Viva Lewes Issue #150 March 2019

VivaMagazines

THE KITCHEN MAKER

TALES FROM THE KITCHEN TABLE


150

VIVALEWES

EDITORIAL

‘Make do and Mend’ is the phrase we held in mind as we put together this –

Viva Lewes’s 150th – issue. It proved a rich seam. The main thing that emerged,

for me, is the importance of commitment. Of real care. To make things better. So,

Michael Ryan of Furniture Now explains how the charity has been transforming lives

for the last quarter century – and how, to him, dignity is central.

There are, of course, other things that need fixing. Plastic waste awareness is top

of the agenda at the Railway Land Wildlife Trust, who suggest a three-pronged

approach to environmental damage. Meanwhile, actor, theatre designer and weddingdress

repairer Nicky Blackwell is already engaged in trying to meet one of these, by

making her own Nevill home plastic-free.

“It’s about effort”, is the view of W.F. Bruce – Bill – who spends his days immersed in

one of the most extraordinary dens of care in Lewes: the antique-clock restorers in

North Street. “We should look after and cherish things that people have made with

care”, he says.

Care goes for art too, of course. This month’s cover was painted by fine artist Lewis

Chamberlain who explains how he’s stuck to his palette, and pursued certain themes,

since the 1980s. While therapist Mark Vahrmeyer, who operates in Lewes out of The

Barn, explains how psychotherapy “works to repair attachment damage”, and help

people learn, perhaps for the first time, “how to hold on to new relationships”.

This issue is devoted to people who care.

THE TEAM

.....................

EDITOR: Charlotte Gann charlotte@vivamagazines.com

SUB-EDITOR: David Jarman

PRODUCTION EDITOR: Joe Fuller joe@vivamagazines.com

ART DIRECTOR: Katie Moorman katie@vivamagazines.com

ADVERTISING: Sarah Hunnisett, Amanda Meynell advertising@vivamagazines.com

EDITORIAL / ADMIN ASSISTANT / HAND MODEL: Kelly Mechen admin@vivamagazines.com

DISTRIBUTION: David Pardue distribution@vivamagazines.com

CONTRIBUTORS: Jacky Adams, Michael Blencowe, Sarah Boughton, Mark Bridge, Lewis Chamberlain,

Daniel Etherington, Mark Greco, Anita Hall, John Henty, Robin Houghton, Jo Jackson, Chloë King, Dexter Lee,

Alex Leith, Lizzie Lower, Carlotta Luke, Nione Meakin, Anna Morgan and Galia Pike

PUBLISHER: Becky Ramsden becky@vivamagazines.com

Viva Lewes is based at Lewes House, 32 High St, Lewes, BN7 2LX, all enquiries 01273 488882


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THE ‘MAKE DO AND MEND’ ISSUE

CONTENTS

‘Maybe it’s because I’m a pink horse‘ by Jo Lamb

Bits and bobs.

8-27 Lewis Chamberlain on his cover

and other art work; Nicky Blackwell’s

Lewes from the hill; Photo of the month

– the Priory model, frosted; a reassuring

Doortrait; Tiger with emerald eyes;

Oyster Project’s two new groups; Lewes

waste and recycling in numbers; Now!

Charity’s unique formula; bike sales and

repairs at CycleShack; the word is spread

far and wide; Carlotta Luke gets out

on the gig; meet the Brighton Festival

Guest Director; win tickets to Firle Place

Garden Show; and Craig the cat shows

initiative (oh, dear).

Columns.

29-33 David Jarman on Francis Bacon and

Battleship Potemkin; Chloë King doesn’t

do small talk; and John Henty applauds

the Ouse Valley Quilters.

On this month.

35-47 Glyndebourne Agreed – a family

affair; saying £¥€$ at ACCA; Philip

Ayckbourn brings androids to Lewes Little

Theatre; Lesley Thomson intrigues, at

Lewes Literary Society; Vice-Chancellor

53

8

Adam Tickell talks Brexit; we learn

lessons in plastic at the Railway Land; and

Dexter Lee gets to see The Great Escape

on a big screen for the first time.

Art.

49-57 Hats at the Pavilion – for

something very different; and Art and

about includes In Colour at Charleston,

plus Sarah O’Kane’s Spring Show

at Lewes House, Pauline Alexander

at Chalk, Surviving or Thriving at

Wakehurst, and more.

Listings and free time.

59-73 Diary dates include The Paint Club,

The Queen of Instruments, and The

Headstrong Club talk by Marie-Bénédicte

Dembour on Human Rights Today, plus

many others; Gig of the month Shirley

Collins, and Gig guide galore; Classical

round-up stars Mark Padmore, worldclass

tenor gracing Lewes; plus, Classical

round-up, with two Nicholas Yonge treats,

Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra, Lewes

Lewis Chamberlain

5


THE ‘MAKE DO AND MEND’ ISSUE

Concert Orchestra and many others. Free

time listings, including Horrible Histories:

Barmy Britain, and other family treasures;

Patina turns 18; Bags of Books’ Anna on

Isabel Sánchez Vegara’s Little People, Big

Dreams; and Shoes on now goes all Beano.

Food.

75-80 Steak at the Kings Head; Rathfinny

Carrot Cake recipe; Bun + Bean at

Soulfit; and Chloë King rounds up food

news.

The way we work.

82-85 Photographer Rosie Wooldridge

76

68

87

visits restorers and asks, what’s been your

most challenging project?

Features.

87-100 The intricate space of WF

Bruce; our guest Gardening columnist

is Charleston Head Gardener, Fiona

Dennis; Michael Blencowe on the

nutjobbers; Barwells’ Lee Waters

offers ethical-investing advice; and

The Barn’s Mark Vahrmeyer, a guide to

psychotherapy; Lewes FC physio mends;

Business news walkabout.

Photo by Chloë King

Inside left.

114 The Humphries speed up Lewes

Race Course, 1924.

VIVA DEADLINES

We plan each magazine six weeks ahead, with a mid-month

advertising/copy deadline. Please send details of planned events

to admin@vivamagazines.com, and for any advertising queries:

advertising@vivamagazines.com, or call 01273 488882.

Remember to recycle your Viva.

Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of our content.

Viva Lewes magazine cannot be held responsible for any omissions, errors

or alterations. The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily

represent the view of Viva Magazines. Viva retains copyright for any

artwork we create.

Love me or recycle me. Illustration by Chloë King

6


Imogen

Lower Sixth

Academic and

Drama Scholar

You are warmly invited to our

Senior School Open Morning

Saturday 9 March 2019

9.30am to noon

HMC – Day, weekly and full boarding

Boys and girls 13 to 18

(Entry at 13 and 16)

To register please contact:

admissions@bedes.org

T 01323 843252

or online at bedes.org

Bede’s Senior School

Upper Dicker

East Sussex BN27 3QH


THIS MONTH’S COVER ARTIST

Alice and the Planets

We’re thrilled with this month’s cover, We think it’s brilliant. Strong and evocative

painted by artist Lewis Chamberlain. I asked – as is all of Lewis’s work, featuring strange

him how he went about it.

perspectives, and angles, shadows, and furniture.

Oh, and toys.

“Initially I thought of setting coloured objects

against a grey pencil sky and, perhaps, a “I’ve always been interested in objects from

distant Wilmington Man made of scissors and childhood because they evoke strong memories

and help recall the past, sometimes in

knitting needles”, he says.

“That didn’t quite work – I felt the objects an unnerving way. More mundane features –

would stand out better in front of a wall with walls, doors, floorboards – can also be imbued

strong shadows. The theme ‘Make do and with significance. Once something is drawn,

Mend’ suggested objects associated with tailoring

and needlework – scissors, wool, thread becomes a part of something new”, he says.

or painted, it takes on a life of its own and

etc. Things with good colours and a contrast I’m struck by his recurring palette – often

of shapes and sizes. I’ve used the idea of creamy shades, and splashes of vivid colour

suspending objects from a mobile before – I (I adore the red walls in Things That Go).

like its association with childhood and things “My palette has never really changed”, he

from the past – and it seemed to work here.” says. “I’m using the same colours I used at

8


LEWIS CHAMBERLAIN

art school in the 1980s”. This he explains

as “partly down to my surroundings. I’ve

always preferred working in old rooms

in artificial light where the walls reveal

something of their past – cracks, stains

and discolouration”. He also emphasises

that, although his palette includes subdued

tones, “colour is actually hugely important

to me. I do use bright colour, just in specific

areas and with a little restraint. Looking

out of my window right now the world is a

mass of indistinct greyish brown and dark

green, with one row of brightly coloured

clothes pegs…”

I ask if he thinks of his work as dark, or

spooky (Toy Story meets Edward Hopper)?

“Not overtly. But I hope it has edge – a

feeling of uncertainty – to prompt the

viewer to question what they’re looking at,

and why. Any artwork should draw people

in, I think: encourage you to look again.

Without holding to a specific narrative, I

want to create the sense that something is

happening, or about to happen, without

explaining what. I like a strong sense of

atmosphere.”

Originally from Hull, and then London –

Lewis studied at the Slade – today he lives

and works in Newick. He does drawings,

and (mostly oil) paintings. “Although I

enjoy painting, drawing is probably my

first instinct”, he says. “At the moment, I’m

concentrating on a series of pencil drawings

of my daughter Alice.”

He’s worked as an artist ever since art

school. “I generally concentrate on my own

work, but take on commissions if they feel

right. Or I need the money. Among other

things, I’ve done portraits, a bit of illustration

and a long, complicated series of paintings

for Merchant Ivory.” Charlotte Gann

lewischamberlain.com

Connected Figures (An Incident)

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Things That Go

9


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MY LEWES: NICKY BLACKWELL

You live something of a ‘portfolio’ life?

Indeed. My bread-and-butter job since I was

21 has been dress-making and alterations. All

the work comes by word of mouth – I don’t

really advertise. Some comes, under cover of

darkness, from Nina Murden, when she has an

overspill, or someone asks her to do wedding

dress alterations: I specialise in these and, at one

time, worked for a bridal shop. I’ve got a studio

upstairs with a cutting table and sewing machine.

I combine this work with acting and theatre. I

run a company with my partner Nick Tigg and

others: Slot Machine Theatre where we create

bold, contemporary theatre for everyone, as well

as working as a theatre designer and actor more

generally.

What led you to all this? One of those chaotic

1970s childhoods. Until I was nine, I was

raised by my paternal grandfather, who was

just lovely, a gardener, and liked by all. After

that, life got more complicated. I found drama

school – Central in London – very competitive

and cut-throat. I somewhat hid in the wardrobe

department (where I learnt a lot about costume

design). These days, I’m mainly compelled by

ideas, although I still like to act: become that cog

in the wheel of a show. At Slot Machine Theatre,

we employ about thirty freelancers across a year,

and make multidisciplinary work. We’ll be at the

Birmingham Mac this Christmas, for instance.

Your home up on the Nevill is also an ecohouse?

The planet is being completely screwed

up – that’s our motivation. When we moved

in, originally to rent, very little had been done

to it for a very long time. This was hair-raising

but also gave us an opportunity. We got grants

for the wood-burner and the solar panels, and

our feed-in tariff pays for any gas or electricity

we use. We also aim to be plastic-free, as far as

possible. (Though I was turfed off my allotment

last year because I just couldn’t find the time…)

What first brought you to Lewes and when?

We moved here from London about ten years

ago, when I was pregnant. Unfortunately, the

pregnancy ended early and our baby, Gilda,

didn’t survive. So we moved here because we

thought we were going to be a family, but we’re

not, as such. This is another reason for the

eco-home. Turn what you’ve got on your plate

into an advantage, I think. (What’s that saying?

How do you make God laugh? Tell him/her your

plans.) Anyway, I find I love to be out of London,

and I like London more now I’m here. (I do

spend a lot of my time trundling all over the

place on Southern Rail, that said.) The Downs

are literally on our doorstep. And, best of all, I’ve

got some killer mates here – people like fellow

actor Jonathan Cullen, and other excellent folk.

Solid gold through and through.

Interview by Charlotte Gann

slotmachinetheatre.com. For bridal alterations:

nickyblack204@yahoo.co.uk

11


Valuation Days

Fine Art & Jewellery

Charleston House, Lewes

3 April 2019, 11am to 3pm

Cooden Beach Hotel, Bexhill-On-Sea

9 April 2019, 10am to 2pm

ENQUIRIES

01273 220000

hove@bonhams.com

bonhams.com/hove


PHOTO OF THE MONTH

MODEL MAGIC

John Hughes sent in this picture, which

we love. It’s of the Lewes Priory model

early one frosty morning. ‘The picture is

a closeup shot of the model, which sits in

the Priory Park’, John told us. ‘It stands on

a fixed table overlooking the Priory walls

in the middle of the ruins. It was installed

as part of the redevelopment of the site in

2011, as a ‘touch model’ which partiallysighted

visitors can use to gain an idea of the

scale of the Priory as it would have been.’

(Designer Andy Gammon later gave us a bit

more detail. ‘The master wooden model’, he

says, ‘was carved in beech wood by Richard

Keal and his colleague Owen, at Kealworks,

from designs and drawings by me. It was

finally cast in reinforced resin by Fulcrum

Modelmakers overseen by Sy Morse-Brown

of the Priory Trust.’)

Back to John’s photo: ‘My picture was taken

on an early morning dog walk, just before

sunrise. The model is a lovely object which

can be enjoyed all year round, but with a

heavy frost and the slightly eerie artificial

light, it looked magical in the light of my

headtorch. Thanks must go to Morse the

labrador who convinced me to go out early

enough to find it. I braved the cold just long

enough to grab this shot before returning

my hands to their warm gloves.’

Please send your pictures, taken in and

around Lewes, to photos@vivamagazines.

com, or tweet @VivaLewes. We’ll choose

one, which wins the photographer £20, to be

picked up from our office after publication.

Unless previously arranged, we reserve the

right to use all pictures in future issues of

Viva magazines or online.

13


BITS AND KNOBS

LEWES DOORTRAITS #10

Jo Jackson, from the blog The Lewes

Home, snaps a front door in Lewes and

asks the owner...

The Sustainable Business Partnership

CIC is currently delivering the Utilise

Plus programme, funded by the

European Regional Development

Fund. Utilise Plus helps small and

medium sized enterprises to save

money and reduce their impact on the

environment by taking control of their

energy use.

If you could give your door a

characteristic what would it be

and why?

Reassurance. The door belongs to the

house.. it’s the original door that we chose

to keep despite the double glazing man

trying to flog us a plastic one AND despite

the fact it’s been patched up several times!

It’s my favourite colour, and the gateway

to my home – warm, vibrant and usually

an unknown quantity when I walk through

the door to my teenagers... will it be messy,

are they fighting, did they make dinner? I

rarely walk through to quiet... it’s usually

a hub of creativity and vibrant family

atmosphere.

@leweshome

Since launching in 2017, Utilise Plus

has supported over 200 organisations

through a variety of services. These

include fully-funded energy audits

to identify energy- and cost-saving

opportunities in organisations, as well

as networking breakfasts, educational

workshops, ‘Sustainability Tours,’

and grant funding for energy-saving

projects.

Contact them today to find out how an

energy audit can save your organisation

money or to book your place on one

of their exciting events in Lewes and

Brighton.

www.sustainablebusiness.org.uk

01273 964239

info@sustainablebusiness.org.uk

14


CATS AND BOBS

PETS OF LEWES

Tiger, 9, classicus catticus stripicus.

Tiger arrived at Cats Protection League in Haywards

Heath after one too many tussles with neighbourhood

moggies. He is a sparky, friendly chap and absolutely

loves attention but he will need to be homed in

an area without many other cats living nearby.

Though in good health, older pets like Tiger are

often overlooked by potential owners and take much

longer to find a new home. With good luck and

medical care, though, cats can live well into their 20s

so there’s still plenty of life in this old-timer.

Likes: INXS, Armenia, anything spherical.

Dislikes: inspirational quotes written in calligraphy, colonialism, herons in tiny berets.

Did you know: Domesticated cats share 95.6 per cent of their genetic makeup with tigers. That said

– and to put that in some kind of perspective – we humans share roughly 60 per cent of our DNA

with… bananas! @dogsoflewes

Interested in rehoming Tiger or one of his furry pals? Visit www.ncac.cats.org.uk to find out more.

Dog lovers wanted:

Open your home to friendly dogs for their holiday

Welcome guest dogs into your family home,

enjoy their company and give them the

holiday they deserve.

Give a dog a holiday!

For more information please contact:

L E W E S T O W N C O U N C I L

LEWES CIVIC

AWARDS 2019

In every community there are people who

work tirelessly for the benefit of others, often

quietly and in the background, and whose

efforts can be too easily overlooked

Do you know someone like that?

Why not show your appreciation and

nominate them for a Lewes Civic Award?

Where happy dogs holiday

Emily Deacon

01273 286 165 / 07736 665 888

bn@waggingtailsuk.co.uk

www.waggingtailsuk.co.uk/bn/carer-enquiry

A franchise owned and operated under licence by Emily Deacon

facebook.com/WaggingTailsBN

For more details and a nomination form

please visit council reception

Town Hall, High Street, Lewes, BN7 2QS

01273 471469 / mayors.sec@lewes-tc.gov.uk

The deadline for applications is 15 March 2019

All nominations will be considered by our panel

Awards will be presented on 25 April 2019


Domestic Pet, Farm Animal and Equine Services

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since 1865

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01273 473 232

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01273 302 609

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01273 814 590

EQUINE CLINIC LAUGHTON

01323 815120

www.cliffevets.co.uk | www.cliffeequine.co.uk


BITS AND BOBS

OYSTER WELL-BEING GROUPS

The Oyster Project has recently started two new

groups – in addition to their existing art and drama

ones. The first, on Tuesday mornings, is a wellbeing

group for adults with disabilities. “We do

mindfulness exercises, as well as exploring other

ways to relax and cope with stress, such as visualisation,”

says Hannah Hill, who’s facilitating both.

“I use visual aids to help explain the ideas – so, a

glitter jar, for instance (see pic), to represent a busy

mind, chaotic with thoughts, which then slowly

settle. Or a pebble, which gets passed around.”

We spoke after the first session. “Quite beautiful”,

is how Hannah described it. “I felt privileged

to be there. We concentrate on building self-esteem,

encouraging people to recognise their own

value, and to listen to their feelings.”

The other is called Creative Community. It’s a

“dementia-friendly creative space”, says Hannah.

“My father has dementia, and seeing how hard it

is for my step-mother as his carer spurred me on

to create a place to benefit both carers and people

with dementia.” She explains this as more of

an open space, with activities to choose from. “So,

an art table. Also large, tactile puppets.” Hannah

is a puppeteer herself, and regularly takes puppets

into old people’s homes, where they can really help

with communication. “It’s all about giving people

the freedom to be expressive.” She hopes to get

funding too to bring guests into the dementiafriendly

group – musicians, say, or storytellers.

Both groups would welcome any newcomers.

And carers are also welcome, to join in or not, as

they choose. Charlotte Gann

Well-being for Adults with Disabilities, Tues,

10.30-12.30, £5. Dementia-Friendly Creative

Space is a drop-in, Fri, 10-12, donations (£3 or

£5, guide). Both are at the Westgate Chapel.

foreststarhannah@gmail.com, (01273) 476077.

oysterproject.org.uk

Photo by Dawn Fuller

LEWES IN NUMBERS: OUR WASTE AND RECYCLING

Our household waste comprises recycling, composting and the remainder. All our waste which cannot

be recycled or composted now provides energy through the Newhaven Energy Recovery Facility,

rather than going to landfill. The electricity produced goes back into the National Grid and provides

enough power for 25,000 homes. The Newhaven plant was opened in 2012.

Across Lewes District, household waste amounts have reduced slightly across the last decade, and we

now recycle more material. In 2005/6, Lewes District households produced on average 345kg of waste

each, and sent 81% to landfill with 19% recycled. By 2015/16 households in Lewes District produced

an average of 291kg of waste, made up of around 20% recycling, 4% composting, with the remaining

76% going for energy recovery. Provisional figures for last October show that recycling rates have

now increased to almost 40% following the introduction of recycling wheelie bins – 40,000 across the

whole district. Sarah Boughton

17


SATURDAY 29 TH JUNE 2019

Damyns Hall Aerodrome, Upminster

Soar through the air to provide hospice care! Experience the world

from a completely different perspective and enjoy the ultimate

adrenaline rush strapped to a Stearman biplane, all to raise money

to support families living with terminal illness. Enjoy spectacular

views and the thrill of zooms and climbs at speeds up to 130mph!*

For more information or to book, visit

www.stpjhospice.org or call 01444 470726

*12 stone weight limit

£199

REGISTRATION FEE

WITH A PLEDGE TO

RAISE £1,000

Registered charity number: 1056114


BITS AND BOX

CHARITY BOX: NOW! CHARITY

The Now! Charity is the

new(ish) name for the local

charity more commonly

known as Furniture Now.

Its Head Office – as is

its Lewes showroom – is

in the Phoenix Works in

North Street and, since last

September, CEO Michael

Ryan has been at its helm.

So how did Now! first

come about? It all started as a Common Cause

Cooperative project. A milk float trundling round

town, picking up furniture and dropping it off to

those most in need – freecycling. The demand

was great, within two years – 25 years ago now

– Furniture Now was established as its own,

independent charity. Today, we have three furniture

and electrical stores – in Lewes, Eastbourne

and Hailsham – a community arm, whereby we

teach English and Maths qualifications, and run

Gardening and Woodwork workshops; 22 staff,

and 10 to 15 volunteers. As from 2019, we’re

introducing a Community Development Fund –

to help wider local causes. Polly Toynbee is our

Patron.

What’s the charity all about? At heart? Not

everyone is aware that East Sussex contains a

troubling number of poverty-bound areas, including

here in Lewes. We work to provide hope

and opportunity to those currently unemployed,

accessing welfare assistance, or regular, workingclass

people in employment who are desperate

for support in the current climate. We take great

pride in a person visiting our stores with hardearned

money and being able to leave, thanks to

our two-tiered pricing system, with a good-quality

item they couldn’t otherwise afford. We’re not

going to strap you up in credit; I do not believe in

credit, full stop.

We have three key values.

One is reducing waste –

challenging a throw-away

culture. Two, eradicating

inequality – lowering

those invisible barriers,

giving people a chance

to access life-changing

items that can be taken for

granted.

And, three, promoting

social inclusion. Here our volunteers can cut their

teeth in a ready-made business environment,

building or rebuilding their confidence. A person

may enrol on one of our English courses, leaving

able to read and write for the first time, or join

our woodworking group and connect with others.

And what brought you, personally, here?

I started with the Sussex County Football Association,

leading on their work with children

and young people. I then progressed to head up

the Brighton-based, non-profit Russell Martin

Foundation before, most recently, working for

Big Youth Group in London.

I love working in an organisation with a strong

social purpose. That passion is what drives me,

every hour I put in I believe is contributing to a

bigger cause.

For me, it’s about dignity. That’s so important

– for everyone. Quite rightly, homelessness is a

cause on everyone’s agenda, but what about those

people in society on the financial brink of losing

their homes? Here at Now! Charity, a person

can be introduced to us with nothing, and within

twelve months, can be transformed.

We gladly welcome people willing to donate both

time and furniture, and I’d encourage anyone

interested in finding out more to get in touch.

Interview by Charlotte Gann

nowcharity.org.uk

Photo by Charlotte Gann

19


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BITS AND BOBS

SPREAD THE WORD

Jo and Paul Fallon didn’t have time to read their

Viva Lewes before leaving on a trip in January to

Thailand, so they took it with them.

‘This is in Koh Pha-ngan, an island in the Gulf of

Thailand, in South-east Thailand’, Jo emailed us.

‘I’m here for a few weeks. Paul will stay on longer,

to spend time with his son who has a successful

travel business here – TruTravels.

It’s been a great excuse to get some winter sun and

escape the cold you’re having at home.

No storms here!’

And Tony Kalume took his Viva all the way to East

Africa. Here he is reading it ‘sitting on the raised

beds in the middle of the famous Kongowea market

in Mombasa, Kenya. And yes, it was 35 degrees

under the shade’, Tony says.

Keep taking us with you and keep spreading the

word. Send your photos and a few words about you

and your trip to hello@vivamagazines.com

RIDERS OF LEWES #05

Lewes has had a history of bike shops over the

decades, but in the late-noughties, after the closure

of the one at the top of town, there were none.

Then, two opened at the same time: CycleShack

in Intersport and Future Cycles on Friars Walk.

When the latter closed in 2013, CycleShack 2

opened on the same premises.

Harvey Grainger, who has worked at CycleShack

since “about 6 months after they opened”, and is

now manager of both shops, says “both offer everything”

in terms of sales and repairs, though there’s

some variation in brands. The main ethos is to offer

customers “the right bike, put together properly”.

Everyone at CycleShack prides themselves on

knowing how to match customers with the right

bike for their requirements.

Harvey says the shops are “almost like a doctor’s

surgery – everyone and their bike is treated

the same,” whether you’re in to have a puncture

mended or for “a

£10k custom build.

Don’t ever ask

what they want;

ask what they want

to use it for”.

Custom-built bikes

are increasingly

popular these days,

paralleling the

rising enthusiasm

for cycling both as

a sport and as a mode of transport that’s healthy

and non-polluting. Another growth area is electric

bikes which, with their small yet highly efficient

motors, help users overcome that perennially offputting

element of cycling in Lewes: hills. Something

we know a fair bit about. Daniel Etherington

lewescycleshack.co.uk

21


CARLOTTA LUKE

FOCUS ON: GIG CLUB

Carlotta Luke has recently joined the Lewes

Pilot Gig Club and she loves it. Starting with

a handful of members in the summer, it has

become a victim of its own success and now has

a waiting list to join. At the heart of the club

is a real sense of camaraderie, dedication and

a passion for getting out on the water. All they

need now is a wooden racing boat of their own

(the boat in the pictures is leased). If you fancy

getting your name on a boat, please contact

them via their website

LewesPilotGigClub.co.uk

carlottaluke.com

23


BITS AND BOBS

BRIGHTON FESTIVAL: BRIDGING DIFFERENCE

We were hugely inspired, at the Brighton Festival

launch, by this year’s Guest Director, Rokia

Traoré. The event started with representatives

from Hangleton and Whitehawk speaking

about their continued involvement in the

Festival, which started thanks to Kate Tempest’s

directorship two years ago. This year the

collaboration, which has been called ‘Your

Place’ renames itself ‘Our Place’, evidence of the

cementing of the relationship.

This set the pace beautifully for what Rokia

Traoré had to say, in conversation with Andrew

Comben, which was a lot about understanding

the importance of diversity and difference.

Rokia comes from Mali. She talked about

different people’s stories – made the striking

point that “unfortunately, Africa’s history has been

gathered and told by people who weren’t there”

and spoke of every

old person dying in

Africa as “like a library

burning”.

“We are now able to

correct and say when

it’s not true”, she says.

One big theme is the

value of curiosity,

and how we keep the doors open even when fear

of difference strikes. “Diversity seems beautiful

when it’s far away”, says Rokia. “How do we deal

with it concretely in our own cities?”

After speaking, Rokia sang to us. It was stunning,

a wonderful privilege at 11am on a February

morning. This year’s Festival in May is going to

be a feast, I’m sure. Get booking. Charlotte Gann

brightonfestival.org

Photo by Summer Dean


BITS AND BOBS

THE GARDEN SHOW AT FIRLE PLACE COMPETITION

The wonderful Garden Show at Firle this year

takes place over Easter Weekend – from Good

Friday, 19th April, to Easter Sunday 21st April

– and we’ve got family tickets to give away.

The garden will be open displaying specialist

growers, arts and craft designers, home and

garden furniture, fashion and country food.

It’s a great family event, too – with birds of

prey, archery, face painting, jugglers, puppet

shows and an Easter egg hunt. Come along

and join the spring festival atmosphere.

We’re going to pull three names from our

Competition draw – each will win a pair of

tickets, or a family ticket (you choose). All you have to do is send us your name and an answer to this

question: what annual has the Latin name Helichysumand? (Top tip: you can find the answer in this issue

of Viva Lewes in our Guest Gardening column on page 92.)

Please email your name and answer to admin@vivamagazines.com by 31st March, and head your email

‘Firle Garden Competition’. For Ts and Cs please see vivalewes.com


Don’t miss your shot at joining the amazing

Lewes FC

Girls Academy

from September 2019

THREE training sessions

a week at Lewes FC run by

the Lewes FC Women

First Team Manager and

coaching staff.

Plus regular matches

Outstanding education

from BTEC to A-Level in

a huge range of subjects

at one of our partner

colleges

Lewes FC Women play in the

FA Women’s Championship

against Man Utd, Spurs and

other top clubs

We are the only football club

in the world to pay women

footballers the same as the

men’s team

Football trials:

Saturday 9th March

Thursday 18th April

Contact

academy@lewesfc.com

TODAY

in partnership with


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27


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COLUMN

David Jarman

View from the front row

In Figure Study II, Joe Hill, the new head of

Towner in Eastbourne, curates a personal

response to the gallery’s permanent collection.

The title of the exhibition is taken from the

name of a Francis Bacon painting, dating from

1946 and related to Three Studies for Figures

at the Base of a Crucifixion, which was first

exhibited the year before. Bacon considered

Three Studies to be his first real work. Most

of what he had painted before, he destroyed.

Figure Study II was presented by The

Contemporary Arts Society to the museum in

Batley, Joe Hill’s hometown in West Yorkshire.

Apparently, it hasn’t been on display in Batley

in Mr Hill’s lifetime. But I wonder what the

town’s residents, no doubt exercising their

traditional, rather tiresome, insistence on

Yorkshire plain speaking, made of the Bacon

when it was on show.

I remember visiting the Whitechapel Art

Gallery in 2010. One room told the story

of a Francis Bacon exhibition in Moscow in

1988. One of the display cabinets included

examples of visitors’ responses to the works

on show. Some were puzzled. Ivanov, aged

30, a technologist, wrote: ‘To my very sincere

surprise I wasn’t pleased with the paintings

by Francis Bacon. It is very hard to explain.’

Stepanov, a physician, provided a professional

perspective: ‘According to the photographs,

the artist drinks a lot.’ (Actually, Stepanov may

have been on to something here. Interviewed

by a characteristically out-of-his-depth Melvyn

Bragg, Bacon said that The Three Studies

triptych was completed in a fortnight when “I

was in a bad mood of drinking. I sometimes

hardly knew what I was doing.”) Another

visitor, name and profession illegible, reflected,

more in sorrow than in anger, that: ‘It’s hard

to believe that Francis Bacon and William

Shakespeare are of the same nationality. The

exhibition reminds me that madness is a real

phenomenon.’

Ahead of the show, Bacon wrote: ‘It is a great

honour to be invited to have an exhibition of

paintings in Moscow. When I was young, I feel

I was very much helped towards painting after

I saw Eisenstein’s films Strike and Potemkin.’

It’s well known that the catalyst for Bacon’s

trademark screaming heads, including Figure

Study II, was the face of the screaming nurse on

the Odessa Steps in Battleship Potemkin.

I saw the film again last year. Few trips to the

Depot, while all very enjoyable, are entirely

glitch-free. This time the film jammed after

eleven minutes. All attempts to rectify the

situation proved unavailing. So we had to

reconvene a week later. This time it all went

OK. I always sit in the front row at the cinema,

partly, but only partly, to read the subtitles.

At a tea date recently, someone told me that

Wittgenstein also insisted on sitting in the

front row. Perhaps the only thing that we have

in common. But Wittgenstein

wouldn’t have been

worrying about

subtitles and he

wouldn’t have

been watching

Battleship

Potemkin: he

only went

to American

films – Fred

Astaire and

Ginger Rogers

were particular

favourites.

Illustration by Charlotte Gann

29


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COLUMN

Chloë King

Words with feeling

I’m walking along the

river at Tesco when

I am stopped in my

tracks at the sight

of what was once a

much enjoyed – and

possibly Lewes’s

last – underground

venue. Gasp! It’s only

being smashed to

smithereens!

I had my wedding

reception in that

building – once

known as Café des

Artistes or, more amusingly, Arthole – barely

five years ago.

“It really is an art hole now,” I think, as I

scrabble to take photos of those two giant

cranes dancing together in front of it like

stumbling drunks crooning into each others’

necks. The entire riverside elevation has been

removed and you can see right into it like you

might a doll’s house. I can make out the old

graffiti to the right, and to the left, the former

infinity room, now very much finite.

My reminiscence is soon interrupted by two

smiley faces, one of whom I recognise.

“Oh hi!” she says, kindly. “How are you?”

“Sad!” I blurt out, trying to fight back that

ungenerous tendency I have to emit the

expression, “can’t you tell I’m occupied?”

I don’t register that, to any normal person,

idling around photographing a building site

from afar does not constitute ‘urgent business’,

no matter how intense the look on one’s face.

“I got married in there and now look at it!” I say.

“You couldn’t get married in it now,” comes an

unfamiliar voice.

“No,” I say, feeling a

little hurt. “But to be

honest, it wasn’t too tidy

when we did.”

There is much laughter,

and I wonder: who

wants a neat place to be

messy in anyway? I feel

awkward now, looking

upon this momentous

demolition.

“Will you be putting the

photos on Facebook?”

“Yes,” I say, forlornly.

“For my friends to laugh

at, no doubt.” Sad face.

At this, my companions take their leave. I

wonder whether they’re wondering why I’m

not more personable? Or why I wanted to

hold my wedding reception inside a heap of

corrugated iron? Different strokes for different

folks, I think. It’s exposing to select a wedding

venue that’s more Poundland-Warhol than

Cornershop-Rees-Mogg.

And then, all of a sudden, I’m reminded of that

crumby Charlotte Rampling quote I heard on

BBC Radio Sussex while parking the car.

“If words don’t have vibration behind them,

and a real feeling behind them, then they’re

just words.”

“Just words, eh?” I thought at the time.

“Snarf!” (It’s this rather loose grasp of

reasonable argument that led to my dropping

out of A-level Philosophy.)

You see, now, for want of a better way of

putting it, it strikes me that Charlotte may have

made a half-decent point. For if a warehouse

doesn’t have vibration behind it, a real feeling

behind it, then it’s just prime brownfield site.

Illustration by Chloë King

31


COLUMN

Lewes Out Loud

Plenty more Henty

As a self-employed person for over forty years,

I have always been a poorly-paid up member

of the ‘one day at a time’ brigade. Long-term

planning gets short shrift from me, so agreeing

to address a group of men in St. Leonards next

month is okay but I’m wisely cautious about

a similar engagement to retired businessmen

in Hailsham in April 2020. I appreciate that

programme secretaries have a difficult job

finding speakers and it’s a compliment to be

asked but…

The St. Leonards visit will be a return to a

church hall at the back of the town where

Hastings Senior Men’s Forum meet weekly

on Tuesday afternoons. I was there four years

ago and was amazed to find well over eighty

gentlemen, both young and old, assembled for

a prayer, a hymn, a collection and, believe it or

not, my Max Miller presentation! That’s what I

call a broad church and I praised them for it.

However, it is true to say that the vast

majority of my talks over the past ten years,

through East and West Sussex, have been to

women’s organisations and in particular to

the numerous Women’s Institutes or W.I.s.

Somehow women together have got these

purposeful meetings down to a fine art and I

always find them invigorating and reassuring to

attend. The tea and biscuits are good too and

the occasional slice of lemon drizzle cake!

This brings me much closer to home and the

thriving Ouse Valley Quilters, based in Lewes,

which has over one hundred members split

up into eleven sub-groups. Meetings are held

on the fourth Tuesday of every month (except

December) in Cliffe Hall, Cliffe High Street

and, currently, there is a waiting list to join.

My wife became a member last year and that

is how I got to hear about Project Linus which

provides quilts for good causes worldwide.

Others are made by members for a variety of

purposes and have been specially welcomed by

the Trevor Mann baby unit at the Royal Sussex

County Hospital. Here they are used to lay

over the incubators, keeping bright light out of

premature babies’ eyes and generally cheering

up the ward.

The group’s vibrant website is well worth a visit

at ousevalleyquilters.org and shows stunning

examples of members’ colourful creativity,

both old and new. On this page you will find

member Gill’s careful restoration of her own

mother’s quilt from the 1950s.

My brief encounters this month were radically

reduced by an unremitting ‘viral cough’ which

seemed to have affected everyone I met. The

town’s former MP, Norman Baker, commented

to me online that he thought my ‘chesty cough’

was probably a former Soviet cabinet minister!

On one of my wary outings, I did exchange

a few words with a reader, Helen, who had

perhaps noted my preference for the colour

yellow last month. She was wearing a stunning

mustard-coloured top coat, set off by a stylish

black hat.

John Henty

33


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ON THIS MONTH: OPERA

Glyndebourne: Agreed

Opera comes to the community

The community

and youth operas

that Glyndebourne

produces have become

keenly anticipated

events in their

calendar. Thirteen

singers from Lewes

are taking part in

2019’s show, Agreed,

making it the most represented town in the

chorus of around 80 people. We spoke to locals

Tim Freeman and his 15-year-old daughter

Lulu about their experiences working on the

production.

Lulu explains that composer Howard Moody

asked the people in her audition group to sing

a song of their choosing, which would form “a

kind of white noise of loads of different songs.

There were people who were doing amazing

operatic arias and I didn’t know what to do.

So I started singing this weird nursery song,

and I thought ‘Lulu you’re an idiot, this is so

embarrassing’. I got in and I always wondered

why, but I reckon they’re looking for good

singers, and for people who are going to throw

themselves in and not be embarrassed.”

Assistant Conductor/Chorus Master Lee

Reynolds grew up in Lewes and Tim is

impressed by what he can get out of people.

“We refer to him as a kind of cult leader: he

can get us to do things which at nine o clock

on a Tuesday night after you’ve been at work or

school all day, you weren’t expecting to… but

we’ll do it for Lee.” Lulu describes Howard as

being responsible for the more spiritual side of

things, “asking us to feel it, or put our emotion

behind what we’re singing. He comes in and

stirs the pot”.

Tim explains that

Howard hopes that

the chorus will sound

like a community on

an island, trying to

“murk it a bit so it’s not

all operatic singing”.

Lulu adds: “That is the

special thing about it.

It’s not exclusive, you don’t have to be a certain

type of singer to be in it… it sounds like a real

group of people.”

I ask Tim and Lulu what the most surprising

thing has been about working on Agreed, and

both comment on how they have got to know a

wide variety of people through working closely

together over time. Lulu answers that she’s

“not been in anything like this before, where

you’re properly interacting with different

generations of people and making something

together that’s not very divided, with different

roles to do. Everyone’s there for the love of

music and theatre and art. No one’s getting

paid but they’re still showing up to rehearsal

on time. That’s where the unique atmosphere

comes from”.

Tim concurs, further outlining a sense of a

safe space and camaraderie in rehearsals. “In

my experience you get very little of ‘what

do you do?’, because what we do is come

to Glyndebourne three days every week. I

wouldn’t say to someone there, ‘what do you

do?’, because I can see what they do three days

a week at Glyndebourne, and it’s good, and I

admire it. They really have built a community,

and a large one.” Joe Fuller

Agreed, Glyndebourne, 1st to 3rd March

Photo by Sam Stephenson

35


ON THIS MONTH: THEATRE

£¥€$

Empathy for the devil

Photo by Michael Devijver

Exploring the themes of banking and the

mysteries of the 1% through an immersive

casino-style environment, £¥€$ (LIES) is a

hearty combination of thought-provoking

and gambling. We spoke to Angelo Tijssens,

who wrote and developed the show with

his colleagues in Belgian theatre company

Ontroerend Goed, ahead of their performances

at the Attenborough Centre.

We began thinking about the show during

the financial crisis of 2006-2008, because it

feels like it’s something so large and vast that

you can’t seem to be able to grasp it. Therefore

you don’t understand it, therefore something is

wrong, so all bankers are all criminals and they

should all be hanged.

We started studying and soon we learned

that the idea of debt is not something that

was invented by an angry banker in 1972: it’s

older than the written word. The idea of ‘if you

owe me this, I owe you that’, and that creates

trust, and peace even, between people, between

tribes, between nations.

It would have been lazy and cheap and easy

to make a show about bankers where we all

wear the same dark blue or grey pinstripe

suits pretending to snort cocaine, talking

rubbish about the people. But we’ve seen that

and that’s already how we imagine it to be – I

think everyone, except for the bankers. We

thought that it would be much more interesting

to use that very powerful tool of empathy and

put our audience members on the 1% seat.

They’re normally the ones trying to look in or

up to the 34th floor of a very large and concrete

building, but what if you put them there, give

them the same tools, let them handle it. We’ve

played the show over 200 times already, the

result isn’t that different: we all like to play

with money.

Audience members are separated when

they come in. There are seven people

around one table, which might resemble a

blackjack table but isn’t. You’re there, if all

goes well, with six complete strangers and

you all become banks. Instead of being Joe,

you become the Bank of Joe, or the Royal

Bank of Joe if you’re the richest. Each table is

a metaphor for a nation: all tables combined

become a European Union, or a World Trade

Organisation.

It’s a show where you as an audience

member have a lot of power because we give

it to you. But we don’t expect you to make the

show, we already did that for you. Even though

you’re very involved in playing the game with

us and playing the show with us, you’re still an

audience member.

We’ve had people who were very loud about

how money is not really their kind of thing.

Give us an hour and a half and they’ll be

shouting for government bonds and complex

financial structures by the time the lights go

out. It’s so human to want that and to want

to engage in that. That winning rush is so

powerful that almost every audience member

gets drawn into it. As told to Joe Fuller

ACCA, Mar 13th to 15th, 6pm & 9pm

37


FOCUS ON HYBRID OR

SOPHISTICATED FAMILY MEDIATION

JO O’SULLIVAN

I specialise in this model (currently rare) form of mediation which

combines the family law model of mediation with the civil law model.

Here is a list of factors from both your solicitor’s point of view and

from your own:

FROM THE CLIENTS’ POINT OF VIEW: The mediator is there to help both of you come to a solution

that suits your family. They will do this by (unlike the usual family mediation process):

1. Keeping confidences when you say so (so

long as there are no safeguarding issues). This

helps the mediator bring about a settlement as

they know what all parties are thinking. This is

really useful in negotiations and saves time.

2. You can have separate meetings which are

useful when things are difficult in the same

room or when there has been domestic abuse.

Separate meetings may be with your without

your solicitor present.

3. Your solicitors will be with you throughout

the mediation process or when you feel they

need to be there. They can support and advise

you ‘in real time’. This means that you can feel

confident in the proposals you reach and you

do not have to wait for advice outside of the

mediation sessions.

4. Your solicitors can draft and finalise legal

documents during the mediation process which

will be legally binding.

5. Your solicitors can be an active part of this

mediation process rather than being relied

upon outside of it. They can be on the phone or

in meetings with you.

6. This is usually a quicker way to reach a

solution.

FROM THE LAWYERS’ PERSPECTIVE:

1. Mediator can keep confidences and have

separate meetings.

2. Lawyers involved throughout in the following

ways:-

- Attending preliminary meetings.

- Supporting the process throughout.

-Providing information including Forms E

(financial summary forms).

-Attending some or all sessions, especially

private meetings.

-Liaising as the process develops (possibly by

telephone).

- Drafting legally binding settlement

documents during the mediation meetings.

3. Particularly useful when there is litigant

in person involved in a case (where one of the

couple does not have their own solicitor).

4. This is particularly useful for clients who have

been very acrimonious or where there has been

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5. Can be helpful between the solicitors

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Do show this article to your solicitor. I’d be

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Please call to discuss what might be the best process for you

on 07780676212 or email jo@osullivanfamilylaw.com

For more details about how I work visit

www.osullivanfamilylaw.com


ON THIS MONTH: THEATRE

Loving Androids

Philip Ayckbourn on drama, decency and droids

Imagine a future where

relationship counselling is

handled by a pair of lifelike

robots. Rather than just

talking, each becomes a

substitute spouse to the

human they’re helping. And

although these ‘Partnerbots’

are capable of offering physical

comfort, they also assess

and role-play the problems

they discover. Consequently,

the human couple quickly

gain a new insight into their

incompatibility, at which point the robots are

taken away to have their memories wiped clean.

Fortunately this isn’t a dystopian nightmare.

It’s the premise of Loving Androids, a comedy

drama crafted by Philip Ayckbourn. Not

only is Philip the writer, he’s also directing

the forthcoming production at Lewes Little

Theatre, where his farce Timeshare was

performed in 2017.

“I’ve always been interested in gadgets and

people”, Philip tells me. Those interests

coincided in Michael Crichton’s 1973 film

Westworld, which used human-looking robots

as entertainment in an adventure park. “I was

hugely influenced by that”, he explains. “I was

very interested about their lives and how the

humans treated them as playthings.”

“The Partnerbots are quite human-like, they’re

not clunky, which also makes the margins a bit

blurred. They’re not just a toy you can switch

off; they have feelings because they’ve been

programmed in a very advanced way.”

A robot counsellor is a fascinating proposition

but it’s not a straightforward one for the actors

to interpret. “It is a challenge – it’s a challenge

for me, too”, Philip says. “It

really comes from movement,

from stillness, really. Starting

from nothing and building up

from the stillness. It gives them

a great power and strength,

which is lovely to watch. If

they become too animated, too

emotional, they become more

human.”

Science fiction isn’t the only

influence on Loving Androids.

This play – and Timeshare, too –

have a comedic style that owes

a debt to Sir Alan Ayckbourn, Philip’s father.

“The Ayckbourn DNA is there”, I suggest. “I’m

very aware of that when I’m writing”, Philip

replies. “Obviously I’m steeped in his work.

There’s no escaping that – which I think isn’t a

bad thing; I feel very fortunate for that DNA.

Something I really admire about him is the

comedy; the ability to find the right word, the

right line, to set something up and the payoff.

And since, principally, I’m concerned with

comedy, that’s very good DNA to be able to

call on.

“When you’re playing with slightly heightened

or unreal situations – like Loving Androids – you

need humour, I think, for people to go along

with the believability of it.”

There’s a supernatural Ayckbourn double-bill

planned for the 2019-2020 season at Lewes

Little Theatre, featuring Haunting Julia by Sir

Alan plus Psychic Connections by Philip. But, like

android counsellors, that’s yet to come. Right

now, Philip’s heading back to rehearsals to teach

people how to be less human. Mark Bridge

Loving Androids runs at Lewes Little Theatre

from 16th to 23rd March. lewestheatre.org

39


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ON THIS MONTH: LITERATURE

Lesley Thomson

Literary crime writer

On the face of it, Lesley Thomson, the Lewesbased

crime writer, who has seen ten novels

published in the last ten years, was a latecomer

to the literary scene.

Her novel A Kind of Vanishing won the People’s

Book Prize in 2010, and she has since found a

place somewhere near the top rank of British

crime writers, with her Detective’s Daughter

series. But dig a little further and, appropriately

enough, the plot thickens.

I’m talking to Lesley in her bookshelf-lined

front room in Southover, and I find there’s

more to her career than meets the eye.

In fact, her first published novel was written

back in 1987, and was based on a real-life

murder, of a friend of hers. And, while the

killing played a crucial role in the narrative,

the book wasn’t a ‘crime’ novel at all: more of a

semi-autobiographical, literary affair. “It was

commissioned by Jeanette Winterson,” she

confides. “It was quite a success. But it’s out of

print now.”

So why the 20-odd-year hiatus? She cites

personal circumstances, and changes in the

publishing industry. “I have two unpublished

novels in the attic,” she says, suggesting they

probably weren’t good enough for her liking,

anyway. “And I had to do some proper jobs.

For example I’ve worked in an Australian

newsagent, an estate agency, for a playwright

agency and one of the UK’s first internet

companies.”

Which is good, when you think about it. How

seriously can you take a crime writer who

hasn’t, in Lesley’s own words, “been round the

block a bit”?

She still works hard. In order to satisfy her

hungry fan base, she produces a novel a year.

To do so, she tells me, she has to treat her

writing as something of a nine-to-five, aiming

at producing 1,000 words a day. She does this

in the morning; in the afternoon she does

research, mainly reading.

Her latest book in the Detective’s Daughter series

– The Playground Murders – is just going to

press as we talk; it will be on sale in April. She’s

already well into her next project, a ‘standalone’

crime novel based in Newhaven, rotating

around three major themes: “Catholicism,

power and fish.”

She clearly takes her research seriously: this

morning she spent between 6am and 8am in

the Lewes branch of Waitrose, her hair in a net,

shadowing their fishmonger.

“Obviously”, she tells me, “the book features at

least one murder.”

Obviously? Her neatly arranged bookshelves

show rows of Ruth Rendells, alongside the likes

of Jonathan Franzen and WG Sebald. She’s

clearly got a broad taste.

Does she ever, I wonder, regret not following a

more ‘literary’ path?

“Not a bit of it,” she says. “My publisher calls

me a ‘literary crime writer’, anyway. And the

crime genre is a perfect medium for exploring

characterisation and the weightier themes of

life. Why would I ever want to change?”

Alex Leith

Lewes Literary Society, All Saints, 12th March,

8pm. lewesliterarysociety.co.uk

Photo by Emily Andersen

41


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ON THIS MONTH: TALK

‘A very dangerous moment’

Adam Tickell on Brexit

About six months ago

the Vice Chancellor of

the University of Sussex,

Professor Adam Tickell,

was asked by Lewes U3A

to give a talk to take place

on March 14th about the

implications of Brexit.

He was expecting to have a

bit more clarity about the

situation by this point, he

tells me, sitting in his office

on the university campus, over a cup of tea, in

mid-February.

“We’re only six weeks away and we don’t know

what it’s going to look like… for Britain, or

for the university sector,” he says. “It’s a very

difficult point in Britain’s history.”

He goes into specifics concerning the

university sector. He’s worried that non-British

EU student numbers will decline, and that this

will lead to the closure of certain universities

(though not Sussex). He’s worried about the fact

that universities are already losing EU members

of staff, put off by the financial and social

implications of Brexit, a trend which can only

accelerate. He’s worried about the cessation

of European research grants, and how this

will diminish the prestige of UK universities.

And he’s upset that – if there is no deal – the

Erasmus cultural exchange, which originates

from a programme rolled out at Sussex in the

70s, will be “off the table”.

Then there’s ‘the bigger picture’. “Just by

chance,” he says, “we’ve got the largest group

of trade experts in the country, the UK Trade

Policy Observatory, at Sussex. This includes

Alan Winters, one of the architects of free

trade in Europe, working

with economists, lawyers,

and international relation

experts on the implications

of the vote on UK trade

relationships. They’ve been

analysing what impact it

will have and trying to work

out what a better trading

relationship will look like.

None of that looks very

positive, I have to say.”

He has given a “range of talks” about the effects

of Brexit over the last couple of years, in front

of a variety of audiences. “What I’ve tried to

do is not to make overwhelmingly political

statements, instead to just put out the facts on

the ground. I’d like people to draw their own

conclusions. Because I think that one of the

real problems we have in our country at the

moment is that the Brexit debate has become

toxic, because people forged their views a good

while ago and I think on both sides of the

debate, to a really significant degree, people

close their ears when [others] are saying things

that are contrary to what they believe. And

when politics becomes a matter of ideology

rather than evidence then that becomes a very

dangerous moment.”

I suspect out loud that Adam won’t be able to

tell me how he voted in the referendum, but he’s

not as coy as I’d imagined. “I’ve made no secret

of that,” he says. “I was very much convinced

that it was in the interest of the universities,

and in the national interests, not to leave.”

Alex Leith

Brexit – A Free Public Lecture organised by

U3A, 14th March, Lewes Town Hall, 7pm

43


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ON THIS MONTH: OPEN DAY

Community Extravaganza Day

Lessons in plastic at the Linklater

In recent time the Lewes

Railway Land Wildlife Trust

has broadened its scope. It still

runs fun and educational events

for school groups, but has also

started designing events for

the wider community too.

On Sunday 24th, there’s a

good opportunity to find out

more by going along to the

Community Extravaganza Day.

Over the past few months the

Trust has organised three

public events, “all designed to

get people out on the Railway Land exploring

and learning about the environment”, Education

Officer Milly Hawkins tells me.

The first, on ‘Habitats’, focused on “the

wonderful dynamic mosaic of habitats at the

Railway Land”, says Milly. The second was

around “raising awareness about single-use

plastics”; and, for the third, ‘Exploring water’,

the group of participants built their own chalk

aquafer, and learnt “how our precious drinking

water arrives in Lewes”.

All three of these events will be repeated on

the 24th, and anyone is welcome – including

families – to come and join in with whichever of

them they fancy. “It’s about enjoying being in

nature”, says Milly. “At the same time, we hope

it’s educational.”

There is also, at the moment, a Plastic Waste

Awareness Trail winding through the reserve,

which visitors are welcome to follow, whether

on a guided talk, or solo, with a leaflet (which

can be picked up from the door of the Linklater

Pavilion). This consists of a lovely circular loop

through the Railway Land via six beautiful

hand-carved wooden signs, each one carefully

placed, and carrying a quote

pertinent to our whole debate

and struggle with plastic-filled

oceans. Milly took me on this

walk on a crisp cold day, the

last of January, when the ponds

were frozen over.

The quotes make an interesting

contrast, ranging from Sir

David Attenborough’s – ‘It’s

not rocket science. And as we

can solve rocket science, we

can work out how to get rid

of ocean plastic’ – to simpler,

unattributed concepts like ‘We cannot throw

plastic away. There is NO ‘away’!’, which

appears evocatively, as Milly points out, right

down by the river. (It’s by river that much of

our plastic travels to the sea.)

As for the open afternoon, Milly says the

messages she’ll be hoping to get across,

about plastic, fall into three categories: what

we can do, as individuals; working together

locally; and our bigger response, as a nation,

even species. She talks about the idea of a

circular economy – where, “instead of waste”

– because, remember, there is no ‘away’ –

the plastic we’ve accumulated “becomes a

resource. This”, Milly points out, “is how all

systems work in nature – cyclically”.

The other thing going on that day is a

celebration of the opening of the newly floored

‘Jolly Room’ downstairs at the Linklater, named

after Dr Alison Jolly. This is open now for hire,

including for children’s parties…

Charlotte Gann

Community Extravaganza Day, 24th March, 2pm-

5pm, free. The Plastic Waste Awareness trail will

be there all month. railwaylandproject.org

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ON THIS MONTH: FILM

The Great Escape, The Ponds, Waru

Film ’19

Dexter Lee’s cinema round-up

In the seventies it was the film they seemed to

put on every Christmas, and I got to know it

so well I could recite most of the lines before

they were uttered. Since then it’s become the

cinematic equivalent of comfort food: I must

have watched it 20 times. But you know what?

I’ve never had the chance to see The Great Escape

on a big screen. Until now, that is. To mark

the 75th anniversary of the mass POW escape

that the film is based on, John Sturges’ movie

is being screened simultaneously in selected

cinemas nationwide, including the Depot (24th,

6pm). I wouldn’t miss it for the world… and I’ll

still be hoping that Steve McQueen might just,

this time, make it over that god-damned fence

on his motorbike.

I’ll definitely be back a week later for the screening

of Scottish film maker Bill Douglas’ highly

acclaimed trilogy (31st) based on his life growing

up in crippling poverty in Edinburgh, and his

subsequent intellectual and spiritual awakening

after being called up for national service. The

trilogy, formed of My Childhood (1972), My Ain

Folk (1973) and My Way Home (1978), was highly

influential on subsequent film-makers and recalled

the work of Indian maestro Satyajit Ray.

As ever, there’s far too much on at the Depot

to fit in this space, but it’s worth highlighting

a few of the one-offs in March. The cinema’s

new monthly Saturday Night Horror season

kicks off with Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining

(2nd); the gentle documentary about the

Hampstead Heath swimming ponds The Ponds

(6th) includes an appearance by director Patrick

McLennan; this month’s book-to-film offering,

with a discussion afterwards, is Norman Z

McLeod’s adaptation of James Thurber’s The

Secret Life of Walter Mitty (7th), starring Danny

Kaye; International Women’s Day on the 8th

is marked with a screening of the Australian

eight-female-directed-film anthology Waru;

drummer Ginger Baker is coming to the cinema

for the screening of the 2012 documentary

Beware of Mr Baker (13th); Mr Voigt points his

critical eye to the 1962 John Schlesinger film

A Kind of Loving (20th). Plus there’s a Cinema

of the Mind screening of the documentary

Trans-Actions: An Exploration of Gender Dysphobia

(23rd), followed by what promises to be an

interesting debate afterwards. For more details

of these and many more films, check

lewesdepot.org.

The Lewes Film Club, meanwhile, has a busy

March at the All Saints (see Diary Dates or

lewes-filmclub.com): our highlight is an Alan J

Pakula 70s political thriller double bill: All the

President’s Men (1st) is followed by The Parallax

View (3rd). Other films are The Rider (15th),

McQueen (19th) and Aquarius (29th).

And it’s worth mentioning that the Attenborough

Centre (formerly the Gardner Arts

Centre, University of Sussex) has started up a

Sunday Cinema Club. This month’s offerings

are Matangi/Maya/M.I.A (3rd), News from Home

(10th), Utoya (17th), Human Flow (24th) and

Theatre of War (31st), the latter a cinematic reworking

of the Lola Arias play Minefield, which

was staged at the Centre in 2017.

47


MAKE YOUR OWN

small bowls and spoons

Louise Bell’s Pottery Taster Afternoon


ON THIS MONTH: HATS

Stephen Jones

Hats at the Royal Pavilion

If hats could talk, one can

only imagine the conversations

that might take place

between those currently on

display in the Royal Pavilion’s

Banqueting Hall. The 26

‘seated’ at the banqueting table

where the Prince Regent

once hosted his lavish dinner

parties are – but for one – all

the work of Stephen Jones, a

milliner whose list of famous

clients would stretch all the

way down Madeira Drive.

In this particular exhibit, the

centrepiece of a spectacular

career-spanning retrospective,

Tilda Swinton (or her

headpiece, at least) mingles

with Cindy Crawford; Lady

Gaga could swap gossip

with Princess Diana, and

Mick Jagger share a drink

with Kate Moss. At the head

of the table, of course, sits

Prinny himself, in a felt

hat Jones copied from the

painting of the Prince Regent

at the National Portrait

Gallery. The only person not

represented by a Stephen

Jones hat is Jones himself,

who has chosen instead his

grandfather’s top hat: “I have

a rather strange head shape,”

he explains, “and obviously

it comes from him because it

fits me perfectly.”

The exhibition, staged in

partnership with Harvey

Nichols and seven years in

the making, spans a career

of nearly four decades, from

Jones’ early days partying

with – and making hats for –

Boy George at London’s legendary

Blitz Club through his

collaborations with designers

including Dior, Giles Deacon

and Comme des Garçons

up to more recent creations

The Mad Hatter 2013 and hat for Thom Browne AW14 in the Kitchen. Photos © Tessa Hallmann/Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove

49


HATS

Stephen Jones in The Saloon of the Royal Pavilion holding ‘Royal Crescent’ from his Chinoiserie-on-Sea collection.

Photo © Tessa Hallmann/Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove

50


HATS

for devoted fans such as Lady Gaga, who

loved the huge, pink, feather-trimmed

hat he made for her so much it was the

only thing she chose to wear when she

appeared on the cover of Vogue in 2012.

“Of course, I didn’t know she was going

to wear it naked but I suppose she had just

worn the dress made of meat…”

Jones’ relationship with Brighton began

many years previously, in his imagination.

“I’m from the Wirral Peninsula, which

is basically a sand dune in the middle of

the Irish Sea and even on an August day

it’s a force 10 gale and freezing. To me,

Brighton was like the Riveria or Mustique

or somewhere like that. In my imagination

it was in the deep south, warm and

welcoming, artistic and creative – all those

things the Wirral Peninsula was not.” In

2012 he spent an extended period in the

city researching Chinoiserie-on-Sea, a

collection of hat designs inspired, in part,

by the Pavilion.

Pieces from that collection are among

upwards of 160 hats now on display in

rooms throughout the seaside pleasure

palace. “I’ve always loved the Pavilion,” he

says. “Apart from all the crazy Chinoiserie

– which has absolutely nothing to do

with the real China – what I love is that

it’s such a celebration of shape and colour.

Everything it represents, all that extravagance

and exuberance, I’m absolutely

attracted to.”

Exhibiting in such opulent surroundings

was a new experience for Jones, who is

more used to showing his work on catwalks

or in white-wall galleries including

the V&A and New York’s Metropolitan

Museum of Art. “If you’re showing hats

in a gallery you have to create themes or

chronology. If you’re showing hats in the

Pavilion, well, you have to just go with it,”

he laughs. Nione Meakin

Royal Pavilion, until June 9

Mannequin reclining on the stairs wearing Giles Deacon AW 2012

Photos © Tessa Hallmann/Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove

Dior AW 2005 crown displayed above George IV’s bed

Photos © Tessa Hallmann/Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove

51


ART

ART & ABOUT

In town this month

‘Maybe it’s because I’m a pink horse’

by Jo Lamb

From the 8th until the 17th of March curator Sarah O’Kane

brings together new work by seven Sussex-based contemporary

fine art painters for a Spring Show in Lewes House,

at 32 High Street. Poetic nature paintings by Linda Felcey,

the colour-saturated art of Jo Lamb, fresh town and cityscapes

by Julian Sutherland-Beatson, painterly imaginative

portraiture by Jane Hansford, and the vibrant Sussex

landscapes of Julian Le Bas all feature. Opening night from

6–8pm on Friday 8th then open daily 10am–5pm.

The exhibition of oil and acrylic seascapes by Eva Wibberley continues at

Chalk Gallery until the 18th when Pauline Alexander becomes the featured

artist. Her vibrant and imaginative works in pastel, acrylic and charcoal

are informed by her deafness, her Buddhist beliefs and her work as a counsellor.

She is interested in the part our senses play in creativity, and she often

works in an intuitive, spontaneous way, removing her hearing aid to immerse

herself in complete silence, sometimes closing her eyes to cut out the ‘knowing

of the brain’.

Pauline Alexander

Open Sundays from 7th April - 27th October

Join us in 2019 for an exciting new season

of House Tours, Workshops and Events

Muddles Green, Chiddingly

East Sussex, BN8 6HW

Tel: 01825 872856

www.farleyshouseandgallery.co.uk

@ FarleysHG

53


EXHIBITIONS

6 MARCH – 26 AUGUST

IN COLOUR – SICKERT TO RILEY

PHILIP HUGHES – LAND

HOUSE | GARDEN | SHOP | CAFÉ | EXHIBITION | EVENTS

CHARLESTON.ORG.UK

Spencer Gore, The Balcony at the Alhambra Image courtesy of York Museums Trust (York Art Gallery)


ART

ART & ABOUT

Out of town

Robert Dukes, Oranges and Quinces. Courtesy of Robert Dukes

The second major exhibition opens in the new

Wolfson Gallery at Charleston from the 6th.

In Colour positions the work of former Charleston

residents Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant

within a century of great British colourists. Bell

and Grant were two of the first abstract painters

in Britain, but even when creating figurative

and representational work, the abstract qualities

of colour remained a dominant element.

Curated by Vanessa’s granddaughter, the textile

designer Cressida Bell (something of a colourist

herself), the show includes a wide-ranging

and highly personal selection of works that

reflect Cressida’s personal aesthetic as well as

her artistic heritage. Drawing on loans from

private and public collections, works by Eileen Agar, Patrick Caulfield, Robert Dukes, Mary

Fedden, Patrick Heron, Paul Nash, Glyn Warren Philpot, as well as Bell, Grant and Roger Fry

all feature. Continues until the 26th of August.

Bonsai inspired sculpture made by Gabi Holden

Also at

Charleston

this month,

East Sussex

College Lewes

have joined

forces with The

Charleston

Trust to create

an exhibition

of work by

Art & Design

and Photography

Diploma

students, responding to the theme of ‘home’.

From Thursday the 14th until Sunday the 24th

of March there will be a sculpture trail in the

gardens of the farmhouse and a display of twodimensional

works in the spectacularly refurbished

Hay Barn. Open from 11am-5pm Weds-

Sun, with an awards ceremony from 10am on

Saturday the 23rd for the best artwork, as voted

by members of the public.

Klocks by Stefan Mucha

The Crypt

Gallery in

Seaford hosts

Collections One,

the inaugural

exhibition to

mark the beginning

of a yearlong

residency

by the Sussex

Arts Collective in the front room at the

gallery. Each month will see a different

and diverse display drawn from the 70+

members of the group. Collections One features

work by 20 artists working in painting,

photography and jewellery, as well as

makers

in glass,

ceramics,

textiles and

wood. (Daily

except for

Wednesdays.)

White Bird by Phil Duncan

55


Spring

Show

new paintings by

Jo Lamb

Julian Le Bas

Linda Felcey

Jane Hansford

Kathleen Mullaniff

Nick Carrick

Julian

Sutherland-Beatson

8 – 17 March

Lewes House, 32 High Street, Lewes BN7 2LX

open 6 – 8pm, Friday 8 March then daily 10am – 5pm

Sarah O’Kane Contemporary Fine Art | sarahokane.co.uk

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ART

ART & ABOUT

Out of town (cont.)

Surviving or Thriving; an exhibition on plants and us opens in the Millennium

Seedbank Atrium at Wakehurst on the 22nd. Drawing on global

research and Kew’s pioneering annual science reports, this timely

exhibition explores the state of the world’s plants and how they are

adapting to our changing climate. Visit a 2050 garden display to see

what a Sussex garden might look like 30 years in the future, learn how

our diet might need to change, and discover what we can do to help

protect and preserve our precious plant resources. Included with entry to Wakehurst.

By Hayv Kahraman

Displaced Choreographies by Hayv Kahraman is at the First Floor gallery at

the De la Warr Pavilion. This exhibition of paintings, drawings and sculptural

works explores her experience of living between Western and Middle

Eastern cultures: having fled Iraq with her family aged 11, as part of the

Kurdish mass exodus, the artist migrated to Europe and now lives in the

USA. A female figure recurs in her work, representing shared histories between

women – particularly women of colour – and building on personal

histories of migration. Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Act 2 continues downstairs.

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57


LOS Musical Theatre presents Lerner and Loewe’s classic musical

My Fair Lady

TICKETS

FROM £12.00

CONCESSIONS

FROM £10.00

£3.00 supplement on tiered seating

Book and lyrics by

ALAN JAY LERNER

Music by

FREDERICK LOEWE

Adapted from George Bernard

Shaw’s play and Gabriel Pascal’s

motion picture “PYGMALION”

Original Production directed

and staged by Moss Hart

This amateur production is presented

by arrangement with Music Theatre

International (Europe) All authorised

performance materials are also supplied

by MTI Europe www.mtishows.co.uk

LEWES TOWN HALL

2nd~6th April

My Fair Lady is one of the best-loved musicals of all time. Eliza Doolittle’s

journey at the hands of Henry Higgins from flower girl to society lady has been

enjoyed world-wide since the 1950s when it was first performed, both on stage

and as a successful movie. Brimming with familiar songs, such as Wouldn’t It Be

Loverly?, With A Little Bit of Luck and I Could Have Danced All Night, exciting dance

routines and a witty script, this entertaining musical will delight audiences,

both young and old. This sparkling production will be staged in The Town Hall

between 2nd and 6th April including a matinee on Saturday 6th April.

TICKETS AVAILABLE from www.losmusicaltheatre.org.uk

TELEPHONE 01273 480 127 FOR MORE SHOW INFORMATION


MARCH listings

FRIDAY 1

Lewes FC Quiz Night. General quiz, four

people per team maximum (must book in

advance, contact nickgeall@tiscali.co.uk). The

Dripping Pan, 7.45pm, £2.50 (optional £10

meal-deal).

up to a mysterious island, there is only one

way for the crew to regain freedom. Storytelling

presented by Dirty Footprints Theatre.

Royal Oak, 8pm, £8/£10.

Film: All the President’s Men (15).

All Saints, 8pm, £5/£2.50.

SATURDAY 2

Mind, Body, Spirit Sussex Festival. Healing

therapies, psychic readers, holistic goods and

produce. Lewes Town Hall, 10am-4pm, free,

see mind-body-spirit-sussex-festival.co.uk.

SUNDAY 3

Film: Matangi / Maya / M.I.A. Biographical

documentary on the Sri Lankan artist

and musician. Attenborough Centre (part of

their film club, running every Sunday), 4pm,

£7/£5.

Film: The Parallax View (15).

All Saints, 4pm, £5/£2.50.

THURSDAY 7

Comedy at the Con. Chris Macausland, Rob

Mulholland and one further act tbc. Con Club,

7.30pm, £8-£12.

FRIDAY 8

Astronomy in Tudor Times. A Friends of

Anne of Cleves’ House talk by Marguerite

Laporte. Anne of Cleves’, 7.30pm, £8/£5. Contact

annacrabtree1@hotmail.com.

SATURDAY 9

The Journeys of Captain Silver Crow.

When Captain Silver Crow’s ship is conjured

Spring Barn Dance. Ceilidh featuring live

band Bring Back the Wolf. All proceeds to Starfish

Youth Music. All Saints, 7.30pm, £8/£10

(£25 advance family ticket).

MONDAY 11

The Paint Club. An entry-level painting class

for those wanting to try something new, meet

up with friends and have fun. Fuego Lounge,

7pm, from £17.

The Legacy of Henry & Amon Henry

Wilds. Lewes History Group talk with Sue

Berry, who will talk about the builder-architects

Amon Wilds and his son Amon Henry, who

worked in Lewes and then in Brighton from

c.1790-1855. King’s Church, 7pm for 7.30pm,

£1/£3.

Bring Back the Wolf

All Saints after 1895, courtesy of

Sussex Archaeological Society

59


Exploring the State of the World’s Plants

From 22 March

For details visit kew.org/wakehurst

Image © Michael Rasmussen

FK ALEXANDER

VIOLENCE

7 MARCH

ONTROEREND GOED, THEATRE ROYAL PLYMOUTH,

RICHARD JORDAN PRODUCTIONS & VOORUIT KUNSTCENTRUM

£¥C$ (LIES)

13 – 15 MARCH

CHINA PLATE & STAATSTHEATER MAINZ

CHRIS THORPE

STATUS

9 APRIL

BRYONY KIMMINGS

I’M A PHOENIX,BITCH

3 – 7 MAY

01273 678 822

attenboroughcentre.com

University of Sussex, Gardner Centre Road, Brighton BN1 9RA


Lewes

Little

Theatre

MAR listings (cont.)

TUESDAY 12

Lewes Literary Society talk with Lesley

Thomson, author of the best-selling The

Detective’s Daughter series. All Saints, 8pm

£10. (See page 41)

WEDNESDAY 13

The Queen of Instruments.

Illustrated talk on the lute in Old

Master Paintings by Adam

Busiakiewicz, presented by

Uckfield, Lewes and

Newick Arts Society.

Civic Centre Uckfield,

2.30pm, £7

(free for members).

THURSDAY 14

Loving

Andro ds

Written and Directed by

Philip Ayckbourn

Saturday 16 March - Saturday 23 March

7:45pm excluding Sunday. Matinee

Saturday 23 March 2:45pm.

Brexit – The Final Countdown. Free public

lecture given by Professor Adam Tickell, Vice

Chancellor of the University of Sussex. Wine

reception courtesy of Lewes U3A. Lewes

Town Hall, 7pm, free. (See page 43)

FRIDAY 15

Prehistoric Art in the Prehistoric Landscape.

A Lewes Archaeological Group talk on

the fascinating subject of rock art by Professor

Richard Bradley. Lewes Town Hall Lecture

room, 7.30pm, £4/£3, (free for under 25s,

non-members welcome), tea/coffee included.

Film: The Rider

(PG).

All Saints, 8pm,

£5/£2.50.

www.lewestheatre.org

Box Office: 01273 474826

£8

Children £6

SATURDAY 16

Make your own small bowls and spoons.

Blue Door Studio, Lewes, 2pm-5pm, £42

(includes materials and firing), see louisebellceramics.com

(also on Saturday 30th).

61


MAR listings (cont.)

SATURDAY 16 – SATURDAY 23

Loving Androids.

New play from Philip

Ayckbourn, presented

by Lewes Theatre Club.

Lewes Little Theatre,

see lewestheatre.org for

times and prices. (See

page 39)

SUNDAY 17

Lewes People’s Choir community singing

workshop. Led by Kirsty Martin of Brighton

Uproar. Westgate, 7pm-9pm, £10/£8.

Guerilla Poetry. Bring words to share or enjoy

the entertainment, free drink for all poets,

everyone welcome. Lansdown, 7.30pm, free.

Philip Ayckbourn

MONDAY 18

Lewes & District Soroptimist Club speakers

event. Speakers for this month will talk

about women’s health, fertility, menopause and

Rebozo massage to help birthing. The White

Hart, 7pm, free.

TUESDAY 19

Life Drawing.

Drop-in session

(bring own materials).

Lewes Arms,

7.30pm, £5 on the

door.

Film: McQueen

(15). All Saints,

8pm, £5/£2.50.

We are looking for delivery crew

in the Lewes area.

If you’re aged 15 or over, and

would be interested in taking

on a round, please email

distribution@vivamagazines.com

V I V A M A G A Z I N E S . C O M


FROM FRIDAY 22

Surviving or Thriving: An exhibition on

plants and us. A specially-curated exhibition

about the state of the world’s plants and what this

means for us, based on annual science reports.

Wakehurst, open daily, see kew.org/wakehurst.

SATURDAY 23

Pause: Film Inspired

Photography. Course

for those who would

like to gain confidence

with using their

DSLR camera in a

creative way. Depot,

10am-4pm, £40.

Caribbean Sightlines. To kickstart the Spring, a

transatlantic evening of words, music and Caribbean

bites with John Agard, Grace Nichols and

friends including John Lyons and Pam Hewitt.

All Saints, 7.30pm, £10/£12.

TUESDAY 26

The Pioneering

Women

Doctors of

Brighton and

Hove. Talk

with women’s

history tour

guide Louise

Peskett exploring the stories of women such

as Doctors Helen Boyle, Louisa Martindale,

Octavia Wilberforce and Hastings-born Sophia

Jex-Blake, and their struggle against prejudice

and the widespread belief that a woman’s place

was not in the operating theatre or consulting

room. The Keep, 5.30pm, £5.

FRIDAY 29

Headstrong Club. Talk and discussion with

Marie-Bénédicte Dembour on human rights today:

the case of immigration detention. Elephant

and Castle, 8pm, £3.

63


GIG GUIDE // MARCH

GIG OF THE MONTH:

SHIRLEY COLLINS

We are spoilt for choice this month by the abundance

of live music happening throughout the

town. Stand-outs are the Radio Lewes doublebill

at Westgate on Saturday 30th featuring The

Dead Sea Scouts and The Dychotics, Gold Badge

Award-winning jazz musician Claire Martin at

All Saints Centre on the 8th, and rock trio The

Wave Pictures at Con Club on Sunday 24th. But

the big mention this month must go to legendary

folk singer (and long-time Lewes resident)

Shirley Collins, who is playing with Ian Kearey at

Lewes Saturday Folk Club (Elephant & Castle) on Saturday 30th. Following a 38-year hiatus, the

hugely influential singer and folk icon released her revival album Lodestar in 2016 to a host of fivestar

reviews, and two BBC Radio 2 Folk Award nominations. With a rich career spanning 60 years,

an MBE, a documentary made about her life and work, and a published memoir under her belt,

Shirley is, in the words of Billy Bragg, “without doubt one of England’s greatest cultural treasures”.

Tickets to this very special gig will certainly sell out, so snap them up if you can!

Saturday 30, Elephant & Castle, 8pm, £10

FRIDAY 1

The Zipheads. Rockabilly/psychobilly. Con

Club, 7.30pm, £10

Oh Mama! Psychodelicious blues & rock.

Royal Oak, 8pm, free

Frolic DJs in the Bar. Special guests The

Magnificent Kevins. Royal Oak, 9pm, free

SATURDAY 2

Elsie’s Band. Folk (English trad). Elephant &

Castle, 8pm, £7

Mountain Firework Company. Acoustic

Roots. Con Club, 8pm, £10

The Manatees & Sweet Onions. A double

bill of local bands: guitar pop & garage rockers.

Royal Oak, doors 8pm, free

SUNDAY 3

Johnny Moped. Punk. Con Club, 7pm, £14

MONDAY 4

Jam night. All welcome and a free drink for all

participants. Lansdown, 7.30pm, free

Steve Buckley, Darren Beckett & Nigel

Thomas. Jazz. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

WEDNESDAY 6

Shakin’ Stevens. Greatest hits and more. De

La Warr, 7.30pm, £35

THURSDAY 7

Zoot Zazou. Vintage Hot Swing. Pelham

Arms, 8.30pm, free

64


GIG GUIDE // MARCH

FRIDAY 8

Claire Martin. Jazz. All Saints, 7pm, £15

Sepia Shadows. Acoustic blues and Soul. Bus

Club Pizza, Old Bus Station, starting 8pm, free

The Curst Sons. Hillbilly Blues. Con Club

8pm, free

SATURDAY 9

Bond of Union. Folk, vocal harmony trio.

Elephant & Castle, 8pm, £6

Fish Brothers. Victorian music hall/punk rock.

Lansdown, 8pm, free

The Urban Voodoo Machine. Gypsy blues

bop’n’stroll. Con Club 8pm, £10

MONDAY 11

Pete Oxley & Nick Meier. Jazz guitar duo.

Snowdrop, 8pm, free

MONDAY 18

Julian Nicholas, Darren Beckett, Nigel

Thomas & Terry Seabrook. Jazz. Snowdrop,

8pm, free

FRIDAY 22

Micky Hart & The Hartbreakers. 50s/60s

rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues, soul. Con Club,

8pm, free

SATURDAY 23

Loose Caboose. DJ night. Con Club,

7.30pm, £6

Elye Cuthbertson. Folk (English trad) melodeon.

Elephant & Castle, 8pm, £5

Love Action: Smash Hits, chart toppers & guilty

pleasures with the Fruitful Sound System. Royal

Oak, 8pm, £5

WEDNESDAY 13

The Poozies. Folk. Con Club, 7.30pm, £15

FRIDAY 15

Fat Belly Jones. Ska. Con Club, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 16

Tom McConville. Folk (Newcastle, Irish, Scottish

trad). Elephant & Castle, 8pm, £8

Who Are You. The Who tribute. Con Club,

8pm, £10

SUNDAY 17

The Ramonas. All-girl Ramones tribute.

Con Club, 7pm, £14

SUNDAY 24

Wave Pictures. Rock. Con Club, 7.30pm,

£12.50

MONDAY 25

Terry Seabrook Piano Trio with Nigel

Thomas & Darren Beckett. Jazz, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 29

Bin Men. Reggae Ska. Con Club, 8.30pm, free

SATURDAY 30

The Dead Sea Scouts and The Dychotics.

Presented by Radio Lewes. Westgate, 7.30pm,

free with tickets

Shirley Collins & Ian Kearey. See Gig of the

Month

SUNDAY 31

John Forrester. Sundays in the bar session. Con

Club, 3.30pm, free

R.O.M.E. Jam session hosted by Sophie C Mason.

Upstairs at The Royal Oak, 7.30pm, free

65


SUNDAY 3 MARCH 2.45PM

BARRY WORDSWORTH

Conductor

MENDELSSOHN

The Hebrides

(Fingal’s Cave)

COATES

London Suite

(London Everyday )

TCHAIKOVSKY

Capriccio Italien

Plus works by

ALFVÉN, LYADOV,

HONEGGER AND

BUTTERWORTH

Tickets from £12.50-£39.50

Discounted parking

at NCP Church Street

just £6 between 1-6pm

BrightonPhil

50% student/U18 discount

Brighton Dome Ticket Office

(01273) 709709

brightondome.org

@BPO_orchestra brightonphil.org.uk


MUSIC

Classical round-up

SUNDAY 24, 6PM

Mark Padmore, Lewes Festival of Song

Winter is Over, the Light is Soft

World-class tenor Mark Padmore comes to St

Anne’s this month to help the Lewes Festival of

Song raise money, in particular for a new piano.

He’ll be singing three contrasting song-cycles

partnered by pianist Nancy Cooley: Schumann

Liederkreis, Op 39, which the composer described

as ‘my most Romantic music ever’; Britten Winter

Words, Op 52, a setting of eight poems by Thomas

Hardy; and Fauré’s joyous La bonne chanson, Op

61. “A really good piano would be an asset for

Lewes altogether, as well as important for the

festival,” explains Festival Director Nancy. A stellar recital and a good cause.

St Anne’s Church. £20, or under 21s £10 from Lewes Tourist Information Centre (01273 483448) / from

the website / on the door. lewesfestivalofsong.co.uk

PICK

OF THE

MONTH

Photo by Marco Borggreve

FRIDAY 1, 7.45PM

Nicholas Yonge Society. Heath Quartet.

Joseph Haydn String Quartet in D major Opus 20

No 4; Gyorgy Ligeti Quartet No 2; and Ludwig

van Beethoven String Quartet 127. East Sussex

College, Mountfield Road. Season membership

£60 for five concerts, single concerts £15. Free

for 8-25 year olds. nyslewes.org.uk

FRIDAY 1, 7PM, SATURDAY

2 AND SUNDAY 3, 3PM

Glyndebourne. Agreed is a new large-scale

community opera by Howard Moody featuring

a chorus of eighty local residents and five

professional singers. (See page 35.) It’s also worth

noting that public booking for Glyndebourne

Festival 2019 opens at 6pm on Sunday 3rd

March. Tickets for Agreed £15 from the website.

glyndebourne.com

SATURDAY 2, 7.30PM

A Spring Evening Concert in aid of the

Lunchbowl Network. Mezzo Georgia Mae

Ellis, tenor Ryan Vaughan Davies and pianist

Robert Scamardella present extracts from Bizet

Carmen and Kurt Weill Street Scene, songs by

Ivor Novello and others. Trinity St John Sub

Castro. £20 to include a drink and canapés. Tickets

from Lewes and Seaford Tourist Information

Centres, 01273 483488 or on the door

SATURDAY 2, 7.45PM

Musicians of All Saints. This month’s concert

includes the first performance of Cleave by John

Alexander and Mozart’s wonderful Bassoon Concerto

with Ian Glen playing the solo. Directed

by Andrew Sherwood. All Saints. £12 regular,

£9 concession, under 18s free on the door only.

mas-lewes.co.uk

SUNDAY 3, 2.45PM

Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra. Barry

Wordsworth is back to conduct the Brighton

Philharmonic in a programme which features

the Mendelssohn Hebrides Overture and Alfvén’s

Swedish Rhapsody No.1. Brighton Dome. £12.50-

£39.50, 50% student/U18 discount.

brightondome.org

67


Esterházy

Chamber

Choir

SUNDAY 17 MARCH 2.45PM

BARRY

WORDSWORTH

Conductor

STEVEN

OSBORNE

Piano

CHABRIER

Joyeuse Marche

RACHMANINOV

Piano Concerto No.3

BERLIOZ

Symphonie

Fantastique

Discounted parking

at NCP Church Street

just £6 between 1-6pm

BrightonPhil

Tickets from £12.50-£39.50

50% student/U18 discount

Brighton Dome Ticket Office

(01273) 709709

brightondome.org

@BPO_orchestra brightonphil.org.uk

Georg Frideric Handel

DIXIT

DOM EINUS

REQUIEM

Tomás Luis da Victoria

Esterházy Chamber Choir

Director Richard Dawson

St John-sub-Castro Church, Lewes

Saturday 30 March, 7:30pm

Tickets £10 from the website or Lewes Tourist Information Office

Tickets may be available on the door, £12

Children under 16 free

www.esterhazychoir.org

Because every life is unique

…we are here to help you make your

farewell as personal and individual as possible,

and to support you in every way we can.

Inc. Cooper & Son

42 High Street, Lewes

01273 475 557

Also at: Uckfield • Seaford • Cross in Hand

www.cpjfield.co.uk


MUSIC

The Notos Piano Quartet

Aquinas Piano Trio, photo by Alexa Kidd-May

SUNDAY 3, 3PM

St Michael’s Recitals. Season opener, featuring

Sebastian Charlesworth’s Treblos Wind Quintet

playing Three Shanties by Malcolm Arnold, and

pieces by Ferenc, Nielsen, Ibert and Rubstov. St

Michael’s, free. stmichaelinlewes.org.uk

SATURDAY 16, 7.30PM

East Sussex Community Choir. Schubert’s

Mass in G and other short sacred works. With

Andrew Wilson (organ) and soloists Angela

Wilkes, Peter Hanson and Chris Wilkes. Priory

School Chapel. £8 from Lewes Tourist Information,

from choir members or on the door.

eastsussexcommunitychoir.org

O’Keeffe, together with works by Delius and

Franck, and Saint-Saens Cello Concerto No. 1

featuring soloist Joel Penrose. Trinity St John

Sub Castro, Lewes. £10 in advance or £12 on the

door. Under 18 and students £5.

lewesconcertorchestra.org

SUNDAY 24, 11AM

Coffee Concert: Aquinas Piano Trio. Leading

British chamber ensemble plays a trio of trios:

Haydn Piano Trio in E Major, Mendelssohn Piano

Trio no. 1 in D minor and the Piano Trio no. 2

in F major by Schumann. Attenborough Centre

for the Creative Arts. £18.50, concessions £16.

attenboroughcentre.com

SUNDAY 17, 2.45PM

Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra. The

last concert of the season is a corker: Berlioz

Symphonie Fantastique Op.14 and Rachmaninov’s

gorgeous Piano Concerto No.3 featuring Steven

Osborne. Brighton Dome. £12.50-£39.50, 50%

student/U18 discount. brightondome.org

SUNDAY 17, 4PM

Corelli Ensemble. A chance to hear the

sublime Concerto for Two Violins by J S Bach plus

music by Vivaldi, Telemann and Frank Bridge.

Seaford Baptist Church, Belgrave Road, Seaford.

£10 in advance, £12 on the door. Children free.

corelliensemble.co.uk

FRIDAY 22, 8PM

Lewes Concert Orchestra. First performance

of Lewes Remembers by Lewes Councillor Ruth

FRIDAY 29, 7.45PM

Nicholas Yonge Society. The Notos Piano

Quartet returns to Lewes for a programme that

includes Mozart Piano Quartet K.493 in E flat,

as well as pieces by Jean Françaix and Robert

Schumann. East Sussex College, Mountfield

Road. Season membership £60 for five concerts,

single concerts £15. Free for 8-25 year olds.

nyslewes.org.uk

SATURDAY 30, 7.30PM

Esterhazy Chamber Choir. Richard Dawson

conducts the choir in Victoria’s 1605 Requiem

and (from about a century later) Handel’s

electrifying Dixit Dominus. Trinity St John Sub

Castro, Lewes. £10 in advance from website or

£12 on the door. Under 16s free.

esterhazychoir.org

Robin Houghton

69


FREETIME êêêê UNDER 16

SATURDAY 2

Jumble Sale in aid of Plumpton Activity

Scheme. Stalls, refreshments and more,

proceeds are in aid of the summer holidays

activity scheme for children from

Plumpton, Lewes and surrounding

villages. Plumpton Village Hall,

2pm, 30p.

SUNDAY 3

Look Think Make. Drop-in family-friendly

creative activities, with support from DLWP

staff and volunteers. For all ages. Children

must be accompanied by an adult. De La

Warr, 2pm-4pm, £1.

Sooty’s Magic

Show. Join Sooty,

Sweep, Soo and

TV’s Richard

Cadell at their

live show, with

flying cars, singing

unicorns and

Sweep’s levitation

sausage. With

special guest

circus star Michael

Jordan and the ultraviolet specialties of

Fantasie de la Nuit. Devonshire Park Theatre,

Eastbourne, see eastbournetheatres.co.uk for

times and prices.

SATURDAY 9 & SUNDAY 10

Horrible Histories: Barmy Britain. ‘We all

want to meet people from history. The trouble

is everyone is dead!’. Live on stage with new

West End show. De La Warr, see dlwp.com

for times and prices.

MONDAY 11

Tales for Toddlers. Feel-goodfun

for little ones with

storyteller Kevin Graal.

De La Warr, 10.15am &

11.15am, £1.

SUNDAY 17 & MONDAY 18

Dear Zoo Live!

Stage adaptation

of the much-loved

children’s book,

with childengaging

puppets, music and lots of audience

interaction. Devonshire Park Theatre,

Eastbourne. eastbournetheatres.co.uk

SATURDAY 30

Lewes Girl Guides Divisional Day. The

Viking Celebration. A collaboration with

Lewes Children’s Book Group, South Down

Storytellers and STEM Sussex. Activities

include working with runes, riddles, natural

dyeing and creating ink from egg and honey,

culminating with a big storytelling session from

Norse mythology. Pickett’s Wood, 10.30am-

3pm, £10.

Beechwood Hall Jumble Sale. Grand Annual

Community Jumble Sale with quality jumble.

Beechwood Hall, Cooksbridge, 2pm, 50p.


êêêê

ONCE UPON A MOVING ON

PATINA AT 18

Patina – which organises the

vibrant, local ‘moving on’

parade through the town,

for Year 6 children leaving

primary school – this year,

itself, comes of age. We met up

with organiser Caroline Croft

(right) just before Patina’s

18th birthday party – in the

Town Hall, in February – to

talk birthday celebrations, and

what the children’s art charity

is really, at heart, all about.

“The party will be great fun,” Caroline says.

“It’ll be a retrospective of Patina from 2001 to

the current day, and we’ve invited the founders

and supporters back, to celebrate their legacy.

My colleague Raphaella Sapir (pictured left) has

been involved since the very beginning which

is phenomenal. Some of the kids from the first

year of Moving On are turning 30 this year –

soon enough we’ll have second generation kids

moving on and the story continues!”

Caroline was happy to share that the 2019

Moving On theme, to be announced at the

party, is ‘Once upon a Moving On’ with all the

costumes and sculptures inspired by children’s

literature. “We hope the schools will have

enormous fun with this”, she says. “Each one

will be given their own popular children’s book

to work from.”

In the run up to the parade – in addition to

weeks of work with children in all the local

schools to develop ideas, designs and run art

workshops – Patina organises theme-related

events for the community. This year these

include an Illustrators’ Geocache Easter Egg

Hunt, taking place in and around Lewes this

month – on the 24th.

“We’re partnering with top

illustrators based here, and

have created a technologyled

trail so young people and

families can enjoy discovering

their work and meeting

them”, says Caroline. “We

ran a similar event around

artists’ studios a few years ago

and it proved really popular.”

Patina – which stands for

Parents and Teachers In

the Arts – has always, primarily, been about

bringing artists and school kids together, and

was first formed – by parent Martha Hammick

and friends, in 2001 – as a response to the

arts being given less priority in the national

curriculum. From the start, parents, teachers

and local businesses came together to help

support the project. “I am endlessly touched

by the support this community gives its young

people and I’m sure that gives them a strong

sense of belonging, which is so important”,

says Caroline. The first Moving On Parade, in

summer 2002, included six local schools. This

summer, 17 will take part.

The main event is on the 5th July. It will, as

usual, culminate in an end-of-parade gathering

in the Paddock, when Starfish bands will also

play. “Starfish is turning 21 this year, so we’re

joining forces for a joint birthday celebration

– a two-day Youth Festival with Moving On

followed the next day by Starfish in the Park.

Everyone is very welcome!” Charlotte Gann

Patina Illustrators Geocache is on 24th

March. Starts at 2pm outside Waterstones.

patinalewes.com

Photo by Parisa Taghizadeh


BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE PEOPLE, BIG DREAMS

BY ISABEL SÁNCHEZ VEGARA

The inspiring Little People, Big Dreams

series first hit our book shelves back in

2016 and continues to go from strength to

strength. The pioneering picture book biography

series about the lives of outstanding

people is written by Isabel Sánchez

Vegara, with each book illustrated by a different

artist, and has been highly acclaimed

for its positive depiction of strong female

icons for young readers. The series so far

has focused on famous women, including

Jane Goodall, Rosa Parks, Marie Curie and Ada Lovelace.

Now the first boys in the series – Stephen Hawking and Muhammad Ali – have just been released,

and I’m pleased to see there are eight more due this year. The books all start with the famous

person’s life as a child, and what motivated them to achieve what they did. This, Vegara believes,

is the secret to the series’ success, “children love to read true stories about other children – like

them – achieving great things. It gives them the strength and the courage to believe in themselves.”

Anna, Bags of Books

Find all the Little People, Big Dreams books with 20% off at Bags of Books throughout March.

Early Years Open Mornings

The Early Years provision is ‘outstanding’ and is a strength of the school.

Pupils enjoy coming to school and grow into articulate, confident young

people, who say that they feel safe, secure and happy. Inspection 2018

Saturday 9th March 2019 & Saturday 11th May 2019

Please register online. Alternatively book in for a Private Tour by email: contact@michaelhall.co.uk

www.michaelhall.co.uk/school-open-days

Kidbrooke Park, Priory Road, Forest Row. East Sussex, RH18 5JA

Tel: 01342 822275 - Registered Charity Number 307006


SHOES ON NOW:

BEANO BOUNTY

All our boys have been through a Beano phase,

each discovering in their own time the delights

of Dennis the Menace and the escapades of

Gnasher and Minnie the Minx. Usually when

the comics have been pored over and read

cover to cover, we donate them to family

friends or to one of the charity stores in Lewes.

This month, we decided to see if we could get

slightly more use out of our old mags whilst

also encouraging a bit of creativity. We cut out

the first and last panel in the comic strips and

stuck them down on a separate piece of paper.

We then got the boys to create a story that

filled the gap. And then – because they’re our

boys and we know them well – we introduced

a competitive element and awarded a prize

for best comic strip judged on humour, story

cohesiveness and drawing ability.

It was fascinating to watch how each responded

to the challenge. Oldest child’s story included

lots of ‘banter’ with Dennis the Menace

outsmarting an entire staffroom of teachers.

Middle child’s efforts were action-packed whilst

our youngest went for straight-up slapstick.

I won’t reveal the winning entry of course but,

suffice to say, it always pays to put a wonderful

mother in your comic strip if your mum is

going to be one of the judges.

Jacky Adams

Acting Singing Dancing

Script writing Audition technique

Improvising Build your confidence


Wood fired pizza

Mon-Thurs 1700-2200

Fri and Sat 1200-2200

Eastgate Street

Lewes BN7 2LP

(Old bus station)

busclubpizza.co.uk

01273 470755

enjoy a

complimentary

St-Germain Gin & Tonic

To redeem, simply present this

advert when dining

Côte Brasserie Lewes

82 HIGH STREET, LEWES, BN7 1XW

01273 311 344 | www.cote.co.uk/lewes

Valid from 01/03/19 until 31/03/19 at Côte Lewes only. One

complimentary St-Germain Gin & Tonic per person 18 years and

over, ordering a main course from our à la carte menu.

Not valid in conjunction with any other offer or set menu.

Lewes_CompStGG&T.indd 1 18/02/2019 10:57:13


FOOD REVIEW

The Kings Head

Steak for a tenner

The last time I went

to The Kings Head

it was under previous

ownership. It might

have even been under

previous ownership

to the previous

ownership, I’m not

sure: it’s been one of

those sorts of pubs,

recently.

The takeover this

time has been by a

small pubco called Revived Inns, who also run

The Rainbow in Cooksbridge, The Royal Oak

in Newick, and another pub in Kent. I visit with

my wife, one Wednesday lunchtime deep into

January.

The first thing I notice, as we approach, is that

the sign has changed. Gone is the Holbeinesque

head and shoulders of King Henry VIII;

in its place a cream affair with the pub’s name at

the top, with the words ‘STEAK HOUSE’ writ

large in the middle.

The first thing you see inside is still the bar, of

course, and they’re still serving two types of

Harvey’s, alongside Long Man Pale Ale. And a

quick nose-round reveals that there’s been no

major gutting: it’s still all nooks and crannies.

But there’s a different feel about the place: it’s

been given a slate-grey paint job, which is nicely

set off with jewel-colour cushions and armchairs,

there are a couple of sofas along one side, and

it all looks a lot fresher. Kaiser Chiefs welcome

us, through the speakers, quietly predicting a

riot. We’re pleased to see that there’s a real fire

on the go, and that the table bang in front of

that fire, in the corner with a view out of two

windows, is free. Bingo.

No Harvey’s for us, at

the (non) bitter end of

Dry January, so we order

a couple of bottles

of sparkling water, and

look at the A3 menus.

There are all sorts of

possibilities among

the ‘pub favourites’

(from pan-fried lamb

rump to mushroom,

brie, rocket

and redcurrant filo

bundle) and, of course, all sorts of steaks, served

with mushrooms and tomato, chips and salad.

Namely a 16oz Chateaubriand (£42.50, for sharing),

or, all weighing in at 8oz, sirloin (£19.50),

rump (£14.50), fillet (£24) ribeye (£19.50) or surf

& turf combo (£19.50).

What stands out, though, is a ‘lunch deal’ 8oz

rump steak, with chips and salad, for just £10.

It’s a good price: we feel justified in ordering

starters, too. I go for the crayfish cocktail, with

Marie Rose sauce (£7.50, very 70s, with a twist),

while Rowena opts for a blue cheese and walnut

soufflé (£7).

The starters are good. The steak is great: plump,

and juicy, and perfectly medium rare. We play

‘name that tune’, which isn’t hard: it’s all Oasis

and Arctic Monkeys, and the like.

And we chat to the pleasant woman behind the

bar – I’d hazard to guess the landlady – who

says it’s all going pretty well, so far: it’s buzzing

at the weekend, but they could do with more

lunchtime customers in the week.

Rump steak for a tenner, with Harvey’s to wash

it down? Don’t worry, I tell her, word will get

out. Alex Leith

7 Southover High St. revivedinns.co.uk

75


76

Photo by Chloë King


RECIPE

Carrot Cake

Chris Bailey, Head Chef at Rathfinny Tasting Room

I used to have a Michelin star restaurant in

Winchester called The Black Rat. When I

moved to Brighton, I was working as a private

chef and doing pop-ups, one of which was

here at Rathfinny. I loved the space, and then

they asked me to come and discuss having a

restaurant here. It’s such a beautiful location,

and the people who own it are lovely.

It’s all about the produce, for me. Local

means the closest place I can get the best

quality. People get a bit caught up with ‘on

your doorstep’ which is great, but you have to

remember taste, how it is raised, relationships

with suppliers. That whole farm-to-fork theory

is the way I like to work. It makes me happy to

cook with nice produce, whether it’s a carrot or

some wild teal, like we had in at the weekend. I

use Namayasai farm in Lewes, who have such a

lovely ethos. We use charcuterie from Beal’s at

Devil’s Dyke and I try to integrate the produce

grown here as well.

All the food here is meant to pair with the

wine, so there are things to consider, such as

high acids don’t go well. So far, we’ve taken the

vine leaves from the different grape varieties,

chardonnay and pinot noir, while they’re

young and tender. We use those to wrap things

like scallops before steaming. The leaves have

different flavours and do different things,

much like the grapes.

The wine is pressed here, underneath the

restaurant, so we took the first pressing

straight out at three-days-old and made wine

gums. I like the idea that people can taste the

wine at different stages. We’re pruning at the

moment, so I’ve taken a lot of the wood to dry

and hopefully cook over.

The idea for this dish came from these

amazing heritage carrots from our Scots

supplier. It’s a light carrot cake with white

raisins and a goat’s curd frosting that has a

slight sourness to it. I top the cake with thinlysliced

carrots poached in a meadowsweet syrup

I made last summer. It goes with a roasted

walnut ice cream and meadowsweet carrot

gel atop a gingerbread crumb. It’s not super

technical. At home, you may not have the

meadowsweet, but you can still make the cake,

the frosting, the ice cream. That’s what my

food is about: simple, clean, not lots of aerated

bubbles. It’s about flavour, really.

Ingredients: 125g plain flour, 125g wholemeal

flour, 25g baking powder, 2tsp cinnamon, 1tsp

nutmeg, 100g desiccated coconut, ground, 5

eggs, 260g golden sugar, 175ml pomace oil (or

olive oil), 500g grated red carrots, 100g white

raisins. For the frosting: 125g goat’s curd, 380g

icing sugar, 250g soft butter

Method: To make the cake, line and grease

a 12” tin; whisk up the eggs, sugar and oil

until doubled in volume. Mix the remaining

ingredients into the egg mixture then pour

into the tin and bake at 180°C for 40 minutes.

To make the frosting, whip all ingredients

together thoroughly, not forgetting to let the

cake cool on a wire rack completely before

icing. As told to Chloë King

rathfinnyestate.com/tasting-room

77


The Pelham arms

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FOOD

Soulfit café

Bun + Bean salads

Soulfit, the yoga studio, now has a café – so we decided

to pop in the first Friday it was open. I was looking

forward to a bean burger, as the café’s run by Bun

+ Bean, but actually, to start with, they’re only serving

salad bowls – although, “this may change…”

That said, these were very tasty. Fresh, as you’d expect, and a good mix (“mm, crunchy... mm, tasty”,

my other half murmured, perched on his breakfast-bar stool, looking more the yogic-part than me).

Pete opted for the salad bowl (£5) with avocado topping (£2), while I tried one with extra Kimchi

(£2). Kimchi, Google tells me, is ‘a Korean dish of spicy pickled cabbage’, and it was quite hot, while

well-judged, as were the cooling avocado slices. Both bowls shared pumpkin and sunflower seeds (we

thought), and a grated beetroot mix, along with other elements.

I washed mine down with a smooth, milky latte (£2.80) which came in a lovely, solid, blue pottery cup

and saucer, and complete with a ‘Latte art’ – so Google terms it – flower-finish, (which does make a

person feel cherished). Meanwhile, the salads came in bowls that sent Pete happily off on a nostalgia trip

for his family caravan at Cuckmere Haven…

Jugs of water and lemon stand on the bar, or you can order smoothies (‘Green’, or ‘Purple’), although we

didn’t this time. Charlotte Gann

47 Western Road, Tues-Fri, 9.30-2pm

RATHFINNY WINE ESTATE SPECIAL OFFER!

ENJOY DINNER, BED & BREAKFAST

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Please find further details of what’s included in this offer overleaf


FOOD

Edible updates

For the 10th anniversary of OctoberFeast, festival co-founders Alison

Field and Jiffa Leeburn are looking for volunteers to help take on the

event and make it new. If you fancy steering the much-loved food festival

for 2019, email alison.field@talk21.com.

Readers with small kids: praise be that Ditchling garden centre Notcutts is

installing a giant café with children’s play area. Also look out for Lewes-microbusiness Little

Bandits, a nicely thought-out range of food products for allergic kids to be launched this year. hungrylittlebandits.com

Congratulations to Emily Clarke for securing a cool partnership with our local Aldi. Emily will be

fighting food waste by redistributing discarded fresh produce via Landport Community Café and

local campaign #241foodbanks.

Sad to say that Charlotte’s Cupboard are closing their mobile grocery so soon after a successful

launch, but Char will be continuing their zero waste mission online. charlottescupboard.com.

The food diary for March includes a fab free music night at Bus Club Pizza with acoustic blues and

soul from Sepia Shadows on Fri 8th and nutritionist Tina Deubert’s ‘Essentials’ workshop on Sat 2nd.

The Royal Oak have a nice fish ‘n’ chips promotion every Monday, and Limetree Kitchen have

brought back their popular ‘bottomless prosecco’. See reader offers for a fab deal at Wingrove

House including dinner, bed & breakfast and a guided tour of Rathfinny vineyard. Chloë King

RATHFINNY WINE ESTATE SPECIAL OFFER!

This limited offer includes:

• A late morning 45 minute tour of the

behind the scenes at Rathfinny Wine Estate

followed by a 2 course light lunch in the

Tasting Room Restaurant, by Chef Chris Bailey.

• A 3 course dinner at Wingrove House

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• An overnight stay in one of our stunning

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Breakfast included.

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TASTING ROOM

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@RathfinnyTR


THE WAY WE WORK

This month, photographer Rosie Wooldridge visited four local

menders – restorers of various sorts. She asked each: What’s been

your most challenging project?

www.rosiewooldridgephotography.com

Tony Webb, Back to the Grain

‘Doors. Every old reclaimed door is unique and it’s a challenge.

We are, as a team, a constant work in progress.’


THE WAY WE WORK

Steve Luker, Luker Designs

‘Covering walls in fabric for a client in Mayfair. The whole of her downstairs

covered in silk damask including downstairs toilet – £200 a metre!’


THE WAY WE WORK

Sue Pearson, Bears & Bygones

‘This bear will be difficult because he is very fragile. He is from the 1930s

English Chad Valley and belongs to the original owner who had him as a child.’


THE WAY WE WORK

Jonathan Tompsett and Phillip Hazel, George Justice

‘Restoring a 5m long display cabinet and fitting it back together at the customer’s house.

The final result was amazing but the process was challenging – we got there in the end.’


RICHARD SOAN

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MY SPACE

Photos by Katie Moorman

Bill Bruce

W.F. Bruce Antique Clocks & Barometers

“It’s about effort. We should look after

and cherish things that people have

made with care.” I wonder what came

first: is Bill Bruce’s ideological stance

regarding the importance of longevity

and history informed by his enthusiasm

for the restoring of antique clocks, or

vice versa? One of the reasons he loves

clocks is because the makers were “trying

to build something representative of its

time. Made to a standard, not to a price.

They were made to be something to be

proud of.”

He discusses the presence, sound and

feel of clocks in a devout manner, and

the horological grotto that is W.F. Bruce

Antiques does a fine job of exemplifying

why they merit such reverence. The two

showrooms are impressive and would

certainly warrant further discussion

themselves, but we head downstairs into

the workshop to explore the ‘mending’

side of things further. The work stations

are packed with myriad tools, many

of which are created by the workers

themselves and, as such, do not have

traditional names.

Does clock restoration require bespoke

tools? “You don’t have to, but I always

encourage it because you learn respect

for them. If you make it beautifully, and

you harden it and temper it and use it

87


MY SPACE

Photos by Katie Moorman

properly – not for levering open a paint can

– it will last. It’s an attitude: we’re working

on some very beautiful things here, it sets

you off on the right trajectory.”

More than a shop, W.F. Bruce Antiques

is in fact a kind of clock enthusiast’s warren,

wherein wandering experts share

their knowledge and enthusiasm for their

craft. Bill’s work carries on the tradition

of reputable Lewes clockmakers such as

Richard Comber, whom Bill lauds, “not for

the complicated way that he did things, but

for building some quite ordinary things so

beautifully. You almost never see one spoilt

or ruined. He also made them with some

consideration for people working on them

all these years later, in terms of reducing

friction for example”.

Clocks are often meaningful family heir-

88


MY SPACE

Photo by Joe Fuller

looms, and Bill sees the effect that his work

restoring a broken clock can have on relatives.

“Family members will ask you to fix it, and

they’ll dissolve into tears when they hear it

ticking and striking [again]. It’s elemental,

very physical.”

The showrooms do a brilliant job of illustrating

the peculiar physicality of antique clocks,

and the weight, look, smell, sound of them certainly

make an impact. Particularly after you

discover that some are over 330 years old. I ask

Bill what the lifespan is of an average longcase.

“We don’t know yet. This clock was made in

1685: it’s in beautiful order. I would think the

reality is, as long as we keep on producing

generations of fine clockmakers – and there

are some fine clockmakers around, not many,

but they do exist – there’s no reason to imagine

that that won’t be going in another three or

four hundred years.”

Joe Fuller

wfbruce.co.uk

89


Focusing

on you

Counselling, Psychotherapy

and Psychological services

in central Lewes

01273 921355

www.brightonandhovepsychotherapy.com

admin@brightonandhovepsychotherapy.com


GARDENING

Planting annuals

Magic ingredient in cottage gardens

Charleston’s garden

captures the decades

1930 to 1950, and

colour is the critical element:

Duncan Grant

and Vanessa Bell selected

the plants themselves.

In researching

older varieties of annuals

and bi-annuals, I

was delighted to come

across a seed list in the Charleston archives.

Scrawled in pencil, on the back of an envelope,

Duncan Grant’s selection for that summer’s

garden annuals: ‘Candytuft, Mignonette, Tobacco

Plant, Poppy, Zinnias, Aster, Stock, Marigold,

Phlox, Canterbury Bell, Scabious, Sweet William,

Dahlia, Heliotrope, Penstemon, Evening Primrose,

Sweet Sultan, Sweet Pea, Forget-me-not’.

We know they bought their annual seeds from

Carters so I’m using my grandmother’s Carters’

seed catalogue, from the 1930s, to capture the

authentic colours.

When did you last actually see Candytuft flowering?

And what is Sweet Sultan? (Centaurea actually.)

Many of these, charmingly old fashioned,

varieties are still available if you search for them.

Others of the period include, Cosmos (white

or pink – don’t get bedazzled), the Everlasting

Flower, Nasturtium (not the peachy modern ones

– go big, red or yellow). The key is to let them

shine in the garden: don’t muddy the waters by

planting a modern variety next to them. This will

create a wholly different tone and glare out from

the beds accusingly.

March is a great month for sowing the hardy

annuals. By now the daylight has lengthened and

the greatest threat of frost should be past, and

you can start to sow outdoors. Some seeds can

be sown exactly where

you would like them to

grow – this is known as

direct sowing. However,

sow very thinly or be

prepared to thin them out

later. Aquilegia, Larkspur,

Poppy, Mignonette, Lovein-the-mist,

Candytuft and

Cornflower are all lovely

cottage garden flowers

that will self-seed given half a chance. If you have

an area in the garden that has rather poor soil

then sow Nasturtiums. Rich soil generates far too

many leaves and crowds out the prolific flowers.

For others, you might want to find a spot in the

garden that is out of the way, not front of border:

somewhere you can establish a temporary seed

bed. You could rig up a cold frame from scrap

wood and cover it with something transparent.

This gives that little bit of protection until the

plants get stronger. From this nursery bed, you

will ultimately transplant them to their final

place in the garden. These annuals include:

Antirrhinum, Aquilegia, Everlasting Flower and

the bi-annuals, which you sow every year to

flower the following summer: Canterbury Bells,

Hollyhocks, Polyanthus.

Finally, there are the half-hardy and the tender

annuals – they need a little heat and frost

protection to get them going. If you do have a

greenhouse, now is the time for a real flurry of

activity: Aster ‘Duchess Mix’, Cosmos, Geum,

(‘Mrs Bradshaw’ and ‘Lady Stratheden’ still the

best). Nicotiana, Salpiglossis, Stock, Swan River

Daisy, Sweet Sultan and Sweet William. Queen

of them all is the Zinnia – but hold-off sowing

until April to be on the safe side.

Fiona Dennis is Head Gardener at Charleston

91


RICHARD GREEN FUNERAL SERVICE

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Funeral Directors & Memorial Masons in Lewes & Uckfield

We offer a full monumental masonry service;

everything from a new memorial

to repair and cleaning

of existing stones

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01273 488121 (24hrs)

lewes@rgreenfs.co.uk

125 High Street, Uckfield, TN22 1RN

01825 760601 (24hrs)

uckfield@rgreenfs.co.uk


WILDLIFE

Illustration by Mark Greco

Nuthatch

The fixer upper

Back garden birdwatchers know there’s a pecking

order on the peanut feeder. Coal Tits are elbowed

out by Blue Tits who in turn are ousted by Great

Tits. But when the Nuthatch shows up everything

scarpers. I don’t blame them. If I was jostling at

an all-you-can eat buffet and some fella in a black

mask brandishing a machete jumped in I’d be off

in a flash too. With its streamlined body, blue back,

pink chest and black eye-stripe the Nuthatch cuts

a dynamic figure; a swashbuckling, bird table buccaneer.

The weapon it wields is a stout, dagger-like

beak but it’s not designed for skewering birds.

Nuthatches are nuts about nuts.

The Nuthatch’s name comes from ‘nut hacker’, a

reference to the bird’s habit of jamming hazelnuts

and acorns into tree crevices and then using its

powerful bill to noisily smash them open. There’s

an old Sussex name which fits this manic, intense

bird perfectly: Nutjobber. I have never seen this

nutty little bird sitting still. They’re so crazy about

climbing that they’re the only British bird that can

actually climb headfirst down a tree.

At this time of year our garden birds become more

vocal and aggressive as they claim and defend

territories and croon their tunes to attract a mate.

Spring lacks this urgency for the male Nuthatch.

He hasn’t stopped fighting all winter as he angrily

defends his hectare of woodland. Nuthatches are

monogamous too and the loyal pair soon dispense

with spring serenades and get down to the hard

work of making a home. Many birds start from

scratch. Twigs and moss are laboriously collected

and nests are painstakingly woven. Nuthatches

however are happy to let someone else undertake

the heavy construction work. Their residence of

choice is a spacious tree cavity drilled and abandoned

by a woodpecker. Sure, it needs a bit of work

but the Nuthatches will make do and mend. The

main problem is the front door. It’s too big. This

gaping hole can let in predators or Starling squatters

who will happily turf out nesting Nuthatches.

So while the male keeps guard the female Nuthatch

starts bricking up the entrance hole. Her bill

is used like a plasterer’s trowel smearing mouthfuls

of mud until the terracotta porch is perfectly

Nuthatch-sized. She is a compulsive builder and

if they move into a nestbox she still cannot resist

plastering mud around the hole, even if it’s already

the right size.

And it’s great to report on a bird that’s actually

increasing in number and range. Once restricted

to south-east England the Nuthatch now breeds

in Scotland – probably assisted by the provision of

garden peanut feeders as it marched north. And as

Britain seemingly gets crazier by the day it’s nice

to know there’s still space for a few more nutjobs.

Michael Blencowe, Senior Learning & Engagement

Officer, Sussex Wildlife Trust

93


TRADE SECRETS

Lee Waters

Making things better with your money

Barwells Wealth is based

in a tranquil cow-shed

conversion in Glynde.

It’s on our (one) day of

snow that I visit, and the

short walk from the station,

flanked by Downs,

is still and evocative. I’ve

come to chat with Chief

Executive Lee Waters

about ethical investing. “Barwells Wealth…?”

I ask gingerly. He smiles, “no, it’s not about

being wealthy! We were established as Barwells

Solicitors in 1896, but have been operating as

financial advisers since 1998. We split into two

(connected) companies about five years ago. We

advise on all angles of personal finance and our

clients are many and varied.”

We’ve agreed to talk about ESG – environmental,

social and corporate governance – which,

Lee confirms, “is becoming much more mainstream.

It’s been around for a good 20 years, but

in the last two or three many more people come

through our door asking specifically for this”.

So, what does it mean? “It covers a number of

things”, says Lee. “Someone may have a particularly

strong view about one area they don’t want

their money near. Tobacco, alcohol, gambling,

fossil fuels. This we call ‘negative screening’. We

compile an investment portfolio with those areas

firmly screened out.”

And what about positive screening? “That’s

where we actively look at areas the client wants

to support. Corporate governance is a big one

these days: companies that are being well and

fairly managed. Obviously the basics are paying

a living wage, and not relying on zero hours

contracts. But of course there’s more. Gender

equality, for instance. These days, good companies

are a better investment

anyway: they’re more

sustainable.”

He also tells me about

“dark-green” and “lightgreen”

investors. The former

signifies someone who

wants lots of detail, and

has very specific areas of

concern. “Climate change,

of course – renewable energy – education, health

and wellbeing, are all common. Light-green

clients are concerned, but want us to sort the

detail. Most people”, he says, “don’t want to feel

they’re funding anything destructive. Take human

rights. Is a company operating in countries with

oppressive regimes? Are they operating in Syria,

or parts of Africa?”

He also says a client could fruitfully and

confidently, today, invest “entirely in renewable

energy. Recent governments have had to support

this – offering tax incentives, and tariffs, for a

windfarm, say, which are locked in for the next

twenty or thirty years. This means, today, these

make for good, solid investments. A lot of general

investor money has flowed into renewables.”

Lee enjoys working with his clients, many of

whom stay for generations. He grew up in

Eastbourne, and originally studied Law, before

following in his father’s footsteps into personal

finance (and, indeed, into Barwells; Roger

Waters is Financial Planner). Lee feels strongly

how attitudes to money change over time and

with different generations. “Financial education

should be taught at schools”, he says. “At GCSE

level. It’s not about numbers – although, yes,

that is a scientific calculator on my desk (I have

another in my bag!) – it’s about people’s lives.

That’s what matters.” Charlotte Gann

94


Lewes Town & Country

Residential Sales & Lettings

Land & New Homes

T 01273 487444

E lewes@oakleyproperty.com

Property of the Month Eastport Lane - Lewes £999,950

Impressive double fronted detached period home tastefully modernised and improved located in a quiet

lane overlooking Southover Grange Gardens. This extremely well presented house offers a sitting room,

double aspect drawing room, hand built bespoke kitchen, modern shower room/utility room, five double

bedrooms, some with views across Southover Grange Gardens, a useful study and a modern bathroom. EPC – 49

Garden House – Lewes £899,950

Detached family home perfectly located on Rotten Row in central

Lewes. This well presented house offers open living and dining

space which opens on to a rear patio garden with views across

Lewes. Superb bedrooms with top floor annexe option. Outside is

a wrap around garden to three sides and garage with drive. EPC – 72

Westdown Heights From £695,000

COMING SOON-REGISTER NOW. A selection of 4 detached 5 bedroom

houses in central Seaford within walking distance of the beach &

train station. Scheduled for completion in May 2019 these substantial

new homes are finished to the highest standard offering generous

gardens, garages and 10 year new homes warranty. EPC - TBC

Friars Walk - Lewes £690,000

Period corner property in central Lewes. Set across 4 floors the

reception hall leads to the kitchen, split level lounge and dining room.

Useful playroom and lower floor reception with utility & WC. Upstairs

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THE OPTICIANS . 01273 471893

1 IN 4 SUFFER FROM

DRY EYE

do you?

Some of the symptoms:

• Sore, itchy eyes

• Sensitivity to light

• Eye redness

• Difficulty with night driving

• Watery eyes

• Blurred vision or tired eyes

There are many causes for dry eye, from air

conditioning to too much screen time.

We have a wide range of preservative-free dry

eye supplements to refresh your eyes, giving

them a new lease of life! Drop in at any of our

8 stores to find out more or visit:

Barracloughs the Opticians Lewes are proud to incorporate

FIND YOUR FEET PODIATRY & CHIROPODY

52 Cliffe High Street . Lewes . 01273 471893 . www.fyfpc.co.uk

- Nail Cutting

- Corn & Callus removal

- In-growing Toenails

- Verrucae

- Fungal Nail advice

www.barracloughs.net

- Diabetic Foot

- Rheumatology

- Wound care

- Nail Surgery

- Biomechanics


HEALTH

Psychotherapy

Mending the mind

What do you think of when you

hear the word ‘psychotherapy’?

Woody Allen? Tony Soprano?

Certainly the ubiquitous couch…

If you have no first-hand experience

of therapy, you may be

drawing your knowledge more

from (American) films and television

than reality. So what actually

is it?

“That’s probably the most

frequently asked question,” says

Mark Vahrmeyer, psychotherapist

and co-founder of Brighton and Hove Psychotherapy,

which runs its Lewes practice from The

Barn in Southover High Street.

“Put simply,” he continues, “it’s a ‘talking’ therapy.

Probably the most helpful answer is that psychotherapy

is a relationship in which past losses can be

worked through. We can’t undo what experiences

we’ve had or what losses we’ve experienced, but

psychotherapy can help. It can enable people to

find meaning.”

Developed by Sigmund Freud in the late 19th

century, psychotherapy has since evolved into various

forms, but is characterised by its emphasis on

communication, and the significance it places on

the relationship between client and therapist.

“The difference between counselling and psychotherapy,”

clarifies Mark, “is that psychotherapists

are trained to work at a more profound

level and to look at deeper patterns. Counselling

is helpful for where someone has suffered a

bump in the road, such as a bereavement, but

psychotherapy works to repair attachment damage,

which is more deeply rooted and dates back

to early childhood.”

‘Attachment’ is the term used to describe

the close bond between parent and child, he

explains. “To a young infant

who does not yet have the use

of words, everything can feel

intrusive, from a passing vehicle

to thunder or a flash of light.

The infant needs the parent to

take in psychic material, and to

use thier mind to make sense

of it for the child – but, for all

sorts of reasons, this can go awry,

leading to a fear of rejection or

abandonment.Through psychotherapy,

people who didn’t have

that secure attachment in childhood can learn

what went wrong, and how to hold on to new

relationships.”

Mark says that clients mainly self-refer (“not

knowing what’s wrong but sensing something

is missing”), and include children, adolescents,

adults, couples and families, with different forms

of psychotherapy tailored to suit each. “We

have a broad area of expertise, and specialise in

different modalities and client groups. The most

important thing is the client-therapist relationship,

as all modalities have the same goal. Just

as different languages have different words for

the same thing, so therapists might work slightly

differently, but the purpose is always the same:

to gently shine a light on what’s going on.”

At its most basic, he concludes, psychotherapy is

about helping people to feel okay.

“Everyone who has endured neglect or abuse

invents a story about being special. Psychotherapy

is about learning to be ordinary. How do we

endure the ordinariness of life and relationships?

It’s not about quick fixes or ‘being happy’ – it’s

about being okay as we are.”

Anita Hall

brightonandhovepsychotherapy.com

Photo by Katie Vandyck

97


Do you want a shot at joining the amazing

Lewes FC Girls Academy

from September 2019

Lewes FC Women play in the

FA Women’s Championship

against Man Utd, Spurs and

other top clubs

THREE training sessions a week at Lewes FC

run by Lewes FC Women First Team Manager

and coaching staff. Plus regular matches

Outstanding education from BTEC to

A-Level in a huge range of subjects at

one of our partner colleges

We are the only football club

in the world to pay women

footballers the same as the

men’s team

Football trials:

Saturday 9th March

Thursday 18th April

Contact

academy@lewesfc.com

TODAY

in partnership with


FOOTBALL

Xavier Smith

Lewes FC physio for the first teams

I’ve been working

for Lewes FC

since Christmas,

alongside Paul

Baskin, having

come over from

Eastbourne Town.

I initially came

over to help with

the men, but I

was soon asked

if I wanted to do

the women, too,

so I jumped at the

chance. It’s a part-time job: I also run my own

private practice.

Most people notice us when we’re running

onto the pitch, and I do pride myself on getting

to the injured player fast. I always slyly look

over at the opposing physio at the beginning of

the match, and think ‘am I faster than them?’

I watch the game differently from everyone else.

I’m always looking ‘behind’ the ball, because I

want to see that the players have come through

the passage of play OK. If you’re not doing that,

you can’t see the reasons for any problems, and

the players aren’t always that explicit. “I got a

whack” is all you’ll usually get.

Sometimes I have to make tough decisions.

At Eastbourne, in a big Cup match, the striker

went down, and I could see his leg was ballooning

up, so I called on the manager to take him

off, even though I knew he’d want to stay on.

We lost the game, but it was the right decision.

We have two surfaces here, the Pan and the

3G training pitch. I wouldn’t say either surface

is better or worse for injuries: each can create

its own problems. The absorption of impact is

different, and while the grassy surface is uneven,

your studs can

get caught on the

artificial surface.

Everyone thinks

my job is all

about treating

injuries, but that’s

just a small part of

it. My main task

is to prevent them

from happening

in the first place.

That is achieved

by getting the

players as fit as possible and working on ‘prehabilitation’:

strength and conditioning exercises.

A lot of this is down to them: we work with the

players when they’re training, but we also give

them maintenance programmes, for example, on

recovery days after matches or training sessions.

When it comes to injuries, the most frequent

in football are knee and ankle injuries,

from all the twisting and turning that’s involved

in the sport. And then there are hamstring pulls,

which can happen when you suddenly slow down.

My space at the Dripping Pan is the First

Aid Centre, where I have all my equipment,

and where players come for treatment. At some

clubs you wonder whether players are really

injured or if they’re just trying it on. I haven’t

come across that here: all the players are gagging

to play.

My bag? It’s full of plasters and tape and

underwraps and rubber gloves, and Deep

Heat, and ice spray. That’s what people think

of as ‘magic spray’: I’m not a great believer in

its healing properties, but I apply it anyway,

because the players like it!

As told to Alex Leith

99


BUSINESS NEWS

Let’s start with the good news: after more than a

year, the building that used to house Santander, at

the top of Station Street, is finally back in action.

Trend-led female clothing chain Oasis, who have

80 stores UK-wide, are opening a ‘Little House

of Oasis’ which promises to be trading in March.

In the meantime there’s a sign in the window:

Lewes, we’ve arrived’. Well, Oasis, you’re very

welcome.

It’s bye bye Bunce’s, sadly, with the Cliffe High

Street hardware store suddenly closing at the end

of January. Bunce’s was founded back in 1928, in

Worthing, and the Lewes store was one of a chain

of seven, situated all over Sussex, which have

ceased trading due to ‘cash flow difficulties’.

And there’s another casualty on Cliffe High

Street, with Darcey Sussex Boutique, just down

the road, announcing ‘after an enjoyable and

successful 11 years we are heading to pastures

new’; they shut their doors for the last time on

February 2nd.

Finally, on the closure front, Hartley’s off-licence

went under in mid-January. The company –

which boasts ‘permanently low prices’ – continue

to trade in other branches in Sussex.

On a more positive note, Lewes’ branch of

Steamer Trading has been spared the axe. The

company started up in 1985 in Alfriston – on the

site of the Steamer Inn, hence the name – and

eventually ran 38 stores across the UK. Administrators

were appointed in January, and almost

immediately rivals ProCook acquired 27 stores

– including the branch on School Hill, which will

continue trading with the same staff.

Don’t be alarmed, meanwhile, by the signs on the

boarded-up windows of The Crown Inn, reading

‘Ken Fowler Demolition’. The former coaching

inn – which dates back to the 17th century – is

not about to be razed to the ground. A look at the

Facebook page of the demolition company reveals

that the job in hand is an ‘internal strip-out… for

refurbishment for retail and accommodation’.

Watch this space.

More exciting news from Lewes FC, our

pioneering, equality-minded community football

club. The Rooks are expanding their girls’

football academy, adding Plumpton College to

their existing academy offering with Cardinal

Newman. Girls aged 16-19 train with UEFAqualified

football coaches, headed up by Lewes

FC Women’s manager Fran Alonso, while studying

for A-levels or BTEC qualifications. The

addition of Plumpton College as a partner adds

accommodation options for students, opening

up the academy to elite young footballers from

all over the country – and beyond. The academy

will also open to boys starting in September 2020.

The next girls’ trials for September 2019 entry

take place on Saturday March 9th at the Dripping

Pan. Any girls currently in Year 11 are welcome to

attend: contact academy@lewesfc.com

Finally, a quick heads up about the eighth annual

Lewes Civic Awards, organised by the

Town Council, who are looking for members

of the public to nominate community-minded

Lewesians in the categories of arts, community,

environment, heritage or sports. The deadline for

applications is March 15th [lewes-tc.gov.uk]. AL

100


DIRECTORY

Please note that though we aim only to take advertising from reputable businesses, we cannot guarantee

the quality of any work undertaken, and accept no responsibility or liability for any issues arising.

To advertise in Viva Lewes please call 01273 488882 or email advertising@vivamagazines.com

• Digital TV aerial upgrades & service

• TV, DAB, and FM aerials

• Extra points

• Communal systems

• Aerial repairs

• Satellite TV installs and service

• SKY installs

• Discreet fittings e.g. listed buildings, thatch roofs, flats

• European systems serviced and installed

• Gutters cleared • CCTV installed

WE FIT BIRD DETERRENTS

WE CAN BEAT ANYONE ON QUALITY AND PRICE

Free estimate • over 40 years experience • OAP discount

Open 7 days a week • Fully guaranteed • Same day service

Freephone: 0800 0323255

Tel: 01273 617114 Mob: 07920 526703

We specialise in TV wall mounting

We can beat anyone else’s price on a like for like basis

www.1strateaerialsandsatellites.co.uk

FREE ESTIMATES

UIS OF EWES 07778987286

leweshandyman@hotmail.com

LOCAL HANDYMAN _ PAINTER AND DECORATOR

Interior and exterior painting

Plastering

Flooring & Tiling

Plasterboard

QUALITY FINISHES

All work in the house, big or small:

Carpentry

Assembling and fitting furniture

Curtains/ Door handles and locks/ ...

FINDING SOLUTIONS

REFERENCES AVAILABLE

IF YOU THINK “WHO COULD REPAIR THIS?” CALL LUIS OF LEWES


HOME

Don’t get caught out,

Locked out - put this number

in your phone NOW!

• Digital Locks fitted

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• Mobile key cutting service.

• CRB Checked & Approved.


DIRECTORY SPOTLIGHT:

VIC STRINGER, RESTORER

How long have you been a furniture restorer?

This year, it’ll be 30 years.

What services do you offer? It’s purely the restoration

and finishing side. I repair antique furniture,

and do polishing – which includes spray

lacquering, hand-polishing, hand-finishing,

French polishing. I do furniture, and kitchens.

Make things brighter.

Why do you believe in restoration? The quality

of the pieces I work with is second to none.

It’s furniture from 200 years ago plus, when

virtually everything was done by hand. Even

the quality of the wood was much better, when

it was air-dried rather than, as today, kiln-dried.

We live now in a throw-away world, but there

are some people out there who have their furniture

restored – which then keeps it going for the

next generation, keeps it in circulation.

So, things were made to last longer in the

past. Do you

have favourite

periods? I like

them all. Victorian

and Georgian

furniture I work

with a lot. Also

Edwardian – with

its marquetry. White lines inlaid in furniture. I

admire the craftsmanship there as well: all these

were cut out by hand and stuck down. Today

the same effect is created by lasering – if you’ve

got £25,000 to spare on a laser machine! It’s all

about saving time, not longevity and quality.

Where is your workshop? Today, in Barcombe

Mills. I’ve been here four years, in the old dairy

milking parlour in Bridge Farm. (Before that, I

was in Ringmer, and before that Lewes.)

vicstringerfurniturepolishing.co.uk

Photo by Katie Vandyck

We come to you!

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HOME

LTD

Nimmo’s Windows is a family

run company based in Seaford,

covering the whole of the

South Coast and London.

Jon is a registered Equinox

roof installer and a certified

Certass installer and surveyor

and carries with him many

years of knowledge and skills.

Jon Nimmo

Qualified Equinox roof installer

We are a building company specialising in residential

extensions, refurbishments, loft conversions

and conservation work on listed buildings.

We pride ourselves on paying attention to detail,

using bespoke materials and bringing projects

in on time and on budget.

Contact us for a free quote and please

visit the website for more info:

www.stjamesbuilding.co.uk

01273 499 641 / 07780 964 608

Aluminium windows, doors,

lantern roofs and bi-folding doors.

Trading in your area for over 30 years

We guarantee all our products, installation and service

for the best doors, windows & conservatories

CLARKS GLASS LTD

Unit 10, Ringmer Business Centre,

Chamberlaines Lane, Ringmer, BN8 5NF

For your FREE no obligation consultation call us now on:

01273 814077

www.clarksglass.org.uk

OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

FREE estimates on all types of

plastering work and finishes.

TELEPHONE: 01273 472 836

MOBILE: 07974 752 491

EMAIL: cdpoulter@btinternet.com


HOME

Plumbing & Heating

Design & Installation

Bathrooms/Kitchens

Plumbing/Heating

Boilers/Central heating

Gas Safe Registered

Tiling / Woodwork

Free estimates & Advice

T: 01273 487 565 M. 07801 784 192

E. tonywplumbing@icloud.com


HOME

07784053679

tom@tbacc.co.uk

thebuildingandcarpentryco.co.uk


HOME

Page 1

Jack Plane Carpenter

Nice work, fair price,

totally reliable.

www.jackplanecarpentry.co.uk

01273 483339 / 07887 993396

Handyman Services for your House and Garden

Lewes based. Free quotes.

Honest, reliable, friendly service.

Reasonable rates

Tel: 07460 828240

Email: ahbservices@outlook.com

N I N A M U R D E N

The Lewes Seamstress

PAUL FURNELL

Carpenter / General Building

and Renovation works,

Based in Lewes

t. 07717 862940 e. paul.lee.furnell@gmail.com

AHB ad.indd 1 27/07/2015 17:46

theLewesSeamstress.co.uk

t: 01273 470817 m: 07717 855314

All trades covered

PROFESSIONAL RELIABLE

FLAWLESS

LADY DECORATOR LEWES

For a no obligation quote call

07917 067847

hello@ladydecoratorlewes.co.uk


HOME AND GARDEN

Global

Gardens

Design,

Restoration &

Landscaping

Jason Eyre Decorating

Professional Painters & Decorators

jasoneyre2@gmail.com | jasoneyredecorating.com

07976 418299 | 07766 118289

Mobile 07941 057337

Phone 01273 488261

12 Priory Street, Lewes, BN7 1HH

info@ globalgardens.co.uk

www.globalgardens.co.uk

GARDENS

RHS

Gold medal

GGS1.001_QuarterPage_Ad_01.indd 1 12/11/10 Winners 18:24:51

Real gardeners for all your gardening needs.

From a one off blitz to regular maintenance.

07812 028704 | 01273 401962

brookhartservices@gmail.com

www.brook-hart.co.uk

Gardener Available

Beds, borders, pruning and tidying

01273 814 926

National Diploma Horticulture


OTHER SERVICES

COMPETITIVE

PRICES

FLO TYRES

& ACCESSORIES

EXPERT

ADVICE

O N E S T O P S H O P F O R P R E M I U M , M I D R A N G E A N D B U D G E T T Y R E S

We also stock vehicle batteries, wiper

blades, bulbs and top up engine oils.

SAME DAY TYRE FITTING.

PUNCTURE REPAIRS.

WHEEL BALANCING

WHEEL ALIGNMENT

FREE TYRE HEALTH CHECKS.

Flo Tyres And Accessories

Unit 1 Malling Industrial Estate, Brooks Road, Lewes, BN7 2BY

Tel: 01273 481000 | Web: flotyres.com | info@flotyres.com

Bridal & Occasion

Repairs & Alterations

nickyblack204@yahoo.co.uk

www.andrewwells.co.uk

We can work it out

• BUSINESS ACCOUNTS AND TAX

• MEDIA AND THE ARTS

• CONTRACTORS AND CONSULTANTS

P

PICK UP A

VIVA BRIGHTON

• FRIENDLY AND FLEXIBLE

T: 01273 961334

E: aw@andrewwells.co.uk

FREE

initial

consultation

Cover art by Jake Kennedy

Andrew M Wells Accountancy

99 Western Road Lewes BN7 1RS


The Cliffe

Osteopathy &

Complementary

Health Clinic

Mandy Fischer BSC (HONS) OST

HEALTH

Taking a Natural Approach

at Menopause

Offering informaaon & support for over 16 years

Appointments at The Cliffe Clinic

LYNNE RUSSELL BSc FSDSHom MARH MBIH(FR)

www.chantryhealth.com 07970 245118

neck or back pain?

Lin Peters - OSTEOPATH

VALENCE ROAD OSTEOPATHS

for the treatment of:

neck or low back pain • sports injuries • rheumatic

arthritic symptoms • pulled muscles • joint pain

stiffness • sciatica - trapped nerves • slipped discs

tension • frozen shoulders • cranial osteopathy

pre and post natal

www.lewesosteopath.co.uk

Ruth Wharton Viva Advert 8.18 AW.qxp_6 03/12/2018 1

20 Valence Road Lewes 01273 476371

OSTEOPATHY

Mandy Fischer BSc (Hons) Ost, DO, PG cert (canine)

Caroline Jack BOst, PG cert (canine)

Cameron Dowset MOst

HERBAL MEDICINE & REFLEXOLOGY

Julie Padgham-Undrell BSc (Hons) MCPP

PSYCHOTHERAPY

Julia Rivas BA (Hons), MA Psychotherapy

Tom Lockyer BA (Hons), Dip Cound MBACP

ACUPUNCTURE & HYPNOTHERAPY

Anthea Barbary LicAc MBAcC Dip I Hyp GQHP

HOMEOPATHY, COACHING, NLP

& HYPNOTHERAPY

Lynne Russell BSc FSDSHom MARH MBIH(FR)

01273 480900

23 Cliffe High Street, Lewes, East Sussex, BN7 2AH

www.lewesosteopath.com

Open Monday to Friday and Saturday mornings

RUTH

WHARTON

BA (Hons) BSc (Hons) Ost Med DO

ND MSc Paediatric Ost

BIODYNAMIC

CRANIAL

OSTEOPATH

ruthwhartonosteopath.com

SALLY

GALLOWAY

BA (Hons) Dip Nat Nut CNM

MBANT CNHC reg

NUTRITIONAL

THERAPIST

sallygallowaynutrition.co.uk

OTHER THERAPIES INCLUDING:

COUNSELLING • LIFE COACHING

MASSAGE THERAPY • REFLEXOLOGY

PSYCHOTHERAPY

(individual, adolescent and family)

ROOMS TO RENT AVAILABLE

INTRINSIC HEALTH • 01273 958403

32 Cliffe High Street, Lewes BN7 2AN

www.intrinsichealthlewes.com


HEALTH

C O L O N I C S & L A S E R L I P O C L I N I C

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SET YOUR NEW YEAR GOALS

AND GET SUPPORT TO HELP YOU

MEET THEM

Visit East Sussex ONE YOU online for help to

stop smoking, lose weight and other health

related support, or ask in the pharmacy.

NHS FREE HEALTH CHECKS

ARE YOU AGED 40 - 74?

DO YOU WANT A FREE BLOOD

PRESSURE & CHOLESTEROL TEST?

We are offering FREE NHS HEALTH

CHECKS to eligible paaents.

Please ask for further details., or pick up a

leaflet from the pharmacy. It takes around

20 minutes. Please call in or phone to

make your appointment.

(Closed between 1-2pm)

HERBALIST

Kym Murden

BA Hons Dip Phyt

Weaving wellness together

whatever your age.

Herb & Health Workshops

Visit:

kymmurden.com

Appointments 07780 252186

Angelica Rossi

HolisticTherapist

Swedish Body Massage

& Reflexology

Gift vouchers are available to purchase at

Intrinsic Health, 32, Cliffe High Street, Lewes

To book an appointment call 07401 131153

Email: angelicarossi@hotmail.co.uk

www.angelsaromahealing.com

Acupuncture, Alexander Technique, Bowen

Technique, Children’s Clinic, Counselling,

Psychotherapy, Family Therapy,

Herbal Medicine, Massage,

Nutritional Therapy, Life Coaching,

Physiotherapy, Pilates, Shiatsu,

Podiatry/Chiropody


HEALTH

HELPING YOU MAKE

SUSTAINABLE CHANGE

Relational Dynamic Coaching & Hypnotherapy

info@claudinegrant.co.uk / 07771 457390

www.claudinegrant.co.uk

Doctor P. Bermingham

Retired Consultant Psychiatrist. Retired Jungian Psychoanalyst.

Assoc. Med. Psychotherapy. Psychotherapy for the

psychological core of depression, depressive illness and relapse.

Supervision for therapists

drpbermingham@gmail.com

LESSONS AND COURSES

Ages 16 and up from an experienced, qualified teacher

Contact: Lucinda Houghton BA(Hons), AGSM (GSMD), FRSM

Kingston, Lewes (Ample parking)

07976 936024 | canto-voice.org

Coranne Campbell

Reiki Master Practitioner

Tel 07584 572226

corannecampbellreiki@gmail.com

www.reikiconnect.co.uk

Energy healing complementary therapy


GARAGES

01273 488882

EXPERT

ADVICE

I N C O R P O R A T I N G F L O T Y R E S

SERVICING & REPAIRS

MOT SERVICE.

COMPETITIVE PRICES.

QUALITY PARTS.

EXPERT ADVICE.

QUALIFIED TECHNICIANS.

ALL MAKES & MODELS.

www.mechanicinlewes.co.uk

info@flomargarage.com

Units 1-3 Malling Industrial Estate, Brooks Road, Lewes BN7 2BY

Vehicle Servicing, Repairs and MOT Service: 01273 472691

www.mechanicinlewes.co.uk | info@flomargarage.com


INSIDE LEFT

SPEED FREAKS

These two chaps, father and son, are Lewis

and Raymond Humphries, posing for Benjamin

Reeves’ camera in front of the family

business Eastgate Motor Garage & Motor

Repairing Works, in Eastgate Road, in 1923.

Humphries senior (left) established the business

in 1910, aged 32. A draper’s son, he quickly

established himself in the community. He’s

mentioned in the Sussex Agricultural Times

as a Brother in the South Saxon Freemasons

Lodge; he was also a Special Constable.

But it was for a far more flamboyant role that

he became best known: motor racing. In the

years after WW1 there was only one dedicated

race track in the country, at Brooklands, in

Surrey. From 1922 local speed events became

all the rage, and the road leading up to Lewes

Race Course (still called the Motor Road)

became a regular venue. Both Lewis and

Raymond participated in the first recorded

run in Lewes, in September 1924, and both

finished first in their categories, in front of an

estimated crowd of 2,000 spectators.

The garage was a thriving business. Their

advert in the 1912 Lewes Directory advertises

their capability of servicing makes such as

‘Austin, Gwynne, Rolls-Royce, GN, Daimler,

Fiat, Lagonda and Morris.’ The GN was a cyclecar

capable of reaching 60mph: Humphries

Sr drove a model known as Kim II.

He was, he testified in Lewes Crown Court on

April 28th, 1928, driving rather more slowly

when, two weeks earlier, he had tragically hit

and killed an 80-year-old retired physician – Dr

Philip Casey – on the junction of Offham Road

and The Avenue. There were no eye-witnesses.

Humphries stated that he had slowed to a walking

pace to allow the doctor to cross, but the old

man had suddenly stepped backwards into his

path. He might have faced conviction for careless

driving and manslaughter, but a verdict of

misadventure was reached.

Lewis Humphries was back in the driving seat

of his racing car for a time trial on October 6th.

He won two categories. Alex Leith

Thanks as ever to Edward Reeves, 159 High

Street, 01273 473274. This image, as well as many

others, is available as a card from their shop.

114


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Store Assistant Salaries

from £9.10 per hour

Deputy Manager Salaries

from £10.10 per hour

Apply online at

aldirecruitment.co.uk


DESIGN . MAKE . INSTALL

41 Cliffe High Street

Lewes

East Sussex

BN7 2AN

alistairflemingdesign.co.uk

01273 471 269 HAND MADE KITCHENS

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