex aural journey highlighting the many

sounds, characters, and emotions found within this beloved

Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale. Also included in the program

is James Balentine’s version of the Norwegian folktale

Three Billy Goats Gruff, performed by string quintet and narrator,

which introduces the string family of instruments as the

three billy goats attempt to cross a bridge manned by a hungry

Ballet Vermont Invites Adult Ballet Dancers to

Audition for Fifth Season of Farm to Ballet

Ballet Vermont will host auditions for the upcoming summer

season of Farm to Ballet on February 10, 2019. Now in

its fifth year, this season will feature six performances, all in

the month of July, at picturesque venues throughout Vermont.

The production will be presented in West Corinth, Wolcott,

Brattleboro, Shelburne, Woodstock, and Essex. The 2019

summer season of the Farm to Ballet project will include live

music provided by a sextet of professional musicians.

The Farm to Ballet project was created to celebrate the

unique culture of Vermont farms while promoting a vibrant,

local, and sustainable food system. It also allows audiences to

enjoy the beauty of classical ballet. Artistic Director and

Vermont native Chatch Pregger choreographed the full-length

production to tell the story of a Vermont farm from spring to

fall. All performances take place at working farms, without

the use of a stage. Rather, the dancers are framed by the natural

beauty of Vermont’s landscape, performing on the grass.

The performances also serve as fundraisers to support and

honor the work of local farmers with fifty percent of the

ticket sales donated to the farm venue.

“We are looking for a diverse cast of dancers from adults

that are just beginning to explore ballet classes to more experienced

dancers, or former dancers with previous training,”

said Pregger. The cast is composed of corps members, demisoloists,

soloists, and 2-3 principal dancers. Interested dancers

Contra Dance with

Luke Donforth

Dance to the calling of Luke Donforth with traditional

dance tunes provided by the accomplished duo of Joanne

Garten on fiddle and Brendan Taaffe on guitar. No experience

or partner needed. Luke will lead an an introductory

session at 7:40 and all dances are taught. Everyone

welcome! The dance takes place at the Capital City

Grange Hall, 6612 Rt 12, Berlin, VT just 1 mile south of

Montpelier. Please bring clean, soft-soled shoes.

Admission is $10 adults, $5 kids and low income, $15

dance supporters. Questions? Call Tim Swartz at 802-

225-8921, visit: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/

contradancing, or find us on Facebook: Montpelier

Contra Dance Umbrella. Mark your calendar for every

1st, 3rd, and 5th Saturday year round.

• • •

• • •

troll. Jon Deak’s B.B. Wolf: An Apologia is a humorous and

virtuosic piece for solo double bassist/narrator that makes a

case for re-thinking the much maligned wolf as is so often

portrayed throughout human history and literature. Departing

from the world of fairy tales, the program includes Scrag

Mountain Music co-Artistic Director Evan Premo’s composition

Oday Daywayigun for string quintet inspired by the

Ojibwe creation legend.

Of this Musical Storytelling program, Scrag Mountain

Music co-Artistic Director Mary Bonhag states, “Presenting a

concert programmed with kids in mind has been a dream of

Scrag’s since its inception nine years ago. In addition to the

school and library programs Scrag will present throughout the

week, we are thrilled to offer three public programs that will

be sure to take listeners on an exciting and unexpected musical

journey.”

Musical Storytelling for All Ages will present three concerts

between February 9-10, 2019. All concerts are “Come as

you are. Pay what you can.” with at-will donations collected

at intermission. Securing your seats in advance at www.scragmountainmusic.org

is encouraged as space is limited.

Musical Storytelling for All Ages is supported by the

Vermont Arts Council and the National Endowment for the

Arts, the National Life Group Foundation, The Seaver Fund,

The Green Mountain Fund of the Vermont Community

Foundation, and Ben & Jerry’s Foundation. Musical

Storytelling for All Ages is co-presented together with venue

partners Bread & Butter Farm, Lost Nation Theater, and

Middlebury Community Music Center.

can request an informational packet that details the benefits,

commitment, and schedule required to participate in this summer’s

performances. “Ballet Vermont is a body positive company

and we believe that all bodies are capable of being

flexible and strong,” said Pregger. “Our company is a mix of

dancers who have danced for one year while some trained

professionally,” he explained. Casting for the production is

designed to highlight each dancers technique and skill level.

Performing in Farm to Ballet offers dancers of all skill

levels the unique opportunity to travel around the state, fine

tune their skills in ballet classes, make friends, dance outside,

and support sustainable agriculture in Vermont.

The audition is on February 10, 11 a.m.-1p.m. at Spotlight

Vermont, San Remo Drive, South Burlington, Vermont.

In-person auditions are preferred, but out-of-state dancers can

submit video samples for consideration.

Ballet Vermont aims to bring high quality ballet to all corners

of Vermont while using art to highlight social issues

important to the community. The company also provides a

path for dancers and musicians to collaborate and bring

Vermont based original works to life.

Registration for the audition is available online at balletvermont.org.

You can also follow the company on Facebook and

Instagram.

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NYT Bestselling Author and Historian Alex Kershaw to Give

Norwich University’s 2019 Bicentennial Commencement Address

Norwich University is honored to

announce that New York Times bestselling

author and historian Alex

Kershaw, who penned “Citizens &

Soldiers: The First 200 Years of

Norwich University,” will give the

commencement address to the Class of

2019 in Norwich’s bicentennial year.

A graduate of Oxford University,

Kershaw is the author of 10 books,

including the New York Times best-sellers “The Bedford

Boys,” “The Longest Winter” and “Avenue of Spies,” and

biographies of Jack London, Raoul Wallenberg and Robert

Capa. It was recently announced that Kershaw’s book, “The

Liberator,” will be made into a four-part animated WWII

drama series for Netflix. An honorary colonel in the 116th

Infantry Regiment of the 29th Division of the Virginia Army

National Guard, Kershaw said he was drawn to the unique

story of Norwich University shaped by its people and many

‘firsts.’

In honor of the university’s bicentennial in 2019, Norwich

University recently released “Citizens & Soldiers: The First

200 Years of Norwich University.” The book chronicles the

history and legacy of the nation’s oldest private military college

and birthplace of ROTC and the alumni who have

defined American and world history over the past 200 years.

Drawing upon Norwich University’s extensive archives and

museum collection, Kershaw spent two years researching and

writing the book. Kershaw’s compelling narrative style is

interwoven with photos, maps, illustrations, and timelines.

Norwich University’s 2019 Commencement ceremony will

begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 11. Kershaw will receive an

honorary Doctor of Military History before addressing

approximately 400 students graduating from 32 undergraduate

programs and one master’s program. The ceremony, which

is free and open to the public, will be held in Shapiro Field

House. General seating for the public is available on a firstcome,

first-served basis. Doors to Shapiro Field House open

at noon. To see the entire schedule for the weekend, please go

here: Norwich.edu/commencement.

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Zuckerman Named as Leader of Nation’s Lieutenant Governor Association

• • •

Lt. Governor

Zuckerman was

appointed to the leadership

committee for

the National Lieutenant

Governors Association

(NLGA). NLGA is the

nonpartisan, professional

association supporting

lieutenant governors and the officeholders first in line

of succession to Governor in all 50 states and the U.S. territories

in the goal of being as effective and as efficient as possible

for constituents.

Lt. Governor Zuckerman is serving as East Region-at-

Large (D) member of the NLGA Executive Committee.

“David’s peers find Lt. Governor Zuckerman to be an

engaged leader who works across party and state and territorial

lines to develop and share ideas from citizen engagement

to addressing the climate crisis to developing rural and agricultural

economies,” said NLGA Director Julia Hurst.

“It is a great honor to be appointed to the leadership committee,”

said Zuckerman. He continued, “I look forward to

working with my colleagues on issues affecting economic

disparities and civic engagement. The success of our states

and nation depend on our ability to ensure civil discourse

between those holding different viewpoints on a wide range

of issues. When we work together, we better our ability to find

solutions that improve people’s lives.”

Lt. Governor Zuckerman was appointed by the NLGA

Chair and begins service immediately. He will be ratified by

a vote in March of 2019 serving then until July 19, 2019, at

which time he is eligible for re-appointment.

The committee meets about three times a year and is

responsible for charting the course of issues and training to be

pursued by the nation’s second-highest state officeholders. In

addition to its specific duties, the committee will also address

issues of mutual concern to all states and territories.

Lt. Governor Zuckerman was first elected to public office

in 1996. He served for 14 years in the Vermont House, including

as Chair of the Agriculture Committee, and for four years

in the Vermont Senate before being elected Vermont’s Lt.

Governor in 2016.

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VT State Housing Authority

Announces Additions to the Staff

The Vermont State Housing Authority announces the following

recent additions to the staff: Andrea Hurley, Continuum

of Care (CoC) Support Specialist and Gloria Lastres, Intake/

Client Services Specialist. Created in 1968, VSHA celebrates

more than 50 years of service and assists approximately 8,500

families statewide and provides housing opportunities for

very-low and low-income Vermont families www.vsha.org.

• • •

• • •

Answers to this week’s

UNRAVEL THE TRAVEL

1. Arizona .. 1912

2. San Marino .. 1/10th the size of New York City,

the Republic of San Marino is the world’s oldest

surviving Republic

3. Hawaii .. it spans a total of 1500 miles!

KAKURO

FEAR KNOT

SUPER CROSSWORD

page 10 The WORLD February 6, 2019

Rebecca Dominguez

Sarah Gould

Karen LaBree

Diana Duke

VTAIP Announces New Members

The Vermont Association of Insurance Professionals is

pleased to announce that Rebecca Dominguez, Karen LaBree,

Sarah Gould, from Vermont Mutual Insurance Group, and

Diana Duke from New England Excess Exchange of Barre,

have become the newest members of the VTAIP.

Membership in VTAIP is an industry commitment to the

insurance community through leadership development, career

enhancement and creating relationships with other industry

related connections.

The VTAIP meets monthly and encourages outside community

members to join us at our dinner meetings to connect

and network with insurance related professionals.

Please join us in congratulating Rebecca, Karen & Sarah for

investing in their insurance careers.

For information about the VTAIP please contact President

Tammy Lawrey at 802-229-5660 ext 110.

Northfield Savings Bank Announces

Promotion of Maryellen LaPerle to

Vice President, Mortgage Banking

Northfield Savings Bank (NSB) is pleased to announce the

recent promotion of Maryellen LaPerle to Vice President,

Mortgage Banking. An NSB veteran of 19 years, LaPerle will

oversee the Bank’s dedicated team of Mortgage Banking

Officers while continuing to work with customers in the

Central Vermont community. LaPerle is based out of NSB’s

Montpelier office.

LaPerle possesses more than 30 years of banking experience.

She worked as a teller while earning her bachelor’s

degree from the University of Vermont before honing her

banking skills in customer service, branch management and

consumer lending. LaPerle joined NSB in 2000 as a Mortgage

Banking Officer and has served the Central Vermont region

ever since. LaPerle is also a graduate of the Northern New

England School of Banking.

In the community, LaPerle is a commissioner for Barre

Housing Authority; a volunteer for Home, Health and Hospice;

serves on the education committee for Vermont Mortgage

Bankers Association; and volunteers for Meals on Wheels.

She resides in Barre town with her husband, Andy, and has

two daughters.

“With her experience and expertise, Maryellen has been an

indispensable member of Northfield Savings Bank for 19

years. We are proud to have her serving at the helm of our

Mortgage Banking Team and we congratulate her on her new

role,” said Cheryl LaFrance, Senior Vice President and Chief

Operating Officer at Northfield Savings Bank.


VT Students Selected for US Senate Youth Program Headed to

D. C. to Receive $10,000 College Scholarship

The United States Senate

Youth Program (USSYP)

announces that high school

students Mr. John Edward

Fannon and Ms. Lia Rubel

will join Senator Patrick

Leahy and Senator Bernard

Sanders in representing

Vermont in the nation’s capital

during the 57th annual

USSYP Washington Week,

to be held March 2 — 9,

2019. John Fannon of Saint

Johnsbury and Lia Rubel of

Lia Rubel

Barre were selected from

among the state’s top student leaders to be part of the 104

national student delegation who will also each receive a

$10,000 college scholarship for undergraduate study.

The USSYP was created by Senate Resolution 324 in 1962

and has been sponsored by the Senate and fully funded by The

Hearst Foundations since inception. Originally proposed by

Senators Kuchel, Mansfield, Dirksen and Humphrey, the

impetus for the program as stated in Senate testimony is “to

increase young Americans’ understanding of the interrelationships

of the three branches of government, learn the caliber

and responsibilities of federally elected and appointed officials,

and emphasize the vital importance of democratic decision

making not only for America but for people around the

world.”

Each year this extremely competitive merit-based program

brings the most outstanding high school students - two from

each state, the District of Columbia and the Department of

Defense Education Activity - to Washington, D.C. for an

intensive week-long study of the federal government and the

people who lead it. The overall mission of the program is to

help instill within each class of USSYP student delegates

more profound knowledge of the American political process

and a lifelong commitment to public service. In addition to

the program week, The Hearst Foundations provide each student

with a $10,000 undergraduate college scholarship with

encouragement to continue coursework in government, history

and public affairs. Transportation and all expenses for

Washington Week are also provided by The Hearst

Foundations; as stipulated in S.Res.324, no government funds

are utilized.

John “Jack” Fannon, a senior at St. Johnsbury Academy,

serves as the vice president of his Class Council, and as a

Student Government representative. He was Green Mountain

Boys State attorney general and a Boys Nation senator. Jack

has spent a semester in Washington, D.C. as a United States

Senate page, and enjoys Nordic skiing and reading. He also

participates in the Colwell Scholars Program, Scholars Bowl,

and the Model UN program at his school.

Lia Rubel, a senior at Spaulding High School, serves as the

Senior Class treasurer. She is the founder and leader of the

Student Outreach Committee, which promotes communication

between the student body and administration, and is a

student representative on the Barre Education Coalition

Committee and a member of Spaulding’s Action for the

Environment (SAFE) organization. In addition, she is a captain

of the varsity field hockey and lacrosse teams. Prior to

attending Spaulding, Lia served as a legislative page in the

Vermont State House.

Chosen as alternates to the 2019 program were Ms. Greta

Solsaa, a resident of Rutland, who attends Rutland High

School and Ms. MiKayla Lee Powell, a resident of Enosburg

Falls, who attends Enosburg Falls High School.

Delegates and alternates are selected by the state departments

of education nationwide and the District of Columbia

and Department of Defense Education Activity, after nomination

by teachers and principals. The chief state school officer

for each jurisdiction confirms the final selection. This year’s

Vermont delegates and alternates were designated by Mr. Dan

French, Secretary of Education.

While in Washington the student delegates attend meetings

and briefings with senators, members of the House of

Representatives, Congressional staff, the president, a justice

of the Supreme Court, leaders of cabinet agencies, an ambassador

to the United States and senior members of the national

media. The students will also tour many of the national

monuments and several museums and they will stay at the

historic Mayflower Hotel in downtown Washington, D.C.

In addition to outstanding leadership abilities and a strong

commitment to volunteer work, the student delegates rank

academically in the top one percent of their states among high

school juniors and seniors. Now more than 5,700 strong,

alumni of the program continue to excel and develop impressive

qualities that are often directed toward public service.

Among the many distinguished alumni are: Senator Susan

Collins, the first alumnus to be elected U.S. senator; Senator

Cory Gardner, the second alumnus to be elected U.S. senator

and the first to be elected to the U.S. House of Representatives;

former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, the first alumnus

to be elected governor; former Chief Judge Robert Henry,

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit; former

Ambassador to West Germany Richard Burt, and former

presidential advisors Thomas “Mack” McLarty and Karl

Rove. Additional notables include former Lt. Governor of

Idaho David Leroy, Provost of Wake Forest University Rogan

Kersh, military officers, members of state legislatures,

Foreign Service officers, top congressional staff, healthcare

providers and other university educators.

Members of the bipartisan U. S. Senate Youth Program

2019 Senate Advisory Committee: Senator Joni K. Ernst of

Iowa, Republican Co-Chair; Senator Richard Blumenthal of

Connecticut, Democratic Co- Chair; Advisory Members:

Susan M. Collins (R-ME), Steve Daines (R-MT), Cindy Hyde-

Smith (R-MS), John Kennedy (R-LA), Michael F. Bennet

(D-CO), Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV), Maggie Hassan

(D-NH), Chris Van Hollen (D-MD). Each year, the Honorary

Co-Chairs of the program are the vice president of the United

States and the Senate majority and minority leaders. For more

information please visit: www.ussenateyouth.org.

Vermont Agency of

Education Awards

30 Presidential Scholar

Nominees

The Vermont Agency of Education today recognized the

state’s 2019 Presidential Scholar nominees in a ceremony at

the Vermont Statehouse.

The Vermont Presidential Scholars Program recognizes

graduating high school seniors who show outstanding scholarship,

leadership and service to their communities. Twenty

scholars are nominated in the general category, and five scholars

are nominated in the Career Technical Education (CTE)

category. For the first time this year, Vermont will award five

scholars in the Arts.

Vermont scholars for the general and CTE categories will

be invited to apply to the U.S. Presidential Scholars Program,

which will announce its winners in May 2019. Additional

Vermont students may be chosen to apply by the U.S.

Department of Education based on ACT and SAT scores. Each

year, up to 161 students are named as national Presidential

Scholars – one of the highest honors for high school students.

During this pilot year, the Vermont student artists will not

automatically be sent on the national pool through YoungArts.

Arts scholars will have the opportunity to participate in the

national Presidential Scholars program beginning in 2020.

“Vermont’s presidential nominees exemplify the strengths

of Vermont’s education system, one of the best in the nation,”

said Secretary of Education Dan French. “Our students have

excelled in science, math, history and the arts, and a diverse

range of CTE programs. I am very proud of their excellence

and hard work and I wish them the best as they represent our

state at the national level for this award.”

The U.S. Presidential Scholars Program was established in

1964, by executive order of the President, to recognize and

honor some of our nation’s most distinguished graduating

high school seniors. In 1979, the program was extended to

recognize students who demonstrate exceptional talent in the

visual, creative and performing arts. In 2015, the program was

again extended to recognize students who demonstrate ability

and accomplishment in career and technical education fields.

Learn more about the Presidential Scholars Program on the

U.S. Department of Education. Connect with the Vermont

Agency of Education on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

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CAN SELL TODAY!

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403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

• • •

Communit

Communit

Forum Announcement

Eleven Community Kitchen Academy students graduated from the 12-week workforce training program on January 31, 2019 at a ceremony

held in the Old Labor Hall in Barre. The guest speakers included Bob Hildebrand of the Abbey Group, Katarina Lisaius of Senator

Bernie Sanders office, Sue Minter of apstone ommunity Action, and on Sayles of te ermont Foodan.

Re-Visioning

Career & Technical Education in Central Vermont

Hosted by the Central Vermont Career Center

Forum Announcement

WANTED: Your input and thoughts on the future needs of career & technical education,

access/school scheduling, workforce needs, and work-based learning opportunities.

Re-Visioning

Career & Technical Education in Central Vermont

Hosted by the Central Vermont Career Center

WANTED: Your input and thoughts on the future needs of career & technical education,

access/school scheduling, workforce needs, and work-based learning opportunities.

Barre City area: Aldrich Public Library, Milne Room .................................................Tuesday, February 5

Barre Town area: Barre Town Municipal Offices, Conference Room #1 .............. Wednesday, February 6

Montpelier area: Montpelier City Hall, Memorial Room .........................................Monday, February 11

All meetings 6-7 pm • Refreshments provided • All meetings open to all communities

Education that works.

www.cvtcc.org

The Central Vermont Career Center does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, religion, disability, sexual

orientation, gender identity, & marital status in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs & activities.

All meetings 6-7 pm • Refreshments provided • All meetings open to all communities

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 11

Education that works.


Corey Allen Rico

Corey Allen Rico, 36, died at his grandparents’ home in

Berlin, Vermont, on January 23, 2019. Corey lived in Littleton,

Massachusetts as a young child. When Corey was three years

old the Ricos moved to Berlin.

He was a friend to many, always ready to listen to problems,

offer advice and assistance. He loved animals, enjoyed feeding

herons visiting the back pond. He loved to cook and was a

great, creative chef.

His passing, though unexpected, followed a series of health

problems and hospitalizations over the past few years.

A family and friends gathering is planned for spring. He is

survived by his mother Jennifer (Rico) Spooner, father James

Whitcomb, grandparents Paul and Judy Rico, uncles Dan

Rico, Jeffrey Rico, great uncle, Peter Van Keuren, great aunts

Luise van Keuren, Linda Wigmore, and many cousins and

second cousins.

Donations in Corey’s honor may be made to the Central

Vermont Humane Society, 1589 VT-14, East Montpelier, VT

05651

***

CATHERINE ANNE ALLARD, 60, died January 22, 2019.

She was born in Northfield on September 4, 1958, the daughter

of Jerry Lynne Wall. She was a graduate of Theodore

Roosevelt High School in San Antonio, TX, and later continued

her studies at CCV and San Antonio College. She married

William Allard and had two wonderful children, Jennifer and

Drew. Cathy was a senior mortgage underwriter for many

years for the Northfield Savings Bank. Cathy loved music,

was known for her “wicked” sense of humor, enjoyed spending

weeks at the beach, and spending time with her family.

Cathy was unique and special in many ways. She is survived

by her husband, Bill Allard, of Northfield; two loving children

Jennifer Titus-Lowe, of Essex, Drew Allard, of Northfield; a

grandson, Dylan; her sister, Sara Steele, of Topeka, KS; a

brother, David Therrien, of Alstead, NH; step-siblings Mary

Katherine, Paige, Ruth Perkinson, all of VA; special uncle,

John Wall, of Atkinson, NH; several nieces, nephews and

many cousins.

WILLIAM JOHN APFEL, 76, died on January 27, 2019.

Born December 2, 1942, in Alba, MI, he was the son of John

and Geraldine (VanSice) Apfel. He married his college sweetheart,

Claudia Grace Jackson, in March of 1965 in Detroit.

They celebrated their 53rd Anniversary in 2018. Bill attended

Bellaire Public Schools. Following college, he and Claudia

started a family, and Bill worked in his family’s commercial

construction company, Chain of Lakes Construction. He was

called into the ministry in 1975. Faith Tech Bible College with

his wife and family. He graduated with a degree in Bible and

Theology. Bill faithfully served four parishes as a pastor. His

final parish was New Life Worship Center in Barre, for 26

years. Bill is survived by his beloved wife, Claudia Grace

Apfel (nee Jackson); his children Jeffrey Alan Apfel and wife

Bridgett, John Apfel, Debby Gallo and husband Rudy; along

with six grandsons; step-granddaughter; and two foster children,

whom he loved like his own, Dennis Clark and Zecor

Margolin Berger. Bill is also survived by two sisters Linda

Lou Dean, of Bellaire, MI, and Patricia Ann Melde, of

Scottsdale, AZ. He leaves behind many nieces and nephews; a

daughter-in-love, Karen Laprade, and a son-in-love, John

Krupa.

JOHN S. BAILEY, 89, died on

December 31, 2018, in Athens,

Greece. Dr. Bailey was born in Chicago, the son

of an educator mother and a businessman father.

He earned his undergraduate degree from Boston

University and his MBA from Northeastern

University. Upon his graduation, he served as a

Combat Infantry Officer in the Korean War and subsequently

was awarded the U.S. Legion of Merit, Bronze Star for Valor,

and Combat Infantryman Badge, the French Croix de Guerre

and the Korean Military Service Medal. During the Berlin

Crisis, he was called to serve in the Pentagon for a year. He

went on to a career in the U.S. Army Reserves, retiring with

the rank of Colonel. His professional educational career

started at Northeastern University when, in 1959, President

Asa Knowles appointed him his assistant. With Knowles as

his mentor, Bailey served in several executive positions before

assuming the deanship of University College, Northeastern’s

largest division. In 1975, Bailey took over the presidency of

Pierce College and Deree College in Athens, Greece, which he

later placed under the umbrella name “The American College

of Greece.” During one highlight of Dr. Bailey’s presidency,

the college hosted the U.S. Olympic Team for the Olympic

Games of 2004. He founded the “Institute of Global Affairs”

PRUNEAU-POLLI

FUNERAL HOME

Serving All Faiths

Family Owned & Operated

58 Summer Street • Barre, Vermont

802-476-4621

Proud Member

National Funeral Directors

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page 12 The WORLD February 6, 2019

and instituted the “Venizelos Chair” to honour the great statesman

Eleftherios Venizelos. Dr. Bailey’s career was notable for

his dedication to creating opportunities for exceptional education.

In the early-1960s, Dr. Bailey purchased a property in

Elmore, VT, raising his family there in the summers. For the

rest of his life, he spent part of every year looking out to the

mountains on his beloved “farm.” He is survived by his

daughter, Laurel Gould, of Montpelier, VT; and his second

wife, Irene Korre-Bailey, of Athens, Greece, and their children

Alexander, Philip and Oliver.

MAURICE S. DAVIS, 93, passed away on

January 27, 2019. Born in Montpelier on January

8, 1926, he was the son of the late Clayton and

Jennie (Riggs) Davis. On June 5, 1954, he married

the former Mary A. Dibbell in Waterbury

Center. Mary predeceased Maurice in 1999.

Maurice was a 1944 graduate of Waterbury

High School and worked on the family dairy farm throughout

his life, retiring in 2006. His memberships included the

Waterbury Area Senior Citizens, the Farm Bureau and the

Waterbury Center Community Church. He enjoyed traveling

back roads, a good book and doing a variety of puzzles.

Maurice is survived by his sons Mark Davis and wife

Maureen, of Waterbury, Stephen Davis, of Middlesex; seven

grandchildren and four great-grandchildren; a sister, Janet

Ferguson, of Winooski; and his loving companion, Lorna

Payne, of Berlin.

BARBARA LOUISE GOULD, 80, passed away on January

25, 2019. Born and raised in Landaff, NH, Barbara was the

daughter of George and Ethel (Bronson) Clement. She began

her nursing career at the former Barre City Hospital. It was

here that she met her husband, George Gould. Barbara and

George wed on October 8, 1960 and had two children,

Elizabeth and Jeffrey, who they raised on 15 Division Street

in Barre. Barbara was predeceased by her husband of 50

years, George Gould, in May of 2011. She worked as a nurse

for many years at the Barre City Hospital, as well as what is

now the Central Vermont Medical Center. Barbara will be

deeply missed by those she leaves behind. Her son Jeffrey

Gould and his wife, Beth Soucy Gould of Barre, and Jeff’s

son Devin Gould; her daughter, Elizabeth Morris and her

husband, Norman Morris of Amesbury, MA and their four

children; Kate Bernardoni and her husband, Jeff; Alexander

Morris and his husband, Jeremy, John Morris, and Wesley

Morris, along with her sister Ann Clement and close friend,

Joyce Read; her brother, David Clement and his wife, Gayle;

and David’s sons Kevin and Tom Clement; her husband’s

sister Joan and her husband, Paul Bagalio and several nieces

and nephews.

WINIFRED L. (FAVREAU) HARRINGTON,

92, passed away on January 22, 2019. Winnie

was born on May 28, 1926, in Waterbury, CT.

She moved with her parents Clarence and

Marjorie (Beecher) Favreau, and sister, Florence,

to West Townshend, VT, where her father ran a

printing business, the West River Printing Co.

Winnie graduated from Leland and Gray Seminary in 1944

and attended UVM. She later returned to UVM’s School of

Cytotechnology in 1975 and subsequently worked as a cytotechnologist

at Central VT Hospital. Her first marriage in

1946 was to Richard “Dick” Cobb. They lived first in the

Burlington area and subsequently in Montpelier. With Dick,

she had three children Steven (& Molly), of Terrace Park, OH,

Brian (& Nancy), of Fort Collins, CO, and Debbie (& Harvey)

Katz, of Marietta, GA. Besides her three children, she is survived

by nine grandchildren, including Elias (CO), Nathaniel

(CA), Ellie (CO), Darren (CO), Alex (OH), Martin (GA),

Brent (GA), KariLeigh (GA) and David (GA); and many

great-grandchildren. She married Robert “Bob” Harrington in

1979, and became good friends with his children Paul, Robert,

Ann (deceased) and Harriet. Until 2009, Winnie was a lifelong

resident of VT other than brief stints in AZ and FL with

Bob. While a resident of her beloved VT, she liked nothing

better than to browse in antique book shops and collected

hundreds of histories, biographies, geography and travel

books, atlases and other nonfiction. And she read everything

she collected. When she passed, she was reading books on

historical China and the “Hidden History of Vermont,” and a

book by environmentalist Wendell Berry. Winnie also loved

nature and loved walking and finding nature’s surprises.

WILLIAM WELTON THOMAS JOHNSON, 80, passed

away on January 20, 2019. He made light of his names, often

telling folks that his mother did not know what to name him,

so she gave him four. He was also known as Weechie, Whitey,

Bill and Uncle. It even showed up with his signature. One day

he might sign as Welton Johnson, another day as William, or

even as W. Welton Johnson for variety. “We don’t have any

have records for a William Johnson,” medical personnel

would exclaim with obvious concern. “Do you have records

for a Welton Johnson,” we would ask. And so it went. Born on

October 12, 1938, in West Fairlee, he was the son of William

T. and Alice M. (Tilden) Johnson. He grew up in Fairlee. He

was the undisputed sleep-walking champion of Orange

County. A lover of airplanes, he aspired to join the U.S. Air

Force after graduating from Bradford Academy in 1959.

Unfortunately, the Air Force did not take sleepwalkers and

those with flat feet. Bill took a job working as a custodian at

Dartmouth College for a dozen or so years before attending

the National School of Meat Cutting in Toledo, OH. After

schooling, he worked as a meat cutter at Gould’s Market in

Piermont, NH, before doing same at Mehuron’s Market in

Waitsfield. He became the store’s meat dept. manager in 1995

and served in that position until he retired in 2003. He was

known as a very hard and excellent worker at Mehuron’s.

Customers and co-workers loved him. He also worked as a

custodian at Fayston Elementary and Moretown Elementary.

Bill enjoyed the outdoors immensely. He loved to chase those

deer, but he was not very successful primarily, we think,

because he really did not want to kill them. Fly fishing was his

real passion. Bill loved cats. Bill developed a powerful friendship

with Bill and Becky Robinson of Warren. Bill and

Becky’s love, support and loyalty to Bill was like none other.

That friendship and love, as well as the love and support from

his family, helped Bill die a happy man.

LUCILLE G. MEYER, 99, passed away on January 19,

2019. Lucille was born in Quincy, MA, on November 5, 1919,

to Ruth and Clarence Pitkin. In 1921, her family moved to

Randolph, VT. In 1938, Lucille graduated from Randolph

High School and moved to Quincy to live with her mother.

Lucy entered Burdett College to study business. She graduated

in 1941 and was hired as a stenographic secretary. Lucy

met her husband, Gilbert A. Meyer and they were married on

November 9, 1944. They had four children: Linda R. Meyer,

Ph.D., Grace A. Meyer, a graphic artist, and John A. Meyer,

an auto-body repair specialist. Their son, Alan F. Meyer, had

severe disabilities and survived until the age of 15 due to the

loving care of his parents. Lucille wrote The Mother’s Creed

which provided parents of special needs children with common

sense advice. The Mother’s Creed was printed in over a

dozen languages. In 1965, Lucille returned to the workforce.

She held positions in several companies as an executive secretary

before becoming an account manager. Lucille and

Gilbert both retired in 1980. They moved to East Orange, VT,

where they bought an old farmhouse. For the next 25 years,

they enjoyed country life

JOSEPH J. “JOE” RITZO, 67, passed away on January 28,

2019. Born September 26, 1951, in Norwalk CT, he was the

son of Joseph J. and Agnes (Magyar) Ritzo Sr. Joe graduated

from Central Catholic High School in 1969 in Norwalk. He

then went on to attend Villanova University in PA where he

earned his bachelor’s degrees in History and Education. In

1975, he received his master’s in History from the University

of Rhode Island. On August 18, 1974, he married Marie

Altavilla in Bridgeport, CT. They then made their home in VT.

Joe was a social studies teacher at Stowe High School for 39

years before his retirement. He was a member of St. Monica

Catholic Church. Joe enjoyed reading, baking, traveling,

model trains, coin collecting, hiking and playing sudoku. He

relished deep discussions but, most of all, loved being with his

family, sharing laughter, and long stories. Survivors include

his wife, Marie Ritzo, of Barre; his son, Charles Ritzo and

wife Deanna; his daughter, Elizabeth Ritzo; his grandson-tobe,

Samuel Joseph Ritzo; his sister, Agnes Peterson; and

multiple nieces and nephews.

BONNIE P. STEARNS, 71, passed away on January 24,

2019. Born January 5, 1948, in Burlington, she was the

daughter of Norman R. and Dorothy (Simonds) Stearns.

Bonnie graduated from Middlebury Union High School. She

then went to Brown University where she earned her Bachelor

of Arts degree. Bonnie took great pride in being a homemaker.

She was a member of the Websterville Baptist Church and a

Vermont Disabilities Council Board member. Throughout her

life, she was involved in counseling service events and peer

support programs. Bonnie loved all things cats, music and

clocks. She especially loved spending time with friends,

including her best friend, Cecile Gendron, and enjoyed cooking

her delicacies with family and friends, especially her

famous fudge. Survivors include her sister, Virginia “Ginny”

Stearns Ashenselter and husband James, of Bristol, and several

cousins.

AUDREY CLAIRE LANDRY WEBSTER, passed away on

January 22, 2019. Born on March 5, 1929, in Milford, MA,

she was the daughter of Wallace “Sam” and Ivis (Hood)

Landry. Audrey met the love of her life, Reginald Webster,

and they were married three years later in 1947. They spent

their early years together in West Topsham with their first four

children. In 1953, they moved the family to their hillside

property in Washington where their next four children – two

sets of twin girls – were born. They worked side by side there

for 51 years building a beautiful home. Audrey and Reggie

moved to Barre in 2004, where Audrey cared for Reggie until

his death in 2006. They were married for 59 years. Survivors

include her children Jacquelyn Webster Kindestin and Stuart

“Bob” McIntosh, Ernest Webster and wife Trudy, Renee

Webster Richardson, Regina Webster and John Richardson,

Danele Webster Bedard, Denise Webster, Melissa Webster

Marden and husband Steve, Michele Webster Snyder and

husband William; her grandchildren; a great-great-grandson;

her sisters-in-law Catherine Webster Nanna, Carolyn Webster

Pepin, Leona Webster and Dorothy Webster; as well as many,

many nephews, nieces, cousins and friends.

RICHARD M. WOODRUFF, 70,

passed away on January 29, 2019.

Born September 20, 1948, in Burlington, he was

the son of Dr. Frank E. and Evelyn (MacDonald)

Woodruff. He joined the U.S. Navy, following

his schooling, in 1968 and was honorably discharged

in 1970. He made his home in the Barre

and Montpelier areas and was employed as a food service

worker at Central Vermont Medical Center, Heaton Woods

and McFarland House, as well as other jobs in the central

Vermont area. Survivors include his brothers Stephen

Woodruff, M.D., and wife Micki, of Barre, Frank Woodruff Jr.

and wife Jackie, of San Antonio, TX, David Woodruff and

wife Dianne, of Manchester, NH, and Paul Woodruff, of

Colchester; his sisters Mary Woodruff, of Williston, Sarah

Ford, of Concord, NH, and Jane Woodruff and companion

Arlene Averill, of Greensboro; several nieces and nephews; as

well as his “special family” at Heaton Woods.


A place to connect, inspire, and learn

28 N Main St., Waterbury, VT 05676

(802) 244-7036

Classical Music Encounters: Classical Music Encounters is

a performance series at Vermont libraries founded last summer

by twin brothers Henry and Nathan Wu from Essex. As

avid classical musicians, their goal is to share their art form

with a diverse audience through performance and commentary.

Listen to selections for piano, violin, and cello by Bach,

Beethoven, Glière, and others at the Waterbury Library,

Monday evening, February 25th at 7PM.

Montpelier Senior

Activity Center

58 Barre Street, Montpelier • 802-223-2518

The Savoy Archive at the Montpelier

Senior Activity Center

Every week, citizens of Montpelier and its surrounding

communities come to the Montpelier Senior Activity Center

(MSAC) in search of a story. Sometimes, they’re looking for

an old favorite to revisit, other times, they’re looking for a

story they can share with their loved ones. As one visitor said,

“My grandson loves this movie – he sings the songs from it all

day. I’m hoping to check it out, so I know a little bit more

about what he likes”. Visitors may come looking for a story

recommended to them by a friend or a trusted guide or for

something completely new. Whatever might bring them in,

each week dozens of people find a story to explore in a film

from the Savoy Archive.

The Savoy Archive is home to over one hundred eclectic

film titles available to MSAC and Savoy Theater members.

MSAC staffs the archive every Monday (3-5 pm) and

Wednesday (4-6 pm) night, and every Tuesday (email rjohnston@montpelier-vt.org

for appointment) and Wednesday (1-3

pm) afternoon. Volunteers are on hand can provide recommendations,

offer suggestions, and place requests for any film you

might be looking for.

PUBLIC NOTICE

BULLETIN BOARD

2019 Annual School District Meeting Warning

Echo Valley Community School District

Orange, Vermont

The legal voters of the Town of Orange in the County

of Orange, in the State of Vermont, are hereby warned

and notifi ed to meet at the Orange Town Hall on Tuesday,

March 5, 2019 at 4:00 o’clock in the afternoon (P.M.) to act

upon the following articles, viz:

Article I

To elect all necessary Echo Valley Community School

District offi cers

for the ensuing year: Moderator, Clerk, and Treasurer.

Article II

To see what sum of money, if any, the School District will

vote to pay

the School Directors and the School Treasurer.

Article III

To see if the Echo Valley Community School District will

authorize the Board of Directors

of the Echo Valley Community School District to borrow

money on the

notes of the School District or otherwise, in anticipation of

taxes.

Article IV

Shall the voters of the Echo Valley Community School

District approve the Echo Valley Community School

District School Board to expend $5,008,088 which is the

amount the school board has determined to be necessary

for the ensuing fi scal year for Echo Valley Community

School District.

This represents a 3.72% increase from the previous year.

It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will

result in education spending of $15,387 per equalized

pupil. The projected spending per equalized pupil is 6.47%

higher than spending for the current year.

Article V

To transact any other business that may properly come

before this meeting.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2019.

Echo Valley Community School District Directors

Jessica Foster

Alan Small

Thomas Dwyer

Joe Bresette

Jennifer Trombly

Lee Gardner

• • •

Writers’ Wertfrei: Writers, fledgling or published, all are

welcome at our monthly gatherings of Writers’Wertfrei at the

Waterbury Library. “Wertfrei” comes from the German

“Wertfreiheit” meaning non-judgmental or value free. These

gatherings are a place where writers can come, share their

work, received comments and suggestions in a supportive,

caring environment. The next gathering is Saturday, February

23rd from 10-noon in the library’s SAL room. Bring 3-5 pages

of writing that you are either currently working on or something

that you have completed. Whether you write for a living

or journal, you write. For more info, contact Judi at judi@

waterburypubliclibrary.com or call 244-7036 to sign up.

Community members who are either Savoy Theater or

Montpelier Senior Activity Center members enjoy free access

to the Savoy Archives. Members of the Montpelier Senior

Activity Center pay dues and then can enjoy classes, participate

in trips, and take advantage of this archive, and so much

more. While this membership is open to anyone over the age

of 55, anyone can become a member of the Savoy Archive!

Enjoy discounts on your movie tickets, get concessions and

support a local independent business today! Once you’re a

member, you can pick up any movies for free from the

archive. The Savoy Archive is cheaper for these audiences

than a subscription to Netflix or Hulu. As one member said, “I

appreciate you all being here, I can’t afford to buy these movies,

but I love having them available.”

Members can enjoy a variety of classic and international

films; genres streaming sites often struggle to fill. With titles

ranging from classics like Casablanca to children’s films like

The Lego Movie, the Archive has something for everyone.

You’ll be able to find international modern classics like this

year’s Academy Award nominated director Pawel Pawlowski’s

Ida to classic art films like Bonnie and Clyde. Whatever your

interest, the Savoy Archive has a film for you!

Easy to access, cheap, and with a great array of options; the

Savoy Archive at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center is a

place to connect with others, to experience something new,

and to discover a new favorite story. Come visit us at 58 Barre

Street to start exploring these offerings today.

2019 Annual School District Warning

Williamstown, Vermont

Paine Mountain School District Directors

The legal voters of the Town of Williamstown are hereby

notifi ed and warned to meet at the Williamstown Middle

High School on Tuesday March 5, 2019 at ten o’clock in the

forenoon (10:00am) to act upon the following articles. Voting

for all Australian Ballot articles and elections will be held on

Tuesday March 5, 2019 from ten o’clock in the forenoon to

seven o’clock in the evening (10:00am - 7:00 pm).

Article I

To elect the following offi cers of the Paine Mountain

School District for the ensuing year by Australian Ballot:

Moderator, Clerk, and Treasurer For the purpose of this

article, the polls will be opened

at 10:00 o’clock a.m. and closed at 7:00 o’clock p.m.

Article II

To see if the Paine Mountain School District will authorize

the Board of Directors of the Paine Mountain School

District to borrow money on the notes of the Town School

District or otherwise, in anticipation of taxes, by Australian

ballot.

Article III

To vote by Australian Ballot on the following :

Shall the voters of the Paine Mountain School District

approve the Paine Mountain School District School board

to expend $17,945,038 which is the amount the school

board has determined to be necessary for the ensuing

fi scal year for Paine Mountain School District.

This represents a 3.18% increase from the previous year.

It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will

result in education spending of $15,564 per equalized

pupil. The projected spending per equalized pupil is 5.08%

higher than spending for the current year.

Article IV

To see if the Paine Mountain School District will vote to

allow the Paine Mountain School District to borrow up

to $75,000 for the purchase of a new generator for the

Northfi eld Middle High School, by Australian ballot.

Article V

To see if the Paine Mountain School District will vote to

apply $100,000 of FY18 (2017-2018) audited fund balance

to be placed in a Paine Mountain School District Capital

Improvement Fund, by Australian ballot.

Paine Mountain School District

Dated this 25th day of January, 2019.

Peter Evans

Emily Gray

Danielle Hulbert

Marie Abare

Mike Bailey

Christine Motyka

Horace Duke

Jamie Cotton

We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:

Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm

Saturday 9am-2pm.

Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!

We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for

your patronage.

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Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~ Central Vermont’s Newspaper

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

2019 Annual School District Warning

Paine Mountain School District

Northfi eld, Vermont

The legal voters of the Town of Northfield are hereby

notifi ed and warned for Australian Ballot articles and

election of offi cers to be held in the lobby of the Northfi eld

Middle High School on Tuesday March 5, 2019 from seven

o’clock in the forenoon until seven o’clock in the evening

(7:00am - 7:00pm).

Article I

To elect the following offi cers of the Paine Mountain

School District for the ensuing year by Australian Ballot:

Moderator, Clerk, and Treasurer For the purpose of this

article, the polls will be opened at 7:00 o’clock a.m. and

closed at 7:00 o’clock p.m.

Article II

To see if the Paine Mountain School District will authorize

the Board of Directors of the Paine Mountain School

District to borrow money on the notes of the Town School

District or otherwise, in anticipation of taxes, by Australian

ballot.

Article III

To vote by Australian Ballot on the following :

Shall the voters of the Paine Mountain School District

approve the Paine Mountain School District School board

to expend $17,945,038 which is the amount the school

board has determined to be necessary for the ensuing

fi scal year for Paine Mountain School District.

This represents a 3.18% increase from the previous year.

It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will

result in education spending of $15,564 per equalized

pupil. The projected spending per equalized pupil is 5.08%

higher than spending for the current year.

Article IV

To see if the Paine Mountain School District will vote to

allow the Paine Mountain School District to borrow up

to $75,000 for the purchase of a new generator for the

Northfi eld Middle High School, by Australian ballot.

Article V

To see if the Paine Mountain School District will vote to

apply $100,000 of FY18 (2017-2018) audited fund balance

to be placed in a Paine Mountain School District Capital

Improvement Fund, by Australian ballot.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2019.

Paine Mountain School District Directors

Peter Evans

Emily Gray

Danielle Hulbert

Marie Abare

Mike Bailey

Christine Motyka

Horace Duke

Jamie Cotton

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 13


Certified Public Accountants

Comprehensive Tax Preparation

*Individual & Business Tax Returns

*Authorized by IRS E-File for all Clients

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current tax laws

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Contacting Congress

U.S. Rep. Peter Welch

Mailing address:

128 Lakeside Ave, Suite 235

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.welch.house.gov

Phone: (802) 652-2450

U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders

Mailing address:

1 Church St., Third Floor,

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 862-0697

U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy

Burlington office

199 Main St., Fourth Floor,

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 863-2525

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Getting on the Right Track

To the Editor,

It is sad that the Governor in his budget speech, that despite

all the dire predictions about global heating and what it is

going to mean for us in coming decades, still refuses to do

anything significant about addressing the issue. Electric cars

are not by themselves the answer. I drive an all-electric Leaf

• • •

but I fully appreciate that it takes a huge amount of fossil fuels

to make the car and its batteries and I have to drive it for a few

years to offset those emissions with the renewable energy

from my solar system.

A real good example of a political leader leading the way is

Representative Curt McCormack from Burlington who

endures some challenges in not driving any car. Governor

Scott, how about you really leading the way with some solutions

that will almost surely result in reductions of Vermont’s

greenhouse gas emissions. A recent study has shown that for

a carbon pricing policy carefully crafted, those of lower

incomes could receive more in rebates than they would pay in

costs. Let’s get on that track Governor Scott instead of the

race car track.

George Plumb

Washington

What Do We Do Now About Marijuana?

By Central Vermont New Directions Coalition

The recommendations of the Governor’s Marijuana

Commission included strong recommendations for prevention

and education at all levels. They included strong recommendations

for public safety, including impaired driving and

product testing. Will any of these recommendations make it

into policy?

Those of us who work in substance abuse prevention

believe that any legislation on taxation and regulation of

marijuana should fully address the recommendations of the

Commission. The last thing we need is a policy that permits

outright commercialization, fails to provide funding for prevention,

education, health, and public safety, and gives the

burgeoning marijuana industry carte blanche at the expense of

small towns, local control, and public health.

“Tax and regulate” should not be about creating an economic

growth environment for marijuana producers and sellers.

Most, if not all, industry business models work this way: to

be profitable, they require regular, heavy consumers. This

runs up against obvious ethical and health concerns when the

product is an addictive substance that causes the user to suffer

increased physical and mental health problems with increased

use. Tobacco is the obvious painful precedent, and it is no

mistake that Big Tobacco companies are investing heavily in

marijuana businesses.

Creation of habitual heavy users is also not affordable for

our society - there will be increased demand for addiction

treatment, rehabilitation and emergency room services to

address the symptoms of heavy use. Employers will find it

harder to find safe and stable employees. There is a link

between heavy use and suicide, psychosis, and traffic fatalities.

This model is unsustainable for nurturing human growth

and potential. This is because the industry, to be “successful,”

depends on creating addiction, which often begins in youth.

Local control is at the heart of Vermont governance. Any

Public Hearing on H.57, an Act Relating to Preserving

the Right to Abortion

Montpelier, Vermont. The House Committees on Human

Services and on Judiciary will hold a public hearing on

Wednesday, February 6, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the

well of the House Chamber at the State House in Montpelier.

For information about the format of this event or to submit

written testimony, contact the House Committee on Human

Services at 802-828-2265 or e-mail jtucker@leg.state.vt.us.

• • •

marijuana bill should contain language that protects a town

from being an unwitting host to a marijuana business. If a

town wants to be part of the industry they should have to opt

IN by a defined process, rather than having to opt OUT

through an expensive voting process. The default should be

that a town or city is marijuana retail or industry free unless

they choose otherwise.

Big Marijuana, like its predecessor Big Tobacco, has powerful

industry forces which expect to profit from their investments.

Our firm hope is that our youth will live in communities

that fully support their health and wellbeing. We think

that most Vermonters do not want marijuana shops in their

neighborhoods, near churches, schools and playgrounds.

They don’t want signs in the windows of Main Street stores

advertising marijuana products. It took us more than 50 years

to make progress battling back at Big Tobacco, and Big

Tobacco is attempting a major resurgence with e-cigarettes.

Let’s try to head Big Marijuana off before we have another

major public health and safety crisis.

For more information: Central VT New Directions

Coalition, cvndc.org, 802-223-4949.

A few references: *”Teen Brain Volume Changes with Small

Amount of Cannabis Use, Study Finds” (January 2019) http://

www.med.uvm.edu/com/news/2019/01/14/teen_brain_volume.

*Marijuana causes psychosis and schizophrenia. Miller

CL, 2018, The Impact of Marijuana on Mental Health in

Contemporary Health Issues on Marijuana, Oxford University

Press, 319 pp. *The industry will need addicts to be profitable,

Rand report, “Considering Marijuana Legalization:

Insights for Vermont and Other Jurisdictions,” 2015; and from

Vermont senate finance committee testimony by Beau Kilmer

of the RAND Corporation,“Daily and near daily users account

for 80% of all the marijuana expenditures. For-profit companies

can be expected to focus on creating and maintaining these

heavy users; dependence is good for the bottom line.” https://

www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR864.html

Witnesses may begin signing up to speak at 4:00 p.m., just

prior to the hearing. Witness testimony is limited to two minutes

per person. The Committees will also accept written testimony.

If you plan to attend and need accommodations to participate,

please contact Julie Tucker at jtucker@leg.state.vt.us by

February 1, so that we can arrange those in advance.


One-Two Punch of Winter Storms, Canceled

Blood Drives, Straining Red Cross Blood Supply

The American Red Cross is reissuing its emergency call for

blood and platelet donors to give now after multiple snow

storms, frigid temperatures, and the government shutdown

have further reduced lifesaving donations.

In January, more than 4,600 Red Cross blood and platelet

donations went uncollected as blood drives were forced to

cancel due to severe winter weather blanketing parts of the

U.S., and additional cancellations are expected this week.

Weather travel advisories may cause even more donors to

delay their planned donations.

The federal government shutdown also affected donations

as more than 4 percent of Red Cross blood collections come

from drives sponsored by military and local, state and federal

government agencies. About 30 blood drives hosted by federal

offices were canceled across the country due to the shutdown,

leaving more than 900 donations uncollected.

“Disruptions to blood and platelet donations jeopardize the

availability of blood for patients who depend on transfusions

for survival,” said Cliff Numark, senior vice president, Red

Cross Biomedical Services. “We’re grateful for all those who

have come out to give since we issued our emergency call

earlier this month and now urge others to come out and give

to prevent delays in essential medical care.”

Right now, Red Cross blood donations are being distributed

Nominated for Best Picture

Vice ★★★1/2

I

have

an easy question for you: Who is the worst living

Republican president?

Your gut instinct is telling some of you to say Trump. I

am a pacifist, though, so the decision is easy for me.

President Trump recently decided to pull all US troops out

of Syria, infuriating the Republican establishment. You remember

the troops in Syria, right? They were sent there by

Nobel Peace Prize winner Barak Obama without Congressional

approval to try to clean up the mess created by the Bush

Administration.

If you think Arab lives matter – at all – the choice between

Donald Trump and George W. Bush is clear. Just in case you

were able to forget what a calamity the Bush Administration

was for the people of the Middle East, “Vice” is a friendly

reminder.

While President Trump doesn’t mind saying ‘no’ to the warmongers

in his administration, George W. Bush always said

‘yes’ to Dick Cheney.

Love him or loathe him, Dick Cheney was an extraordinary

figure in American history. As Vice President an office with

no official power he became a fearful warlord who reshaped

American imperialism.

Writer/director Adam McKay (“The Big Short,” “Talladega

Nights”) presents Dick Cheney as a reasonably likable man.

He has a wonderful relationship with his ambitious wife and

he adores his two daughters. He unconditionally supported his

openly lesbian daughter and refused to argue against gay marriage.

The first half of Vice is light and funny. We can’t help

but root for young Cheney (Christian Bale) as he shrewdly

works his way up through the ranks of the Nixon and Ford Administrations.

Steve Carrell is delightful as Donald Rumsfeld,

Cheney’s mentor and political soulmate.

When George W. Bush is elected in 2001, Dick Cheney

goes from likable guy to arch-megavillain.

House Gives Final Approval to Ethnic Studies Bill

The House gave unanimous approval to H.3, the Ethnic

Studies Bill. This bill creates an Ethnic and Social Equity

Standards Advisory Working Group that will set standards

and review student performance in order to accurately represent

various ethnic and social groups in Vermont schools.

“Our education system is top notch. Our administrators,

teachers, and education professionals do extraordinary work.

Yet recent evidence suggests students of historically marginalized

ethnic and social groups face greater challenges and

barriers to educational success,” said Representative Dylan

Giambatista, (D-Essex), a sponsor of the bill. “To provide

equity, we must see, hear, learn from, and grow with people

who have been minimized or written out of our textbooks and

classrooms. This bill is a first step to move all of our citizens

into our textbooks, into our classrooms, and into students’

hearts and minds where the seeds of learning are planted.”

“The fundamental idea is that there’s a lot missing from the

history books,” added Representative Kevin “Coach” Christie

• • •

• • •

• • •

to hospitals faster than they are coming in, and there is less

than a three-day supply of most blood types on hand. The Red

Cross strives to maintain a five-day supply of blood to meet

the needs of patients and to be prepared for emergencies that

require significant volumes of donated blood products.

All eligible donors, especially platelet donors and blood

donors with type O blood, are urgently needed to help restock

the shelves for hospital patients. Donation appointments can

be easily scheduled by using the free Blood Donor App, visiting

RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS

(1-800-733-2767).

There is still time for donors to receive a special thank-you

for helping save lives in January, National Blood Donor

Month. All donors who give blood or platelets in January at

Red Cross blood drives in New York, Massachusetts,

Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Rhode

Island will receive a $5 Dunkin’ Gift Card via email.*

Upcoming blood donation opportunities in Washington

County

Barre: 2/19: 10-3, Canadian Club, 414 E Montpelier Rd.

Montpelier: 2/21: 11:30-5:30, VFW Post 792, 792 Pioneer St.

Northfield: 2/28: 9-5, Norwich University, 158 Harmon Dr.

Waterbury: 2/8: 11-5, American Legion, 16 Stowe St.

Adam McKay claims that Cheney invited dozens of his

buddies from the petroleum industry to the White House to

divvy up Iraq’s oil fields just in case they became available to

steal. This was before 9/11.

After 9/11, Vice President Cheney worked to concede

America’s moral high ground as quickly as possible. According

to McKay, Cheney was the one who came up with the sick

idea of moving POWs to secret prisons in allied countries that

allow torture.

When Bush (Sam Rockwell) expresses concern about the

plan, Cheney answers: “Mr. President, the United States does

not torture. Therefore, what we’re doing is not torture.” We

are not convinced.

All told, approximately 750,000 people were killed as a result

of Mr. Cheney’s ill-fated invasion of Iraq. And if it were

left up to him and his fellow foreign policy experts, US troops

would remain in the Middle East indefinitely.

If you want to argue that Donald Trump is a bad president,

that’s reasonable. I could add a few pieces of evidence to bolster

your argument. His handling of the Wall has been embarrassingly

incompetent. But if you want to say that he’s as bad

as Bush/Cheney, then no. That’s not okay with me.

Bush is only better if you think that the sovereignty of

Middle Eastern countries doesn’t matter. Bush is only better if

you think that paying for CIA agents to torture men in Egypt

doesn’t matter. Bush is only better if you think Arab Lives

Don’t Matter.

(D-Hartford), one of the bill’s sponsors. “Here in Vermont, we

have an opportunity to really be a leader in racial justice, and

the unanimous approval of this bill shows that our brave little

state is an inclusive one.”

“This bill gives a stronger voice to racial, ethnic and indigenous

groups, women, LGBTQIA people, individuals who

experience disabilities, and groups that have been historically

subject to persecution or genocide,” said Representative Jill

Krowinski (D-Burlington).

“The working group will aid Vermont schools in properly

addressing and reducing bias, harassment, and disproportionate

patterns of discipline of students from marginalized ethnic

and social groups. We are constantly working to better our

education system and this bill gives our students access to a

fuller, more accurate representation of history while shaping

the culture in our schools to be even more inclusive and

accessible to all Vermonters,” added Speaker of the House

Mitzi Johnson (D-South Hero).

VOTE

FLO

SMITH

To Open Seat

SELECT BOARD

BERLIN

PUBLIC NOTICE

BULLETIN BOARD

INVITATION TO BID

155 MAIN STREET

REROOFING OF MANSARD FAÇADE

MONTPELIER, VERMONT

Roofi ng Contractors are invited to bid on the

replacement of the mansard roof shingles at 155 Main

Street.

The Montpelier Housing Authority will receive sealed

bids until 2:00 P.M., February 19, 2019 at the office

of the Montpelier Housing Authority, 155 Main Street,

Montpelier, VT. The bids will be opened privately at

the Montpelier Housing Authority.

Before commencement of the work, the contractor

will provide certifi cates testifying to the coverage

of Workmen’s compensation, Public Liability

and Property Damage Insurance. Complete bid

specifi cations may be obtained by contacting the

Authority at 802-229-9232.

Inspection of the existing roof is recommended.

Contact the Office of the

Montpelier Housing Authority to

notify the owner that you wish to

visit and follow their instructions.

2019 Annual School District Meeting Warning

Orange, Vermont

Echo Valley Community School District Directors

The legal voters of the Town of Washington in the County

of Orange, in the State of Vermont, are hereby warned

and notifi ed to meet at the Orange Town Hall on Tuesday,

March 5, 2019 at 4:00 o’clock in the afternoon (P.M.) to act

upon the following articles, viz:

Article I

To elect all necessary Echo Valley Community School

District offi cers for the ensuing year: Moderator, Clerk, and

Treasurer.

Article II

To see what sum of money, if any, the School District will

vote to pay the School Directors and the School Treasurer.

Article III

To see if the Echo Valley Community School District

will authorize the Board of Directors of the Echo Valley

Community School District to borrow money on the notes

of the School District or otherwise, in anticipation of taxes.

Article IV

Shall the voters of the Echo Valley Community School

District approve the Echo Valley Community School

District School Board to expend $5,008,088 which is the

amount the school board has determined to be necessary

for the ensuing fi scal year for Echo Valley Community

School District.

This represents a 3.72% increase from the previous year.

It is estimated that this proposed budget, if approved, will

result in education spending of $15,387 per equalized

pupil. The projected spending per equalized pupil is 6.47%

higher than spending for the current year.

Article V

To transact any other business that may properly come

before this meeting.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2019.

Echo Valley Community School District

Jessica Foster

Alan Small

Thomas Dwyer

Joe Bresette

Jennifer Trombly

Lee Gardner

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 15


50th Anniversary Card Shower

February 15, 2019

Bruce and Theresa

Bartlett

71 Martin Meadow Rd.

Plainfield, Vt 05667

Gifford Medical Center

BIRTH

Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

February 4

Nicholas Sawyer, 8, So. Royalton

February 6

Leeland Hosmer, 6, So. Royalton

Carol Livendale, 86, Barre

Bob Edwards

Debbie Sicily, 62, Montpelier

KEN MCPHERSON

KEN MCPHERSON

IS TURNING 80!!!

Help him celebrate his 80th birthday,

February 13th by sending a card!

Ken McPherson

109 Woodland Dr., Barre, VT 05641

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center

on January 27, 2019. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

A boy, Thatcher Paul Gearwar, was born January 18, 2019 to

Charlee Drury and Robert Gearwar of Rochester.

A boy, Tavian Leigh Carroll was born January 21, 2019 to

Victoria Dailey and Tyler Carroll of East Calais.

A girl, Winona Withrow Wright was born January 21, 2019 to

Alicia Wilder and Quentin Wright of Randolph.

February 8

Warren Lanigan

Amanda Austin, 38, Colchester

February 9

Ashley Nutbrown, 33, Berlin

February 11

Jennifer Green, 46, St. Albans

Debbie Smith, 50, Plainfield

This Week’s Cake Winner:

February 6, Carol Livendale, 86, Barre

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, February 7 to arrange for cake pick-up.

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for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

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to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

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NAME _________________________________________________

AGE (this birthday) _______________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________ ______________

page 16 The WORLD February 6, 2019

My Memories Of

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A kind Hearted Gal who will

never Be Forgotten.

Yes, She was my Little Sis

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with Mom & Dad.

You’ll Be In Our

Heart Always

Your Brother, Steve

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

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anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

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Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

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Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 171 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

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DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

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Singing Valentine

Deliveries Available

The Barre Tones, Vermont’s internationally-ranked women’s

a cappella barbershop chorus based in central Vermont, is

now accepting orders for delivery of Singing Valentines.

Deliveries are available all day and into the evening of

Thursday, February 14. This unique musical gift is delivered

by a women’s quartet to offices, homes, hospitals, nursing

homes or by telephone. Included in the delivery are a song (or

two), your choice of a rose or bundle of Birnn chocolate, and

a be-ribboned scroll with your personal message. Singing

Valentines delivered by telephone to anyone in the U.S. are

also available.

Singing Valentines may also be purchased for delivery as a

gift to a local assisted living facility. Orders are $40 and may

be placed by calling 802-552-3489 or email info@

BarretonesVT.com. Telephone deliveries are $20 and can be

delivered between 8am and 8pm. Book early to ensure your

desired delivery time can be scheduled. Delivery area includes

Barre/Montpelier, Mad River Valley, Waterbury, Northfield

and adjoining communities. Other areas may be accommodated

– but order soon! Net proceeds benefit the Barre Tones,

a 501c3 non profit organization dedicated to empowering

women through music.

Great Valentine’s

Gift Ideas

See Pages 20-23

ARIES (March 21 to April 19)

Doing something nice for others is

typical of the generous Arian. But

be prepared for some jealous types

who might try to question one of

your more recent acts of kindness.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You’re eager to take on

new responsibilities. But before you do, you might want

to check out exactly what would be required of you so that

you don’t face any “surprises” later.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It might be best to put off

an important decision until a uctuating situation becomes

more stable. Recently received news could help resolve a

long-standing family matter.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you still have a problem

getting that information gap closed, you might consider

asking a higher authority to resolve the matter, leaving you

free to move on to another project.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A family matter needs to be

dealt with at the start of the week. Once it’s resolved, the

Big Cat can devote more attention to that new opportunity

that seems to hold so much potential.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Pay attention to

those niggling doubts. They could be warning you not to

make any major decisions until you’ve checked them out

-- especially where money matters might be involved.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A business venture

might need more of your attention than you are able to provide.

Consider asking a trusted friend or family member to

help you work through this time crunch.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A more-positive

aspect helps you get a clearer focus on how to handle your

time so that you can deal with several responsibilities that

are just now showing up on your schedule.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A very

close friend (you know who that is!) has advice that could

help you work through a confusing situation. So put your

pride aside and ask for it. You’ll be glad you did.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A workplace

situation could turn a bit tense. The best way to handle it

is to confront it and deal with it openly. Doing so can help

reveal the underlying reasons for the problem.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A colleague’s

remarks appear to be especially cutting. But don’t waste

your time or your energy trying to deal with the situation.

You have more important things to do.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Support for your work

comes as a surprise from someone you thought was critical

or, at least, indifferent. Your spouse or partner has big

plans for the weekend.

BORN THIS WEEK: Your spiritual strength often acts as

an inspiration to help others make decisions about their

lives. (c) 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.


SPEAKING OUT | THE WORLD

Romantic Films to Watch Together this Valentine’s Day

Couples celebrate Valentine’s

Day in many different ways.

For some the idea of dinner

out followed by a stroll armin-arm

seems the epitome

of romance, while others

may want to go out dancing or engage in a

favorite hobby.

Valentine’s Day also can be a romantic endeavor if a couple

chooses to spend time at one with each other watching a

romantic movie. The following are a handful of love-inspired

movies that can add a special something to Valentine’s Day

festivities.

• The Notebook: Author Nicholas Sparks has a way of taking

the everyday experiences in a person’s life and making them

relatable and heartbreaking in a pluck-at-your-heartstrings

sort of way. His novel “The Notebook” won the hearts of

many and seemed a natural to be adapted to film. Starring

Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, the movie illustrates

how love can last through the years and even survive an

Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

• The Proposal: In order to remain in the country, a demanding

New York-based book editor (Sandra Bullock) asks her

brow-beaten assistant (Ryan Reynolds) to marry her. Their

tumultuous relationship involves a trip to Alaska to meet his

family.

• An Affair to Remember: Romantic melodramatic master

Cary Grant falls in love with Deborah Kerr aboard a cruise

ship while they are traveling with other people. They agree to

meet at the top of the Empire State Building in six months if

they have ended their relationships and are ready to commit

to each other. Grant makes it to the rendezvous spot, but an

injured Kerr never shows as Grant assumes she has rejected

the proposal.

American Film Institute’s 100 Years... 100 Movies - How many have you seen?

1. Citizen Kane (1941)

2. Casablanca (1942)

3. The Godfather (1972)

4. Gone With The Wind (1939)

5. Lawrence Of Arabia (1962)

6. The Wizard Of Oz (1939)

7. The Graduate (1967)

8. On The Waterfront (1954)

9. Schindler’s List (1993)

10. Singin’ In The Rain (1952)

11. It’s A Wonderful Life (1946)

12. Sunset Blvd. (1950)

13. The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957)

14. Some Like It Hot (1959)

15. Star Wars (1977)

16. All About Eve (1950)

17. The African Queen (1951)

18. Psycho (1960)

19. Chinatown (1974)

20. One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

21. The Grapes Of Wrath (1940)

22. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

23. The Maltese Falcon (1941)

24. Raging Bull (1980)

25. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

• Say Anything: In pursuit of a woman he believes is out of

his social league, Lloyd Dobler (John Cusack) creates hope

for the underdog in us all. The movie inspired teens to raise

their boom box radios over their heads and blast romantic

tunes to illustrate their love.

• The Wedding Singer: This quirky movie about a wedding

singer who falls for a banquet waitress highlights the importance

of loving each other for what makes you unique.

• Once: Attraction between the main characters comes by

way of creative musical collaboration. Music proves to be an

aphrodisiac, making the film and the song Falling Slowly

from its score so popular. This romantic tale helped take the

film from the big screen to the Broadway stage.

• West Side Story: “West Side Story” is yet another homage

to Romeo and Juliet. But the film made Shakespeare’s

tragic love story relatable to audiences of the 1960s.

26. Dr. Strangelove (1964)

27. Bonnie And Clyde (1967)

28. Apocalypse Now (1979)

29. Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (1939)

30. The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre (1948)

31. Annie Hall (1977)

32. The Godfather Part Ii (1974)

33. High Noon (1952)

34. To Kill A Mockingbird (1962)

35. It Happened One Night (1934)

36. Midnight Cowboy (1969)

37. The Best Years Of Our Lives (1946)

38. Double Indemnity (1944)

39. Doctor Zhivago (1965)

40. North By Northwest (1959)

41. West Side Story (1961)

42. Rear Window (1954)

43. King Kong (1933)

44. The Birth Of A Nation (1915)

45. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

46. A Clockwork Orange (1971)

47. Taxi Driver (1976)

48. Jaws (1975)

49. Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs (1937)

50. Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969)

• • •

51. The Philadelphia Story (1940)

52. From Here To Eternity (1953)

53. Amadeus (1984)

54. All Quiet On The Western Front (1930)

55. The Sound Of Music (1965)

56. M*A*S*H (1970)

57. The Third Man (1949)

58. Fantasia (1940)

59. Rebel Without A Cause (1955)

60. Raiders Of The Lost Ark (1981)

61. Vertigo (1958)

62. Tootsie (1982)

63. Stagecoach (1939)

64. Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (1977)

65. The Silence Of The Lambs (1991)

66. Network (1976)

67. The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

68. An American In Paris (1951)

69. Shane (1953)

70. The French Connection (1971)

71. Forrest Gump (1994)

72. Ben-Hur (1959)

73. Wuthering Heights (1939)

74. The Gold Rush (1925)

75. Dances With Wolves (1990)

SPEAKING OUT | The WORLD

What’s your favorite movie?

• My Best Friend’s Wedding Julianne (Julia Roberts) is

called on to be the “best man” for her friend’s (Dermot

Mulroney) wedding. Only when the wedding planning is

underway does Julianne realize she is in love with her friend

and needs to get him to fall for her instead.

• Never Been Kissed: A reporter goes undercover at a high

school to discover something controversial and ends up being

the subject of her story when she falls in love with her

English teacher.

• Harold and Maude: A man in his twenties and a much older

woman begin a romantic relationship and challenge social

norms along the way.

• Annie Hall: Winner of four Academy Awards, “Annie Hall”

follows a comedian who is trying to maintain his relationship

with a woman.

• Bridget Jones’ Diary: A modern adaptation of “Pride and

Prejudice,” the movie tells the tale of a self-conscious woman

who finds love in a man that seems to be her polar opposite.

• Ten Things I Hate About ou Filmmakers reinvented The

Taming of the Shrew” in this teen comedy starring Julia

Stiles and Heath Ledger.

• Casablanca: No romantic

movie list would be complete

without this wartime

drama. Humphrey Bogart

and Ingrid Bergman are in

top form in this movie of

chance meetings.

• The Princess Bride: Girl

meets boy, girl detests

boy, girl truly loves boy,

and then girl loses boy.

This fairy tale shares the

purity of true love and

happily ever after.

76. City Lights (1931)

77. American Graffiti (1973)

78. Rocky (1976)

79. The Deer Hunter (1978)

80. The Wild Bunch (1973)

81. Modern Times (1936)

82. Giant (1956)

83. Platoon (1986)

84. Fargo (1996)

85. Duck Soup (1933)

86. Mutiny On The Bounty (1935)

87. Frankenstein (1931)

88. Easy Rider (1969)

89. Patton (1970)

90. The Jazz Singer (1927)

91. My Fair Lady (1964)

92. A Place In The Sun (1951)

93. The Apartment (1960)

94. Goodfellas (1990)

95. Pulp Fiction (1994)

96. The Searchers (1956)

97. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

98. Unforgiven (1992)

99. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (1967)

100. Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

Virgil M., Barre Town

I like the westerns although War

of the World’s is pretty cool.

Roger D., Barre

I just like sports!

John - Barre

“Padrino” Godfather

David - Montpelier

Avatar

Barre

622-0730

DRIVE

UP

B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

DRIVE

UP

Montpelier

223-0928

DRIVE

UP

Jerry - West Berlin

Titanic

Virginia - Montpelier

Dead Poet Society

with Robin Williams

Rachel - Warren

Pretty Woman

Claire - Barre

Paddington

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 17


Test Your Home for Radon.

It Can Save Your Life

A few years ago, athy Robinson’s family

was rocked with the news that her mother had

stage IV lung cancer a diagnosis that was

all the more difficult to fathom because her

mom was not a smoker. Her mother died two

years after her diagnosis. We couldn’t understand

it, my mom lived a very healthy life,

said Robinson. Then we learned about the

radon that had been seeping into the house for

years.

Radon is an odorless, colorless gas made

up of radioactive particles that enter the home

from the underlying soil and bedrock. Over

long periods of time, radon can damage lung

tissue. According to state health officials,

radon is the leading cause of lung cancer

among non-smokers. It is estimated that 50

Vermonters die each year due to radon-related

lung cancer. For smokers, the risk of lung

cancer from radon is especially high.

athy’s story became widely known when

she offered to speak about her family’s experience

for a video urging Vermonters to test

their homes for radon. athy said it was her

mom’s health care provider who suggested

testing their home for radon. The radon levels

in the living room were found to be 25 times

higher than the Environmental Protection

Agency’s radon action level. The levels in the

basement, where athy’s bedroom was when

she was growing up, were even higher.

Health Commissioner Mark Levine, MD

said that many factors contribute to how

much radon gets into a home, and neighboring

houses can have significantly different

radon levels from one another. It doesn’t

matter where or how old your home is, it can

still have high levels of radon, said Dr.

Levine. One out of every seven homes in

Vermont has elevated levels of radon, and the

only way to know if radon is present in your

home is to test for it.

I wish we had been more aware of radon.

We would have done something about it,

said athy. Everywhere I go and everyone I

meet, I tell them about radon and encourage

them to get their home tested. It can save your

life. Watch the video athy’s story.

The Health Department offers free radon

test kits. To request your free kit, call 1-800-

43-8550 or send an email with your name,

mailing and physical address and phone number

to radonvermont.gov.

Homes should be tested for radon every

five years and after renovation work that

affects heating or ventilation, or disturbs the

foundation or underlying bedrock. Radon

levels can be reduced by installing a radon

mitigation system.

See athy’s video and find more information

about radon, testing and mitigation

healthvermont.govradon. View an interactive

map about radon risk in your town https

arcg.is1TGSba. For health news, alerts and

information, visit healthvermont.gov.

INTOLERANCE TEST

Food Sensitivity Test

NEW - In house visit $100.

Now we can test out of the office for $70. Just mail in a hair

sample and contact information to Many Words Herbs c/o

First In Fitness Building, 652 Granger Rd., Barre VT 05649

and you’ll receive your test results with in 5 business days.

Food intolerances can also lead to chronic diseases by

creating inammation within the body. It’s a well-known fact

that all disease starts with Inammation. It’s like putting

watered-down gas in your vehicle. We all know what

happens when you do that

Imagine what years of inammatory

foods can do to your body over time We’ll

do a simple DNA test that recognizes what

600+ different foods/non-food products are

causing your body the most harm.

We’ll also test you for the 80+ essential

minerals, vitamins and nutrients. This

portion of the test is a good balance to

creating a healthy lifestyle and can boost the

immune system and reduce your intolerance

levels simply by adding recommended foods

to your diet.

Heart Health Is for Children, Too

With February being

National Heart Month, parents

have been pumping

me about their children’s

heart health. Let me get to

the heart of the matter and

talk about the prevention of

heart disease, beginning in

childhood.

Heart disease is the

number one killer of men and women in the

S. There are risk factors that can increase

your chances of developing a heart problem.

They include high blood pressure, being

overweight or obese, being physically inactive,

and having a high blood-level of cholesterol.

All of these can begin to develop in

childhood.

A family history of these factors can put

someone at an even greater, possibly earlier,

risk for heart disease.

So what can we do to reduce the risk of

heart disease in children

1. Reduce the amount of saturated fat and

cholesterol in your child’s diet as early as age

2. This can reduce the chances of developing

hypertension, high cholesterol or obesity. The

American Heart Association recommends

poultry, fish, lean meat, low-fat dairy (like

skim or 2 milk) and limited egg consumption.

Reading food labels can ensure that the

AG’s Office Warns of Increased

Hypothermia Risk for Vulnerable

VT; Heating Assistance Available

With extreme cold hitting Vermont, Attorney

General T.J. Donovan is warning that

older adults and those with chronic medical

conditions are especially susceptible to hypothermia.

Hypothermia is a dangerous drop

in core body temperature. It caused 1 deaths

in Vermont last year. The Attorney General’s

message comes through his Elder Protection

Initiative and the Vulnerable Adult Fatality

Review Team.

Warning signs of hypothermia include

slowed or slurred speech sleepiness or confusion

shivering or stiffness in the arms and

legs poor control over body movements slow

reactions, a weak pulse, or a core body temperature

of 5 degrees Fahrenheit or lower.

Tips for Hypothermia Prevention in Older

Individuals

• If you know of an older community member

who keeps their home heat temperature

low to save on energy costs, inform them of

Vermont’s many fuel assistance programs

(see next page) and check on them before and

during a cold snap.

• Make sure your own home is warm

enough. Experts suggest that, for older individuals,

the temperature should be set to at

least 8 degrees.

• Check with your doctor to see if any prescription

or over-the-counter medications you

take may increase your risk for hypothermia.

• To stay warm at home, wear long underwear

under your clothes, along with socks and

slippers. se a blanket or afghan to keep your

legs and shoulders warm and wear a hat or

cap indoors.

• When going outside in the cold, it is important

to wear a hat, scarf, and gloves or

mittens to prevent loss of body heat through

your head and hands. Wear several layers of

loose clothing to help trap warm air between

the layers.

• If possible, let others know when you’re

planning to spend time outdoors and carry a

• • •

foods you buy are heart

healthy.

2.Another way to

stay heart healthy is to

serve foods low in salt.

Salt use is an acquired

taste that can lead to

increased risk of high

blood pressure and

stroke. se other herbs,

spices, and even lemon juice to make a dish

tasty. Consider not having the salt shaker on

the table, which is easier said than done.

3. Ask about blood pressure and weight

measurements during your child’s checkups.

ou can work with their health care professional

to make changes in their diet or lifestyle

to reduce those risks.

Hopefully tips like these will not miss a

beat when it comes to keeping your family

heart healthy, beginning in childhood.

Lewis First, MD, is chief of Pediatrics at

The University of Vermont Children’s Hospital

and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at

the University of Vermont College of

Medicine. You can also catch “First with

Kids” weekly on WOKO 98.9FM and WPTZ

Channel 5, or visit the First with Kids video

archives at www.UVMHealth.org/

MedCenterFirstWithKids.

fully charged cellphone.

Vermont Heating Assistance Programs

The following programs provide heating

assistance to qualifying Vermonters, including

in emergency situations where an individual

or family is about to run out of fuel or be

disconnected from electric service. To learn

more about these programs, call the listed

contacts, dial 2-1-1, or visit Vermont 2-1-1’s

tility Assistance webpage here.

Crisis Fuel Assistance: Help to purchase

heat, electricity, repair furnace, negotiate payments

plans, prevent disconnection. Contact

your local Community Action Agency.

WARMTH Program: Help to purchase heat

in emergency. Contact your local Community

Action Agency.

Fuel Your Neighbors: Emergency heating

assistance. Contact your local Community

Action Agency.

Low-Income Home Energy Assistance

Program: Help to pay home heating bills.

Contact the Dept. of Children and Families

1-800-47-151 (including after-hours assistance)

Split the Ticket: Free fuel, donated by VT

Fuel Dealers Association. Contact VT Fuel

Dealers Association 1-802-223-7750.

The mission of the Attorney General’s

Elder Protection Initiative (EPI) is to promote

the safety and security of older Vermonters.

To learn more about the EPI, visit its website

here.

The Vermont Vulnerable Adult Fatality

Review Team was established through legislation

in 201 and functions under the auspices

of the Office of the Attorney General.

The Team consists of representatives of State

and private entities and associations. Its purpose

is to examine select cases of abuse and

neglect-related fatalities and preventable

deaths of vulnerable adults with the goal of

improving the lives of Vermonters.

Therapeutic Practice & Apothecary

Rosalene Bussiere

Certified in Herbalism & Reiki III

652 Granger Rd., Berlin, VT 05641

802-793-9371 manywordsherbs1.weebly.com

page 18 The WORLD February 6, 2019

CENTRAL

VERMONT’S

BEST

COUNTRY


CVHHH Goes Red for Women in Honor

of American Heart Month in February

Did you know that heart disease affects one

in three women? That’s one in three of our

mothers, wives, aunts, sisters, and best

friends.

Go Red for Women Day, last Friday,

February 1, kicked off American Heart

Month. In recognition of the risks of heart

disease for women, and to support central

Vermonters to make heart-healthy choices,

Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice

(CVHHH) is celebrating seven CVHHH

employees. These women—four nurses, one

social worker, and two office staff—provide

care and support at home for central

Vermonters living with a range of conditions,

including heart disease. These women are

also committed to staying active and to making

choices to keep their hearts as healthy as

possible.

Robin Bador, CVHHH’s Human Resources

Recruiting Specialist, and Bridget Coburn, a

Registered Nurse on CVHHH’s Hospice &

Palliative Care team (pictured in the pink

shirt, lower- right corner, with her back to

Robin), are two of these women. Bridget lives

with a congenital heart defect and is motivated

to make heart-healthy choices, in large

part, for her two children. Robin has a family

history of high blood pressure, but, has

recently gotten her symptoms under control.

She is motivated to keep making healthy

choices because of how good she feels. Over

the past year, Bridget and Robin lost a total of

130 pounds. They started their diets about the

same time and became fast friends. Today,

they continue to support one another.

To be inspired, and to read how these seven

women are taking action to be their healthiest

selves, visit www.cvhhh.org/hearthealth,

where you can read each woman’s story and

learn their heart- healthy tips. Pictured above,

top to bottom, left to right, are Sarah

Sadowsky, LICSW, Medical Social Worker,

Ashley LaFirira, RN; Shelby Lunn, RN,

WCC, Clinical Team Manager; Shelby

Chicoine, RN; Colette Page, Billing

Specialist; Robin Bador, HR Generalist;

Bridget Coburn, RN, Hospice & Palliative

Care.

Vermont Care Partners Trains

30 New Adult Mental Health

First Aid Instructors

On January 7th -11th, Vermont Care

Partners (VCP) trained 30 new adult Mental

Health First Aid (MHFA) instructors. As a

result, VCP now has a network of 75 youth

and adult MHFA instructors who are working

to decrease suicide and reduce stigma in

Vermont. The training was provided through

VCP’s Community FIRST Substance Abuse

and Mental Health Services Administration

(SAMHSA) Mental Health Awareness

Training Grant. Mental Health First AidTM is

an 8-hour training course designed to give

members of the public key skills to help an

individual who is developing a mental health

problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.

The new instructors are now certified to

teach the 8-hour program to a variety of audiences,

ranging from educators and school

staff, law enforcement, higher education,

veterans, immigrants and refugees, and community

members at large. These adult and

youth MHFA courses will be provided free of

charge across the state through the Community

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

FIRST grant for the next two and a half years.

Over the previous three years, Vermont

Care Partners created a statewide network of

Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA)

instructors who trained over 2,400 Vermonters

in YMHFA, which resulted in 1,326 youth

being referred to mental health services.

Through Community FIRST, 30 new Mental

Health First Aid instructors have now been

trained with the goal of certifying an additional

3,600 community members in youth

and adult Mental Health First Aid.

Included on SAMHSA’s National Registry

of Evidence Based Programs and Practices,

studies show that training in Mental Health

First AidTM builds confidence in helping an

individual experiencing a mental health challenge,

reduces negative or distancing attitudes

towards individuals with mental illnesses,

and increases mental health literacy –

being able to identify, understand and respond

to signs of mental illnesses and substance use

disorders.

Lung Cancer?

Asbestos exposure in industrial,

construction, manufacturing jobs, or

the military may be the cause. Family

in the home were also exposed.

Call 1-866-795-3684 or email

cancer@breakinginjurynews.com.

$30 billion is set aside for asbestos

victims with cancer. Valuable settlement

monies may not reuire ling a lawsuit.

Nurturing Skills for

Families Program

Offered in Northfield

On March 5, 2019, The Nurturing Skills for Families

Program will be offered in Northfield at the United Church.

The program will be offered every Tuesday evening from

5-7pm for 10 weeks. The Nurturing Program is a great way

that parents can improve their parenting skills, meet other

families, learn about children’s growth and development, and

have fun together as a family. Children have their own “learn

and play” groups that are designed for their particular ages.

There is no cost to participating families and dinner and

childcare is provided.

For more information and to register, call Theo Lagerstedt,

Family Service Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or 1-800-244-

5373.

• • •

Connecting Patients

with Life-Saving Bone

Marrow Donors

Every three minutes, one person is diagnosed with a blood

cancer. Every 10 minutes, someone dies from a blood cancer.

That’s more than six people each hour, or 148 people each

day. Patients are searching for a cure. It could be you.

The Be The Match Registry® is operated by the National

Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP), a nonprofit organization

that’s dedicated to creating an opportunity for all patients to

receive the marrow or umbilical cord blood transplant they

need, when they need it. It is the largest and most diverse

donor registry in the world. Our partnerships with international

and cooperative registries provide doctors with access

to more than 33 million potential donors and more than

765,000 cord blood units worldwide.

We need donors like you to help be the cure

Seventy percent of all patients who need a transplant don’t

have a fully matched donor in their family. A patient’s likelihood

of finding a matching donor on the Be The Match

Registry is estimated to range from 19-80%, depending on

ethnic background. Our donor and cord blood registries can

only continue to grow if people like you sign up to become a

member of the registry or donate your baby’s umbilical cord

blood. Because of you, more patients will be able to receive a

life-saving transplant.

You can make a difference – whether through bone marrow

donation, giving a financial gift or volunteering – and turn the

impossible into the achievable for a patient in need of a cure.

You never know when you could be the cure. Join the Be

The Match Registry today.

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 19


CENTRAL VERMONT

ROTARY CLUB

Gifts for

Everyone you love!

Dinner Raffle

Silent Auction

The Steak House - Barre-Montpelier Road

Friday, Feb. 8, 2019

Hors d’oeuvres, Silent Auction at 6pm

Dinner at 7pm

$2500 First Prize

$200 Second Prize

$100 Third Prize

$100 Fourth Prize

$100 Fifth Prize

Two Other Cash Prizes $100

Plus (1) Last Chance Drawing

(must be present to win) $250

PLUS Merchandise, Dinner Prizes &

a Fabulous Silent Auction.

Lots of Surprises

NEW! ITALIAN BUFFET DINNER!

CHICKEN PARMESAN, CHEESE RAVIOLI,

PASTA PRIMAVERA, ITALIAN MEATBALLS, HOT

VEGETABLES, GREEN SALAD, CAESAR SALAD,

FRUIT SALAD, ROLLS, COFFEE, SPECIAL DESSERT

& LOTS OF CHOCOLATES AT EACH TABLE!

Tickets $100 each

includes 2 Dinners & Raffle

Call Gary Hass

479-2582 for more Info/Reservation

Sensual & Natural

Suggestions for

Valentine’s Gifts

Oils, Bubbles, Soaps & Candles

Lovely Lingerie

223-7752

67 N. Main St.

Thursday, February 14

8AM - 8PM

Central VT area, Mad River Valley, Stowe,

Waterbury, Barre/Montpelier, Burlington

(as schedules permit—call early!)

ONLY $40

$20 for telephoned deliveries to any U.S. number

Includes a song or two, a rose or chocolates, and

customized card delivered by a quartet from the

Barre-Tones women’s barbershop chorus

info@BarretonesVT.com or call 552-3489

Valentine’s Gifts for Your No. 1 Guy

As Valentine’s Day approaches, the pressure is on to find ideal gifts

for a special sweetheart. The National Retail Federation indicates

shoppers spent around $19.6 billion on Valentine’s Day gifts in 2018,

a dramatic increase from the year prior.

When gifting the men in

their lives, others may be

hard pressed to find an ideal

gift for the guy who seems

to have it all. Even though a

small study published in Psychology

Today determined

that gifting men is seemingly

easier than gifting women —

regardless of who is doing

the buying — there’s a prevailing

stereotype that men

are hard to buy for. That said,

these suggestions for men’s

gifts may get the creative

gifting juices owing.

• Leather gloves: Leaving

home when the weather is

frightful can be a challenge.

But warm, stylish gloves

may help the process along.

Look for gloves that also

have touchscreen compatible

tips, so that he doesn’t have

to remove the gloves to send

that “I (heart) you” text.

• Pixel heart mug: This

heat-changing mug is ideal

for gamers who realize you

need full health, or hearts,

to make it through game

play — or the workday.

The heart illustration turns

red when it’s filled with a

hot beverage. This mug is

available from Kikkerland

on Amazon.

• Luxury shave kit: More

men are realizing that

indulging in quality grooming

items does not require

checking manliness at the

door. In fact, it is quite

trendy for men to use products

entirely geared toward

Send something special

to a loved one!

SAX-O-GRAM

FOR YOUR

VALENTINE

eventsrusvermont@gmail.com

802-249-0414

their skin and hair types,

with more masculine scents.

• Portable record player: If

he’s a music buff and has

collected vintage albums

through the years, give him a

modern way to play them. A

wireless, Bluetooth-enabled

turntable can be a heartfelt

and practical gift.

• Whiskey-inspired gifts:

From whiskey barrelfaced

watches to jumbo

ice wedges to chill without

watering drinks down,

whiskey gifts are definitely

trending upward. Of course,

a good bottle of single-malt

is certainly a winning go-to

gift as well.

• Wireless phone charger:

Tame that cord clutter with

a gizmo that can quickly

charge his phone and have

him ready to take your calls

or receive your texts.

Two love songs played by a

well-known sax musician

at your home, office, restaurant.

Add a rose and/or chocolate to

your gift for a special touch!

Cookies by

Cookie Kreations in Every

Arrangement - Every Day!

ASSORTED

GIFTS &

VALENTINE CARDS

LADDER

“Where Heroes Are Made"

JEWELERY

The Northfield Pharmacy

MON.-FRI. 9-6; SAT. 9-2; SUN. 8-NOON

DEPOT SQUARE • NORTHFIELD

485-4771

FREE *

$10 GIFT

CERTIFICATE TO

1

GRILL

WITH VALENTINE FLORAL DELIVERIES

IN BARRE, MONTPELIER & SELECT

SURROUNDING AREAS BY

Emslie the Florist

& Gifts

14 No. Main Street, Barre, VT

476-3126

www.emslieandco.com

*$10 Gift Certificate & Cookie will be with every

Valentine's Day Arrangement delivered on Feb. 11, 12 , 13 & 14.

page 20 The WORLD February 6, 2019

Rubber Bubbles will make the

STUFFED

BALLOONS

LOVE

NOVELTIES

MASSAGE

OILS

RISE!

Open VLENTINE'S DAY

THURSDAY, FEB. 14

9:30 am-5:30 pm

SOFT

PLUSH

Valentine

Orb Balloons!

FREE Delivery in local area on Feb. 14th

With purchases over $30.00

Stuffed Balloons make the Best Gift!

Rubber Bubbles

Balloon & Party Supply

802-476-6011 Barre-Montpelier Rd.

Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-2:00

DELICATE DECADENCE

BARRE’S HOMETOWN BAKERY

CUSTOM CAKES

AND DESSERTS

Specialty Cupcakes

& Cookies

Assorted Cookie Gift Box

Raspberry Macaroons

French Macarons

Mon., Tues.&Thurs. 8-4:30

Wed.& Fri. 8-5:30

Sat. 8-2pm

15 cottage street

barre•479-7948

ddbakeryVT@gmail.com

delicate-decadence.com

Reserve Now for

Valentine’s

Day

Dinner!

It promises to

be a very

romantic

experience!

Barre-Montpelier Road

www.SteakHouseBarre.com 479-9181

Roses are red,

Violets are blue,

And we sure do

appreciate

Fine folks like

you!

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

171 North Main Street, Barre • 476-6700

Mon.-Fri. 9-6 | Sat. 9-1 We belong to the Flower Shop Network!

www.forgetmenotflowers.barre.com


Shop Locally for

Valentine’s Day Numbers to Know

Valentine’s Day is one of the most

popular days of the year to celebrate.

Here’s a look at some interesting

numbers associated with this day to

celebrate the love people have for one

another.

400: The year that Pope Gelasius declared February 14 a day

to honor Saint Valentine.

62: The percentage of adults who say they celebrate the

holiday.

1.7: The amount, in billions, that is spent on candy for Valentine’s

Day, according to the National Retail Federation.

512: The average dollar amount spent per person for Valentine’s

Day.

58: The number of pounds, in millions, of chocolate bought

during Valentine’s Day week.

150: The number of cards and gifts, in millions, sent each

year for the day of love.

1: The dollar amount, in billions, that Americans are expected

to spend on Valentine’s Day cards.

1 Percentage of men who purchase owers or plants for

Valentine’s Day.

15: Average cost, in dollars, of a box of chocolates.

8.6: Amount of dollars, in millions, spent on sparkling wine

for Valentine’s Day, making it the second most popular occasion,

after New Year’s Eve, to enjoy some bubbly.

150: The average amount, in dollars, men spend on gifts.

Women spend an average of $74 on gifts.

2: The ranking of red roses in comparison to other types of

owers gifted.

Sources: NRF, Greeting Card Association, National Confectioners Association,

U.S. Postal Service, USDA.

Sweet treats for

your sweetie at

Capital Kitchen

18 State Street, Montpelier

capitalkitchenvt.com

The Best

Selection

of Local

Craft Beers

& Wines

Beverage Baron

411 North Main Street

Barre

Bragg Farm Sugarhouse

& Gift Shop

1005 VT 14N, East Montpelier

802-223-5757

www.braggfarm.com

Valentine Cards

Northfield Pharmacy

Depot Square • Northfield

802- 485-4771

10 to 12 dessert sized truffl es

$2.50 ea. in a lovely heart-shaped

box only $25 to $30.

Lots of other sweet treats!

S

5 State St, Montpelier, VT

802-223-7933

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& Your Heart Warm with

YETI Products

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190 No. Main Street, Barre, VT

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To my Valentine...



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(802) 476-4031

Yummy Treats for Valentine’s Day

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15 Cottage Street, Barre

479-7948

20% Off All Jewelry

February 11-14

No. 9 Boutique

75 Main Street, Montpelier, VT

(802) 229-0019

OPEN 7 DAYS

20% OFF ALL JEWELRY

Feb. 8-14

Global Gifts

9 Langdon Street • 229-2777

Open Mon.-Sat. Closed Sun.

Now Offering WeatherTech ®

Floor Mats For most cars & trucks!

Midstate Service

Barre-Montpelier Rd.

802-476-4724

www.midstatedodge.com

Bury The Needle

136 North Main (Suite 2)

Barre

(802) 622-0204

utty Steps ocolate B earts

flavors

Capitol Stationers

Downtown Montpelier

223-2393

FORGET ME NOT

FLOWERS & GIFTS

171 No. Main Street, Barre, VT

802-476-6700

Whimsy Vermont

124 No. Main St., Suite 2, Barre

622-0680

Richard J. Wobby

Jewelers

124 N. Main St.,

Barre, Vt 05641

(802) 476-4031

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 21


Because we love you...

WE’RE OPEN SATURDAYS!

Now Through February 23 rd

BLANKETS | FLANNEL PANTS | ROBES | ROMANTIC GIFTS

Diamond & Sterling Silver

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Happy Valentine’s Day

124 N. MAIN ST. | BARRE, VT 05641 | (802) 476-4031

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com

or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302,

Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m., Thursday preceding

publication. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community

events, which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able

to include ongoing classes.

Ongoing Events

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont at

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Granite Center Garden Club, the Barre Congregational Church.

Runs Apr.-July & Sept.-Nov., 2nd Mon., 6:30PM. Info: www.facebook.com/@granitecentergardenclub.

Church of God of Prophecy, 241 Quarry Hill Rd. Sunday School:

9:30AM; Service: 10:30AM; free potluck dinner: 12PM on 2nd

Sun. Info: (814) 428-2696.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings. Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Wed. of each month. 6PM.

Women & Children 1st: Senior Day Every Wed. Seniors 55 &

older receive 10% off their purchases. 114 N. Main St.,

Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

PAWS. Support for those grieving the loss of a pet. Universalist

Church. 1st Thurs. of month. 7 p.m. Info. beyondthedog97@

gmail.com.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ group,

bowls at Twin City Lanes on Sunday afternoons twice a month. For

dates and times: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm. 479-

9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont. Thurs. at The

Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 6:30-8:30PM.

Playgroup. Aldrich Children’s Library, Every Wed. 9:30-11AM

(*Only during school year.). Sponsored by The Family Center of

Washington County. www.fcwcvt.org

Additional Recycling Collection Center. Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main

St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Jabbok Christian Center Prayer Meeting. 8 Daniel Dr. 6:30-

8PM. 1st & 3rd Thurs. Info: 479-0302.

Medicare and You. Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd and 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 S. Main

St., Every other Tues., 5:30-7PM. Info: 498-3030 (David) or 249-

7931 (Sandy).

Aldrich Public Library Activities. 6 Washington St., 476-7550.

Story Hour: Mon. & Tues.,10:30AM. Reading Circle Book Club:

3rd Wed., 6:30PM. Living & Learning Series: 1st Sun., 1PM.

Senior Day: 1st Wed. 1PM.

Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National Bank,

1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,

Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thurs. during

school year, 9:30-11AM

Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes yearround.

Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer St.,

3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

Feel the Warmth at Maplewoods

Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor

boardroom, 4th Tues. 6:30PM. Info: 476-7550.

Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and caregivers.

Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts, refreshments,

etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40 Washington

St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Free Community Supper: Fri.

5:30-6:30PM; Community Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds &

Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St., Barre. Safe &

supportive place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info & programs, call 479-7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group at the Central Vermont

Home Health & Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is

open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one.

Group 1 Meets every 3rd Wed. 10AM-11:30AM, Group 2 meets

every 2nd Mon. 6PM-7:30PM. Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barre City Police, 15 Fourth

St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

Overeaters Anonymous: 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics,

etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Place & time & info: www.

oavermont.org/meeting- list/ and 863-2655.

BERLIN- The Central Vermont Chess Club at the Hub at the

Berlin Mall. Weds., 6PM-9PM. Bring equipment. All ages and

experience levels welcome. Info: 229-1207.

Drop-in Meditation Sitting Group. W/Sherry Rhynard. CVMC,

conf. room #2, Thurs., 6-7PM. sherry@easeofflow.com or 272-2736.

Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. Capital City Grange 6612

Rt 12. Mon., 6:30-9PM. www.barretonesvt.com 223-2039.

NAMI-VT Connection Recovery Support Group. Central

Vermont Medical Center Boardroom, 130 Fisher Rd. 2nd Thurs.,

4PM. Free. 90-minute recovery support groups for people living

with mental illness. Also at CVTMC, NAMI Vermont Family

Support Group, Room 3, . 4th Mon., 7PM. For families and

friends of individuals living with a mental illness.

Cancer Support Group w/ potluck. 2nd Wed., 6PM. Info: 229-

5931.

Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided, 2nd

Tues. 12-1PM & Writing to Enrich Your Life: For anyone

touched by cancer, 3rd Tues., 12-1PM. Both held at CVMC Cancer

Center resource room. Info. 225-5449.

Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members

welcome. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mon., 6:15PM. 229-0235.

Parkinsons Support Group. Woodbridge Nursing Home, 142

Woodridge Rd, 3rd Thurs., 10AM. Info: 439-5554.

Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, 1st Thurs.,

7-8PM. Free. Info: 371-4152.

Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tues., 6-8:30PM.

Info: 229-5193.

Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference

room #3, 4th Mon., 6:30-8:30PM. 371-4304.

Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition.

CVH, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM.-1:30PM. Info: 479-4250.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. Capstone, 20 Gable Place,

1st & 3rd Tues., 5:30-7PM. Info: (802) 476-0908 or mlferguson2002@yahoo.com.

Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents, etc.

CVMC, 1st Wed., 5:30-7PM. RSVP/Info. 371-4613.

Total Joint Replacement Class. CVMC. Conference Rms 1 & 2.

Free. 1st & 3rd Thurs., 2-3PM. Info: 371-4357.

Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing

Center, 1st Mon., 5:30-7PM. Info: 371-4415.

Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station. Free.

1st Fri., 12-4PM. Appointments required: 371-4198.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Berlin Police, 108 Shed Rd.,

223-4401. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program. United Church

of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info: 728-7714.

continued page 24

You are cordially invited

to our Third Annual

Reasonably-Priced Wines, Champagnes, Craft Beers, Local Chocolates,

Maple Products, Lottery and Scratch-Off Tickets, Gas Cards, etc.

“The Talk of the Town”

Vermont Travelers’ Service Centers

Located off

Exit 7 of I-89 -

Berlin, VT

and other locations

in Central Vermont

Third Annual Sweetheart

of a Sale featuring over 25

crafters & vendors in one spot!

Proceeds benefit local soup kitchens

and Good Samaritan Haven!

Luncheon by: “Two Sisters Catering”

Saturday, February 9th

9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Old Labor Hall

46 Granite St., Barre, VT 05641

page 22 The WORLD February 6, 2019


100%

solar

Powered

11-year-old Fresh Air child Madyson of the Bronx practices her pirouettes with her 12-year-old Fresh

Air sister Addison. Te summer sisters favorite activities include erry picing, oating, riding orses,

and maing up new dances. Poto courtesy of Susanne avas.

For Valentine’s Day,

Give the Gift of Friendship

Make this Valentine’s Day extra special for

your family by giving them the gift of friendship

with a Fresh Air child! Fresh Air summers

are filled with children running through

the sprinklers in the grass, gazing at star-filled

skies and swimming for the first time.

This summer, join volunteer host families

in Central Vermont, and open your heart and

home to a Fresh Air child. Each summer,

thousands of children from New York City’s

low-income communities visit suburban,

rural and small town communities along the

East Coast and Southern Canada through The

Fresh Air Fund’s Friendly Towns Program.

“Hosting is an incredible experience. We

really like idea of giving a new opportunity to

a child and that we could help give Madyson

a broader perspective, since when she visited

us it was her first time away from New York

City.” – Friendly Towns Host mom, Courtney

Partlow of Leesburg, VA.

The Fresh Air Fund, an independent, notfor-profit

agency, has provided free summer

experiences to more than 1.8 million New

York City children from low-income communities

since 1877. Fresh Air children are

boys and girls, from seven to 18 years old,

who live in New York City. Children who are

reinvited by host families may continue with

The Fresh Air Fund through age 18 and can

enjoy extended trips.

For more information on hosting a Fresh

Air child this summer, please contact Renee

Bates at 802-595-2417 or visit The Fresh Air

Fund at www.freshair.org.

FEBRUARY 7 - 11

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© 2019 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 23


unation

188

189

190

191

192

193

194

195

196

197

198

199

FEBRUARY 2019


New Moon Feb. 4, Mo 04:04 PM

First Quarter Feb. 12, Tu 05:26 PM

Full Moon Feb. 19, Tu 10:53 AM

Third Quarter Feb. 26, Tu 06:29 AM

Full Snow Moon: Usually the heaviest snows fall in

February. Hunting becomes very difficult, and hence

to some Native American tribes this was the Hunger

Moon

2 Ground Hog Day

3 Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast

3 Superbowl Sunday

4 Stuffed Mushroom Day

5 Chinese New Years

6 National Chopsticks Day

8 Boy Scout Day

9 National Pizza Day

10 Umbrella Day

11 Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk

12 Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday

14 Ferris Wheel Day

14 Valentine’s Day

15 Susan B Anthony Day

17 Random Acts of Kindness 1

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continued from page 22

BRADFORD- Rockinghorse Support Circle. Grace Methodist

Church. For young women w/ or w/o kids, childcare & transportation

available. Wed., 1-2:30PM. Info: 479-1086.

New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, Mon.,

7-9PM. Info: 1-800-564-2106.

BROOKFIELD - Mothers of Preschoolers. Meal & childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Wed.,

7-8PM. Info: 276-3142.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot Library,

563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups. County Road,

Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Story Time. For ages 0- 5. Chelsea Public Library,

Wed., 1:15PM. Info: 685-2188.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United Church of

Chelsea, North Common, Wed., 5:45PM. Info: 685-2271.

Chronic Conditions Support Group. Chelsea Senior Center, in

the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-

11AM. Info:728-7714.

Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum. Open 3rd Sat. May-

Oct., FREE, 10AM.-12PM. Info: 685-4447.

EAST BARRE- Story Hour. Aldrich Library York Branch, Tues.,

ages 0-3. 10AM., ages 3-5 10:30AM. Info: 476-5118.

E. HARDWICK- Touch of Grace Assembly of God Church,

corner Rts. 15 &16.Sun. worship 10AM; Tues. Bible study (call for

info). Wed. youth group: 5PM dinner, 6PM activity. Info: 472-5550.

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, Sundays, 4-5PM at East Montpelier Elementary.

Music by secular &Christian artists. Info: zabundancejoy@gmail.

com.

Men’s Ministry. Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM. Men’s

Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info: 476-

8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center. 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing and info: 223-3322.

GROTON - YA Book Club: 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK - Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mon.,

8:15AM-9:45AM (except when school not in session).

Story Time & Playgroup. Jaquith Public Library. Wed.,

10-11:30AM. For kids age 0-6. Program not held days Twinfield

Union is closed.

Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common,

Story & Play Group: Wed. 10-11:30AM. Book Group for Adults:

stop by for copy of the book, 4th Mon., 7PM. Info: 426-3581.

MIDDLESEX - Food Shelf. United Methodist Church, Sat.,

9-10:30AM.

MONTPELIER- Free Coffee House Potluck. 1st Fri. at the

Trinity Methodist Church. 7PM-9PM.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series at

the Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-

7:30PM. Free snacks.

LGBTQ Veterans Group, Christ Episcopal Church. 6PM-8:30PM.

2nd & 4th Wed. Info: 825-2045.

2nd Friday Folk Dancing. Montpelier Senior Activity Center.

Donation: $5. November-March. Info: 223-2518.

H E R E ’ S M Y C A R D

Local Businesses

in Central Vermont

A S P E C I A L S U P P L E M E N T T O T H E W O R L D

403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641-2274

802-479-2582 www.vt-world. com e-mail: sales@vt-world.com

Classified

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

Irish Session. Sat.,2PM-5PM & Southern Old Time Music Jam.

2nd and 4th Sun., 10AM-12:30PM. Both take place at Bagitos, 28

Main St.

Sunday School. Christian Science Church, 145 State St., Sun.,

10:30AM.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup. North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club. Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library. 46 Barre St. Over 85 tools.

Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, 58 Barre St. An LGBTQ

group. 3rd Tues., 5:45PM for a casual dinner at a local restaurant.

Info: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org.

Friday Night Group. Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22. Pizza

& social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT. Unitarian

Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation. Mon.,1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults, Fri.

11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State St.

Info: 272-8923.

Open Library. Resurrection Baptist Church. Sun. 12:30-2PM.

Central VT Roller Derby’s Wrecking Doll Society. Intro to roller

derby, gear supplied, bring mouth guard. Montpelier Rec. Center,

Barre St., Sat. 5-6:30PM. Info: www.twincityriot.com.

Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

MSAC Public Activities. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58

Barre St. FEAST Together: Tues. & Fri.,12-1PM (EXCEPT July

24, July 27, July 31, August 3). RSVP 262-6288. Living Strong:

Mon. 2:30-3:30PM. & Fri. 2-3PM; Crafters Group: Wed., 12-2PM.

Photography Club: Thurs., 12-1PM; Ukulele Group: Thurs., 6-8PM;

Walks with Joan: Tues., 10-11AM; Italian Group: Tues., 1:15-

2:45PM; Trash Tramps: Tues., 2-3PM.For info on a listing: 223-

2518.

A Course in Miracles at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up. Connect with local parents to share

advice & info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm, 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Families Anonymous. For families or friends who have issues with

addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany Church, 2nd floor

youth room, Mon., 7-8PM. Info: 229-6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre

St., Wed. 4-6PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals. Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support

group, childcare provided. Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm

St., 2nd Thurs., 6-8PM. Info: 476-1480.

Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135 Main St., Story Time:

Tues/Fri, 10:30AM. Info:223-3338.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group. Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events. 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM. Prayer

Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St. Drop-In Hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support: 3rd

Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri., 9:30-

11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-7:30PM.

Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon. Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tues. & Thurs.

12-1PM., Wed. 7-8PM. Info: 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.

Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM. Info: 249-6825.

continued on next page

Romantic Chamber Music of

Brahms, Saint-Saëns, Massenet, and Piazzolla

plus complimentary cookies prepared by

Chef Andre Burnier in celebration

of Valentine’s Day

Sunday,

February 17

3:00PM

Unitarian Church

of Montpelier

Edward Arron, cello

Jeewon Park, piano

Theodore Arm, violin

Karen Kevra, flute

Tickets: $15-$25 at the door;

in advance at Bear Pond Books,

Montpelier; and online at:

capitalcityconcerts.org


CAPITOL MONTPELIER 229-0343

PARAMOUNT BARRE 479-9621

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343

or www.fgbtheaters.com

CALL OR LOG ON FOR

CURRENT SHOW TIMES

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Wednesday Bargain Matinees.

Free small popcorn with admission.

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Our FGB Theater MOVIE Card is for the movie lover. Tuesday

is your $5 ticket to savings to see the hottest releases.

Maple Jam to Celebrate Valentine’s Day with

an Evening of A Cappella Love Songs

continued from previous page

Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany Church parlor, 115

Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian Church, 3rd Thurs., 1:30-

2:30PM. Info: 1-877-856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM. and Sat., 9:30-

11AM, at Family Center of Washington County. Held during school

year only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support for patients

& caregivers. Info: 1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mon., 12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group. 149 State St., Last Entryway,

First Floor. Peer & professionally led support for people coping

with mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin

Court, 223-3445 & Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent safe

disposal sites.

MEMORY CAFE. is no longer at the Montpelier Senior Activity

Center, 58 Barre St. It is now called MEMORABLE TIMES

CAFE hosted Central Vermont Council on Aging and the State of

Vermont ABLE Library and will be held the 3rd Wednesday of each

month October through March at the Vermont History Center, 60

Washington St., Barre, VT. Contact Barb Asen, CVCOA Family

Caregiver Support Director, at basen@cvcoa.org or 802-476-

2681

Community Song Circle. Center for Arts & Learning, 46 Barre St.

1st Sun. except July/Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@gmail.

com.

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals at Harwood

Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE - “The Role of Power, Authority and Control

in Groups” Monthly Meeting at the Morristown Centennial

Library, 20 Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous: 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics,

etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time: 863-2655.

River Arts Events. Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd Thurs., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation. Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo. Northfield Senior Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. Ages 12-18. Readiness &

Regional Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tues., 6-8:30PM.

Info: capitalcomposite@yahoo.com.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green Mountain Cloggers,

ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM. Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup. United Church of Northfield. Wed., 9:30-11AM. Held

only when school in session. Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Northfield Police, 110 Wall

St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

PLAINFIELD- Farmers Market. Fri., 4-7 P.M., Mill Street.

Local produce, plants, crafts, maple syrup, teas and tea service,

and more.

• • •

Maple Jam, Vermont’s celebrated a cappella jazz septet,

returns to Chandler Center for the Arts with an evening of

classic love songs in honor of Valentine’s Day. The jazzy

vocal masters will share their artistry as part of Chandler’s

intimate “Live & Upstairs!” music series in the Upper Gallery

on Friday, February 15 at 7:30 pm.

Maple Jam is set to serve up a program of romantic sounds

from the “Great American Songbook” in a belated Valentine’s

Day celebration that will warm the hearts of lovers, friends,

and families. The a cappella ensemble last wowed a Chandler

audience in September 2017, opening for vocal music legends

The Persuasions in Chandler Music Hall.

The septet is presently in a studio recording its second CD,

which will feature signature tunes of Frank Sinatra, Antonio

Carlos Jobim, and Miles Davis, as well as music of the bigband

and bebop eras. Their Chandler performance will be

liberally sprinkled with love songs from the upcoming recording,

as well as standards from Maple Jam’s extensive repertoire

of jazz classics.

The master vocalists Maple Jam, all based in Vermont,

include Clara Cavitt, alto; Karen Chickering, soprano; Vikki

Day, alto; Jose Schmidt, bass; Alexandra “Alex” Tursi,

soprano; Maarten van Ryckevorsel, tenor/vocal percussion;

and Andy Warner, baritone. Collectively and individually, the

group members share experiences and roots in a wide range

of the region’s most acclaimed vocal outfits, including the

Vermont Symphony Orchestra Chorus, the Vermont Choral

Union, the Oriana Singers, Counterpoint, Bella Voce, and the

Burlington Choral Society.

Rejoice in a romantic, post-Valentine’s Day evening with

Maple Jam in the Chandler Upper Gallery on Friday, February

15 at 7:30 pm. For tickets and more information, call the

Chandler Box Office at (802) 728-6464, visit chandler-arts.

org, or stop by Chandler weekdays between 12 and 4 pm.

Community Supper Support Group, Grace United Methodist

Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. the Community Center. Fri., 5-6PM. Info:

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities. Classic Book Club: 1st

Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info: 454-

8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group. Everyone welcome. The

Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups. Maple Leaf Room at

Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group at the Gifford Medical Center.

2PM-3PM. Meets 2nd Wed. of the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program. Kingwood Health Center (lower

level conf. room), 1422 VT Route 66. Thurs., 10AM-12:30PM. Six

week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Info/

register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT

Rte 66, 2nd Wed.s, 11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Yoga Classes. All ages & levels. Donations benefit Safeline. VTC

Campus Center, last Sun. of month, 2-3:30PM.

Randolph Senior Ctr. Activites, 6 Hale St., Lift for Life Exercises:

8:30AM,Tu/Th & Weds/Fri; Cribbage: Mon., 10AM; Bingo: Mon.,

10:30AM; Bridge: Mon., at the Joslyn House, 2:15PM;Mahjongg:

Tues., 10AM; Crafts: Wed., 10:30AM; Knit-Wits: Thurs., 10AM;

Foot Clinics: 1st Wed., call to sign up; Book Club: 1st Wed.,

12:45PM. Info: 728-9324.

Cancer Support Group. Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tues., 9:30-

11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddler-time,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6PM.

WAITSFIELD - Community Acupuncture Night. Free assessment

& treatment. Donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM. RSVP: 272-3690.

WARREN- Knit and Play. Warren Public Library. Bring your kids

& your projects. All levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities. Art & Adventure w/ April: 3rd

Sat., 1AM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In: Sat.,

10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY - Waterbury Public Library Activities. Preschool

Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby & Toddler Story Time: Mon.,

10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group. Waterbury Ctn

Grange. Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.

Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tues., 6PM.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barretown Police, 149

Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites. continued on next page

CLIP & SAVE

SAMBEL’S! SAMBEL’S!

Book Your Get-togethers, BBQ’s,

Weddings, Anniversaries, etc.

Sambel’s Catering 249-7758

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

CHICKEN PIE SUPPER

Saturday, February 16, 2019

5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

at VFW Post 792

1 Pioneer Street, Montpelier, VT

$10.00 - Seniors $8.00

Ages 6-12 $5.00 5 and under Free

Chicken & Biscuits, Mashed Potato, Squash,

Cole Slaw, Cranberry Sauce, Apple Crisp

Sponsored by Auxiliary to VFW Post 792

CLIP & SAVE

Montpelier Antiques Market

DATES:

February 10 & 24

March 10 & 24

April 14

Canadian Club, 414 E. Montpelier Rd. (Rte. 14) Barre, VT

8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Early Buyers $5 (8 AM) General $2 (9 AM)

Don Willis Antiques

(802) 751-6138 for info

www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com

CLIP & SAVE

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An Old-Fashioned

Barre, Vermont Favorite.

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February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 25

CLIP & SAVE


California Guitar Trio and Montreal Guitar Trio @

UVM Recital Hall

February 8, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Shanghai Opera Symphony Orchestra @ Lyndon

Institute Auditorium

February 13, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Kurt Vile & The Violators @ Higher Ground

February 14, 2019 @ 8:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Matt Nathanson @ Higher Ground

February 28, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Ranky Tanky @ UVM Recital Hall

March 8, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Storm Large @ Flynn Center

March 9, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Marcia Ball and Sonny Landreth @ Lebanon Opera

House

March 10 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Québecfest @ Flynn Center

March 15, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Dervish @ Barre Opera House

March 16, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

The Secret Sisters @ Barre Opera House

March 23, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

oncert

Connections

Frankenstein @ Fuller Hall

March 27, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

The Allman Betts Band @ Strand Theatre

March 30, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Fatoumata Diawara @ Highland Center for the Arts

March 31, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Angélique Kidjo @ Flynn Center

April 3 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Choir of Clare College @ United Community

Church

April 4 @ 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn @ Barre Opera

House

April 6 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Once @ Barrette Center for the Arts

April 10 @ 7:30 pm - May 19 @ 10:00 pm

Jethro Tull @ Lebanon Opera House

April 18 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Ballet Hispánico @ Lyndon Institute Auditorium

April 26 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at

www.pointfm.com

ART EXHIBITS

BARRE- Studio Place Arts Presents in the Main Floor

Gallery: Strictly Sedimentary: Layer upon layer, this group

show exposes the rich variety of work that defines collage art;

in the Second Floor Gallery: Going on Twenty: This show

features the artwork of longtime painting instructor Jeneane

Lunn and a group of nearly 20 of her students; in the Third

Floor Gallery: Interaction: Alexandra Turner and Alissa

Faber explore the connections between the organic and vitreous

through combinations of objects from the forest and glass.

Run until March 9, 2019. Info: www.studioplacearts.com.

CHELSEA- Aspects of the Universe: Paintings in Acrylic

and Watercolor by Marina Sprague at the Chelsea Public

Library, 296 VT-110. Runs 1/2-2/28. Open Reception: 1/25,

6PM-8PM. Info: www.chelsealibrary.com, 685-2188.

HARDWICK- The Buffalo Mountain Food Coop & Cafe

presents !SCRAWL WALL! Join us in our first ever community

involved interactive art wall. The purpose is to create an

accessible medium for all to scrawl on in hopes to make a finalized

mural. Individuals encouraged to create/add on to an existing

drawing to create a bigger picture. Runs until 1/31.

JEFFERSONVILLE- Bryan Memorial Gallery Presents

Sandra fw Beaty in a Pop Up Gallery Exhibition, Creating

With Paper. This exhibit will feature Beaty’s brilliant paper

collages of scenes from her many travels. Papers from all over

the world are utilized in her depictions of locations familiar and

unfamiliar. Runs 2/1 - 2/8. The gallery is open Friday – Sunday,

11 – 4 and by appointment. Info: www.bryangallery.org.

MARSHFIELD- Jaquith Invitational Art Show at the Jaquith

Library, Old Schoolhouse Common, 122 School St. 15 Local

Artists - various media. Runs 1/5-2/28. Info: 426-3581.

MONTPELIER- Endangered Alphabets at the VT State

House Cafeteria. Brookes explores the elements of calligraphy,

woodwork, linguistics, anthropology and human rights to

address a question that is rarely asked, but directly affects hundreds

of millions of people worldwide: what happens when a

culture loses its alphabet? Runs 1/3-2/1. Info: https://curator.

vermont.gov.

Thomas Waterman Wood – The Master Copies at the T.W.

Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. Wood created portraits across the US

and Canada which lead to a trip to Europe in 1858 with his wife.

While Wood was in Europe, he fell in love with the paintings of

the European Masters. Runs 10/30– 6/1/2019. Also at

T.W.:“Close to the Cloth,” A textile exhibit featuring the work

of Barbara Bendix, Karen Henderson, Stephanie Krauss, Skye

Livingston, Kate Ruddle and Neysa Russo. Gallery hours are

Tuesday-Saturday 12-4PM and by appointment. All shows are

free and open to the public. Runs 2/16-3/29. OpenReception,

3/7, 5PM-7PM. Demo Day, 3/23, 1PM-3PM. Info: www.

twwoodgallery.org.

Fellow Travelers, an Exhibit of Ann Young’s Paintings at the

Vermont Supreme Court Gallery. This talented multidisciplinary

Northeast Kingdom artist has a strong background in ceramic

sculpture, illustration, site specific instillation, and painting.

Runs 1/3–3/28. Info: annyoung773@gmal.com.

The annual Winter Juried Exhibit and “Something Dear” at

the T. W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. The Juried Exhibit will be

on view in the Contemporary Gallery (runs 1/8-3/1) and

“Something Dear” will be presented by the Photographer’s

Workroom in the Group Exhibitions Hallway (runs 1/8-2/15).

We invite you to visit the gallery, view the work, and find your

own personal favorite! Free & open to all. Info: www.twwoodgallery.org.

SHOW 30 at the Front, 6 Barre St. Opening reception on 2/1,

4PM-8PM. Live music, food and drink while you take in recent

works by the membership of Montpelier’s sole collective art

gallery! Free. The gallery is open Fridays, 4-7PM; Saturdays,

11AM- 5PM; and Sundays, 11AM-5PM; and by appointment.

Runs 1/25-3/9. Info: email info@thefrontvt.com, 552-0877.

NORTHFIELD- 200 Years—200 Objects at Norwich

University’s Sullivan Museum and History Center. The state’s

only Smithsonian Affiliate features permanent exhibitions and

changing exhibitions. Open reception on 2/15, 4-6PM. Free &

open to the public Mon-Fri., 8AM-4PM. Runs until 12/21. Info:

www.norwich.edu/museum.

RANDOLPH- Paper Possibilities at the Chandler Center for

the Arts. An intriguing exhibit of ten artists who use paper in

diverse and innovative ways. Runs until 3/2 with regular hours

Fri & Sat. 12 – 6PM. The exhibit will also be open during

Chandler performances.

‘Vanishing Vermont Landmarks’at Gifford Medical Center.

Pen-and-ink drawings by Sandra Brockmeyer Button, whose

work captures the character of historic barns and other farm

buildings. Free & open to the public. Runs until 2/13. Info:

728-2380.

page 26 The WORLD February 6, 2019

Weekly Guided Nature Walks, Barre Town Forest. 9AM. Meet at

44 Brook St. Websterville. All ages & dogs on leashes welcome.

Easy to moderate. Tues. (unless it’s raining enough for an umbrella)

through September. Info: 476-4185.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study. New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church,

Sun., 6PM. Info: 476-3221.

WOODBURY- Woodbury Community Library Winter Hours:

Mon/Wed., 1-5PM, Sat., 10AM-12PM. Knitting/Handworkers’

Circle: Sat., 10AM-12PM. All ages & abilities.Valley Lake Road.

Info: 472-5710.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Wednesday, February 6

BARRE- GED Testing at the Barre Learnng Center, 46 Washington

St. 4PM-9PM. Info: 476-4588.

EAST MONTPELIER- Orchard Valley Walk-Through, Grace

Farm Campus, 2290 VT Rt. 14 N. 8:30AM-10:30AM. Preregistration

required. Info: www.ovws.org.

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week Movie: Love After Love at the

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6PM-8PM. $5

donation. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org, 533-2000.

MONTPELIER- Farmer’s Night: An Evening with Langston

Hughes, Vermont Statehouse. 7:30PM. In this dramatic rendition

of Langston Hughes’ poems and short stories, actor and writer

David Mills celebrates the life of the Harlem Renaissance writer.

Free & open to the public.

Climate Change: The Vermont Perspective at the MSAC.

1-3PM. Prof. Gillian Galford reviews our future climate and its

impacts on communities, natural resources, agriculture and

tourism. Info: 223-2518.

Free Tax Preparation, Kellogg-Hubbard Library. 2PM-7PM.

Info: 477-5176.

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday

6:00AM - News

7:00AM - ArtfulWordInternationalFestPart3

7:30AM - I Want My Life Back Better

8:00AM - News

09:00AM - ArtfulWordInternationalFest

09:30AM - ArtfulWordAnaisMitchell

10:00AM - Government Matters

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Abled and On Air

3:00PM - Here We Are with guest Annie

Richards

4:00PM - Vermont State House

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - ArtfulWordInternationalFestPart3

7:30PM - I Want My Life Back Better

8:00PM - The Folklorist

09:00AM - ArtfulWordInternationalFest

10:00PM - The Curious Giraffe Show

Season 1

11:00PM - Dukes of Sports

Thursday

6:00AM - News

7:00AM - Charlie Daniels Interview in 2007

7:30AM - Lifelines is an educational, prolife

issue program

8:00AM - The Curious Giraffe Show

Season 1

9:00AM - All Things LGBTQ

10:00AM - The Folklorist

11:00AM - Dukes of Sports

12:00PM - Wednesday Night Live with

Lesley Grant

2:00PM - JD Aired Out Talk Show

3:30PM - Oak Ridge Boys Interview in

2004

4:00PM - ESRD - Kidney Health

5:00PM - Not Just Rock ‘n Roll

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Charlie Daniels Interview in 2007

7:30PM - Lifelines is an educational, prolife

issue program

8:00PM - Constitutional Crisis? Series -

The Powers of the Presidency

10:00PM - The Cinemaniacs

11:00PM - Sports

Friday

6:00AM - News

7:00AM - The Time is Now

7:30AM - Lifelines is an educational, prolife

issue program

8:00AM - News

9:00AM - The Kingdom of Light Network

10:00AM - The Cinemaniacs

11:00AM - Aging Insights

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Sports

4:00PM - Vermont State House

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - JD Aired Out Talk Show

8:30PM - The Time is Now

9:00PM - LarnerUVMHealthDisparitiesMLK

F 01232019

11:00PM - Ghost Chronicles-Next

Generation

Saturday

6:00AM - Barre Congregational Church

7:30AM - Independent Lifestyles

8:00AM - News

9:00AM - Health Talk

10:00AM - Washington Baptist Church

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Barre Congregational Church

4:00PM - JD Aired Out Talk Show

5:30PM - Aging Insights

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Under The Golden Dome 2019

8:00PM - Ghost Chronicles-Next

Generation

9:00PM - Health Talk

10:00PM - VT Digger Presents Digger Dish

- Senator Tim Ashe

Sunday

6:00AM - Washington Baptist Church

7:30AM - ESRD - Kidney Health

8:00AM - COPC Sermon

9:00AM - 05 Feb 03, 2019 TV Mass cc

10:00AM - New England Uncut - Episode

12:00PM - Barre Congreg Church

2:00PM - Cooking Show

3:00PM - COPC Sermon

4:00PM - Wash Baptist Church

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

ORCA Media Channel 15

Public Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, February 6

6:00a Understanding Vt's Opioid Crisis

7:30a Your Spark of Humanity

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Celluloid Mirror

9:30a Octagon St. Laveau

10:00a Salaam/Shalom - Report on

Palestine/Israel

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Havana Fairfax Connection

2:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

2:30p Pollinator Epiphany

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Christ Church Concert Series

5:00p Tales from A Winter's Eve

7:00p Plan V

8:00p The Artful Word

9:00p Women Preventing Gun-Related

Domestic Violence

11:00p A Showcase of Fun

Thursday, February 7

6:00a Words On Film

7:00a U32, an Experiment in Public

Education

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a The Science of Effective Prevention

10:30a Havana Fairfax Connection

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Mad River Glen Today

2:30p Eckankar

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Understanding Vt's Opioid Crisis

5:30p A Showcase of Fun

6:30p Your Spark of Humanity

7:00p Tales from A Winter's Eve

9:00p Senior Moments

11:00p Extempo

Friday, February 8

6:00a Senior Moments

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

12:00p Brunch With Bernie

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

5:00PM - Christ Community Church

6:00PM - Sports

8:00PM - St. Luke Utd Methodist Church

09:30PM - Oak Ridge Boys Interview 2004

10:00PM - Barre Congreg Church

Monday

6:00AM - Energy Week

7:00AM - FOCUSHumanTrafficking

8:00AM - Science & Technology

9:00AM - HavanaFairfax

10:00AM - Sports

12:00PM - Entertainment

1:00PM - WHC Evolution of the 19th

Century Silhouette

3:00PM - TSC History of Brookfield’s

Floating Bridge

4:00PM - New England Uncut - Episode

5:00PM - Prideability: Episode 10

6:00PM - Addiction Recovery

7:00PM - FOCUSHumanTrafficking

8:00PM - Inspiring Careers

9:00PM - Black River JV Boys’ Basketball

vs Green Mountain

10:00PM - JD Aired Out Talk Show

Tuesday

6:00AM - News

7:00AM - Lifelines is an educational, prolife

issue program

7:30AM - Inspiring Careers

8:00AM - News

9:00AM - Addiction Recovery

10:00AM - Learning Music With Pat

12:00PM - Entertainment

01:00PM - HavanaFairfax

2:00PM - Sports

4:00PM - Energy Week

5:00PM - Prideability: Episode 10

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Mad River Glen

7:30PM - Goals vs Opportunities

8:00PM - Science & Technology

9:00PM - The World Fusion Show

10:00PM - WHC Evolution of the 19th

Century Silhouette

11:00PM - Classic Movies: Night Train to

Munich

MORRISVILLE- Cults & Culture Discussion Group Meeting

at Morristown Centennial Library, 20 Lower Main St. 5:30PM-7PM.

Free & open to the public. Everyone who has an interest in how

misused power can harm is welcome in this respectful community

dialog. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

RANDOLPH- Mini Mud Youth Variety Show Auditions at the

Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Age 6-18. Sign-up/

info: 728-3038.

Thursday, February 7

BARRE- Blue Fox (Acoustic) at Gusto’s. 5PM. All ages. Open

Mic, 8PM. 21+. Info: 476-7919.

Free Tax Preparation at Capstone Community Action 20 Gable

Place. 9AM-3PM. Info: 477-5176.

GREENSBORO- Scrag Mountain Music, Highland Center for

the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 1PM-2PM. Free school program; a

series of fun, sophisticated, and accessible performances featuring

classical music inspired by well-known children’s tales. ALSO at

HCA: Music @ The Café: New Suede Blues at the Highland

Center for the Arts. 6PM-8PM. A night of funky roadhouse bluesrock.

No cover, please tip your performers and servers. Info: www.

highlandartsvt.com.

WASHINGTON- Free Discover Girl Scouts Event, Washington

Village School, 72 School Lane. 6PM-7PM. Free. Meet local Girl

Scouts and volunteers; learn about expanded STEM and outdoor

programs; enjoy fun, girl-led activities; explore programs; learn

about volunteer opportunities. Info: www.girlscoutsgwm.org.

Friday, February 8

BARRE- Jeff Shelley & Patty Lynch (Acoustic) at Gusto’s.

5PM. All ages. Also, Nite Sky, 9PM. 2$5. 1+. Info: 476-7919.

GREENSBORO- Opening Reception for Kate Emlen, Highland

Center for the Arts. 5PM. Emlen is a thoughtful painter who paints

both the fields and forests of VT and the coast of ME. Free. RSVP/

Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- 2019 Friday Night Reading Series Kick-off in

Café Anna, VCFA. 5:30PM. Readings of fiction, poetry comics,

and graphic memoir. Free & open to the public. Free snacks provided

and drinks available for purchase.

RANDOLPH- ‘Four Fridays in February: Living Through

Loss’ Series in the Red Clover Conference RM at Gifford

Medical Center. 12PM-1:30PM. Weekly bereavement series open

to anyone who has experienced loss of a loved one (death/relationship

change/divorce). Free. Info: teberhardt@giffordmed.org,

728-2107.

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

10:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

Friday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Barre Supervisory Union

9:00AM - Barre Supervisory Union

12:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

3:00PM - Barre Town Select Church

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - Washington Baplist

Church

5:00PM - Barre Congreg Church

7:00PM - News

09:30PM - First Presbyterian Church

11:30PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

6:00AM - Barre Congreg Church

9:00AM - Washington Baplist

Church

10:00AM - First Presbyterian Church

12:30PM - Barre Congreg Church

2:30PM - Washington Baplist

continued on next page

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

3:30PM - Christ Community Church

6:00PM - First Presbyterian Church

9:30PM - Barre Congreg Church

10:50PM - First Presbyterian Church

Monday

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House

Programming

3:00PM - Barre Act 46

6:00PM - State House Programming

7:00PM - Barre Act 46

10:00PM - Barre Act 46

Tuesday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Barre Act 46

9:00AM - Barre Act 46

12:00PM - Barre Act 46

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 6:00a Human Trafficking - Its Context and 3:00p First Wednesdays

Thu, February 7

2:00p Energy Week

Its Effect in Vermont

5:00p U-32 School Board

7:00a Artificial Intelligence Task Force

3:00p Democracy Now!

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema 7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board 11:00a VT Digger

4:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

8:00a Democracy Now!

LIVE

12:00p Vermont State House

5:00p Plan V

9:00a Vote for Vermont

Thursday, February 7

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

6:00p The Artful Word

10:00a Plan V

12:00p Harwood Unified

8:00p Waterbury Selectboard

7:00p Understanding Vt's Opioid Crisis 11:00a The Artful Word

4:00p Berlin School Board

11:00p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

8:30p Gay USA

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 8:00p Washington Central Supervisory Fri, February 8

9:30p League of Women Voters

1:00p Celluloid Mirror

Union

7:00a Berlin Selectboard

11:30p St. Laveau's World Cinema 1:30p Octagon St. Laveau

11:00p New England Cooks

8:30a Berlin Development Review Board

Saturday, February 9

2:00p The Legal Edition

Friday, February 8

6:00a Mad River Glen Today

2:30p Yoga for You

10:30a Middlesex Selectboard

12:00p Washington Central Supervisory

6:30a Pollinator Epiphany

3:00p Democracy Now!

12:00p Moretown Selectboard

Union

7:00a Eckankar

4:00p 4th Annual Festival Of Trees

3:00p Central Vermont Fiber

3:00p Berlin School Board

7:30a Abled to Cook

5:00p League of Women Voters

6:00p Rochester Selectboard

7:00p Preserving State Street

8:00a Tales from A Winter's Eve

7:00p U32, an Experiment in Public

8:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

10:00p Game of the Week

10:00a League of Women Voters

Education

11:00p VT Digger

12:30p House at Pooh Corner

8:00p Snowboarding in Southern Vermont

Saturday, February 9

Sat, February 9

1:30p The Science of Effective Prevention 9:00p House at Pooh Corner

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute 6:00a CV Regional Planning Commission

3:00p Bear Pond Books Events

10:00p Mad River Glen Today

2:00p New England Cooks

8:30a Vermont State House

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

11:00p Words On Film

3:00p Preserving State Street

12:00p Randolph Selectboard

5:00p Washington Baptist Church Tuesday, February 12

5:30p North Branch Nature Center 5:00p Calais Selectboard

6:00p Words On Film

6:00a Snowboarding in Southern Vermont

8:00p U-32 School Board

8:00p Green Mountain Care Board

7:00p The Legal Edition

7:00a The Legal Edition

11:00p Astronomy for Everyone

11:30p Under The Golden Dome

7:30p Yoga for You

7:30a Yoga for You

Sunday, February 10

Sun, February 10

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

8:00a Democracy Now!

12:00p Orange SW Supervisory Union

7:00a Waterbury Selectboard

9:00p Vote for Vermont

9:00a Women Preventing Gun-Related 3:30p East Montpelier School Board

10:00p Octagon St. Laveau

Domestic Violence

6:00p Higher Education

10:00a Berlin Selectboard

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror 11:00a Extempo

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

12:00p Vermont State House

Sunday, February 10

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program Monday, February 11

4:00p Montpelier Development Review

6:00a A Showcase of Fun

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

12:00p Middlesex Town School District

Board

7:00a Bear Pond Books Events

2:00p U32, an Experiment in Public Board

6:30p Montpelier Design Review

8:30a Energy Week

Education

3:30p Astronomy for Everyone

Committee

9:30a Washington Baptist Church 3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Higher Education

9:00p Montpelier City Council

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

4:00p Human Trafficking - Its Context and 5:00p VT State Board of Education Mon, February 11

11:00a House at Pooh Corner

Its Effect in Vermont

Tuesday, February 12

7:00a Moretown Selectboard

12:00p Women Preventing Gun-Related 5:30p Abled and on Air

12:00p North Branch Nature Center 10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

Domestic Violence

6:30p Abled to Cook

2:30p Osher Lecture Series

12:00p Bethel Selectboard

2:00p Extempo

7:00p 4th Annual Festival Of Trees 5:00p Orange SW Supervisory Union 4:00p Middlesex Selectboard

3:00p Senior Moments

7:30p Pollinator Epiphany

8:00p Middlesex Town School District 5:30p Montp Planning Commission LIVE

5:00p Vote for Vermont

8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

Board

Tue, February 12

7:00p Havana Fairfax Connection 9:00p Bear Pond Books Events ORCA Media Channel 17 7:00a Calais Selectboard

8:00p Your Spark of Humanity

10:30p Myra Flynn

Government Access 10:30a Under The Golden Dome

8:30p Abled and on Air

Weekly Program Schedule 11:00a Central Vermont Regional Planning

9:30p Abled to Cook

ORCA Media Channel 16 Wed, February 6

Commission

10:00p Human Trafficking - Its Context and Education Access 7:00a Bethel Selectboard

1:30p Vermont State House

Its Effect in Vermont

Weekly Program Schedule 11:00a Green Mountain Care Board 5:30p Montpelier Design Review

11:30p Celluloid Mirror

Wednesday, February 6

3:00p Randolph Selectboard

Committee

Monday, February 11

12:00p East Montpelier School Board 6:30p Montpelier City Council

7:00p Montp Development Review Board

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net


Bob Dylan Wannabe Contest

This Saturday at Mingle Nightclub

Attention all Bob Dylan Wannabes in central Vermont and

beyond (and we know there are many, many of you out there,

be at Mingle Nightclub in downtown Barre this Saturday

night for a really fun solo contest.

Mingle Nightclub owners, Scott & Connor Mears, has

wanted to host this event for a long time and has extensively

researched how to do it right. “I know a number of years ago

a Montpelier music store owner, Patrick Mulligan, came up

with a Bob Dylan Wannabe event at the Unitarian Church and

attracted about 50 people,” recalls Mears, adding “It soon

grew to an event at Montpelier City Hall that attracted 400

people.”

Mears attended three or four of those events and was quite

impressed. He has also attended the real Bob Dylan performance

multiple times and Bob Dylan’s opening for the

Grateful Dead in Highgate, VT.

Helping Mears on this event is Barre native and multimusic

technician Jim Miller who has worked on a Bob Dylan

production as a “Roadie.” Also as a roadie for the Johnny

Saturday, February 9

BARRE- Tender Loving Homecare 2nd Annual Kick for Care,

Spaulding High School Athletic Fields. Team reg., $150 due by 2/2.

The event will sponsor 2 rooms at the Tender Loving Respite House

specifically reserved for veterans, as well as a handicapped accessible

ramp for the facility. Info: 622-1112.

Come Solve the Mystery “A Rocky Night in a Mountain

Chalet” and Enjoy a Roast Pork Dinner at the edding United

Methodist Church. 12Pm & 5PM. Limited seating. Tickts on sale at

Women & Children First. Tickets & Info: 839-9376.

LaFountaine (DJ) at Gusto’s. 9:30PM. 21+. Info: 476-7919.

Free Tax Preparation, Aldrich Public Library. 10AM-2PM. Info:

477-5176.

CRAFTSBURY- Bluegrass Gospel Project, Music Box. 7:30PM.

Original, time-honored, and contemporary Americana music. Info:

www.themusicboxcraftsbury.org.

GREENSBORO- Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival:

Dateline Saigon, Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St.

4PM-5:30PM. $10/$8. At 6:30PM: All The Wild Horses. Info:

www.highlandartsvt.org.

JEFFERSONVILLE- Eric Tobin Winter Painting

Demonstration, Bryan Memorial Gallery. 1PM-3PM. Awardwinning

VT artist Tobin will complete a large format painting from

start to finish, including commentary about composition and palette,

as he works. Free. RSVP: 644-5100.

MONTPELIER- Winter Wild Edibles, North Branch Nature

Center, 10AM-1PM. Bundle up and join NBNC teacher naturalist

Ken Benton to forage and cook a variety of wild foods from the

land. RSVP required: northbranchnaturecenter.org.

Scrag Mountain Music Presents Musical Storytelling for All

Ages at Lost Nation Theater. 4PM. “Come as you are. Pay what you

can.” with at-will donations collected. Securing your seats in

advance at www.scragmountainmusic.org. Space is limited.

NORTHFIELD- Valentine’s Dance with the Rock Band

MIRAGE at Northfield’s American Legion. 7PM-11PM. $8

cover/21+. Open to the public.

RANDOLPH- Auditions for the Mud Season Variety Show,

Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Appointment only.

Get involved in this favorite frolic of local talent. Performances will

be March 22. Sign-up/info: 234-5514.

TUNBRIDGE- Just Desserts, Tunbridge Central School, 523 VT

RT 110. 7PM-9PM. Desserts, live music, silent auction, door prize.

$5 adminssion, dessert plates $5. Info: 889-5528.

WEST FAIRLEE- Chef Steve’s Famous Spaghetti Dinner &

Chef Pam’s Famous Alfredo Pasta at the Westshire Elementary

School. 5PM-7PM. A fundraiser event. Info: 685-3141.

• • •

Sunday, February 10

BARRE- Antiques Market at the Canadian Club, 414 E.

Montpelier Rd. 8AM. Info: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com.

EAST MONTPELIER- Come to Antarctica at the Four Corners

Schoolhouse, 495 Vincent Flats Rd. 3PM. Join fellow armchair

travellers for a slideshow about Julie Potter’s 2017 trip to

Antarctica. Info: 4cornersschoolhouse@gmail.com.

MONTPELIER- Introductory Wildlife Tracking at the North

Branch Nature Center, 713 Elm St. 9AM-1PM. Info:

NorthBranchNatureCenter.org, 229-6206.

Dance, Sing, and Jump Around! A Family Dance for All Ages at

the Capital City Grange. 3PM-4:30PM. All dances taught and

called, live music. Free parking. Suggested donation: $5/adult, kids/

free. NO ONE turned away! Info: http://dancesingandjumparound.

weebly.com.

MORRISVILLE- Sunday Brunch at the VFW, Pleasant St.

9AM-10:30AM. Scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, Strata, fruit salad,

pancakes, baked beans, sausage gravy w/biscuits, juice, coffee and

more. $10/$5. Info: 888-4919.

Monday, February 11

BARRE- Free Tax Preparation at Capstone Community Action

20 Gable Place. 3PM-7PM. Info: 477-5176.

Tuesday, February 12

BARRE- Free Tax Preparation at Capstone Community Action

20 Gable Place. 3PM-7PM. Info: 477-5176.

Free Discover Girl Scouts Event at the Barre City Elementary &

Middle School, 50 Parkside Terrace. 6PM-7PM. Info: www.

girlscoutsgwm.org.

GREENSBORO- Trivia Tuesdays at the Hardwick Street Cafe,

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6:30PM-7:30PM.

Free. RSVP: 533-9399. Every Tues. thru April.

RANDOLPH- GED Testing at the Randolph Learning Center, 10

S. Main St. REg: 10:30AM; Test: 11AM-4PM. Info: 728-4492.

Wednesday, February 13

CRAFTSBURY- XC Ski with GMC. Moderate. Various distances.

All abilities. Craftsbury Touring Center. Trail fee or pass

Cash Tribute at Mingles recently.

We believe we will have at least 20 contestants, including

two women, ranging in ages from 15-74 years old,”notes

Mears. “That will make about a two and a half hour show.

There will be five to seven judges (including Barre Mayor

Lucas Herring) following a 10-point value criteria for each

contestant.

Incidentally, the 15-year old boy won the contest three years

ago at the Hardwick Coffee House performing a Dylan song.

Mears recently traveled to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida to meet

a friend of Bob Dylan, artisit Heratio Aróme. He is offering,

as a first place prize, a 12 x 18 color-block print art of Bob

Dylan “The American Icon.”

Also, Calendonia Spirits of Hardwick will host a tasting

and cocktail sharing with their famous Barr Hill Spirits line.

Bob Dylan wannabes can contact Mears to register for the

contest at 802-793-8819. The event starts sharply at 7:30pm

but doors open earlier at 6pm. -GH

required. Bring lunch/water/buy at the center. Contact 505-0603 for

meeting time and place.

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week Movie: Unsane, Highland Center

for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6PM-8PM. $5. Info: 533-2000.

MONTPELIER- Farmer’s Night: Vermont Youth Orchestra

String Squad at the Vermont Statehouse. 7:30PM. Hear talented

young musicians from throughout VT perform an eclectic chamber

orchestra program.

Free Tax Preparation, Kellogg-Hubbard Library. 2PM-7PM. Info:

477-5176.

Refugee Resettlement: Globally and Locally at MSAC. 1-3PM.

Hear from Refugee Counselor, Anna Wageling, on how the VT

Committee for Refugees and Immigrants has served over 8,000

refugees and those granted asylum who have established new

homes in VT since 1980. Info: 223-2518.

Thursday, February 14

BARRE- Jacob Green (Acoustic) at Gusto’s. 5PM. All Ages. Bay

6 DJ. 8PM. 21+. Info: 476-7919.

Free Tax Preparation at Capstone Community Action 20 Gable

Place. 9AM-3PM. Info: 477-5176.

GREENSBORO- Valentine’s Day Dinner: A Special Event

Featuring A Four-Course Meal & Music From Sam Bulpin at

the Highland Center for the Arts. 5PM-8PM. $50. Featuring favorite

foodmakers from around the NEK, and continued local musician on page Sam 29

Bulpin on piano for the perfect ambience. Reservations required:

533-9399.

PLAINFIELD- The Plainfield Little Theater Presents the

Merchant of Venice, Plainfield Opera House, 18 High St. 7PM.

Directed by Tom Blachly. 12$/$15. Info: blachly@together.net.

Friday, February 15

BARRE- Joe Sabourin (Acoustic) at Gusto’s. 5PM. All Ages.

NOS482 (Band). 9PM. $5. 21+. Info: 476-7919.

MONTPELIER- Naked in the Lake: A Superior Adventure at

the North Branch Nature Center,. 7PM-8:30PM. Ojibwa legends

and pictographs meet fog, big waves, and rare wildlife. Info: northbranchnaturecenter.org.

PLAINFIELD- The Plainfield Little Theater Presents the

Merchant of Venice, Plainfield Opera House, 18 High St. See 2/14

listing.

Top 10 Video On Demand

1. Night School (PG-13)

Kevin Hart

2. Crazy Rich Asians (PG-

13) Constance Wu

3. Venom (PG-13) Tom

Hardy

4. Bad Times at The El

Royale (R) Jeff Bridges

5. A Simple Favor (R) Anna

Kendrick

6. The Equalizer 2 (R) Denzel

Washington

7. White Boy Rick (R)

Matthew McConaughey

8. Peppermint (R) Jennifer

Garner

9. The House With a Clock in

Its Walls (PG) Jack Black

10. Mission: Impossible --

Fallout (PG-13) Tom Cruise

Top 10 DVD, Blu-ray Sales

1. Venom (PG-13) Sony

2. Night School (PG-13)

Universal

3. The House With a Clock in

Its Walls (PG) Universal

4. Bad Times at The El

Royale (R) FOX

5. The Predator (R) FOX

6. Incredibles 2 (PG) Disney

7. Hell Fest (R) Lionsgate

8. The Equalizer 2 (R) Sony

9. Smallfoot (PG) Warner

Bros.

10. Mission: Impossible --

Fallout (PG-13) Paramount

Source: comScore

(c) 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.

THE AMERICAN

LEGION

BARRE POST 10

320 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT

Saturday

February 9

7-11 pm

CONTAGIOUS

$6 COVER

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 21 & OVER

For information, call the Post at

479-9058

To Perform - 802-793-8819 or attend anytime.

Bob Dylan Wannabe!

Mingle Night Club

$10

Calling all friends of BPOE # 924!

Best Burgers on the Hill!

Come in and enjoy a light lunch

Tuesday-Friday from 11 to 2.

Also experience our delicious

Friday night dinner specials.

Montpelier Elks Lodge #924

203 Country Club Rd. • Montpelier • 223-2600

CANADIAN CLUB

BINGO

•Flash Ball 1: $200.

•Flash Ball 2: $100.

•Mini Jackpot: $4,100.

•Jackpot: $1,800.

Thursday Night

•Doors Open at 4:00 PM

•Premies at 6:00 PM

•Regular Games at 7:00 PM

CANADIAN CLUB

ROUTE 14 • 479-9090

Just outside of Barre

Solo Contest

Saturday, Feb. 9th

7:30PM

North Main St. Barre. VT

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

THIS WEEK'S

SPECIAL

HAM &

POTATOES

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 27


continued from page 27

RANDOLPH- ‘Four Fridays in February: Living Through

Loss’ Series in the Red Clover Conference Rm at Gifford Medical

Center. See 2/8 listing.

“Live & Upstairs!” at the Chandler Center for the Arts. 7:30PM.

Rejoice in a romantic, post-Valentine’s Day evening with Maple

Jam in the Chandler Upper Gallery Tickets/Info: 728-6464.

STOWE- Heartless (Heart & Zeppelin Experience) at the Rusty

Nail. 9PM. $8 in adv/$12 day of. 21+. Info: 585-2650.

TUNBRIDGE- “Slow Democracy: Keeping It Real in the

Green Mountains and Beyond” Talk by Writer Susan Clark at

the Tunbridge Public Library, 289 VT-110. 7PM. Info: 889-9404.

Saturday, February 16

BARRE- GED Testing at the Barre Learnng Center, 46 Washington

St. 11AM-4PM. Info: 476-4588.

KAOS (DJ) at Gusto’s. 9:30PM. 21+. Info: 476-7919.

Corn Hole at the Barre Elks. 5:30PM. Registration at 6PM. Double

elimination tournament. $10/person. Cash bar, concession stand.

All welcome. 32 team max.

Free Tax Preparation, Aldrich Public Library. 10AM-2PM. Info:

477-5176.

BERLIN- Contra Dance at the Capital City Grange Hall, 6612 Rt

12. 7:30PM. No experience & no partner needed. $10/adults, $5/

kid and low income, $15 dance supporters. Info: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing.

Every 1st, 3rd, and 5th

Saturday.

BOLTON- Dance Party with DJ Craig Mitchell, Bolton Valley

Sports Center. 10PM-2AM. $5. Come boogie!

GREENSBORO- Dance Sampler Workshop at the Highland

Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 3PM-5PM. $20/$25.

Experience five choreographers’ movement in one thrilling master

class! Later, 7PM-9PM: Vermont Dance Alliance Winter Gala.

$15/$10. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Winter Birding in the Champlain Valley with

the North Branch Nature Center, 8AM-4PM. Join expert birder and

NBNC Teacher Naturalist Zac Cota on a trip to one of New

England’s premier winter birding destinations. Eagles, waterfowl,

raptors, owls, snow buntings, winter finches, and more. RSVP

required: northbranchnaturecenter.org.

NORTHFIELD- Texas Hold’em Tournament at the American

Legion Post 63. 1PM. $50 in advance/$75 the day of.

A Night of Jazz to Benefit the United Church, 58 S. Main St.

7PM. Pianist Daniel Bruce is a professional pianist and founding

music director of the Burlington Civic Symphony. He has performed

in many diverse genres. Refreshments in Howe’s Hall will

follow. $15 suggested. There will also be a food collection for the

CERV Food Shelf. They are in need of tuna, cereals, soups, diapers,

and peanut butter. Info: 485-8347.

PLAINFIELD- The Plainfield Little Theater Presents the

Merchant of Venice, Plainfield Opera House, 18 High St. See 2/14

listing.

STOWE- Dr. Strangeways (KISS Tribute) at the Rusty Nail.

9PM. $10 in adv/$15 day of. 21+.Info: 585-2650.

WATERBURY- Annual Spaghetti & Homemade Meatball

Supper at St Leo’s Hall in back of St Andrews. 5PM-7:30PM.

Includes cookie walk. $11/adults; $8/children 6-12 yrs old. Free for

5 years and younger.

Sunday, February 17

BARRE- The Knights of Columbus Annual Free Throw

Contest at the St Monica/St Michael Gym. Sign-up: 11:30AM.

boys & girls age 9-14. Competition begins at 12PM. Winners will

be invited to stay for the District contest at 2PM. District winners

will be invited to a Statewide competition on 3/17 in Winooski.

Vermont Philharmonic 60th Anniversary Season Presents

“Classics & Contemporaries” at the Barre Opera House. 2PM.

$20/$15/$5. Info: www.vermontphilharmonic.com.

GLOVER- The Museum of Everyday Life’s 1st Cold-Snowand-Warm-Hearts-Post-Valentine’s-Day

Snowman Building

Contest. 3PM-6PM. Bring your own snowman-building equipment

and accessories, partake of our modest selection of scarves,

carrots and mismatched socks. Hot chocolate and treats served.

Bundle up, the museum is not heated. Free. All ages.

GREENSBORO- Vermont Dance Alliance Winter Gala,

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 2PM-4PM.

$10/$10. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Capital City Concerts Presents “Heart &

Soul,” Unitarian Church of Montpelier. 3PM. Piazzolla, Massenet,

Saint-Saëns, and Brahms. Complimentary sweets. $15-$25. Info:

www.capitalcityconcerts.org.

PLAINFIELD- The Plainfield Little Theater Presents the

Merchant of Venice at the Plainfield Opera House, 18 High St.

2PM. Directed by Tom Blachly. 12$/$15. Info: blachly@together.

net.

Monday, February 18

BARRE- Free Tax Preparation at Capstone Community Action

20 Gable Place. Info: 477-5176. 3PM-7PM.

Tuesday, February 19

BARRE- Free Tax Preparation at Capstone Community Action

20 Gable Place. Info: 477-5176. 3PM-7PM.

GREENSBORO- Trivia Tuesdays, Hardwick Street Cafe,

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6:30PM-7:30PM.

Free. RSVP: 533-9399. Every Tues. thru April.

MONTPELIER- Full Moon Snowshoe Hikes (for families) at

the North Branch Nature Center, 7PM-8:30PM. Fun nighttime

activities for kids and parents alike. Snowshoes and hot chocolate

provided. RSVP required: northbranchnaturecenter.org.

Wednesday, February 20

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week Movie: Oceans 8, Highland Center

for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6PM-8PM. $5. Info: 533-2000.

MONTPELIER- Farmer’s Night: The Norwich Regimental

Band at the Vermont Statehouse. 7:30PM. In celebration of its

bicentennial year. Info: dscolaro@norwich.edu.

ECO Institute (for Educators) – Winter Series at the North

Branch Nature Center. 4:30PM-7PM. Wilderness skills, tracking,

firebuilding, snow science, and more. Runs Jan. 8 -Mar. 5. RSVP

& Info: northbranchnaturecenter.org.

Malcolm Before the X: A Leader in the Making, MSAC.

1-3PM. The author of X: A Novel, co-written with Malcolm X’s

daughter Ilyasah Shabazz, Magoon will discuss their writing

process, Malcolm’s life and legacy, and how his story inspires

a new generation of leaders. Info: 223-2518.

Free Tax Preparation, Kellogg-Hubbard Library. 2PM-7PM.

Info: 477-5176.

1. What is the youngest contiguous U.S. state ..

Idaho, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico?

2. What country is entirely surrounded by Italy

.. Monaco, San Marino, Malta, Slovenia?

3. Which U.S. state has the longest width east

to west .. Montana, Alaska, Hawaii, Texas?

Answers included with other puzzle answers

If you are looking at this space so are

29,999* other people

According to te nationally nown audit rm

irculation erication ouncil

The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue

Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.

STATE LIQUOR STORE

SALES FOR FEBRUARY

Items on sale for the month of February 2019 Only!

JAMESON IRISH

WHISKEY

750ML

GREY GOOSE

ORIGINAL VODKA

750ML

MAKER'S MARK

BOURBON WHISKEY

750ML

ABSOLUT

VODKA

750ML

BARR HILL

GIN

750ML

SALE PRICE

$

25 99

SALE PRICE

$

24 99

SALE PRICE

$

26 99

SALE PRICE

$

18 99

SALE PRICE

$

32 99

SAVE $4.00

SAVE $5.00

SAVE $3.00

SAVE $3.00

SAVE $3.00

BULLEIT BOURBON

FRONTIER WHISKEY

750ML

KAHLUA COFFEE

LIQUEUR

750ML

JIM BEAM

BOURBON

1.75L

PLATINUM 7X

VODKA

1.75L

BACARDI

SUPERIOR RUM

1.75L

SALE PRICE

$

24 99

SAVE $5.00

SALE PRICE

$

20 99

SAVE $3.00

SALE PRICE

$

31 69

SAVE $3.30

SALE PRICE

$

16 99

SAVE $3.00

SALE SALE PRICE

PRICE

$ 19 99

SAVE $8.00

SAVE $8.00

COINTREAU

LIQUEUR

750ML

BLACK

VELVET

1.75L

KNOB CREEK

BOURBON

750ML

BULLEIT RYE

WHISKEY

750ML

CANADIAN

CLUB

1.75L

SALE PRICE

$

35 99

SAVE $4.00

SALE PRICE

$

16 99

SAVE $3.00

SALE PRICE

$

29 99

SAVE $5.00

SALE PRICE

$

24 99

SAVE $5.00

SALE PRICE

$

21 99

SAVE $3.00

This ad paid for by Vermont Liquor Brokers or individual companies.

Most liquor stores are open on Sunday • 75+ Convenient Locations Throughout Vermont

For a Complete Price List Visit 802spirits.com• Not responsible for typographical errors

February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 29


page 30 The WORLD February 6, 2019

Department of Environmental

Conservation Teams with CCV to

Offer Free Green Production Course

Agency of Natural Resources Initiates

Rulemaking Process to Adopt Maximum

Contaminant Level for PFAS Compounds

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B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

DRIVE

UP

Montpelier

223-0928

DRIVE

UP

Barre

622-0730

DRIVE

UP

For many businesses in Vermont, protecting

the environment is a key aspect of daily

operations. To support companies interested

in becoming more sustainable, the Department

of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and

the Community College of Vermont (CCV)

are teaming up to offer a free class focused on

green manufacturing and production.

“The Green Production course is just one

of the many benefits businesses receive when

they join DEC’s Sustainability Cohorts currently

offered for the dairy products, brewing,

and specialty foods sectors. Sustainability is

about cutting waste and improving efficiency,

which can also improve profitability. The

cohorts are about building a network of people

who understand, apply, and share concepts

of green manufacturing, to make

Vermont businesses better,” said Emily

Boedecker, DEC Commissioner.

DEC’s Environmental Assistance Office

will launch three Sustainability Cohorts this

spring. These cohorts are managed by DEC in

partnership with Efficiency Vermont.

Participating businesses receive technical

assistance and training alongside a network of

committed peers to make voluntary improvements

in multiple areas, including energy

efficiency and water use. They will also work

towards membership in the Vermont Green

Business Program. Cohort participants taking

CCV’s Green Production course will learn

about the economics of green manufacturing,

green materials, conducting environmental

hazard investigations, and environmental regulations

applicable to manufacturing.

“We are thrilled to be offering this course

in partnership with the Department of

Environmental Conservation. The Green

Production module gives Vermont employees

at all levels of manufacturing the chance to

delve deeper into the issues surrounding

green manufacturing,” said Tiffany Keune,

Associate Dean of Workforce Education at

CCV. “The class also provides a forum for

Vermont businesses to talk to one another

about the challenges and opportunities organizations

face balancing production and environmental

impacts.”

The online course, which starts in late

April, also involves an in-person assessment

that can be taken at any CCV location. It follows

the Manufacturing Skill Standards

Council’s Green Production Certification.

The course is open to any business participating

in the Sustainability Cohorts. Businesses

that are part of or working towards membership

in the Vermont Green Business Program

may also be eligible to take the course for

free, pending available spaces. The Green

Production class is fully funded by an EPA

Pollution Prevention grant. To learn more

about the course or to request registration,

please contact workforce@ccv.edu or (802)

786-3825. To learn more about the

Sustainability Cohorts, visit www.eaovt.org

or call 802-477-2669.

As part of the ongoing approach to make

sure all Vermonters have safe drinking water,

the Agency of Natural Resources (ANR) is

proposing to adopt the Vermont Health

Advisory as the Maximum Contaminant

Level (MCL) at 20 parts per trillion for five

per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

Over the next 30 days, the State will conduct

pre-rulemaking stakeholder engagement to

gather additional comments on the approach.

The Vermont Department of Health has

issued a health advisory covering the following

five compounds: perfluooctanoic acid

(PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid

(PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid

(PFHxS), perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA)

and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA).

Adopting an MCL ensures PFAS will not

pose an undue risk to Vermonters’ drinking

water. The Agency decided to initialize rulemaking

for the following reasons:

The Vermont Department of Health has

concluded that the five PFAS substances pose

a health risk and has established a Health

Advisory for them.

The United States Environmental

Protection Agency has not established an

MCL for these contaminants and does not

appear to be establishing an MCL in the near

term.

These five PFAS are not naturally occurring

in the environment.

PFAS have been contaminants of particular

concern to the State of Vermont.

The State has initiated this process, in part,

in response to a petition from the Conservation

Law Foundation (CLF) requesting either the

establishment of an MCL or a treatment standard

for PFAS. The Agency will not pursue a

treatment standard at this time. Economical

and technically feasible methods already exist

to measure the PFAS contaminants at the

health level of concern, making an MCL the

best option. In addition, the effectiveness of

various PFAS treatment technologies is still

unknown. There is not enough data to determine

the effect of available treatment technologies,

which may lead to a false sense of

protection. ANR is working with other States

and the Federal Government to evaluate data

to develop a scientific approach to regulate

PFAS as a class in the future.

PARTIES

WELCOME

GUESS HOW MANY

VALENTINES IN

OUR SPECIAL BOTTLE

AFTER GAME

GET-TOGETHERS

WELCOME

CHILDREN’S GAME NIGHT

Your Local Store

1490 US Rte. 302

Barre(Berlin)

479-1031

Others To Be Announced

$10 includes Pan Pizza & Kid-size Drink

ANNOUNCES

MONDAYS 6:30-7:30

AGES 5

& OLDER

WIN A LARGE PIZZA!



Give Back And Protect The

Environment All At Once

Companies and individuals across the

globe volunteer their time and donate their

money to nonprofit groups and worthy causes.

Hundreds of billions of dollars are raised, and

many hours are clocked furthering the efforts

of charitable groups.

Although nonprofits in various categories

receive support, one sector has experienced

the largest percentage gain: environmental

and animal welfare organizations.

According to a report released in 2017

from Giving USA, interest in charities

involved with animal welfare support and

environmental issues rose 5.8 percent when

adjusted for inflation.

Even though the first piece of legislation

concerning widespread environmental concerns

in the United States was the Federal

Water Pollution Control Act in 1948, environmental

causes are still gaining steam. The

discovery of a growing hole in the ozone

layer prompted change in the mid-1980s, as

did the devastating Exxon Valdez tanker spill.

However, environmental issues have gained

considerably more attention over the last two

decades than they used to. As a result, curbside

recycling, solar energy, electric cars,

low-energy light bulbs, and reusable tote bags

are now some of the eco-friendly mainstays

of everyday life.

Environmentalists have founded numerous

charities with a goal of protecting the planet

and its natural resources. Donating directly or

volunteering with environment- or animalbased

charities is one way to elicit environmental

change. Yet, there are other philanthropic

efforts people can take of their own

volition.

• Target trash. Men and women can organize

like-minded individuals who can make a difference

by ridding parks, beaches and public

recreation areas of as much litter as possible.

Litter can impact ecosystems, adversely

affect animal welfare and threaten humans.

All it takes to make a difference are some

volunteers to sweep areas of trash and discard

it responsibly.

• Support animal welfare groups. Thousands

of relinquished or lost pets reside in area shelters

awaiting homes. Adopt family pets from

shelters to help reduce overpopulation.

Spreading the word about animal adoption is

another noble effort.

• Educate others. Share knowledge about

alternative products and techniques for lawn

and garden care, pool maintenance, home

upkeep, and more that are less harmful to the

environment than standard techniques. Share

your thoughts with friends and neighbors

directly or broadcast them on social media.

• Advocate for change. Speak at town hall

meetings and with legislators about what can

be done to promote environmental protection

in your community. Raise funds where possible

to implement small actions that can lead

to change

• • •

You

+

29,999 * others

=

average number of people reading this issue

WE GET RESULTS

According to te nationally nown audit rm

irculation erication ouncil

The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue

Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.

You

+

29,999 * others

=

average number of people reading this issue

WE GET RESULTS

According to te nationally nown audit rm

irculation erication ouncil

The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue

Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.


February 6, 2019 The WORLD page 31

Proudly Sponsored by:

ANNUAL HOT STOVE BANQUET

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Keynote Speaker:

DAN DUQUETTE

Former GM of the

Baltimore Orioles,

Montreal Expos and

Boston Red Sox

Devil’s Bowl Speedway celebrated its champions and top

performers from the 2018 stock car racing season on Saturday,

January 26, at the annual Banquet of Champions. A crowd of

well over 300 guests honored more than 80 drivers and special

award winners during the event, which was held at the

Holiday Inn Rutland-Killington in Rutland, Vermont.

The Tremont family of West Sand Lake, New York,

received the biggest cheers during the evening; driver Kenny

Tremont Jr., was officially crowned for the ninth time in his

career as the Devil’s Bowl Speedway track champion, while

his father and car owner, Ken Tremont Sr., was the recipient

of the seventh annual John Bruno Award – the track’s highest

honor.

Tremont Sr.’s award – given in memory of the late driver

and car owner John Bruno – recognized his lifelong commitment

to local racing while maintaining high standards of

conduct. At age 80, Tremont won his 11th Devil’s Bowl

Speedway track championship as a car owner in 2018; along

with the titles won with his son driving, he also won championships

in 1970 with Joe Messina and in 1977 with Chuck

Ely.

Tremont Jr. had a three-win season to capture the Central

Vermont Motorcycles Sportsman Modified division championship

and the final Vermont State Championship under the

NASCAR Whelen All-American Series banner. Tim LaDuc

collected runner-up honors ahead of Joey Scarborough, Justin

Comes, and Vince Quenneville.

First-year Modified racer Brent Warren of Salisbury,

Vermont, collected the championship trophy in the O’Reilly

Auto Parts Limited Sportsman division. A three-time race

winner, Warren defeated Travis Billington, Paolo Pascarella,

Joey Roberts, and Adam Piper.

Chris Murray of Fair Haven, Vermont, took his second

consecutive title with a dominant, 10-win season in the Super

Stock division, topping Scott FitzGerald, Curtis Condon, Lou

Gancarz, and Josh Bussino.

Kaleb Shepard of Vergennes, Vermont, won the Portland

Glass Mini Stock crown on the strength of five wins and was

followed in the standings by Shawn Moquin, Mike Preston,

Johnny Bruno, and Craig Kirby.

Cody O’Brien of Springfield, Vermont, was recognized as

the youngest champion in Devil’s Bowl Speedway’s 52-year

history, taking the Friend Construction 500cc Mini Sprint title

at age 13. Austin Chaves, Shawn McPhee, Dakota Green, and

Joel Belanger were next in line.

Will Hull of Plainfield, Vermont, was crowned the champion

of the five-race Sprint Car series, while Demetrios

Drellos of Queensbury, New York, earned the four-race 358

Modified title. Brian Whittemore of Pittsford, Vermont, collected

his first career championship in the five-race Central

Vermont Motorcycles Challenger Series.

Several special awards were also given during the evening

including Rookie of the Year, Sportsmanship, and Most

Improved Driver laurels. Marty Kelly III took the rookie title

in the Sportsman Modified class with similar honors going to

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