Boxoffice - March 219

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The Official Magazine of the National Association of Theatre Owners

$6.95 / MARCH 2019

NEW YORK

GROOVE

BIG SCREENS

IN THE BIG APPLE

NATO IN THE

TRENCHES

HIGHLIGHTS FROM

THREE RECENT

PROGRAMS

MARVELOUS

THE BOX OFFICE

HISTORY OF THE MARVEL

CINEMATIC UNIVERSE

ICTA RECAP

THE TOP TECH

TRENDS FROM THIS

YEAR’S EDITION

BRIE LARSON STARS IN

DISNEY’S CAPTAIN MARVEL

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THEATRE OWNERS


YOUR

EYES

ONLY

take off for

the smart projection era

Let your imagination reach for the stars and start the countdown for lift-off.

Discover how you can create memorable movie moments, empower

your business performance to overcome gravity, and explore new horizons.

Are you ready for the adventure?

Be at the heart of the action at CinemaCon.

Discover more on www.cinionic.com/take-off


2019 VOL. 155 NO. 3

COVER STORY

FIVE FEET APART

THE MUSTANG

Number Crunch

THE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE

AT THE BOX OFFICE

40

High Five

PHOTO: ANGEL NICANOR

INTERVIEW WITH DIRECTOR

JUSTIN BALDONI

44

PHOTO: TARA VIOLET NIAMI / FOCUS FEATURES

Riding High

LAURE DE CLERMONT-TONNERRE

ON HER FEATURE DEBUT

48

30

TALKING

TECHNOLOGY

ICTA SEMINAR SERIES

OFFERS A WIDE-RANGING

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

KEVIN WINES / DOLBY

Boxoffice has served as the official publication of the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) since 2007. As part of this partnership, Boxoffice is proud to feature exclusive columns

from NATO while retaining full editorial freedom throughout its pages. As such, the views expressed in Boxoffice, except for columns signed by NATO executives, reflect neither a stance nor an

endorsement from the National Association of Theatre Owners.

4 MARCH 2019


THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART

Still Awesome

WE SPEAK WITH FILMMAKERS MIKE

MITCHELL & TRISHA GUM

52

34

BIG SCREEN IN

THE BIG APPLE

BOXOFFICE TAKES

THE TEMPERATURE OF

THE NEW YORK CITY

THEATRICAL SCENE

THE HUMMINGBIRD PROJECT

Speed Trap

KIM NGUYEN CHRONICLES RACE TO

CONQUER THE STOCK MARKET

58

DEPARTMENTS

HELLO 6

TRADE TALK 7

EXECUTIVE SUITE 18

MEMBERSHIP NEWS 22

CHARITY SPOTLIGHT 24

INDIE FOCUS 26

ASK THE AUDIENCE 64

TECHNOLOGY 68

TIMECODE 70

INVESTOR RELATIONS 74

SOCIAL MEDIA 76

EVENT CINEMA CALENDAR 78

ON SCREEN 80

BOOKING GUIDE 96

MARKETPLACE 104

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BOXOFFICE ® (ISSN 0006-8527), Volume 155, Number 3, March 2019.

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MARCH 2019

5


“RETURN WITH US NOW TO

THOSE THRILLING DAYS OF

YESTERYEAR …” >> A reader of

a certain vintage will recognize

that phrase from the old radio and

television show The Lone Ranger,

which began broadcasting in 1933—

the same year our founder combined

nine regional exhibitor journals he’d

launched a decade earlier into one

national magazine—Boxoffice.

As we celebrate our 99th year of

publication, we have reached deep

into our vast archives—over 3,500

issues—and recovered, refreshed, and

recrafted our original 1933 logo. But

wait! There’s more!

THE POWER OF TWO >> We didn’t

stop at a new logo and call it a day. To better serve you we joined forces with

our friends at Film Journal International in late 2018, adding their marketing

coverage to our pages. FJI readers are already familiar with the fine work of

Kevin Lally and Rebecca Pahle and Boxoffice subscribers will quickly come to

know and rely on their experience, expertise, and craft.

THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS >> Boxoffice is a

celebration of movies and film exhibition. To that end, we have redesigned our

covers to better display the often stunning studio key art. The cover lines that

tout the contents have been moved to a flap that opens to reveal a full-frame

image. That flap even has a fancy name—a French gatefold.

MARCH MADNESS >> A complete refresh of our offerings—magazine,

website, and mobile platforms—is now being released out into the world.

Throughout the year, we’ll be adding to our site a full-fledged box office data

dashboard, a comprehensive database of all companies in the industry, and

other new and exciting features. Stay tuned.

YOU ARE THE COMPANY YOU KEEP >> We are pleased to continue our

association with the National Association of Theatre Owners and place high

value on their insights. But more than the organization, it is its members—

that would be you—whose trust and support we most value. It is our mission

to live up to the standards you have set in the exhibition industry as we look

toward our 100th anniversary and beyond. Maybe not to infinity, but you get

the picture.

6 MARCH 2019


EDITED BY LAURA SILVER

Delivering

innovative

insurance products

for the cinema

exhibition industry

JACK KLINE

STEPS DOWN

AFTER 40 YEARS

AT CHRISTIE

>> Jack Kline

(right), a pioneer in

digital cinema technology

and architect

of the virtual print

fee (VPF) that accelerated

the adoption

of digital projection

in movie theaters,

is stepping down as

chairman, president,

and CEO of Christie

after 40 years with

the company, effective

April 1, 2019.

Current Chief Financial Officer Kazuhisa

Kamiyama will assume the role of

chairman and CEO, while Kline remains

at the company as an executive adviser to

the CEO until April 1, 2020, to assist in

a smooth transition.

“I am fortunate to have worked at

Christie my entire professional life and to

have played a critical role in leading the

company into the digital age, helping it

become a global force in digital display

technology,” said Kline. “I have full confidence

in the future of Christie, which

is filled with talented, dedicated, and

highly motivated people who are focused

on developing innovative technology and

service to our customers.”

During his tenure at Christie, Kline

led a growth strategy that included the

purchase of Canada’s Electrohome Projection

Systems in 1999, shortly afterward

becoming the first OEM to license and

bring to market digital cinema projectors

using Texas Instruments’ DLP Cinema

technology. The move catapulted the

company from a

35-millimeter analog

projector manufacturer

to a global

leader in digital projection

solutions.

In 2005, Kline

created strategic

partnerships with

major Hollywood

studios, exhibitors,

projector manufacturers,

and technology

providers to advance

the installation

of digital cinema. He

then played a critical

role in developing

the virtual print fee

(VPF) financial solution and the Christie/

AIX deployment program that introduced

thousands of cutting-edge digital

cinema projectors into the marketplace.

Kline joined Christie in 1979 as a

national sales representative and was

promoted to VP of sales and marketing

in 1988. He was named executive VP

and COO in 1997 and appointed president

and COO in 1999. In 2014, he

assumed the role of chairman, president,

and CEO of all of Christie’s operating

companies, worldwide.

Kamiyama joined Christie’s parent

company Ushio Inc. in 1995 and became

CFO of Ushio America in 2003. He was

named general manager of accounting in

2011 and executive officer and general

manager of Ushio’s corporate headquarters

in 2016. He earned an MBA from

the International University of Japan.

“Jack’s vision and his spirit of innovation

will remain integral parts of the

company’s success for years to come,”

said Kamiyama.

INSURANCE COVERAGE

C O M P A N I E S

P R I C E

INSURANCE SERVICES

WWW.MOCINS.COM

425·957·0600

LICENSE #0589960

MARCH 2019

7


TRADE TALK

MARCUS COMPLETES ACQUISITION OF

MOVIE TAVERN

>> The Marcus Corporation has closed the acquisition of dinein

cinema circuit Movie Tavern from VSS-Southern Theatres, the

portfolio company of Veronis Suhler Stevenson (VSS), a private

equity firm.

The acquisition will boost the Marcus Theatres division by

23 percent, adding 208 screens across 22 locations in Arkansas,

Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, New York, Pennsylvania,

Texas, and Virginia. Marcus Theatres now has a cumulative

screen count of 1,097 screens at 90 locations in 17 states.

Movie Tavern will now be branded under the “Movie Tavern

by Marcus” banner. Marcus’s $5 Movie Tuesdays promotion

will be applied to all existing Movie Tavern locations. Other

trademark Marcus offerings, such as its DreamLounger recliner

seating, PLF auditoriums, and loyalty program, are expected to

be integrated at Movie Tavern in the coming months.

“We are excited to welcome Movie Tavern customers and

associates to the Marcus Theatres family,” said Marcus Theatres

Chairman, President, and CEO Rolando B. Rodriguez, in a press

release. “Movie Tavern is an attractive addition to our existing

circuit and we are especially pleased to expand our portfolio of

in-theater dining locations.”

According to the Marcus Corporation, the price of the

acquisition consisted of $30 million in cash and the issuance of

2,450,000 shares of Marcus common stock. The shares of The

Marcus Corporation common stock are subject to certain restrictions

on resale by Southern Theatres.

VISTA SIGNS ENTERPRISE

AGREEMENT WITH ODEON

>> Vista Group International Ltd. has

signed an agreement with Odeon Cinemas

Group to deliver solutions for guest

engagement, influence, and insight for

ODEON. The combination of Vista’s cinema

management software portfolio (Vista

Cinema), Movio Cinema big-data analytics

and marketing, Cinema Intelligence

film forecasting, and MX Film—real-time

distribution of digital media assets—represents

one of the most comprehensive

rollouts of Vista’s solutions to date.

ODEON, Europe’s largest cinema operator

with more than 360 cinemas located

in 13 countries, will deploy Vista across

120 cinema sites in the UK and Ireland.

According to Odeon Cinemas Group

CIO Ian Chapple, “We’re delighted to

have selected Vista Group as a strategic

partner to assist us in transforming our

guest experience at Odeon. We recognize

the strength and depth of the Vista

proposition, and the experience that they

bring will be key to helping us evolve our

technology platforms and take the business

to another level.”

Vista Group CEO, Kimbal Riley,

said: “Our agreement with ODEON is

a watershed moment for Vista Group.

Our ability to deploy a wide-ranging,

integrated set of solutions for ODEON

is a credit to the vision of our founders

and to the capability of our teams across

the business who imagine, design, develop,

and deploy technologies that delight

our customers and enable the delight of

their customers.”

The rollout of the Vista solutions suite

across ODEON UK and Ireland is expected

to commence later this year.

8 MARCH 2019


REGAL & CJ 4DPLEX OPEN 200TH

SCREENX THEATER

>> CJ 4DPLEX and Regal were to

open the 200th global ScreenX theater

on February 13 in Houston, Texas. The

panoramic cinema experience now has a

global footprint in 16 countries with 17

locations now in North America.

The new ScreenX auditorium is

located at the Regal Marq*E theater in

Houston. This location brings the current

Regal ScreenX count to 12 and is also

home to the immersive film format 4DX,

which opened in January. The latest

ScreenX opening is part of the previously

announced major expansion plan with

the Cineworld Group, the parent company

of Regal.

ScreenX uses a proprietary system

that expands images of feature films and

pre-show advertising to the left and right

walls of the theater, creating an immersive,

270-degree viewing experience.

“This installation is very special to us

as it marks a new global threshold for

ScreenX,” said JongRyul Kim, CEO of CJ

4DPLEX. “This is another big step in the

global expansion of our immersive theater

experience, and we hope to continue to

reach new markets so more people can

experience ScreenX.”

“We are truly excited to bring ScreenX

to our Regal Marq*E location in Houston,

Texas, and in doing so be a part of

ScreenX’s historic 200th opening,” said

Ken Thewes, CMO at Regal. “We’re always

looking for innovative technologies

to engage our audiences, and ScreenX

offers a new level of excitement for our

guests to experience movies in an incredible

immersive new way.”

STUDIO MOVIE GRILL

ANNOUNCES FURTHER

EXPANSION

>> Ted Croft, CFO of Studio Movie

Grill (SMG), has announced that SMG

Sunset Walk, SMG’s third Florida location,

is set to open at the end of March.

Croft also announced three more new

locations, in Philadelphia, Charlotte,

and Sacramento, will also open in 2019.

These locations will add an additional 48

screens to its current 314 screens operating

in nine states nationwide.

Sunset Walk at Margaritaville Resort

Orlando, which sits on 40 acres of

lagoons and lakes, is currently under

construction across the street from Disney’s

Animal Kingdom. SMG’s 12-screen,

40,000-square-foot location will feature

over 1,100 luxury leather recliners and

will be the largest anchor of the Margaritaville

Resort Orlando.

In addition to its new locations, SMG

is actively preserving and updating traditional

movie spaces. The three locations

SMG acquired last year in Southern

California recently opened as full-service

in-theater dining concepts, offering the

next generation of moviegoers the charm

of old movie palaces with the modern

MARCH 2019

9


TRADE TALK

convenience of dinner and drinks and luxury recliners.

SMG Prosperity Market is SMG’s second location in Charlotte,

North Carolina, and is set to open in Q3 2019. The

47,000-square-foot theater will feature 13 screens and over 1,000

luxury leather recliners.

SMG Citrus Heights is SMG’s seventh California location

and second in the Sacramento area. It is also set to open Q3

2019. The 49,000-square-foot theater will feature 11 screens

with 1,300 seats.

Newly announced SMG Willow Grove will mark a second

Philadelphia location for the Studio Movie Grill concept, offering

12 screens and 1,256 seats in a 50,133-square-foot location.

This location will open its doors Q4 2019.

FRANKLIN DESIGNS NAMES CHAD DAVIS

VP OF OPERATIONS

>> Franklin Designs of Flowood, Mississippi, the full-service

auditorium installation company, has announced the addition of

Chad Davis to its staff as VP of operations.

Bobby Franklin, owner of Franklin Designs, said, “Mr. Davis

is an outstanding addition to the team and brings a wealth of

knowledge and experience to our leadership group. We are more

than excited to have him a part of Franklin Designs.

“We started a restructuring process in early 2016 to improve

our products, processes, and customer experiences. We began by

moving our headquarters to Flowood, Mississippi, in early 2017

and have made several other internal adjustments and upgrades

since then. This most recent addition of Mr. Davis represents the

culmination of all those efforts—he will be a very visible player

for our current clients and in the theater industry as a whole.”

Franklin said Davis’s mission is “to be the forward face and

voice of Franklin Designs, to service our existing clients, to visit

and oversee our new installation sites, to visit with prospective

clients, and represent us at national and international theater

industry events.”

Davis graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi

in Hattiesburg with a degree in architectural engineering technology

and also has an associate’s degree in drafting and design.

Prior to accepting his position with Franklin Designs, he served

as construction superintendent and project manager. He has over

25 years’ experience in the construction business.

Franklin specializes in custom-made wall coverings. The company

also designs and manufactures custom screen frames and

specifies and installs seating, speakers, and screens, making them

a one-stop shop for theater interiors.

ECLAIR PARTNERS WITH ISTANBUL-BASED IMAJ

>> Eclair recently announced an agreement with Istanbul-based

film- and TV-content services provider Imaj for the deployment

of Eclair’s broadband network and digital content-delivery

solutions, including its EclairPlay content-delivery platform, in

PARAMOUNT’S HELEN MOSS TO RECEIVE

PASSEPARTOUT AWARD

>> Helen Moss (pictured), senior VP of international

distribution at Paramount Pictures, will receive this year’s

CinemaCon Passepartout Award. The announcement was

made by Mitch Neuhauser, managing director of the show.

The Passepartout Award is given annually to an industry

executive who demonstrates dedication and commitment to

the international marketplace. CinemaCon, the official convention

of NATO, will

be held April 1–4, 2019,

at Caesars Palace in Las

Vegas. Moss will be presented

with this honor

at the International Day

Luncheon taking place

on Monday, April 1.

“With over a decade

of experience in the international

film business,

Helen Moss has continuously

shown her dedication

to the international

film community through

her work with both exhibition

and distribution,”

noted Neuhauser. “We

are honored that we are able to present her with this year’s

Passepartout Award.”

Moss began her career a decade ago at Paramount Pictures

as VP of film planning in London. In 2012, she played

a key role in the successful transition of the international

head office in Los Angeles. She took on her current position

in 2014.

Moss manages the theatrical releases, planning, and

execution of all Paramount titles in over 65 markets worldwide.

She oversees box office reporting, strategic dating,

competitive analysis, financial review, and integrated release

planning. Her accomplishments at Paramount include the

releases of the Mission: Impossible, Transformers, and Star Trek

franchises. She has also worked on a number of Dream-

Works Animation titles distributed by Paramount, including

Kung Fu Panda, Shrek Forever After, and How to Train Your

Dragon, as well as the critically acclaimed releases The Big

Short and A Quiet Place.

Prior to joining Paramount Pictures, Moss managed

European finance and planning for Expedia.com, in

addition to roles at Intercontinental Hotels Group and

Oriflame International.

10 MARCH 2019


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TRADE TALK

Turkey. Eclair and Imaj’s new joint service offering has been designed

to meet the needs of Turkish film producers, distributors,

and cinema exhibitors.

“We are delighted to be partnering with Imaj, an established

and highly respected content-services provider in Turkey, to

launch this exciting end-to-end theatrical delivery service for

distributors and cinema exhibitors” said Pascal Mogavero,

senior vice president of Eclair. “With Imaj’s expertise in digital

distribution and broad client base, Eclair’s innovative and

cost-efficient digital content delivery solutions, and the installation

and maintenance of customers’ broadband delivery network

by our sister company CinemaNext Turkey, we are very

confident in our potential to become a key player in theatrical

delivery in the region.”

Founded in 1979, Imaj is a group of companies with 115 full

time employees. Best-known for its production and post-production

activities, Imaj also provides digital distribution services

(DCP mastering, hard drive DCP duplication and fulfilment,

KDM management) in Turkey for major and independent

motion picture studios. Imaj will oversee all logistics and physical

and digital theatrical delivery services to cinemas from its Istanbul

hub.

KINEPOLIS AND REALD ANNOUNCE

3-D PARTNERSHIP

>> Kinepolis and RealD have entered into a new partnership

on RealD 3-D equipment and 3-D glasses in France, Belgium,

the Netherlands, Switzerland, Spain, and Luxembourg. Kinepolis

will use RealD 3-D equipment in all its venues. The contract was

signed as part of a wider deal to include Landmark in Canada.

Eddy Duquenne, CEO of Kinepolis Group, said, “This

long-term partnership with RealD will enable us to introduce

a uniform, industry-leading 3-D system in all our territories. It

has always been our goal to create the ultimate movie experience

for our customers, and ever-evolving technology, including

mind-blowing 3-D, contributes significantly to that experience.”

John Trafford-Owen, managing director of RealD Europe,

said, “RealD is delighted to partner with such a progressive company

as Kinepolis. Together we will strive to continually develop

technology and screen the latest and greatest movies to consumers

in the way they were meant to be seen: in spectacular, bright,

and crisp RealD 3-D.”

RETAIL DESIGN COLLABORATIVE DESIGNS

MAYA 14-PLEX

>> Retail Design Collaborative has announced the grand opening

of a new multiplex in North Las Vegas by Maya Cinemas, a

circuit providing family-oriented entertainment to underserved,

Latino-dominant communities.

The complex features a 14-screen movie theater designed in a

contemporary style. It is the chain’s sixth location in the Unit-

PETER FORNSTAM TO RECEIVE 2019 UNIC

ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

>> Peter Fornstam (pictured), founder and managing

director of Svenska Bio and chairman of the Swedish Exhibitors’

Association, has been announced as the recipient

of the 2019 UNIC Achievement Award, given each year

to recognize outstanding dedication and service to the

European cinema industry. The award will be presented as

part of the CineEurope

awards ceremony on

Thursday, June 20, at

the Centre de Convencions

Internacional de

Barcelona (CCIB) in

Barcelona, Spain.

A third-generation

cinema exhibitor whose

family has been dedicated

to the film industry

for over a century,

Peter Fornstam founded

Svenska Bio together

with the Bonnier Group

(now Filmstaden) in

1987. Now operating

200 screens, Svenska

Bio is today the second-largest cinema chain in Sweden and

Finland (Bio Rex), alongside its operations in Denmark

under the Biografkompaniet umbrella.

Svenska Bio’s efforts toward providing audiences with the

best possible cinematic experience reflect not only Fornstam’s

own passion for the industry but also his visionary leadership,

wealth of experience, and immeasurable commitment

to the big screen.

Fornstam’s broad involvement in the film industry

stretches beyond exhibition, serving as he does on the board

of SF Studios, the largest production and distribution company

in the Nordic region.

Welcoming the announcement of the award, Phil Clapp,

president of UNIC, said, “We are delighted to recognize

Peter’s extraordinary career in European exhibition, as well

as his key role in making Svenska Bio a pioneer in enhancing

the cinemagoing experience.

This award recognizes in particular Peter’s considerable

contribution to developing both the Swedish and wider

European cinema sectors through his work as chairman of

the Swedish Exhibitors’ Association. On behalf of the entire

UNIC Board, I thank him for his tremendous support as

UNIC has evolved in recent years.”

12 MARCH 2019


TRADE TALK

ed States. Retail Design Collaborative

served as the architect of the project.

The cinema’s ground and mezzanine

levels are 72,000 square feet, designed

with 14 screens and 1,605 seats that

fully recline, along with accessible seating

areas. The lobby adds an additional

10,000 square feet and includes a bar,

concessions, a game area, guest services,

and a party room. Additional private

viewing rooms were also designed on the

mezzanine level.

“We were thrilled to partner with

Maya Cinemas on this project to create

a first-rate entertainment experience

that is family-oriented and which helps

to revitalize the community,” said senior

principal Mitra Esfandiari. “Maya

Cinemas has a humanitarian goal of

revitalizing underserved communities

while having a great commitment for

creating high-rate theaters. This is a

rare combination.”

Maya Cinemas North Las Vegas

serves as a retail anchor for the area,

which is continuing to grow and attract

additional retailers as the city’s newest

family destination.

CIELO AND CINEMAXX

PARTNER IN INDONESIA

>> Cinemaxx Global Pasifik, an

Indonesian movie theater network

and part of Lippo Group, has selected

Cielo as its partner of choice for digital

management of the Cinemaxx circuit in

Indonesia. Founded in 2014, Cinemaxx

operates 45 theater complexes with 235

screens and growing in Indonesia.

Lance Gil, VP of global sales for Cielo

Cinema, said, “We are extremely proud

to have been selected by Cinemaxx to deliver

our enterprise-monitoring solution

in Indonesia. This partnership is a validation

of the value that Cielo Cinema is

adding to exhibitors across the world. We

are looking forward to delivering Cielo’s

end-to-end digital suite of products and

process-optimization capabilities to all

Cinemaxx theaters.”

According to a company release, Cinemaxx

chose Cielo for its cutting-edge

automated and highly mobile management

capabilities that allow Cinemaxx

to cover a vast geographic area, generating

greater efficiencies for Cinemaxx and

resulting in cost savings from on-site

tech time and prevention of potential

loss shows.

Gerald Dibbayawan, chief executive

officer at Cinemaxx, said, “With

Cinemaxx’s aggressive expansion across

the 260 million populated nation of

Indonesia, along with our aim in uplifting

the guest experience, it is inherent

to streamline and monitor Cinemaxx’s

screen operations effectively and

efficiently in real time from anywhere,

which is why we chose Cielo Cinema as

our platform of choice.”

Cielo operates over 12,000 screens

and 20,000 devices across the world.

CINEMARK TO OPEN 14-SCREEN IN WACO, TX

>> Cinemark Holdings Inc. will build a 14-screen theater in

the new Cottonwood Creek Market development in Waco,

Texas. The theater is part of a 143-acre, master-planned,

mixed-use center developed by NewQuest Properties and is

scheduled to open in the spring of 2020.

“We are proud to work with our long-time partner

NewQuest to bring the Waco community the ultimate

moviegoing experience with our new Cinemark location

coming soon to Central Texas,” said Mark Zoradi, Cinemark’s

CEO. “With our Luxury Lounger recliners, XD

auditorium, and more, Cinemark will give guests the

opportunity to enjoy the newest films in one of the most

innovative viewing environments.”

All 14 auditoriums at the Cinemark Waco and XD theater

will have advanced technology and customer-preferred

amenities including: Cinemark XD auditorium; Cinemark’s

electric-powered Luxury Loungers; reserved seating in all

auditoriums with online and kiosk ticketing; wall-to-wall

screens and enhanced sound systems in all auditoriums; 4K

Barco digital projection with RealD 3-D capability; lobby

lounge offering expanded food and beverage options.

In addition to the new Cinemark theater, Cottonwood

Creek Market will offer restaurants, entertainment, and a

variety of retail shops in its 285,000 square feet of space covering

63 acres. The center will also include multifamily homes

and office space.

“We are pleased to welcome Cinemark to Cottonwood

Creek Market,” said Steve Alvis, the co-founder and managing

partner of NewQuest Properties. “The Cinemark theater

will anchor our entertainment wing, which will have an

exciting collection of restaurants and retail in a beautifully

landscaped environment.”

14 MARCH 2019


TRADE TALK

CGR AND VOX BRING “ICE” TO

THE MIDDLE EAST

>> French company CGR Cinemas and

Majid Al Futtaim, Emirati real estate and

retail conglomerate and parent company of

VOX Cinemas, have announced a strategic

partnership to add the premium screen

concept ICE Theater (ICE for Immersive

Cinema Experience) to select cinemas in

the Middle East and North Africa.

The ICE Theater combines state-of-theart

design, excellence in sound and image

technologies, and the ICE Immersive

sensory experience. VOX Cinemas will

operate the very first international rollout

of this premium technology in its cinemas.

Speaking on the partnership, Cameron

Mitchell, chief executive officer at Majid

Al Futtaim Leisure, Entertainment, and

Cinemas, said, “We were impressed by the

outstanding technological excellence of

the ICE Theater concept and welcome this

strategic partnership with CGR Cinemas.

As part of our vision to deliver outstanding

offerings to customers across our markets,

we continually seek the best cinema experience

that can truly enthrall our audience.

The outstanding offerings delivered by

ICE Premium Theaters is yet another

opportunity for us to further enhance the

cinemagoing experience and bring great

moments for our customers.”

Jocelyn Bouyssy, managing director of

CGR CINEMAS, added: “I’m thrilled

to announce this ambitious new venture

for CGR Cinemas, as we fully share VOX

Cinemas’ innovative vision regarding the

future of the cinema exhibition business.

This partnership, which will extend to

some of the most dynamic markets in the

world, pays tribute to our efforts to develop

an innovative concept based on a suitable

business model for cinemas operators.”

CGR LIGHTVIBES ICE VOX

CINEMARK AND SPACES

ANNOUNCE VR EXPERIENCE IN

SAN JOSE

>> Cinemark Holdings Inc. has opened

an immersive virtual reality (VR) experience

at its Century 20 Oakridge and

XD theater in San Jose, California. As the

16 MARCH 2019


newest SPACES location, it will feature

multisensory VR technology blending

4-D effects, 3-D face scanning, physical

interaction, and social group play.

“Cinemark is constantly innovating

and providing new experiences for our

guests; we love taking entertainment and

moviegoing to the next level,” said Mark

Zoradi, Cinemark’s CEO. “Cinemark is

excited to partner with SPACES to provide

our Bay-area guests with a fun, immersive,

mixed-reality adventure.”

The first Cinemark SPACES experience

will be “Fight for the Future,” based

on Terminator: Salvation. Upon entering

Cinemark SPACES, guests will register

and scan their faces using SPACES’

unique, proprietary face-scanning technology.

Fans will then be immersed in a

free-roam, virtual reality battle with up to

four people in a group.

SPACES invites guests to engage their

senses through virtual reality, haptic feedback,

and environmental effects that guests

can reach out and touch. The moment

they take off their headsets, guests will

immediately receive a cinematic video of

their experience that they can take home

and share on social media.

“At SPACES, we say ‘Go Anywhere,

Do Anything’ where guests are the stars

of the experiences,” said Shiraz Akmal,

SPACES CEO. “We provide consumers an

incredible virtual reality adventure where

they can suit up and escape with their

friends. Guests depart from SPACES and

are transported into the action. We especially

love that our experiences are meant

to be shared; people repeat the experiences

with friends and family again and again.”

SCREENX BROKE RECORDS

IN 2018

>> CJ 4DPLEX closed out 2018 with

record-breaking box office attendance for

its immersive cinema technology, ScreenX.

It grossed more than $40 million in the

worldwide box office and hosted over four

million attendees for the year.

According to a company release, the

recent surge of growth for ScreenX was

achieved by strengthening partnerships

with leading Hollywood studios that doubled

the number of films from the previous

year and through expanding the international

reach of its theater locations. The top

ScreenX films of the year, Bohemian Rhapsody,

Black Panther, Detective China 2, Ant-

Man and the Wasp, and Aquaman, grossed

over $40 million combined, tripling its box

office from the previous year.

ScreenX expanded globally to 195

theaters across 16 countries, a 30 percent

growth from the previous year, of which

a significant portion came from the

Cineworld Group expansion plan to open

100 locations across the U.S. and Europe.

In 2018, there were nine new ScreenX

openings in the U.S. market, tripling its

footprint, and 12 new theaters in Europe.

A new record for the highest number of

openings for a country in a year was set by

China, with 18 new locations in 2018.

“We are thrilled to report that ScreenX

set a new box office record of $40 million

for 2018,” said JongRyul Kim, CEO of CJ

4DPLEX. “We have had great success both

expanding our theaters worldwide and

partnering with major Hollywood studios.

“We look forward to continuing to create

a next-generation cinema trend that gives

movie fans around the world an exciting

reason to go to ScreenX theaters.”

AMC STUBS TOTALS 18 MILLION

MEMBER HOUSEHOLDS

>> AMC Stubs, AMC Theatres’ loyalty

program, has continued its brisk growth

and now has more than 18 million member

households in the United States. At the

U.S. average of 2.6 people per household,

that means approximately 46 million

Americans receive moviegoing benefits via

AMC Stubs.

“The continued growth of AMC Stubs

remains a win for our guests, our studio

partners, and our investors, said Adam

Aron, CEO and president, AMC Theatres.

“We’ve seen AMC Stubs continue to grow

by millions of members each year without

any slowdown, which is a testament to the

program’s incredibly popular benefits and

the quality of experience guests expect at

AMC. And just as important, the approximately

46 million American frequent moviegoers

currently earning valuable AMC

Stubs points allows AMC to generate

attendance growth through highly effective

targeted marketing.”

MAJID AL FUTTAIM OPENS VOX

MULTIPLEX IN JEDDAH

>> Majid Al Futtaim Cinemas, the dedicated

cinema arm of Majid Al Futtaim,

a shopping mall, communities, retail,

and leisure developer in the Middle East,

Africa, and Asia, has opened its first VOX

Cinemas multiplex in Jeddah. The opening

ceremony was attended by government

officials, including the chief executive

officer of the General Commission for

Audiovisual Media, Bader Al Zahrani.

VOX Cinemas has recently confirmed

that 110 screens will be operational in the

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia by the end of

2019. Moreover, three new cinemas will

open in Riyadh within the first quarter

of 2019. In addition to the Red Sea Mall

Jeddah, VOX will launch its deluxe experiences

in Al Qasr Mall, the Roof Mall,

and Kingdom Tower. The exhibitor has

also committed to rolling out its offering

in 10 cities across the kingdom, including

Dammam and Tabuk.

Commenting on the Red Sea Mall

opening, Khaled El Chidiac, acting CEO

at Majid Al Futtaim Ventures, said: “We

are proud to bring a historic milestone

to Jeddah in the form of our new VOX

Cinemas multiplex at Red Sea Mall. We

are confident that our partnership with

Red Sea Mall will contribute to attracting

a large audience to these experiences and

support our success.”

The seating capacity of the new cinema

exceeds 1,400 seats and offers experiences

for every kind of movie fan. It is home

to Saudi’s first IMAX cinema featuring

IMAX with Laser, IMAX’s next-generation

4K laser projection and 12-channel sound

system. The new multiplex at the Red Sea

Mall will also feature three GOLD screens

and a luxury dine-in experience.

MARCH 2019

17


EXECUTIVE SUITE

BY JOHN FITHIAN, PRESIDENT & CEO, NATO

JOHN FITHIAN

>> As I begin my 20th year in this position

with the National Association of Theatre

Owners, I remain inspired by the passion and

volunteer spirit of our trade association members.

Led by our officers and other executive

board members, more than 100 movie theater

company executives contribute substantial

time and effort to advance the common

interests of all exhibitors, and to motivate

more people to go out to the movies. Yet despite

these efforts, there remain some in our

industry who don’t know what NATO does. If

you operate movie theaters, and want to know

more, please contact our director of membership,

David Binet, at db@natodc.com.

NATO establishes its priorities under the

guidance of our board and in response to a

strategic plan developed and adopted by the

members. Though we and our members tackle

many other topics on behalf of the industry,

updates on three key programs follow.

NATO IN THE

TRENCHES

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THREE RECENT PROGRAMS

Netflix, Amazon, Apple, Disney (and Fox) and

the Future of Theatrical Exclusivity >> I have

described in this space previously how streaming

services and the theatrical business grow together.

Our research demonstrates that the more time people

spend streaming at home, the more times they

go to cinemas. Movie lovers simply love movies everywhere.

In 2018 the domestic box office reached

an all-time high, and streaming services signed up

millions in additional subscribers.

What concerns us at NATO is not the growth

of streaming services, but the movie release models

they choose. A robust period of theatrical exclusivity

remains paramount for the movie industry

generally. Indeed, in their strategic plan NATO’s

members designated preservation of theatrical windows

as the industry’s number one priority.

Over the past year (and continuing into the

near future), NATO’s leading members and staff

have conducted dozens and dozens of meetings

on this topic. We’ve been meeting with movie

studio executives, streaming-company leadership,

talent agencies, and movie directors and

producers to make our case. We’ve been armed

with independent research demonstrating that

an exclusive theatrical window prior to streaming

drives profitability for those movies worthy of a

theatrical run.

The results of these conversations have been

fruitful, with one exception. The major studios

generally model their movie businesses with

exclusive theatrical runs. Though there continue

to be discussions about how those models evolve,

the core principle of exclusivity is not in doubt.

Disney’s leaders, for example, have publicly stated

their commitment to exclusive windows. And with

the acquisition of Fox, Disney will likely remain

the market leader for some time, and will employ

exclusive windows even as that company rolls out

its own streaming service.

The vast majority of movie producers, directors

and their business agents also desire exclusive theatrical

runs for their movies. NATO has developed a

series of interviews and statements from a growing

list of filmmakers who state their preference for the

exclusive big screen experience. (Contact NATO’s

Phil Contrino at prc@natodc.com to learn more.)

Then there are the streaming companies.

Amazon simply gets it. That company releases

movies with long exclusive theatrical runs prior to

exclusive home viewing on Amazon Prime. And

with four significant purchases at Sundance this

year, Amazon has declared its desire for growth in

the movie space. Apple is the newest entrant in the

movie market, and it may become one of the biggest.

Though Apple does not have an established

record of release patterns yet, the company has

begun to entertain theatrical windows as it enters

into movie deals. Our discussions with Apple and

its moviemakers will continue.

The one clear exception to all of this, of course,

is Netflix—a company that generally releases its

movies directly to its subscribers. I have written

previously why Netflix should consider robust

exclusive theatrical runs for at least some of its

movies. And recent economic analysis from a

18 MARCH 2019


leading Wall Street analyst at Barclays further supports that proposition.

Our conversations with Netflix, and with filmmakers doing business with

Netflix, continue.

A Growing Focus on State and Local Government Relations >> NATO’s

members selected government relations as another top priority in their

strategic plan. For many years NATO has addressed a litany of challenges

from the federal government, including taxes and regulations and other

threats to exhibitors’ bottom line. That is why NATO established an office

in Washington, D.C., years ago. In more recent years, though, partisan

gridlock in Washington has reduced (but certainly not eliminated) policy

challenges at the federal level.

Like many other industries, motion picture exhibitors now confront

increasing policy challenges at the state and local levels of government.

Historically, theater owners responded to these challenges through state and

regional (i.e., multi-state) trade associations separate from the national organization.

The state and regional associations have used their own dues payments,

reserves, special assessments, or other revenues to fund state and local

government relations efforts. But in recent years, disparate resources between

the various state and regional associations have contributed to difficulties for

those local associations that face significant legislative challenges.

Given the gridlock in Washington, detrimental laws adopted in any

state can have a precedential effect on policies in other states. For that and

other reasons, the national association has supported the local groups by

facilitating information sharing and coordinated strategies through the

work of a regional liaison based in the national headquarters. With the

rising scope of local challenges to the industry, the national board recently

took action to provide more support to state and local efforts.

Specifically, beginning in 2018 NATO has allocated up to $1 million

annually to help the local associations address particular legislative threats

deemed to have specific commercial impact on exhibitors and likely to

have a precedential effect on other areas. These funds will support the

government relations efforts of the local associations based on defined

criteria and an annual application process. The national association will

also provide professional tracking of state and local initiatives relevant to

exhibitors along with a professional government relations staff to assist in

those efforts.

The active member volunteers on NATO’s Government Relations

Committee will work with NATO’s staff to set priorities for government

relations and to review the specific applications for support. Then NATO’s

staff and volunteer members will work with the state and regional associations

to execute local government relations strategies. Some of the most

important issues currently pending at the state and local level include:

• Admissions and business taxes

• Bedbug regulations

• Minimum wage increases

• Open caption screening requirements

• Predictable scheduling requirements

• Soda taxes and regulations

… people have left their home and they’ve

paid the money to go and sit down. That

level of commitment in the movie theater

is the highest level of commitment. You

can’t be on your phone, you can’t talk

to anybody, you’ve totally given up your

evening, there is no way to turn it off and

you don’t get to choose when it starts. All

of that stuff you’ve committed to, and the

relationship between the audience and the

storytelling going on is more demanding

and intimate. For me, with streaming it’s

a wonderful form—it’s just not the movie

theater. Creating for the movie theater is

the main form of art that I do. They are

just not the same.

–M. Night Shyamalan,

in an interview with NATO’s Phil Contrino

MARCH 2019

19


EXECUTIVE SUITE

NATO Expands Its Industry Public

Relations Efforts >> During the

summer of 2017 the domestic box

office suffered a significant downturn

driven primarily by the insufficient

quantity and quality of the movies in

the marketplace. Many stories in the

trade and financial press nonetheless

described the downturn as a reflection

of secular decline. Experienced

NATO members have confronted

this press negativity periodically over

the years as the business can have

cyclical highs and lows. Indeed, with

a slow start in 2019, a few reporters

have already returned to the

question of secular decline despite

the recent completion of a massive

record-breaking year in 2018.

A task force of NATO members

with marketing and public relations

expertise has worked with

NATO staff to develop an industry

messaging campaign designed to

contrast the short-term cyclicality

of the exhibition business with the

long-term strength of the industry.

Backed by annual funding of up to

$1 million, the industry messaging

campaign has grown to include

several vital elements:

• Retention of public relations

experts

• Commission of third-party

research by Ernst & Young to

provide supportive data

• Work with trade, financial, and

mainstream reporters to positively

influence reporting about the

industry

• Enlistment of influential members

of the creative community

to make statements in support of

theatrical exhibition

• Program development at film

festivals across North America—

Sundance, South by Southwest,

the Toronto International Film

Festival—to generate positive

What concerns us at

NATO is not the growth

of streaming services,

but the movie release

models they choose.

A robust period of

theatrical exclusivity

remains paramount for the

movie industry generally.

Indeed, in their strategic

plan NATO’s members

designated preservation of

theatrical windows as the

industry’s number

one priority.

media attention and to build

more relationships with the

creative community

• Meetings with financial analysts

and investors to dispel negative

misconceptions and emphasize

the long-term strength of the

industry

The results of this campaign have

been impressive. Since September

2017, we have had a positive impact

on over 120 articles in influential

publications such as Variety, The Hollywood

Reporter, Deadline, The New

York Times, The Washington Post, Business

Insider, and Bloomberg that have

generated a combined total of more

than 5.4 million estimated views.

In that time we have also secured

endorsements of the theatrical experience

from a wide range of filmmakers

including Steven Spielberg, M. Night

Shyamalan, Adam McKay, Ryan

Coogler, and Barry Jenkins. Several

important analysts—from Michael

Pachter at Wedbush to Leo Kulp at

RBC Capital Markets—now write

positive blurbs about our industry on

a regular basis.

Beyond these three priorities,

NATO and our members work

together to fight movie theft, to

execute and protect a voluntary

movie rating system, to influence

the development and understanding

of cinema technologies, to enhance

security at movie theaters, to provide

professional training to new theater

employees, to educate members on

current topics, and to host a major

international convention (Cinema-

Con) each spring and an educational

summit each fall. But a report on

those activities will have to wait for

another day!

If you are engaged in the operation

of motion picture theaters and

you aren’t yet a NATO member,

please contact us.

20 MARCH 2019


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MEMBERSHIP NEWS

BY DAVID BINET, DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP, NATO

LITTLE RASCALS

Heber City kids stand in line

for 1951’s The Highwayman,

released by Monogram

Pictures, one of several

“Poverty Row” studios.

HISTORY RESONATES IN

THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

NATO STAFF HITS

THE ROAD TO

VISIT MEMBER

LOCATIONS

DAVID BINET

>> While attending the Art House Convergence,

I took the opportunity to drive a few

minutes down the road and visit a NATO

member operating two single-screen cinemas

in Heber City, Utah. Despite the nearly eight

inches of snowfall in the area, the sidewalks

were clear and the cinema was open for business.

I met Jane and Jim Lane and Margaret

Stalcup, owners of Heber City Theatre LLC, in

the lobby of the Ideal Theatre. The smell of

fresh popcorn mixed with the sounds of a few

excited children waiting to see the (award-winning)

masked web crawler on-screen.

Soon after we began our conversation, Jim

recommended that I take a walk to the Avon

Theatre just down the street. He told me that

the sound system in the cinema is a piece of

technology history. The Avon had Bumblebee

on its screen, and the show times were suitably

staggered to allow me a chance to visit both

cinemas. Jim goes into the Avon’s acoustics later

in the article, but upon personal inspection

I thought the sound was incredible. If you ever

find yourself near the area, I strongly encourage

you to visit the cinema.

Following my visit, Jane and Jim were gracious

enough to share some background about

their business.

22 MARCH 2019


What attracted you to the cinema industry and

how did you start? >> The three of us worked parttime

for a single-screen theater in Rifle whose owner

and family had been into theaters for many years. All

three of us have always been avid movie buffs, and

when the opportunity presented itself, we felt it was a

viable option to make a change in our lives, and that

would afford us the option of reestablishing self-sustaining

businesses that were at the time failing.

The way everything fell into place made our

decision almost an absolute. There were a number

of obstacles we had to overcome, but 14 years later

it is obvious that we were successful and hope to

remain that way for many years to come.

How did you acquire the cinema? >> We became

aware that both theaters were available through a

friend and employer that had been in the business

as a family for many years. Both theaters needed

extensive renovation before they could be run as

successful businesses, and the current owners were

not interested in, or able to, make those changes.

Tell us about the surround sound at the Avon

Theatre. >> We stepped in and put the theaters

back into operation. The Ideal Theatre was established

in the early teens, and the Avon was established

in the 1940s. The Ideal has undergone many

renovations over the years and increased its seating

capacity from about 60 to 260. We would like, if

the resources become available, to make changes

in the storefront that would return it to its original

look at some point. The Avon was designed in the

Art Deco style and remains on the exterior much

the same as it was when it was built, although the

interior has undergone several renovations. The

Avon was the first theater ever to have surround

sound, which was invented by Jim Fosgate (see

“Jim Fosgate,” Wikipedia). The Avon was his primary

sound stage, and in 2005, when we acquired

the building, much of his original equipment was

still in the building. We have since upgraded to

7.1 surround sound in both the Avon and Ideal,

and if the resources become available will make the

change to Atmos. Both the Avon and Ideal were

the first independently owned theaters in Utah to

make the change to digital projection in 2010.

What is your biggest challenge with the cinema?

What keeps you up at night? >> Paying the bills!

Coming up with creative, affordable ways to attract

more patrons. There never seems to be enough

revenue to cover the expenses, and when we do find

some relief, it is temporary (the NATO card-processing

program with Vantiv is the perfect example). On

another note, the studios offered the VPF program

to help theaters recover some of the expense of going

digital, and then refused to give us product because

they did not want to pay the VPF, or have in turn

raised their rental percentages high enough for the

product that it offsets their cost of the VPF. Now

that the program is gone, they have other excuses for

not providing product. We will be surprised if the

rental percentages go down for their product, since

they no longer have to pay the VPF. This is the tip of

the iceberg. The other frustration is the general public’s

lack of concern or willingness to understand the

expense of operating a theater. Hardly a day goes by

that we are not approached by someone saying they

hear a multiplex is going to be built, or why don’t

we build one. We do our level best to explain why,

and that if we felt it was viable we would, but until

certain things change they will have to wait. Most

people try to wrap their minds around the facts, but

we have a very large number of local residents who

still leave Heber City to seek more variety and newer

facilities for their viewing habits.

What is your favorite movie and what concessions

would you have while watching it?

>> How do you answer this question? It changes

from time to time, but I would have to say The

Last Samurai. Jane’s favorite movie is Dances

with Wolves, and Margaret’s is Secretariat. We all

agree with popcorn and M&Ms (regular, caramel,

or peanut).

BACK TO THE FUTURE

The Avon now seats up to

400 guests and has been

remodeled to include

digital projection and 3-D

capability. Avon also houses

Corner Sweet Treats, a

small nostalgic ice cream

parlor that features its own

premium ice cream and

candies.

MARCH 2019

23


CHARITY SPOTLIGHT

TO ADD EVENTS IN AN UPCOMING ISSUE, PLEASE SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS TO NUMBERS@BOXOFFICE.COM

A DOG’S WAY HOME CHARITY SCREENING

A REALLY HAPPY FILM / TAIWAN DR. DOG PROGRAM

Four-legged friends (and their pet humans) were welcome at a Taipei, Taiwan,

screening of Sony release A Dog’s Way Home, about a dog (voiced by Bryce

Dallas Howard) who travels hundreds of miles in search of her owner. The

charity screening took place at Taipei’s Songshan Cultural and Creative Park

and was powered by the Christie CP2320-RGB pure laser projector, installed

by Christie’s Taiwan partner Dacoms Technology. Taiwanese singer/actress

Rainie Yang and “celebrity corgi” OLi were in attendance.

VARIETY OF DETROIT

6TH ANNUAL VARIETY CHILI, WINGS & SOUP(ER) BOWL

JANUARY 25, 2019 / TOWNSEND HOTEL

Over 250 guests voted in a friendly competition for best chili, wings,

and soup prepared by Metro Detroit’s most talented chefs.

24 MARCH 2019


A CALL TO ACTION

If you’re a young professional who would like to use your time,

talents, and connections to help others in your community,

consider joining your local Variety chapter’s Young Variety.

Comprising volunteers between the ages of 21 and 40, Young

Variety ensures that the thousands of children served by

Variety will continue to receive help in the years to come.

In addition to regular happy hours at area bars and

restaurants, Young Variety hosts its own pillar events

throughout the year to raise funds for Variety children.

On February 2, hundreds of people gathered at St. Louis

University High School for Variety Trivia Night, hosted by the

St. Louis chapter’s Young Variety. Attendees enjoyed 10 rounds

of trivia and also participated in various games, raffles, and a

silent auction, all in support of the real MVPs: Variety Kids.

Young Variety members are also active volunteers,

supporting Variety’s inclusive programs and working directly

with children who have physical or intellectual disabilities.

For more information, please visit variety.org/get-involved/

young-variety.

VARIETY OF DETROIT

SUNDAY, MARCH 3

THE SOMERSET COLLECTION

Children of Variety and FAR Therapeutic

Arts and Recreation will take to the

catwalk for Variety of Detroit’s 6th

Annual SHINE Fashion Show, benefiting

FAR and the Variety 4-H Horseback

Riding program. Tickets are available via

phone at (248) 258-5511 or at https://

bit.ly/2SPxhkM.

VARIETY OF NATIONAL CAPITAL

REGION

SUNDAY, MARCH 10

REGAL CINEMAS 14

Fredericksburg, Virginia, will play host to

Variety of the National Capital Region’s

2:30 p.m. screening of Paramount’s

animated feature Wonder Park, co-hosted

by Harkness Screenings. The screening

will raise funds for children with mobility

impairments in Virginia. Tickets can be

purchased at https://bit.ly/2SJqIAt.

VARIETY OF SOUTHERN

CALIFORNIA

THURSDAY, MARCH 14

SANTA ANITA PARK

Since 1998, Variety of Southern California’s

Day at the Races has given hundreds

of members a day of outdoor fun as they

raise funds to help children in need.

This year at Day at the Races, Variety of

Southern California is honoring longtime

Variety supporter Eric Carr, vice

president of in-theater marketing at Focus

Features. Tickets are available at http://

bit.ly/VarietyDATR19.

MARCH 2019

25


INDIE FOCUS

CONTRIBUTORS: ADAM PORTER AND STUART LANDON

b r o u g h t t o y o u b y

Midtown Cinema

HARRISBURG, PA

HISTORY

Midtown Cinema, a for-profit, threescreen

indie theater, was founded as a

nonprofit in 2001 by Allen Brown and

Todd Shill and moved into an old grocery

storefront in Midtown Harrisburg. The

term for our neighborhood, Midtown,

hadn’t been in use until the new upstart

movie theater moved in. Even the current

mayor of Harrisburg named his business

the Midtown Scholar because of us. A

few years later, during the recession,

the theater was having difficulty. Allen

Brown and his cinema had a lovely and

dedicated following and had a big fan in

one particular patron, Betty Andrews.

Betty and her daughter Abby frequently

enjoyed films at the cinema. And Mrs.

Andrews happened to be the mother-inlaw

of John Tierney, who is a partner in a

development company.

This is a paraphrase here, but Betty

looked at her son-in-law and said something

like, if Midtown Cinema closed

down, he shouldn’t bother to come home.

So, naturally, John’s company purchased

Midtown Cinema.

26 MARCH 2019


INDIE FOCUS

SCREENS

3

CAPACITY

Auditorium 1: 122

Auditorium 2: 60

Auditorium 3: 52

TOP TITLES

2018

Won’t You Be My

Neighbor?

RBG

BlacKkKlansman

The Shape of Water

Bohemian Rhapsody

TOP TITLES

HISTORICAL

Spotlight

Lady Bird

Three Billboards

Outside Ebbing,

Missouri

The Lady in the Van

Fast forward. John Tierney hired Stuart Landon

and Adam Porter to co-manage Midtown Cinema.

They did a deep dive into repertory, throwing

programming at the wall to see what stuck. We went

digital, hired a team of fabulous creatives, spruced up

the lobby, and started up an immediately successful

membership program that today has 2,400 members.

Our members are fiercely loyal and a lot of fun.

FOOD & BEVERAGE

We aim to offer as many local concessions options

as we can, including coffee from Elementary Coffee

Co., a vendor at our local farmer’s market, ice cream

from Lancaster (that’s Amish country), and baked

goods from a café around the corner. Because of

some rather antiquated liquor laws in Pennsylvania,

we don’t sell alcohol ourselves in the theater, but a

microbrewery called Zeroday Brewing Co. is in the

rear of our building and patrons can get a crowler (a

32 oz. can) to go and “BYOZ,” as we say.

PROGRAMMING & COMMUNITY

At Midtown Cinema, we love having fun

with our films, especially our repertory bookings.

Every third Friday, Harrisburg holds a “3rd in the

Burg” gallery walk and we deemed our cinema the

unofficial after party with a $3 showing of a fun,

nostalgic, or cult film. This year we’re showing

fantastic, fun films like Clue, Monty Python and the

Holy Grail, the first Harry Potter film, Office Space,

The Muppet Movie, Mean Girls, Star Trek II: Wrath

of Khan, The Toxic Avenger, Spirited Away, Hocus

Pocus, Donnie Darko, and National Lampoon’s

Christmas Vacation.

Every month, we have the supreme honor of

hosting a team of improvisers—a comedy improv

panel called “Down In Front!”—who sit, well,

down in front of the audience and riff on some of

the best of the worst piles of movie. Movies like

Manos: The Hands of Fate, Plan 9 from Outer Space,

and The Brain That Wouldn’t Die. We love going

out into the community and sharing our love of

film. We often can be found with a table or a tent

at a local market or festival. One year we rented a

huge tent to house our outdoor, air-conditioned

screening room! It wasn’t quite air-conditioned

enough, but we showed animated shorts that were

fun for all ages.

We also like to have fun outside at Midtown

Cinema. We host a local monthly flea market—the

HBG Flea--each summer. Every year we also host

the Harrisburg Jewish Film Festival, which continues

to grow each year.

We have been lucky enough to host a lot of

live performances, including the local story slam

group, drag and burlesque, live jazz scoring silent

films, and lots of bands. We’re also on staff at a

local professional theater in town and we decided

to produce Annie Baker’s Pulitzer Prize–winning

play, The Flick, at Midtown Cinema. The play is

about a small indie movie house named The Flick

and three of its down-on-their-luck employees who

28 MARCH 2019


navigate their personal problems and the drama

and angst of going digital. It was really cool and

weird and meta and all too close to home. Every

year we hold a party on Oscar night. Our Red

Carpet evening is a hoot, and this particular year

Sam (assistant manager and in-house reviewer

Sammi Leigh Melville) wrapped us in some of the

decorations to Oscar-fy us. We like her. We really

like her.

Our membership program is still going strong.

Members receive discounted tickets, guest passes,

and some vouchers for soda and popcorn. Every

year we host member-appreciation events. Last year,

Midtown Cinema was honored at the Arts Awards,

a Kennedy Center Honors–type evening for the

Harrisburg Region. It is truly the vision, dedication,

and passion of John and Abby Tierney that keep

Midtown Cinema alive, allow our creative and fabulous

staff to thrive, and create a community space

where our members and patrons can enjoy beyond-the-mainstream

independent cinema. We sure

are thankful for them. The entire Midtown Cinema

family makes the magic happen. Due to the hard

work of this team, the theaters are pretty full.

SHOWMANSHIP & GRASSROOTS

MARKETING

Marathons and outdoor films have had a big

impact on our culture and attract some great

partnerships, sponsorships, and appearances. We

partner with a neighborhood community group

for a series of outdoor movies each summer in our

parking lot. One night we watched Labyrinth with

700 of our closest friends. The Central Pennsylvania

Ghostbusters showed up at our outdoor

screening of the original film last summer, and a

couple of years ago the Capital City Jedi Knights

were there for our screening of The Force Awakens.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a big part of

our October, our “24 Hours of Potter” Harry Potter

Marathon is making a comeback this year, and the

Middle Earth Marathon was a treat. Local drag performers

Maxwell Treats and Felicia O’Toole often

host these epic nights, and our staff—led by Sammi

Leigh Melville—decorate the lobby. We also had

a Star Trek Original Series Movie Marathon, we’re

looking forward to showing all the Marvel Movies,

and a Muppet movie marathon is in the works,

along with our fourth-annual Miyazaki Madness

Anime Weekend.

CINEMA ADVERTISING

Being a for-profit theater, we can’t access philanthropic

dollars like many of our art house colleagues,

but we still have similarly high operational

costs. The trailer-quality ads Spotlight Cinema

Networks provides us have been a hassle-free piece

to the budget puzzle so that ticket prices remain

accessible while keeping the lights on and the

projectors humming. We’re happy to have found

an advertising partner like Spotlight that coincides

with our theater.

MARCH 2019

29


TECHNOLOGY

BY J. SPERLING REICH, EXECUTIVE EDITOR, CELLULOID JUNKIE

PHOTOS: J. SPERLING REICH

TALKING

TECHNOLOGY

ICTA SEMINAR SERIES OFFERS A

WIDE-RANGING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

ALAN ROE, ICTA PRESIDENT

>> No matter how many cinema trade

shows fill the annual calendar (and more

seem to sprout up every day), the Los

Angeles Seminar Series of the International

Cinema Technology Association

(ICTA) continues to hold a place of

honor as the first each year. Comprising

companies and professionals from all over

the world that develop, manufacture, and

supply equipment and create innovations

for modern movie theaters, the Seminar

Series helps fulfill the ICTA’s mandate

of educating exhibitors and the industry

about the latest technological advancements.

Over the years, the organization’s

conferences and events have shined a

spotlight on digital cinema, laser projection,

immersive audio and, more recently,

direct-view LED displays.

This year’s Los Angeles seminar was

held January 14–16 and, as usual, offered

keynotes, panel discussions, lectures, and

programming on a wide range of topics.

In fact, the “technology” label is a bit of

a misnomer, since the ICTA conferences

often feature sessions that focus on business

trends and marketing issues within

the exhibition industry. For instance, the

January program opened with Robert H.

Sunshine, executive director of the ICTA,

in an onstage, in-depth conversation with

comScore’s senior media analyst, Paul

Dergarabedian.

Reacting to a record year at the box

office in which receipts totaled $11.8 billion

in North America and $41.7 billion

worldwide, Dergarabedian was quick to

point out that not only were grosses on

the rise, so was attendance (by 2.7%).

That’s why he said he firmly believes this

year will be just as strong for studios and

exhibitors as 2018 and dismissed any notion

that moviegoing is declining, even as

streaming video providers produce their

own original content.

“I have to give kudos to the industry,”

he declared. “We’re not saying, ‘Someday

the small screen is gonna take over, so

we’re not going to spend money here.’

That just hasn’t happened. And this whole

idea has been vindicated by the fact that

we’ve been over $11 billion in North

America for the past four years and we’ve

been over $40 billion for two years in

a row worldwide. We’ve never had four

record months in North America in one

year like we did in 2018. That says a lot

about the robust nature of this business

right now. You don’t break records like

that if people aren’t going to the movies.”

There were two additional noteworthy

sessions during the conference’s first morning,

beginning with a panel on cinema

network security moderated by Alan Roe,

CEO of Jacro and current president of

the ICTA. Greg Ackerman, CEO of FRS

Pros, an IT firm specializing in technical

support and security (especially as it pertains

to financial transactions), cautioned

everyone in attendance that while it might

be Marriott and Equifax who get all the

headlines for being hacked, “over half of all

security breaches happen in small businesses.

Two-thirds of those small businesses go

bankrupt within six months.”

Panelist James Pope, IT director of

Metropolitan Theatres, warned that

theater owners cannot simply rely on

their cybersecurity insurance to cover any

breach, and urged exhibitors to “segment

your networks as much as possible. You

30 MARCH 2019


JEFF FORMAN, DISNEY

GREG ACKERMAN, FRS PROS / JAMES POPE, METROPOLITAN THEATRES / WYNN SALISCH, CASABLANCA VENTURES

have a digital menu board company that

needs remote access to update the latest

assets. But does that need to be in the

same network with your digital projection

systems and your audio processors and

your speakers, or can you break that off

into its own separate network by itself?

If the digital menu board company gets

compromised and someone gets remote

access into that system, are they contained

to just digital menu boards or can

they get to everything else?” Pope said

that even some of his smallest two-screen

cinemas have no fewer than nine different

networks to prevent a single hack from

taking down an entire business.

This panel was followed by a presentation

from Peter Ludé, CTO of Mission

Rock Digital, who gave a status report on

the progress of direct-view cinema technology,

aka high-resolution LED screens,

such as those being marketed by Samsung

and Sony. Using vocabulary such as “pixel

pitch” (the distance between two LEDs

in a display) and “nits” (the amount of

light a screen produces spread over a

square meter), Ludé took the audience

on a fascinating deep dive into the latest

standards and metrics pertaining to LED

displays. His presentation was far too

detailed to summarize, but he believes

that narrow-pitch versions of LED wall

displays are “now very practical for

cinema applications and we can expect to

see continued improvements and the cost

continue to come down.”

The first day’s afternoon program

featured another conversation led by

Sunshine, this time with Jeff Forman,

senior VP of international distribution at

The Walt Disney Studios. We were told

ahead of time that the subject of the upcoming

merger between Disney and 20th

Century Fox was strictly verboten, but

with someone in Forman’s position there

is always plenty to talk about. He confirmed

what we all knew or assumed to be

the case: that international box office can

be upwards of 50–70 percent of a Disney

film’s returns and that China is leading

the way in terms of growth. Though

there is not another market expanding as

quickly (or as huge) as China, the studio

continues to do well each year in Japan,

the United Kingdom, and South Korea.

“One of the markets I’m most excited

about is Indonesia,” Forman noted. “Indonesia

is the fourth-biggest population

in the world. It’s a massive country, thousands

of people, thousands of islands, and

we’re just starting to touch Indonesia. It’s

the number 15 market now, but I see a

lot of growth opportunity.”

The second day of the conference

began with a trip to the Pacific Winnetka

Theatre to see one of those LED

screens Ludé had been talking about the

previous morning. Nick Conti, business

development senior manager at Samsung,

demonstrated the company’s Onyx display

with sample footage that showed off

the screen’s high dynamic range capabilities.

Mark Collins, senior sales manager at

Harman International, explained how the

company had developed a new method of

delivering sound, since the audio cannot

emanate from directly behind the screen.

For those who are wondering, the picture

looks amazing and the audio is much

improved since the Onyx screen was first

installed last April.

MARCH 2019

31


TECHNOLOGY

BETH FIGGE, DOLBY

AVATAR PRODUCER JON LANDAU

Beth Figge, senior sales manager at Dolby,

kicked off the second day’s formal program

by leading an interesting panel debate on the

equipment dealer’s role in an age of consolidation.

Kobe Bone of Tri State Digital, Kevin Eagle

of Cinematronix, Frank Tees of Moving Image

Technologies, David Pflegl of Specter Cinema,

and Alex Younger of CES+ assembled onstage

for the talk. One of the main takeaways was the

frustration each has with manufacturers getting

“in front of the sales process” by dealing with exhibitors

directly. Such behavior, they said, upends

and can even destroy a dealer’s relationship with a

cinema operator, making it harder to service them

in the future.

Another highlight from the second day was the

conversation between Stuart Bowling, director of

content and creative relations at Dolby Laboratories,

and Jon Landau, who has produced many

of director James Cameron’s movies, including

Avatar. And no, Landau does not know if the Avatar

sequels will once again have their release dates

pushed back, nor would he divulge the frame rate

at which Cameron had decided to shoot the films.

For what it’s worth, he did say, “We’ve come to

the conclusion that high frame rates is a presentation

format and not always a capture or creation

format. That you don’t have to capture or create

at the higher frame rate. You can play it back

at the higher frame rate, even by double-printing

the frames. And there are certain moments

where you’re going to get an advantage of actually

shooting or capturing at the higher frame rate.

We see that very similarly for how we’ll approach

the Avatar movies, that there will be sequences

that are natively completed in high frame rate for

creative reasons.”

The ICTA Seminar Series is known for scheduling

at least one field trip during every conference,

like the one to view the Onyx screen. This

year, there were three field trips. The first night’s

attendees visited the historic American Legion Post

43 in Hollywood, which has a completely renovated

500-seat movie theater. David Rahn, North

American sales manager at Alcons Audio, arranged

for a tour of the facility and a screening of footage

that included a 70-millimeter reel of Murder on the

Orient Express.

This year’s ICTA Seminar Series came to a

close with the second day’s field trip to the TCL

Chinese Theatre, where a panel on esports was led

by Mike Archer, VP of worldwide cinema sales at

Dolby. The conversation took place in MediaMation’s

esports tournament venue, which doubles as

a cinema auditorium with the company’s motion

seats and 4-D technology. Matt DeVuono, director

of programming and events at Cineplex Entertainment,

and James Dobbin, director of event cinema

at National Amusements in the UK, described how

their respective circuits handle esports tournaments

and gaming events. One thing seemed very clear

from their presentations: If executed properly,

cinemas can make a lot of money opening up their

theaters to esports.

32 MARCH 2019


Big Screens in

the Big Apple

BOXOFFICE TAKES THE TEMPERATURE OF

THE NEW YORK CITY THEATRICAL SCENE

BY REBECCA PAHLE

>> The movies love New York, and New York loves the

movies. In the nearly 100 years since the exhibition industry

first came to the Big Apple, the theatrical landscape has

blossomed, resulting in a diverse mix of cinemas, from

multiplexes packed with luxury amenities to art house

cinemas low on cutting-edge technology but high on

customer loyalty. And yet—as is always the case in the

exhibition arena—things are changing. New cinemas are

opening as cultural mainstays are shutting their doors—or

engaging in renovations to keep up with the times.

To get the inside story on this ongoing love affair,

BOXOFFICE spoke with some of the people

behind the city’s theatrical scene.

34 MARCH 2019


First, the bad news: Last year, two NYC institutions—the

Upper West Side’s Lincoln Plaza Cinemas and the West

Village’s Landmark’s Sunshine Cinema—shut their doors.

In 2016, the famed Ziegfeld Theatre, one of the few movie

palaces still left in New York City, became an event space.

When it comes to succeeding (or not) in New York City,

Landmark Theatres’ CEO Ted Mundorff explains: “The high price of real

estate is a big factor.” It was real estate concerns that led to the Sunshine’s

closing. Though the theater was “welcomed by the specialized community,”

Mundorff says, “having only a 15-year lease prematurely shortened

its life.”

THE LANDMARK AT 57 WEST

But Landmark still has a presence in New York City. In 2017, the

chain opened the Landmark at 57 West. Like the late Sunshine, it skews

more toward art house cinema. Unlike the Sunshine, it offers the sort of

amenities—like a full bar and electric recliners—that many moviegoers

have come to expect.

“Theaters and buildings don’t last for a lifetime,” Mundorff says. “As

they age, they need to be remodeled to keep up with technology. If not,

they will close to make room for a newer, more comfortable model.”

Three art house institutions—the Quad Cinema (owned by Charles

S. Cohen of the Cohen Media Group, which purchased Landmark

Theatres earlier this year), Film Forum, and the IFC Center (formerly

the Waverly Theater)—are determined not to be pushed out. The three

cinemas, which between them have racked up over 150 years of screening

movies, either have completed (the Quad and Film Forum) or are in the

process of undergoing (IFC Center) major renovations.

MARCH 2019

35


FILM FORUM

The theater is the only

autonomous nonprofit cinema

in New York City and

one of the few in the U.S.

The Quad, New York City’s first multiplex,

updated its tech with the help of Christie and Barco,

added digital screens in the lobby, and added a bar

for post-movie (or, heck, pre-movie) conversation.

The IFC Center’s in-progress renovations will

include additional screens and a much-needed larger

lobby; anyone who’s walked past the Sixth Avenue

cinema during prime movie times has probably

seen the standard crowd of ticket holders gathered

underneath the marquee.

The Film Forum’s renovations, completed in the

summer of 2018, are probably the most interesting

because they’re the least noticeable. Seats and

sight lines were improved and a fourth screen was

added, granting the cinema “greater flexibility in

terms of acting quickly on titles that are offered

to us,” per director Karen Cooper. But the new

Film Forum looks … pretty much exactly like the

old Film Forum. Explains Cooper, “We intended

to keep the look, the color scheme (more or less),

and the sensibility the same. We never considered

radical changes—we leave the radical content to

our documentaries.”

Radical or not, the renovations at all three

theaters reflect an awareness that sitting back and

cooling your heels won’t fly in a market with as

much competition as New York City.

Brooklyn’s Nitehawk Cinema opened its second

location last year, taking the 90-year-old Pavilion

Theater and giving it new life with a full bar and

dine-in service. The Lower East Side’s Metrograph

opened in 2016, with emphasis on independent

and foreign titles and a hip, highly Instagrammable

interior space. The same year, Alamo Drafthouse

opened its first New York City location in Brooklyn;

the chain’s first Manhattan location is slated to open

later this year and will boast 4K Barco projection,

immersive sound, and luxury recliners. And, of

course, premium food and beverage options—this is

the Alamo, after all.

Speaking of premium food and beverage options,

2016 also saw the opening of New York City’s first

iPic location, which features the luxury seating and

dine-in service typical of the chain. And, in 2018,

CMX Cinemas, Mexico’s second-largest movie

chain, moved into New York City for the first time

with their CMX CinéBistro, located on Manhattan’s

Upper East Side. “New Yorkers are a very demand-

36 MARCH 2019


ing, cultured, and refined audience,” says CEO Jose

Leonardo Martí, and “challenges us every single day

to exceed our efforts and satisfy our guests’ needs.

So far, we think we’ve done a great job.” A “modern

and minimalist design,” says Martí, features “rich

textiles and bold fixtures that embody the spirit and

passion of New York.” The chain’s philosophy, says

Vice President of Operations Fred Meyers, is “very

food and drink focused.” To that end, the CMX

CinéBistro has a multiethnic food-and-beverage

menu and two full-service bars.

And then there’s Regal’s upcoming multiplex in

Tangram, a mixed-use development in Flushing,

Queens. As the first New York City outpost of

South Korea–based CJ CGV, the cinema was to feature

ScreenX and 4DX screens and a slate of diverse

programming to cater to one of New York City’s

most diverse populations. Earlier this year, CJ CGV

was replaced by Regal, which (due to its partnership

with CJ 4DPLEX) is still expected to bring 4DX

and ScreenX to their to-be-opened Queens location.

But wait! There’s still one more theater that’s

opened in New York City over the last three years:

The Roxy Cinema. The single-screen Roxy, previously

a private screening space, is unusual in that it’s

located on the cellar level of Tribeca’s Roxy Hotel.

That, says curator Illyse Singer, has gone a long way

toward ameliorating the real estate issues that other

New York City cinemas have to deal with.

But the real secret behind getting butts in seats,

Singer explains, isn’t location or fancy amenities.

(Though it should be noted that the Roxy did an

overhaul before opening as a commercial cinema,

adding 16-millimeter and Christie 4K projectors.

As for luxury food and beverage options—well, you

have the Roxy Bar and the Django jazz club right

upstairs.) The key is, as always, movies.

“I think it’s really important to play films that

no one else is really taking on, and to play films

that move and inspire people,” Singer argues. The

theater’s intimate 118-seat space lends itself well to

audience Q&As, which is another core component

of the Roxy’s brand: “We really like the Roxy to

be a place where guests can engage with talent and

feel inspired and included.” It’s that combination of

outside-the-box programming and guest appearances—plus

the Roxy’s low-for-New York $12 ticket

cost—that, Singer says, helps to pull audiences away

CMX CINÉBISTRO

Located in the Lenox Hill

neighborhood on Manhattan’s

Upper East Side,

CMX CinéBistro features six

intimate auditoriums with

seating ranging from 46 to

64 seats.

MARCH 2019

37


COCKTAIL FOR TWO

CMX CinéBistro’s multilevel

layout includes two screening

rooms on each floor

and complete food and

beverage service.

from home entertainment options.

A smart approach to programming explains

why the IFC Center had its biggest year ever in

2018, despite a lack of the amenities many other

theaters have, or even the amenities the IFC Center

itself will have after its renovations are complete

at some to-be-announced date. “We’ve never

really had the space to experiment with amenities

or additional sales opportunities, like dine-in and

so forth,” says Senior Vice President and General

Manager John Vanco. “We’re so cramped as it is,

we’ve not been able to dive into this brave new

world of luxury loungers and so forth that a lot of

other theaters have.”

What the IFC Center does have is a wide-ranging

lineup, both in terms of its day-to-day screenings

and special events like DOC NYC, the offbeat

genre series What the Fest?!, and the recent Iranian

Film Festival, just to name a few. People—not necessarily

the same people—come to the IFC Center

for documentaries and Oscar-nominated shorts (the

cinema’s biggest program of the year) and its annual

screenings of It’s a Wonderful Life. IFC will keep

something like the Oscar-nominated foreign film

Border for months—on one screen, maybe just for

one show time a day, but still selling out as word-ofmouth

expands.

A diversity of programming is reflected, by necessity,

in many theaters across New York City. That’s

true of the CMX CinéBistro, which, while it leans

more mainstream than the IFC Center, still makes

an effort to blend blockbusters with movies that will

“satisfy more targeted audiences,” says Martí. “At

CMX, we recognize the need for an elevated cinema

experience, and we are in the process of understanding,

in-depth, our guests’ interests and needs in

order to offer a more diverse array of movie content,

services, and amenities that appeal to New York City

and Upper East Side audiences.”

It’s this “diverse array” of movies that makes

the New York City theatrical space so vital, even

if the old guard isn’t always able to keep up with

the bigger chains in terms of the latest and greatest

theatrical amenities. In terms of programming,

studio releases, indies, foreign films, cult classics,

and repertory screenings are represented, as well as

any other sort of movie that New Yorkers may want

to see. Which is all of them.

38 MARCH 2019


COVER STORY

BY JESSE RIFKIN

Number Crunch

THE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE AT THE BOX OFFICE

>> The Marvel Cinematic Universe,

often abbreviated as the MCU, needs little

explanation by now: It’s an audacious

series of 20 interconnected movies, spanning

more than a decade to date, featuring

overlapping characters and story lines.

Marvel’s track record speaks for itself,

with box office totals of $6.86 billion

domestically and $17.52 billion globally.

Whether in pure dollars or adjusted for

ticket price inflation, that’s the biggest

movie franchise ever. And its box office

prowess has grown with age. In 2018, the

MCU boasted the top two highest-grossing

films of the year—Black Panther and

Avengers: Infinity War. The three installments

coming in 2019 all appear likely

to finish among the year’s top 10 earners.

The slate debuts with March’s highly anticipated

Captain Marvel, followed only a

month later by Avengers: Endgame. With

those two releases soon to hit theaters,

let’s look back at the box office history of

the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

In the beginning >> It started with a

bold ambition: an overarching narrative

across a series of films, with each film

spotlighting a different protagonist but

sharing crossover characters with the

others. The seeds were planted in May

2008 with Iron Man—on paper, a highly

risky bet in several respects. At the time,

Iron Man was not a household name but a

distant cousin to much more recognizable

comic book favorites like Spider-Man,

Superman, and Batman. An ingenuous

marketing campaign began to change that

perception, prompting a satirical headline

in The Onion: “Wildly Popular Iron Man

Trailer to be Adapted into Full-Length

Film.” The film debuted to $98.6 million

on the first weekend of May, such a

massive debut that Marvel would schedule

a film for either the last weekend of April

or the first weekend of May every single

year for the next dozen years. A postcredits

scene laid the groundwork for the

movies to come: standalone superhero

films leading to an ensemble blockbuster,

Marvel’s The Avengers.

Iron Man went on to earn $318.4

million domestically and $585.2 million

worldwide. Iron Man 2 (2010) improved

40 MARCH 2019


IRON MAN · 2008

IRON MAN 2 · 2010

THOR · 2011

THE INCREDIBLE HULK · 2008

IRON MAN 3 · 2013

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS · 2012

THOR: THE DARK WORLD · 2013

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER · 2011

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY · 2014

AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON · 2015

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER · 2014

ANT-MAN · 2015

DOCTOR STRANGE · 2016

CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR · 2016

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2 · 2017

THOR: RAGNAROK · 2017

BLACK PANTHER · 2018

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING · 2017

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR · 2018

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP · 2018

CAPTAIN MARVEL · 2019

AVENGERS: ENDGAME · 2019

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME · 2019

MARCH 2019

41


COVER STORY

upon its predecessor: a $128.1 million debut, a $312.4 million

domestic haul, and $623.9 million global total. Iron Man 3

(2013), the superhero’s last standalone title, reflected the franchise’s

growing popularity: a $174.1 million bow, a $409 million

domestic take, and a $1.21 billion global tally.

Assembling a team >> As other characters were introduced,

Marvel increased the number of releases to as many as three

separate films in certain years. While other studios might have

worried about audiences getting franchise fatigue (imagine three

James Bond films released per year), Marvel’s unique properties—with

their distinct tones, characters, and worlds—kept

audiences coming back.

Along the way, the films introduced new characters before

giving them their own installments, acquainting audiences with

a growing roster. Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow debuted

in Iron Man 3, while Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther and

Tom Holland’s Spider-Man both premiered in Captain America:

Civil War.

The second franchise to emerge was 2011’s Thor, starring

Chris Hemsworth. Debuting with $65.7 million,

it earned $181.0 million domestically and

$449.3 million globally. Just like the three

Iron Man installments, the Thor trilogy

improved at the box office

with every subsequent

release. Thor: The Dark

World (2013) opened

to $85.7 million,

earning $206.3 million

domestically and $644.6

million globally. Thor: Ragnarok (2017) started with

$122.7 million, earning $315.0 million domestically

and $854.0 million globally.

The third franchise to arise from the Marvel

canon, 2011’s Captain America: The First

Avenger starring Chris Evans, enjoyed similar

success. It started with $65.0 million,

earning $176.6 million domestically and

$370.6 million globally. Each ensuing

Captain America installment similarly

bested its predecessor in all metrics.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

(2014) opened to $95.0 million,

earning $259.7 million domestically

and $714.3 million globally. Two years

later, Captain America: Civil War

debuted to $179.1 million, taking

in $408.0 million domestically

and $1.15 billion globally.

Age of dominance >> Marvel’s true juggernaut run arguably

began with 2012’s Marvel’s The Avengers, which brought together

six superheroes in one blockbuster. While the previous films were

certainly hits, none rose to the level of The Avengers.

The ensemble film launched with $207.4 million, at the

time the biggest domestic opening weekend ever. It would ultimately

accrue $623.3 million and $1.51 billion globally, the

top title of the year on both metrics and the first Marvel movie

to be the biggest of its year. At the time, it was the second-biggest

movie of the post-Titanic era, behind only Avatar.

Its sequel, Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), brought back

its predecessor’s cast along with several additional characters

introduced in standalone installments over the subsequent

three years. It posted a $191.2 million opening, $459.0 million

domestically, and $1.40 billion globally.

Last year’s Avengers: Infinity War took things to yet another

level, in terms of both story and box office. It combined virtually

every character ever featured in any Marvel movie over

the previous decade, and while its two predecessors had

both cleared a billion dollars worldwide, this installment

topped $2 billion—only the fourth movie in history to

do so.

It began by opening with $257.6 million,

the biggest domestic opening ever (or

no. 2 adjusted for ticket price inflation)

and a $640.5 million global

opening, also the biggest ever.

Ultimately the title would

take in $678.8 million

domestically

and $2.04 billion

globally,

the highest-grossing

film worldwide

in 2018.

MARVEL

SMASH

20 MCU Films

Total Domestic Gross

Coming up >> It looks like 2019 is

shaping up to be another massive

year for Marvel, possibly their

biggest yet. Captain Marvel,

starring Brie Larson, out March

8, follows a highly buzzed-about

character teaser from Avengers:

Infinity War. As for Avengers,

the fourth and (supposedly) final

installment, Avengers: Endgame,

out April 26, is expected to

be one of the year’s biggest

box office hits.

42 MARCH 2019


Speed Trap

KIM NGUYEN’S THE HUMMINGBIRD PROJECT

CHRONICLES A RACE TO CONQUER

THE STOCK MARKET

BY KEVIN LALLY

High Five

INTERVIEW WITH FIVE FEET APART

DIRECTOR JUSTIN BALDONI

BY JESSE RIFKIN

>> How would you start a romance with someone if you weren’t

allowed within six feet of each other? That’s the premise of Lionsgate’s

romantic drama Five Feet Apart, in theaters March 15.

Cole Sprouse and Haley Lu Richardson star as two teenagers

hospitalized with cystic fibrosis, who can’t get close without

risking contamination.

The movie is directed by Justin Baldoni, best known to the

public for playing romantic interest Rafael Solano on CW’s hit

television show “Jane the Virgin.” Baldoni spoke to Boxoffice

about the real-life inspiration for Five Feet Apart, shooting “winter”

scenes in 100-degree weather, and the challenges of being

a first-time feature-film director.

44 MARCH 2019


How did you come across this project? >> About

seven years ago, I started making a documentary

series called “My Last Days,” where I traveled the

country and told the stories of amazing individuals

who were dying of a terminal illness but living

incredible lives. That little show went on to

become one of the most watched documentary

series online ever, and I later sold it to the CW, so

now it’s an existing television event every year.

What came out of the first year it aired on

TV was I met a young woman named Claire

Wineland who had cystic fibrosis. She became

one of my dear friends and like a little sister to

me. It was in a conversation with Claire, when I

was talking to her about dating other people with

cystic fibrosis, that she told me two people with

cystic fibrosis have to stay six feet apart or they

could contaminate each other—or in the worst

case, kill each other.

I just [knew] this could be a beautiful film. Romeo

and Juliet was one of the first plays I remember

seeing, and I was just obsessed with the love story.

Instead of the Capulets and the Montagues, what if

it was the illness that kept these two kids—who so

badly wanted to be together—apart? The acknowledgment

of mortality and all of these things I had

spent my whole career trying to find ways to talk

about, I found in this one story.

Could I tell a story with two young people in

a young-adult movie without [showing] physical

touch? As a filmmaker, that was my challenge and

what I set out to achieve. I really wanted to make

a film in this age where almost every teenage love

story has a sex scene. We’re so obsessed with the

physical. Can we find intimacy again, without

physical touch, on screen?

Claire later became a consultant for the film

and really helped me tell the story in a sincere way,

through the lens of the people who are actually

living with cystic fibrosis. She passed away just

before I could show it to her, after a successful lung

transplant with complications. I dedicated the film

to her. Her energy is all over this film.

What surprised you most about directing a

feature film for the first time? >> I’ve spent the

last 15 years directing, but I’d always had a boss.

Whether it be a music video or a commercial or

even a documentary, there’d always been somebody

to report to. So really having to dig deep to trust

myself and my intuition. I remember finding

myself on set at one point just completely alone.

“Wait a second, the only person that can mess this

up right now is me.” [Laughs]

Directing anything is difficult, but I had

no idea how hard it would really be, let alone

to direct a story that you [feel so strongly

about]. You don’t make a movie like this just

to make it; you make a movie like this to

hopefully affect people and touch people,

to remind people about the beauty that is

life. That means what goes into it has to be

the same appreciation. As the director, you put

the most into it of anybody. A lot of other people

are not as invested, so it’s a really tricky thing. I

had to learn how to get everybody invested in the

same way that I am. Because for me, directing is a

collaboration. I’m not a tell-everybody-what-to-do

kind of director.

What are your favorite stories or funniest

moments on set? >> There’s an emotional

climactic point in the film, where my lead actress

gets handed a notebook. Inside the notebook are

supposed to be some very important sketches. We

were hitting hour 13 on one of our last days of

shooting; it might have been the final day. My lead

actress has been emotionally spent all day long,

crying. I’m starting [the shot] on the notebook

and tilting up to her face, and she’s supposed to

have this huge reaction. She opens the notebook

and starts laughing because the prop department

put the dummy notebook in, which had nothing

inside! [Laughs]

Here’s another funny story, which at the time

wasn’t very funny. We shot this movie in New Orleans,

and it’s a winter movie. My actors were melting.

Any scene that was outside, we had to put them in

winter coats and multiple layers—but under those

coats we had ice vests, because it was literally 100

degrees at night. Those ice vests melted in 15 minutes.

My poor actors are acting cold and give deep

emotional performances while overheating.

What were your cinematic inspirations here?

>> I didn’t watch The Fault in Our Stars within the

last six months of shooting this movie for a reason.

I knew it would be compared a lot to it because

of the premise, but I really wanted to make a very

grounded film. In fact, The Pursuit of Happyness

was one of my cinematic inspirations for this

movie. It touched me on such a deep level; there

PHOTO: ANGEL NICANOR

GALENTINE’S DAY

On February 13, 2019,

Haley Lu Richardson

(above), along with costar

Cole Sprouse and director

Justin Baldoni, surprised

patrons at free Galentine’s

Day screenings of Five Feet

Apart. Galentine’s Day is a

faux holiday invented by

Amy Poehler’s Leslie Knope

character on “Parks and

Recreation.”

MARCH 2019

45


was such a rawness and grittiness and realness to that movie.

I had a similar aspiration or goal for the style of this

film. Fault was a bit more shiny, the shots were a little more

set up. We brought a rawness—have the imperfections be

what makes the movie perfect. From top to bottom, I didn’t

want anything in this movie to come off perfect. I wanted

this to feel as grounded in reality as possible. Once when

the dolly broke, I said, “Great! Let’s throw the camera on

my shoulder instead.”

JUSTIN BALDONI, COLE SPROUSE, AND HALEY LU RICHARDSON

PHOTO: DAVID LEESON

What’s your best Cole Sprouse story? >> I was on “The

Suite Life of Zack and Cody” as a guest actor! [Cole and his

twin brother, Dylan Sprouse, became child stars as the title

characters on the 2000s Disney Channel sitcom.] I played a

Spanish fencing instructor named Diego.

Cole was the only actor I met for this role. I just knew that

he had so much to give, that he was blowing up; he looked

like the character and in many ways acted like the characters.

Cystic fibrosis patients have this very mature outlook on life,

because they spend so much time in the hospital with doctors.

These doctors and nurses become their friends, so they become

friends with adults. In a very similar way, Cole grew up

with adult friends, being a child star working with directors

and producers and PAs.

JUSTIN BALDONI AT THE MOVIES

MOVIEGOING MEMORY

“When that first Jurassic Park came out, it was

one of those cultural moments. I remember

seeing the world that Spielberg had created,

with the reinvention of dinosaurs. As a young

boy, I was obsessed with dinosaurs. It was a little

bit of a conversation between [my dad] and

my mom, whether to take a nine-year-old to go

see it. I remember sitting down in the theater,

that music started playing, I looked over at my

dad and he looked over at me. I’ll cry just thinking

about it! It was just super special.”

AT THE CONCESSION STAND

“I always go with a large popcorn and butter.

I’ve been doing it since I was a kid. It just makes

you feel like you’re ‘at the movies.’ If it’s a popcorn

flick, you’ve got to get the large popcorn.

Even though I always know I’m going to pay for

that decision later.”

JUSTIN BALDONI

PHOTO: ANGEL NICANOR

46 MARCH 2019


LAURE DE CLERMONT-TONNERRE

PHOTO: TARA VIOLET NIAMI / FOCUS FEATURES

Riding High

LAURE DE CLERMONT-TONNERRE ON HER FEATURE DEBUT, THE MUSTANG

BY DANIEL LORIA

>> It all started when Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre encountered

a curious story in a newspaper. Apparently, there

were programs in U.S. prisons that would match inmates

with small animals as part of their rehabilitation process.

Fascinated by the concept, the French actress delved deeper,

researching the programs mentioned in the clipping and

emerging with her 2014 short film, Rabbit. The short was

featured in the short film lineup of that year’s Sundance

Film Festival, a connection that would eventually lead to her

inclusion in the festival’s famed Sundance Labs screenwriting

workshops. De Clermont spent the following years working

on a feature-length version of the project in Park City, a

venture that had her touring prisons on the West Coast of

the United States. Five years later, that project, now known

as The Mustang, went on to make its worldwide premiere at

the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. Boxoffice caught up with

the filmmaker to talk more about her directorial debut—

and why a theatrical release was a crucial priority for her.

48 MARCH 2019


How did you find out about this program? And secondly, why was

this right for a movie? What compelled you to write a screenplay about

it? >> I actually found out about it through an article in a French newspaper.

It was five years ago and I became really fascinated by this story about a

therapist who was introducing animals to inmates: rabbits, chinchillas, birds.

It seemed so unusual, funny even. I’ve always been intrigued by the idea of

punishment—how these institutions and systems function, the impact of

punishing someone. The subject grabbed my attention, so I called the therapist

and she invited me to go spend a day with her. I went and it was not

fun at all. It was heartbreaking but also wonderful to see how those inmates

could connect with love and empathy through little animals.

I was affected by that experience and wrote Rabbit, my short film,

based around it. I shot Rabbit in Rikers Island, and very soon after that I

traveled to Nevada to explore the horse program they had there. I called

journalists who had written about the program. From there, I ended up

getting picked up from the airport in Sacramento and going to Carson

City, Nevada. I spent three days in prison observing this program and

seeing [a horse] auction. I was fascinated; the first draft of The Mustang

was born after this experience.

I traveled back and forth from that place for four years, mainly to this

prison in Nevada, but we also visited like four or five prisons with different,

unique men who had similar paths. That really helped me understand the

factors that could trigger someone to violence, to lose control, and how

empathy can help these men with this profile of physical abuse.

So you went from reading a newspaper in France, to a five-year journey

through prisons in Nevada with violent inmates. >> [Laughing] Yes,

I know. I love taking a journalistic approach. I wanted to write a story that

reflected my experience and all this research.

With the level of research you conducted, and depth of access you

had, why not just make a documentary? >> A feature on this subject,

and in general, allows me to take a poetic license where I can still have this

authenticity but still tell an innovative story. It allows me to take something

real and be able to make it dramatic, poetic, and reflective. That was my

goal. I was so inspired by this program and felt there was definitely a film in

this story. Visually alone, there are so many contrasts, from inside the prison

to the space outside with the horses.

I’ve always been

intrigued by the idea

of punishment—how

these institutions and

systems function, the

impact of punishing

someone.

How many of your characters were influenced either directly or indirectly

from your research? >> I had some ideas in mind when I started

writing the film, but it was all very green. I didn’t know anything; basically

I had read an article and knew I wanted to include a female character, but

that was it. I knew I wanted my lead to be in prison for domestic abuse, a

very common crime that affects so many families. That’s roughly all I knew,

but after going to the prisons, everything got a lot more precise.

The characters of Roman and Henry are based on real people, different

stories that I heard. Connie Britton’s character, the psychologist, is based on

a woman who helped me get access to the prisons and explore these programs.

I thought it was interesting to show that there are two ways to handle

counseling for violent inmates. Yes, there’s the regular counseling sessions—

MARCH 2019 MARCH 2019 / BOXOFFICE ® / 49


ut there are also programs like this one that help these men get a different

connection. I would say that 85 percent of the script is based on real stories.

One of the things that stand out in The Mustang is the diverse casting

in the film. You didn’t populate your prison scenes with models and

professional actors. >> There are a lot of former inmates in the film. The

character of Tom in the film is played by a Native American actor who

spent 15 years in prison in Nevada. I met him just as he had left prison

and was working as a horse trainer. He was so charismatic and had such an

interesting story, I really wanted to include him in the film. At first he was

hesitant but eventually came on board once he felt he was ready to tell that

story. He was also a wrangler on the set, so he had two tasks: acting and

helping us with the horses. There are two other inmates from this program

in Nevada that are in the film. I wanted to have as many interesting faces, a

diverse group of men for the movie. And that didn’t only mean inmates, I

heard about this group, the Compton Cowboys, young men who grew up

in Compton and attended this program that introduced them to horses. It’s

a program for kids and they ride so well that we invited them to join us in

the film—you can see them in some of the bigger scenes. We ended up with

a very interesting group of men; some as wranglers, some as cowboys—some

actors, some who weren’t. It was important for me to have a group of people

who were connected to the story in order to give the film an organic and

visceral dimension to it.

We’re going through a curious period in independent cinema, where

just because you get acquired at a major festival doesn’t mean

you’re going to get a good theatrical release. There are companies

with big budgets out there that don’t attach much importance to it.

Why was it important for you to have The Mustang, your feature film

debut, play in cinemas? >> I’m a huge cinephile; I love the experience

of seeing a movie on a big screen with strangers. I grew up in a cinephile

family, watching films in theaters, sharing emotions in an auditorium.

Even though now we have some platforms that don’t allow a big theatrical

release, which I think is really sad, we can still insist on having our movies

play at a theater. A film like Roma is something I refuse to see on a laptop.

I would have been really sad if I hadn’t had a theatrical release. I really

believe in the cinema and I want to protect it. Watching something on a

laptop kills 50 percent of my desire. We are in a world where we cannot

focus anymore; we are completely overwhelmed with so much information

all the time. So when you’re watching something at home, and your phone

is ringing, it becomes too distracting. I like going to the cinema because

it is an appointment. I go there and that’s what I’m doing for the night.

That’s what I love about the experience that is different than watching TV

in my living room.

What do you hope audiences can take away from your film? >> As a

filmmaker, I’ve never been very interested in making something so commercial

with buildings and stuff blowing up. I feel this is a private and intimate

movie, but one with a very positive message about healing that I hope is accessible

for a lot of audiences. I hope it’s a film that helps people talk about

the criminal justice system.

WILD HORSES

Matthias Schoenaerts

stars as Roman Coleman,

a violent felon, who enters

a rehabilitation program

involving the training of

mustangs.

50 MARCH 2019


MARCH 2019

51


BY REBECCA PAHLE

52 MARCH 2019


In 2014, audiences—and the worldwide box office—fell for The LEGO

Movie. The film was a surprise megahit, earning nearly half a billion dollars

worldwide despite a previously-thought-verboten early February release.

Almost four years to the day later, Emmet Brickowski (Chris Pratt),

Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks), and Batman (Will Arnett)—plus a healthy

assortment of new characters, including velociraptors, a talking banana,

and a shape-shifting queen (Tiffany Haddish) who may or may not be

evil—are back in cinemas with The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part.

“There are no rules for LEGO,” explains director Mike Mitchell. “That’s

the theme of the first movie: Throw away the rule book.” Mitchell and

animation director Trisha Gum have taken this anything-goes attitude

and crafted a fun, high-energy, song-filled sequel, where the journey

of minifig heroes is paired with a live-action component about warring

siblings Finn (Jason Sand) and Bianca (The Florida Project’s Brooklynn

Prince). Mitchell and Gum took the time to speak with Boxoffice about

controlling the chaos.

MARCH 2019

53


How did you both come to be involved with this

movie? >> MM: Chris [Lord] and Phil [Miller]

came in to help me on the last film I directed,

Trolls, to help punch it up and come up with gags.

And while they were there, they told me how they

wanted to make a sequel to The LEGO Movie. And

I told them, “LEGO is one of my favorite films,

and I don’t think you should make a sequel.” It’s

a perfect film, beginning to end. And then they

pitched me the story about how it evolves and

how it incorporates the little sister. And I was like,

“Oh man, that is a great idea.” And that’s when I

said, “Trish and I have to be a part of making this

film. It sounds so fun.”

TG: I had just come off of working on The

LEGO Batman Movie when Mike and I met. I was

excited about telling a continuation of [The LEGO

Movie], but now from the little girl’s point of view.

So I said, “Sign me up.”

It was so neat seeing Brooklynn Prince after

The Florida Project. >> TG: From day one, she

was the only person we wanted to play the role

of Bianca.

MM: I was happy that she didn’t curse as much

in this film as she did in The Florida Project.

AT THE HELM

Director Mike Mitchell

(Shrek Forever After) and

Emmy-winning animation

director Trisha Gum (“Robot

Chicken”)

First, I loved the film, but it’s been a couple of

weeks since I’ve seen it and “Catchy Song” is

still stuck inside my head. So I’m kind of mad at

you. >> Mike Mitchell: Trisha and I talked about

how we have to get it surgically removed from our

heads. Because we worked on this film, we had to

listen to that song over and over again. It’s a curse.

Trisha Gum: My fiancé hears me sing it at

home all the time. He’s never even actually heard

the song, but I catch him singing it, too, just

because of how often I sing it.

Who wrote that? Whom do I blame >> TG: That

was Jon Lajoie, who did a lot of the original music

in this film. He definitely got our sense of humor,

and he really helped us out with keeping the songs

catchy and really fun.

One of the things that stand out about the

two LEGO Movies is that you get to bring in so

many different characters from different franchises,

all mixed together with this Lisa Frank

aesthetic. >> MM: Not only do you get the DC

characters, you get Harry Potter. All the characters

from The Wizard of Oz make an appearance.

Bruce Willis.

TG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg. And it’s funny that

you say Lisa Frank. She was a huge inspiration

for me as a kid when I was becoming an artist. I

kept using her as an inspiration for this colorful,

glittery, eclectic world that we created.

Of all the different characters in this film,

both existing characters and the new ones,

who were you most excited about bringing to

life? >> TG: For me, the most exciting thing was

bringing the queen to life. She’s a shape-shifting

character who is constantly changing, so who

she is from scene to scene can get really confusing.

Tiffany [Haddish] has such a charming

energy to her, and the singing and dancing that

she did was so inspirational for our animation

54 MARCH 2019


team. She was my favorite to bring to life, just

because she was such a challenge. But the payoff

was really satisfying.

MM: They could only use the handful of

LEGO bricks that the queen is made out of. For

me, it was fascinating to see how many different

characters that they can turn that queen into with

the same handful of bricks.

How about you, Mike? >> MM: I would say

Sweet Mayhem [voiced by Stephanie Beatriz],

because she’s the coolest character of all time. She’s

this really sleek robot, and she’s got like a really

cool ship and clever weapons, like stickers she

could shoot.

You didn’t write the screenplay, but as a lot

of these smaller, supporting characters are

being created, do you have an idea of whom

you want to voice them? Were you thinking,

“Yeah, I really want Ben Schwartz to voice this

banana”? >> MM: For [parts in] this film, we

were thinking, who can voice it, and while they’re

voicing it, who can write in different gags?

TG: Ben came in to give us feedback on the

film. And instantly I was like, “This guy loves

bananas so much.” He’s amazing, and he’s got

such a fun, playful voice. I was just like, “He’s

got to voice Banarnar.” He really came in and

was Banarnar.

MM: Originally we had him come in to write

for us, to come up with jokes—

TG: But he gravitated towards bananas!

MM: He really just liked bananas.

I love how you have “The Mighty Boosh” costars

Richard Ayoade as Ice Cream Cone and

Noel Fielding as Balthazar the sparkly vampire.

>> MM: That was a fantasy of mine, because I

love “The Mighty Boosh.” It’s one of my favorite

shows of all time. And we really did design those

characters for them. There’s a little bit of a trick

there, when it’s people we want it to be, so we just

made it happen.

Mike, you have experience working with both

live action and animation. And obviously this

film has both live-action and animation components.

Can you talk about making the jump

from one to the other? >> MM: I like the combo

platter. I love live action, and I love animation.

TG: I love being able to do live action and

animation. I love that movies are blending the two

more and more. We really wanted there to be a

live-action component in this. Some of the LEGO

movies don’t have that live-action component, but

it was important to us to advance the storytelling

through seeing the little girl and little boy in the

live-action world.

MM: It’s all storytelling, however you tell that

story. Whether it’s animation or puppetry or live

action. As long as the story is strong. That’s all

there is to it.

Animation tends to get thought of as its own

genre, rather than a medium that you can use

to tell all sorts of different stories. >> MM:

These stories are expansive. They’re not just for kids.

They’re for everyone. I think that’s something that

everyone has been coming around to, to see that

animation is a really special form of filmmaking.

TG: I think this next dawn of animation is really

going to be exciting for us as filmmakers. It’s being

seen more as a medium, rather than as a genre.

There are so many things in animation that you

can’t accomplish through live action. Obviously,

“I’M BATMAN.”

Will Arnett again voices

LEGO Batman, who had

his own movie in 2017 that

grossed over $300 million

worldwide.

MARCH 2019

55


TOUGH AS NAILS

Elizabeth Banks (above)

returns as Master Builder

(and Batman’s former

flame) Lucy/Wyldstyle.

there are the LEGO

movies. But even

with something like

Spider-Man: Into the

Spider-Verse—if that

had been a live-action

movie, it wouldn’t

have looked nearly as

good. >> MM: You can

bring so much more

into animation than

you can in live action.

It really is a more

expansive medium.

And it looks so much better on the big screen.

>> MM: When Trish and I made this film, we

certainly didn’t design it to be watched on your

phone or on an iPad or even a TV. We’re putting

a lot of thought and care into how it’s going to

sound and look on the big screen. Most of our job

is sitting in a giant theater and seeing what the

movie is going to look like. So for us, it’s almost

a shame that people would not experience it in a

theater. I realize there are so many different ways

to watch movies. But that’s really why we got into

this business: We love going to the movies.

TG: Especially for this film, where we blast

off into space and it’s so massive and exciting and

epic, to see it on a big screen is really important.

MM: I keep calling the LEGO films the

Where’s Waldo? of filmmaking. There are so many

characters on the screen, and there are so many

layers, that it feels like you’re missing out if you’re

not seeing it on the big screen.

With animation, you have control over every

single pixel in the film. >> MM: And every color,

every texture. If you notice, every once in a while

we even put little thumbprints from the brother

and sister on the LEGO bricks. And that’s something

that you can really see on the big screen.

What was the first movie you remember seeing

in a theater? >> TG: Mine was Back to the Future.

MM: I’m going to go way back. This was the revival

of the film, and it has nothing to do with the

film we just made. Rear Window. I went crazy for

it. Thought it was the coolest thing in the world.

If any quote-unquote children’s movie were to

do a Rear Window homage, it would be a LEGO

movie. >> MM: I can’t wait to do that. “Really,

Hitchcock and Lisa Frank are the two people who

inspired us.”

So movie three, then? >> MM: LEGO Movie 3:

The Rear Windowing.

56 / BOXOFFICE ® / MARCH 2019


Speed Trap

KIM NGUYEN’S THE HUMMINGBIRD PROJECT

CHRONICLES A RACE TO CONQUER

THE STOCK MARKET

The Hummingbird Project is all about a race against time,

but it’s not an action thriller. Rather, writer-director

Kim Nguyen’s film delves into the very arcane world of

high-frequency trading, and a scheme by two cousins

to construct a fiber-optic line between Kansas and New

Jersey to shave milliseconds off stock transactions and

reap a fortune. The plan may seem wild, but it’s loosely

based on real events.

BY KEVIN LALLY

This was a 130-page script which

scared people a little bit because

it means 130 minutes, which

is a very long movie. But I told

them, yeah, but Jesse [Eisenberg]

speaks really fast.

>> Jesse Eisenberg and an unrecognizable Alexander Skarsgård

star as the second-generation Eastern European cousins,

with Salma Hayek as their ex-boss and ruthless competitor.

The Orchard release opens in New York and Los Angeles on

March 15, with a national expansion to follow.

Montreal native Nguyen became interested in the topic

after reading some newspaper articles and a book about the

impact of algorithms on our lives. “It’s amazing how little

FOLLOW THE MONEY

Salma Hayek plays the high-powered CEO of a high-frequency

trading company and the ex-boss of Jesse Eisenberg and an

bald-pated Alexander Skarsgård.

KIM NGUYEN PORTRAIT BY ULYSSE EL DRAGO

58 MARCH 2019


MARCH 2019

59


SCHEMING COUSINS

Jesse Eisenberg and Alexander Skarsgård play cousins who plan

to build a a fiber-optic cable from Kansas to New York to gain an

advantage on New York Stock Exchange transactions.

people know about high-frequency trading,” he

says. It represents almost 50 percent of trades that

are happening on the stock market today. What

this means is that there’s a lot of fictitious money

being created. It’s almost as if you have 100 pennies

off of the dollar, and while nobody’s looking

they’re taking 50 of those pennies. You have the beginning

and the end of that dollar, but you’re not

realizing that those 50 pennies are missing. A lot

of that is due to people inventing commissions in

between dimensions of space—the way I [describe]

it is as weird as it is. People are inventing different

spaces almost like in quantum physics, but in the

financial world.

“But how do you talk about that? When I

discovered that people were actually building

fiber-optic lines, straight lines for thousands of

miles to try to gain a couple of milliseconds off

the edge, I thought that was something that I

could convey that could be visual and compelling

in a cinematic narrative.”

Eisenberg plays Vincent Zaleski, an intensely

ambitious trader who’s placed his faith in his

I had a hunch about the kind of relationship

between Alex and Jesse from seeing their general

energy. But when I saw Alex hovering over Jesse

… I think that people who are much taller than

average kind of hunch their backs a little bit so

that they can look at people. So I immediately

had this Of Mice and Men metaphor.

60 MARCH 2019


illiant but nerdy and introverted cousin Anton

(Skarsgård) to write the algorithmic codes that will

break new speed records for stock transactions.

Meanwhile, their resentful former employer, Eva

Torres (Hayek), is furiously at work on her own

scheme involving microwave towers.

Nguyen’s script is a perfect fit for Eisenberg,

whose brainy, arrogant, and driven Vincent

could be a distant cousin to his Oscar-nominated

incarnation of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

“This was a 130-page script,” Nguyen notes,

“which scared people a little bit because it means

130 minutes, which is a very long movie. But I

told them, yeah, but Jesse speaks really fast. It’s so

weird the way Jesse handles lines: He speaks fast

but you understand every single word he says. I

was really impressed with how much preparation

Jesse goes through before going on a movie. He

actually learned the script as if it was a play—he

knows every single line from beginning to end

before we start day one of principal photography.”

While Eisenberg is very much in his element

here, Skarsgård, who gained fame as a dangerously

seductive vampire on HBO’s “True Blood,” makes

a startling transformation as Anton, a socially

inept, eccentric genius who’s likely somewhere on

the autism spectrum. The six-foot-four Swede, who

shaved his head for the movie and wears glasses,

somehow makes himself the most unprepossessing

figure in the room.

‘One thing I noticed about Alexander, and I

think a lot of actors have this,” Nguyen observes,

“is that their outgoingness is kind of a fabric of

their career and how they’ve made it. But there’s

a difference between who the person is and what

the exterior world made them to be. Alexander is a

person who appreciates his solitude and his peace.

He dove into that character, and in a way there are

parts of his character that relate to his desire not to

be disturbed and not to be part of a crowd. I think

there’s a genuine part of Alex that he relates to that

he put into Anton.

“The hair was something that he wanted to do

and was really excited about—but my distributors

were not,” Nguyen says with a laugh. “So the way

Alexander addressed the issue was he just came on

set, and the first thing he did was almost literally

run to the hairdresser and say: ‘Okay, shave it.

We’ll solve that issue, it’s done, and that’s the way I

want to do it, period.’ One thing that’s fun is when

your actors support your vision that way.”

Together, Eisenberg and Skarsgård make a

volatile, memorable pair. “I had a hunch about the

kind of relationship between Alex and Jesse from

seeing their general energy. But when I saw Alex

hovering over Jesse … I think that people who are

much taller than average kind of hunch their backs

a little bit so that they can look at people. So I

immediately had this Of Mice and Men metaphor.

Often when actors are smaller than their counterparts,

they ask: Could you shoot more close-ups?

Sometimes we even use what we call these apple

crate sidewalks where the actor can be a little

taller, But Jesse was totally open, and he actually

was excited about building that Of Mice and Men

relationship, which I thought was a fun little layer

we added to the film.”

As for the fearsome Eva Torres, “I had a number

of powerful actresses in mind, and Salma was

one of them. The way I try to do films, there’s a

script, and then I would be a fool not to welcome

the energy and the instincts of the actor. There’s

something very exciting and so instructive about

that first read. You work on a script for two or

three years, but then when you get those two

or three actors together and you go through the

script and you read the lines—in Salma’s case it

was just her and me—I almost all the time rewrite

and retouch the actors’ lines, maybe 30 percent of

the actors’ lines, after those reads. And it was very

much the case for Salma because, instead of trying

to change her accent or whatever, we decided to

embrace it. Her character is part of a family empire

of rich people who probably made their money

off cellphone lines when they were needed, and

OH, CANADA

Montreal’s Kim Nguyen on

the set of The Hummingbird

Project

MARCH 2019

61


she went to New York to invest in

the stock market. That’s basically her

backstory, but she really was a part of

that process of finding out who she

was. And we decided to welcome her

heritage for her character.”

The standoff between the Zaleski

cousins and Eva Torres leaves no one

unchanged. Nguyen says he hopes

his film also has an impact on the

audience. “It’s very generic but it’s

true, I think, that our entire sense of

happiness has been so aimed at being

successful, but in a monetary way. I

hope that this will bring some insight

that true happiness is somewhere else.

It’s fun to make money, but at the

end it’s not about that.”

Speaking of money, how did

Nguyen find the backing for a project

that defies easy descriptions? Surprisingly,

he notes, “the industry [in

Canada] was generally very supportive

of the premise of this film. And

once Jesse read the script and called

me 24 hours later, the ball got rolling

fairly quickly. It’s never easy, but it wasn’t one of those films

where I fought to finance it for like five or 10 years.”

“In Canada, we’re very, very lucky to have those sources. I do

find that sometimes that [financial] comfort doesn’t necessarily

help make better movies. I see people from Eastern countries,

and when they want to do a movie they’re hungry and want to

fight for it: I’m going to do this and I’d rather die than not do it

that way … I think that our comfort as Canadians sometimes is

not necessarily good for being creative to the maximum where

our heart would like to go.”

The Hummingbird Project is Nguyen’s seventh narrative feature

and his third in English. His big career breakthrough came in

2012 with War Witch, a harrowing drama about a young girl

in sub-Saharan Africa who is kidnapped and forced to become

a soldier. The success of that film and its Oscar nomination in

the foreign-language category “made a huge, huge, huge difference,”

he recalls. “I asked questions of people I respect who had

made a lot of successful movies, and I think that’s what made a

difference. I talked to a producer called Robert Lantos who did

a couple of movies with [David] Cronenberg, and he’s the one

who told me: Well, you have to go to an agency, Kim, and the

way you do it is you think about who are the best actors, the

ones you respect the most, and you go to their agency and ask

them to represent you. He helped connect me to bigger agencies—it

makes a big difference who represents you. He guided

WAR WITCH

Kim Nguyen’s 2012 film Rebelle (War Witch) was the third consecutive

Quebec film to be nominated for a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar

and won 10 Canadian Screen Awards trophies.

me through that, and joining CAA

combined with being nominated for

an Oscar really turned things around

and helped me dive into the English

market … It doesn’t happen naturally;

it doesn’t happen if you don’t work

at it.”

Nguyen takes pride in the current

international cachet enjoyed by

Quebec filmmakers like himself.

“Absolutely. I love Denis Villeneuve’s

work and Jean-Marc Vallée’s TV

series. I find that there’s so much

freedom, and all the while he follows

a cool narrative. He’s so much in

his zone for the last two series that

he’s done. And I love Xavier Dolan’s

work. There are a lot of filmmakers

that I respect.”

Nguyen hopes as many people

as possible get to see his new movie

on a big screen. “It’s still a privilege.

When we projected our film at

TIFF [Toronto International Film

Festival] in this huge old theater …

nothing compares to an old theater

with 1,500 seats and people who are focused and excited to go

see your film. There’s an energy that is conveyed that is amazing.

Roma is an amazing film this year, and I was sad to hear that it

was going to be shown only mostly on video, so I actually rushed

to see it twice on the big screen to get an imprint in my head, because

it was made for a huge screen. It’s not the same experience

on a small computer screen.

“I love those big screens,” he adds, “but recently in London

I went to one these smaller venues that are niche, higher-end,

with a great restaurant on the ground floor. I love that experience

too, where you buy your ticket with an assigned seat, red

velvet seating, and you almost feel like you’re going back to the

’20s. My generation, people in their 30s, get really excited about

those experiences coming back: having a great glass of wine, a

French-bistro kind of experience, then going to see a movie all in

the same building. I find that there’s a new avenue for that kind

of experience.”

Nguyen’s next likely project also sounds destined for the big

screen. “I’m not going to tell you my one-liner because I don’t

have it yet, but the working title is Hell Raft, and it’s probably

going to be based in the Indian Ocean.” The film will be in English,

and Nguyen is aiming high: “I know the actors I want for

it, but I can’t say who. There are a number of actors who would

be great for this, but they’re definitely among the 20 best, most

known actors in the world.”

62 MARCH 2019


BIG DATA

COURTESY OF NATIONAL CINEMEDIA

EVENT

CINEMA

NCM’S ASK THE AUDIENCE PANEL REVEALS TOP

MOVIEGOING TRENDS AROUND EVENT CINEMA

As event cinema continues to grow in the North American

market, Boxoffice tapped into NCM’s Ask the Audience

panel of moviegoers to discover the most popular trends

in alternative programming.

HOW WOULD YOU RATE YOUR OVERALL

EXPERIENCE AT THE EVENTS YOU HAVE ATTENDED?

THE MOST COMMON TYPES OF EVENT

CINEMA PROGRAMS ATTENDED ARE

CLASSIC FILMS, DOCUMENTARIES,

THEATRICAL PERFORMANCES, AND

CONCERTS.

How do you become aware of upcoming

special cinema events?

On screen at movie theaters 79 %

Email newsletters 40 %

Social media 32 %

Internet advertising 32 %

Lobby posters 30 %

Word of mouth/from friends 22 %

Lobby TV screens at movie theaters 21 %

VERY SATISFIED 68 %

SOMEWHAT SATISFIED 27 %

NEITHER 3 %

SOMEWHAT DISSATISFIED 1 %

VERY DISSATISFIED 1 %

TV commercials 16 %

Reviews/Media coverage 10 %

None/I was not previously aware 4 %

Other 3 %

What add-on items would you like to see

available at a cinema event? Choose the

top two items.

Concession packages like free

popcorn and sodas 47 %

Event-specific merchandise

(T-shirts, posters, or other items

promoting the event)

Discounts or coupons to future

related purchases (ex. use ticket

stub for 20% off)

33 %

33 %

The most popular events requested

all centered on movies (in order): movie

marathons, classic movies, film festivals,

and private screenings. Concerts

and theatrical performances were

the most popular nonmovie events.

Limited-edition collectibles or

souvenirs 28 %

DVD/Blu-ray copy of the event 23 %

Free playbill about the event 16 %

None 5 %

Other 2 %

64 MARCH 2019


HAVE YOU EVER ATTENDED A SPECIAL

EVENT IN A CINEMA?

HOW MANY OF THESE EVENTS HAVE

YOU ATTENDED IN THE PAST YEAR?

NONE 24 %

YES 55 %

ONE 29 %

TWO 21 %

NO 45 % THREE 10 %

FOUR 3 %

FIVE PLUS 12 %

WHAT KINDS OF SPECIAL EVENTS HAVE YOU EVER SEEN IN CINEMAS?

AGE GROUP

GENDER

18-34 35-54 55+ Male Female

PARTICIPANTS 249 57 128 64 126 123

Classic Film 56% 56% 58% 53% 61% 51%

Documentary 30% 19% 30% 41% 29% 31%

Theatrical Performance 28% 30% 25% 31% 20% 36%

Concert 26% 21% 20% 41% 25% 27%

Movie Marathon 23% 25% 24% 19% 25% 21%

Other Event 11% 12% 13% 6% 9% 13%

Sporting Event 10% 11% 7% 16% 18% 2%

Opera 8% 4% 5% 19% 7% 10%

Comedy Act 8% 14% 5% 8% 10% 7%

Ballet 6% 4% 7% 8% 2% 11%

All three age groups

and both genders

were equally likely

to have previously

attended a special

event at the cinema.

Moviegoers age 55

and over chose

opera significantly

more than those

ages 18–34 and

35–54.

Women chose

ballet and theatrical

performance significantly

more than

men.

Men chose sporting

events significantly

more than women.

High Satisfaction

for Event Cinema:

95% of panelists

were satisfied with

their experience

Men wanted the

following events

significantly more

than women: Anime,

director’s cuts /

interviews / behindthe-scenes

/ special

looks at a movie,

esports/gaming,

sporting events

Women wanted the

following events

significantly more

than men: ballet,

opera, theatrical

performances

Faith-based Event 6% 4% 6% 9% 9% 4%

Private Celebration/Party 6% 9% 5% 3% 6% 6%

Work Event/Meeting 2% 0% 3% 2% 2% 2%

MARCH 2019

65


BIG DATA

REASONS TO ATTEND CINEMA EVENTS

Nothing can beat the experience of being at a live event, including the communal atmosphere and buzz of a sold-out crowd. However,

sometimes the event may be too far away or you just might not want to deal with the hassles of attending the event. Rank (in order of

most to least) the top three reasons that would make watching an event at the cinema better than going to the event itself.

MORE AFFORDABLE

BETTER VIEW /SOUND

3

0

2

1

1

1

0

2

0

3

MORE COMFORTABLE SEATS/DON’T HAVE TO STAND

2

3

NO LARGE CROWDS/LONG LINES

0

1

2

3

ABLE TO ATTEND WITH MORE FRIENDS

0

1 2 3

0

DON’T HAVE TO DEAL WITH TRAVEL/PARKING/TRAFFIC

1 1 2 3

3

2

BETTER FOOD AND DRINK OPTIONS

0 0

1 2

3

NO WEATHER CONCERNS

BEST ADD-ON

ITEMS AT EVENT

CINEMA:

MEN choose the

following significantly

more than

women: DVD /

Blu-ray copy of the

event, limited-edition

collectibles or

souvenirs

WOMEN choose

the following

significantly more

than men: concession

packages like

free popcorn and

sodas, discounts or

coupons to future

related purchases

WHAT TYPES OF SPECIAL EVENTS WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE AT CINEMAS?

AGE GROUP

GENDER

18-34 35-54 55+ Male Female

PARTICIPANTS 447 99 232 116 225 222

Movie Marathons 62% 72% 64% 51% 64% 61%

Classic Movies 57% 55% 59% 57% 60% 55%

Film Festivals 49% 52% 49% 47% 48% 49%

Private Screening/Party 43% 47% 46% 34% 41% 45%

Concerts 40% 42% 38% 43% 41% 40%

Film Special Features 40% 47% 39% 35% 45% 35%

Theatrical Performance 36% 41% 35% 34% 29% 43%

Documentaries + Q&A 31% 33% 32% 27% 29% 33%

Stand-Up Comedy 28% 32% 27% 28% 26% 31%

Sporting Event 24% 35% 23% 16% 33% 15%

Award Show 18% 26% 17% 11% 18% 17%

Anime 17% 30% 18% 4% 21% 13%

Opera 11% 12% 10% 13% 8% 15%

Ballet 11% 14% 11% 9% 6% 17%

Faith-Based 11% 13% 11% 9% 12% 9%

eSports/Gaming 6% 15% 4% 0% 8% 4%

None 4% 2% 3% 5% 2% 5%

Other 2% 3% 2% 3% 3% 2%

66 MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

BY REBECCA PAHLE

DIGITAL

DELIVERY

DYNASTY

DCDC CELEBRATES FIVE YEARS

DCDC CEO RANDY BLOTKY

Blotky was appointed

CEO of the Digital Cinema

Distribution Coalition

in 2013 after serving as

DCDC’s principal consultant

since 2010.

>> The world moves fast,

but technology moves

faster. Five years may seem

like nothing, but for the

Digital Cinema Distribution

Coalition, or DCDC,

it’s enough time to bring

cinemas in the U.S. to the

next stage of distribution

technology.

“The idea for an

electronic delivery system for digital content arose

in about 2007 at Warner Bros.,” explains DCDC

CEO Randy Blotky. “There were a couple of executives

there who decided that it would be very silly

to have the whole industry converting to digital

projection and storage, yet still be delivering

hard drives to them.” Hard drive delivery

prices, at that time, were in the

$150–$250 range. That’s nowhere

close to the four-figure

print costs that had come

before, but still, there

had to be a cheaper,

more efficient way.

And so AMC, Regal,

Cinemark, Warner

Bros., and Universal

decided to figure it out.

The companies joined

forces to found DCDC,

with Blotky—uniquely

suited to the new venture due

to his background in the entertainment

industry, law, and physics—at

the helm. “It’s the first time in the history of the

industry that the people from those different backgrounds,

who are usually at war with one another,

got together and were actually able to agree on

[something]. And, even more importantly, to fund

it,” says Blotky. “They put their money where their

mouth was.”

Five years later, that shared effort has yielded

positive results for the film industry. Thirty-two

thousand screens, representing approximately 80

percent of the screens in the U.S., are served by

DCDC. These screens are able to receive movies,

event cinema content, in-theater advertising, and

more at a cost of less than a third of what it took to

deliver hard drives.

“We don’t charge the exhibitors anything for

putting our equipment in there,” says Blotky. “We

put our rack in their control booth. We install

the equipment. We pay for that. We maintain the

equipment. We pay for that.” The theaters pay

for two things: To fix damage they themselves

have caused, and the amount of those decreased

delivery costs, which, Blotky emphasizes, “are the

same whether you’re a Regal, one of the largest

exhibition chains in the world, or if you’re a small

theater in Idaho.”

Those costs won’t rise, either, which Blotky

admits caused some skepticism early on. “[People

would ask], ‘If you’re the only game in town, then

you’re going to be a monopoly, and you’ll raise

prices, right?’ I said, ‘No, absolutely not. We will

never raise prices.’ And we haven’t … I was a veteran

entertainment lawyer for a long time before

I went into the industry. If you tell people that

you’re not going to do something, and then you

go do it, they’re never going to trust you again.

And trust is the foremost thing in our mind.”

(If you’re wondering, “Wait, what’s the downside?”—Blotky

has heard that question before.

“There’s really no barrier to entry at all,” he argues.

“As I went around and had conversations with

content providers and exhibitors in the early days,

they would say, ‘It seems like a no-brainer. Are

there any reasons why I wouldn’t do this?’ And I

said, ‘Just fear. Fear of the unknown.’”)

One word comes up again and again as Blotky

discusses DCDC: “Collective.” He labels his

attitude as “a matter of personal philosophy …

All the profits, if there are profits, go back into

the business” to keep it running. The point isn’t to

make money, he says, but to improve the industry

as a whole.

Five years down the line, DCDC has managed

to do just that. One of the main goals set by the

company when it was founded was to pay back its

original investors, after which point its customers—almost

300 exhibition chains and over 50

content providers, including all the major studios—would

begin getting rebates “in proportion

to, essentially, how much revenue they’ve been

responsible for over the course of time.” This year,

Blotky predicts that it will finally be time for them

to begin cutting those rebate checks.

That’s not the only change that Blotky’s considering

as DCDC moves steadily toward the decade

68 MARCH 2019


mark. “We’ve had interest from international exhibition and content-providing

communities,” Blotky notes. As satellite technology improves,

the signal required to deliver content will be available from anywhere in

the world—and, with the tech angle ready to go, DCDC “will have the

lowest cost and the best history of being able to deliver different kinds of

content to different places.” In terms of expansion, they’ll start looking at

“Europe and Latin America, Australia, and probably Asia as well.”

Before they can get to that point, however, DCDC is prioritizing the

optimization of its service in the United States and, later, Canada. That

means, in part, getting to the 8,000 screens they have yet to serve, many

of which belong to smaller cinemas that play second-run films and are

thus not ideally suited to the satellite delivery model.

Of the screens that DCDC does serve, some of them still use the old

“send me a hard drive” model by necessity. These are the “satellite-challenged”

theaters, places where the signal required to deliver content can’t

reach. That doesn’t necessarily mean we’re talking about a remote location;

often, theaters in big cities are satellite challenged if they’re blocked

by a tall building. For those theaters, DCDC is working on delivering

files via terrestrial means, like fiber connections or underground cables.

The goal, Blotky explains, is to “become a fully hybridized network”—

one where each site is outfitted with more than one modality of delivery.

But satellites themselves are improving. Various companies and tech

moguls are experimenting with low-Earth-orbit satellites, whizzing past

at around 150 miles above the planet’s surface. These satellites, arranged

in configurations called constellations, “will basically blanket the Earth

within three to five years,” Blotky explains. At any place on Earth, with

the right antenna, a person—or a cinema—can pick up those signals.

That means an increase in the number of cinemas DCDC will be able

to reach.

What it also means is that there will be an increase in the types of content

DCDC will be able to deliver. Just one example—but an example

that speaks to the vast potential to be found in this kind of tech—is in

the area of esports.

Every year in Incheon, South Korea, fans crowd into a 50,000-seat

stadium to watch the world finals of “League of Legends,” a massively

popular video game with players around the globe. Companies like

Ymagis Group and MediaMation have begun investing in video games

as a communal, in-theater experience. The potential—not to mention

interest—is there for fans of esports to congregate and watch competitions

at movie theaters. Once satellite technology evolves, theaters half a world

away from each other will be able to communicate within milliseconds,

enabling exhibitors to take full advantage of this burgeoning niche.

That’s not here quite yet. But with the support of its founders behind it,

DCDC is here to stay. So the improvements will just keep coming, moving

at the speed not of light, but satellites. “It’s fascinating what it is that can

be done,” Blotky says. “We’d love to find ways to create the same kind of

partnerships that gave birth to DCDC elsewhere. It really was the combination

of exhibition and production that’s driven the success of it. My hat’s

off to these guys. They started early on and stuck with it. And it’s worked

out. The next five years are going to be really, really interesting.”

I was a veteran

entertainment lawyer

for a long time before I

went into the industry.

If you tell people that

you’re not going to do

something, and then

you go do it, they’re

never going to trust

you again. And trust is

the foremost thing in

our mind.

MARCH 2019

69


TIMECODE

BY KENNETH JAMES BACON

THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE

SHOWMANDIZER BUSINESS

PART 3 OF OUR 12-PART DEEP DIVE INTO THE BOXOFFICE ARCHIVES

EXCERPT FROM BOXOFFICE EDITOR MAURICE “RED” KANN’S

JUNE 27, 1942, ANNOUNCEMENT OF SHOWMANDIZER

“Large or small, the exhibitor who wants to get a load off his

chest has an open forum, fifty-time a year. He may praise, if he

likes. He may bellow, if he prefers that. He may report, upbeat or

downbeat, on how his shows go as a guide to fellow exhibitors

distantly removed from his own scene. The Exhibitor Has His Say

is precisely what its designation says it is.”

>> In the June 27, 1942, issue of Boxoffice, Editor-in-chief Maurice “Red”

Kann announced the creation of a new section called Showmandizer. Showmandizer

appeared each week for nearly 40 years. That 1942 issue, like the one

you are now holding, also featured a redesign. Here’s Red:

“We’re in somewhat new dress today. This page [his editorial], getting bolder,

reflects that intention in terms of a bolder type face. The headlines on news

pages are more stalwart than their predecessors. But that’s not the news which

really excites and, for the first time, persuades us to divert this page from the

usual editorial discussion to an account of what’s cooking on our own stove.

The news is an innovation in trade paper publishing in this field, taking its bow

today as the Boxoffice Showmandizer Section.”

Showmandizer—a sobriquet now well past its sell-by date—awarded citations

each week to theater operators with inventive and successful campaigns,

with each winner receiving 10 bucks.

Film reviews included ideas on how to promote films locally. These notions,

called Exploitips, with “selling angles” and “catchlines,” could be removed from

the magazine and saved in a special binder for future reference. Here are our

genius ideas for promoting 1949’s Mighty Joe Young: “Since there are many

nightclub scenes herein, work out tieups with local cocktail bars, which might

serve a “Joe Young” cocktail. Make over the lobby and theatre front in jungle

fashion and dress attendants either as African natives or as hunters. In the

lobby or in the window of a sporting goods store set up a display of high-powered

rifles such as are employed in big-game hunting expeditions. Organize a

“safari” for street ballyhoo, with “natives” toting dummy “crates” the sides of

which carry a picture and theatre billing.” Yikes! quickly comes to mind. But,

you know, 10 bucks is 10 bucks.

Turn to page 72 for a tiny taste of Showmandizer.

THE EXHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY

Jan. 12, 1957

Francis in the Haunted House: How much can you get for a dime? On the second

night of this I came home when the feature started, and Mildred closed up.

During the show, two little girls came to the lobby and Mildred proceeded to pull a tooth

for each of them, gave them salt water and a Kleenex. Dental care and all at the Linn

Theatre. Oh, yes, Francis is not drawing too well, but Mickey [Rooney] is as good as Donald

[O’Connor]. Believe folks are getting tired of the talking mule. The novelty is

wearing thin. Played Tues., Weds., Thurs. Weather: Fair

— Joe and Mildred Faith / Linn Theatre, Linn, MO / Pop. 758

70 MARCH 2019


From the August 14, 1943, edition of

Boxoffice’s Showmandizer

PEOPLE NAMED LUCKY INTERVIEWED

IN RADIO TIE-UP ON MR. LUCKY

Kansas City—Manager Lawrence Lehman

of the Orpheum effected a tie-up

with radio station KCKN’s “Lady Luck”

program in his campaign for Mr. Lucky.

Each day some person bearing the

name of Lucky was interviewed, chiefly

on lucky events in their lives. The half

hour program also was interspersed

with Musical selections having some

relation to the lucky theme.

The management daily urged listeners

to bring their lucky charms and tokens

for display in a lobby show case. A free

ticket was given daily to the owner of

the charm adjudged the most unusual.

PAGE 1 OF A JUNE 26, 1943, 4-PAGE CLASSIC AD FOR THE

CARY GRANT/ LARAINE DAY FILM MR. LUCKY

MARCH 2019

71


TIMECODE

>> In the June 20, 1960, issue of Boxoffice,

Columbia Pictures supplied a folded promotional

insert touting William Castle’s 13 Ghosts. When

unfurled, it measures 24" x 24" and is made up

of dozens of ads ready for placement in local

newspapers, promotional ideas, synopses, and

reproductions of various in-theater lobby cards

and posters that could be ordered from National

Screen Service. Above is the front panel of the

Showmandizer insert with an actual Ghost-viewer

attached—perhaps the last one in existence. Über

William Castle fan John Waters—who played Castle

in Ryan Murphy’s “Feud”—would love to get

his hands on this piece of movie history. 13 Ghosts

was remade in 2001 without a Ghost-viewer. What

was the point?

BOXOFFICE REVIEW: JUNE 27, 1960 / 13 GHOSTS There seems little doubt

that this new offering of producer-director William “Haunted” Castle is

bound to duplicate the success gained by his earlier “horror” gimmick pictures.

And perhaps, because Castle is tireless in his personal selling efforts,

this one will even surpass the others. The fact that few of the large preview

audience emerged without a happy smile is in itself a pretty good indication

of its general reception—and this among the frequently hard-boiled,

film-satiated Hollywood press. The story and screenplay, expertly fashioned

by Robb White, is filled with hokum. Coupled with the ever present Castle

“gimmick,” this time a device he calls “Illusion-o” that takes a handout gadget

he labels a “ghost viewer” to see, it provides a good deal of delightful

spoofing at the horror idea. … Photographed in black and white essentially,

it has momentary uses of color in the special scenes, though a description

of these would be unfair to patrons or theatremen who should waste no

time in seeing or booking it, respectively.

72 MARCH 2019


Alfred Hitchcock cooked up a Castle-like

gimmick in the same month as 13 Ghosts’

summer release with his low-budget blackand-white

Psycho. As seen is this clipping from

the September 19, 1960, edition of Showmandizer,

the gimmick was that no one would be

allowed to be seated once the film started.

THE EXHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY

Nov. 28, 1960

Without a doubt, this will be our

biggest grosser this year. I can’t see

anything coming up before the end of the

year that will top this. Held it over for a run of

eight days. Paramount has the plan that will

insure success with this picture. Follow it to

the letter and you will wonder where the people

have all come from. Just terrific

in every way.

—Jim Fraser / Auditorium Theatre

Red Wing, MN / Pop. 12,500

MARCH 2019

73


INVESTOR RELATIONS

BY ROB RINDERMAN

FINANCIAL NEWS ROUNDUP

ROB RINDERMAN

Rob Rinderman is an avid

follower and fan of the

cinema and exhibition

businesses. He has

assisted many public and

privately held companies

with communications and

business development

consulting services for over

two decades and written

as a freelance journalist

covering these industries

since 2015.

Dolby Laboratories Inc.

(DLB) reported its fiscal 2019

first quarter (three months ended

December 28, 2018) financial

results, including total revenue

of $302.4 million, a slight improvement versus the

$299.5 million the company generated in the yearago

fiscal Q1 three-month period.

Kevin Yeaman, president and CEO, Dolby

Laboratories, commented, “Our momentum for

Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos was on strong

display at CES (Consumer Electronics Show held

January 2019 in Las Vegas), and we opened our

first Dolby Cinema in the UK at the iconic Odeon

Leicester Square.”

Dolby’s GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting

Principles) net income was $98.2 million, or

$0.93 per diluted share, significantly better than

the GAAP net loss of $53.3 million, or $0.52 per

diluted share reported in the prior year fiscal Q1.

On a non-GAAP basis, fiscal Q1 net income was

$78.7 million, or $0.74 per diluted share, down

from non-GAAP net income of $95.4 million, or

$0.90 per diluted share, in the comparable 2018

fiscal period.

DLB announced payment of a cash dividend of

$0.19 per share of Class A and Class B common

stock, payable on February 21, 2019, to stockholders

of record as of the close of business on February

12, 2019.

The Marcus Corporation

(MCS), parent company of

Marcus Theatres, announced

completion of its acquisition

of the assets of Movie Tavern

from VSS-Southern Theatres, LLC.

The Movie Tavern purchase further expanded

Marcus’s theatrical footprint by 23 percent, increasing

its circuit by 208 screens and 22 locations.

The additional theaters are based in the states of

Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana,

New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia. Marcus

now owns or operates a total of 1,097 cinema

screens within 90 complexes in 17 states.

As previously disclosed, the acquisition

purchase price consisted of $30 million in cash

and the issuance of 2.45 million shares of MCS

common stock. The issued shares are subject to

certain resale restrictions by Southern Theatres.

At the time of the transaction’s closing, the aggregate

purchase price was valued at approximately

$139 million.

Commenting on the acquisition, Rolando B.

Rodriguez, chairman, president, and CEO of Marcus

Theatres, stated, “Movie Tavern is an attractive

addition to our existing circuit, and we are especially

pleased to expand our portfolio of in-theater

dining locations.”

Rodriguez said the company plans to brand

its new locations as “Movie Tavern by Marcus.”

Marcus is immediately introducing its popular $5

Movie Tuesdays to the 22 Movie Tavern locations.

The $5 promotion includes all-day admission each

and every Tuesday; patrons also receive a free complimentary-size

popcorn with a ticket purchase.

On the same day it completed the Movie Tavern

acquisition, MCS also announced its preliminary,

unaudited financial results for its fiscal fourth

quarter ended December 27, 2018.

For Q4, the company expects to report total revenues

of approximately $175 million, a 5.7 percent

year-over-year increase. Theater admissions revenue

growth is expected to be in-line with the industry,

after adjusting for the company’s new theaters.

MCS management is predicting net earnings

of between $7.8 million and $8.7 million and net

earnings per diluted common share of $0.27 to

$0.30. The company forecasts fiscal Q4 Adjusted

EBITDA of between $34.8 million and $36.0 million,

a 7 percent to 10.7 percent annual increase.

Marcus also recently announced the closing of

a registered public offering of 1,725,000 shares

of common stock held by Southern Margin Loan

SPV LLC. The public offering included the sale

of 225,000 MCS shares pursuant to the underwriter’s

exercise in full of its option to purchase

additional shares.

The company issued the shares to the selling

shareholder in connection with the closing of

Marcus Corp’s acquisition of Movie Tavern. Marcus

did not sell any shares in the offering nor did

it receive any proceeds from the aforementioned

share sale.

74 MARCH 2019


Lionsgate (LGF) reported fiscal Q3

2019 results (three months ended

December 31, 2019), which included

revenue of $933.2 million, compared to

top-line results of $1.14 billion in the

company’s fiscal Q3 2018. On a segmented

basis, the company’s motion picture

division disclosed revenue of $362.6

million. Segment profits decreased by

19.9 percent to $43.5 million, reflecting

underperformance of certain titles in

fiscal Q3 ’19, compared to the outperformance

of the movie Wonder, in the prior

year quarterly period.

Analyst Jim Goss of Barrington

Research weighed in on LGF’s financials:

“The segment faced difficult fiscal

Q3 comparisons in theatrical revenues

and some downstream revenue categories,

driving a significant revenue

dip, though overall revenue levels were

somewhat above

estimates. Profits in

the segment were

lower due to softer

revenues, though

strong cost control

provided an offset.

“The company

has remained focused

on a risk-mitigation

strategy

in its film slate,

reducing overall

exposure to any one film, while aiming

for smaller releases as a form of alternative

programming to major blockbusters.

Management also highlighted confidence

in its 2020 slate with a balanced slate of

content with strong early indications for

box office success including John Wick

Chapter 3 (above) and Hellboy in the first

fiscal quarter, positioning the studio well

for growth in fiscal 2020.”

KEANU REEVES IN THE UPCOMING JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 – PARABELLUM

Devasis “Dev” Ghose announced

his retirement from Reading International,

Inc. (RDI) as the company’s

executive vice president, chief financial

officer, and treasurer. Gilbert Avanes,

vice president, financial planning and

analysis, was appointed interim CFO

and treasurer. To ensure a seamless

transition, Ghose will serve for a year as

Reading’s ongoing advisor.

MARCH 2019

75


SOCIAL MEDIA

BY ALEX EDGHILL

Trailers 30 Sec. Ad Rate Viewership

2015

8 $4.50m 114.4m

2016

6 $5.00m 111.9m

2017

6 $5.00m 111.3m

2018

ASSESSING THE

VIRAL IMPACT OF

THIS YEAR’S BIG GAME

TRAILERS

Super Bowl Trailer Social Media Analysis 2019

CAPTAIN

MARVEL

Ad Meter 5.34

Tweets 26,007

New Facebook Likes 708

New Instagram Followers 9,933

AVENGERS:

ENDGAME

Ad Meter 5.34

Tweets 127,162

New Facebook Likes 3,867

New Instagram Followers 26,152

HOBBS &

SHAW

Ad Meter 5.15

Tweets 8,678

New Facebook Likes 4,611

New Instagram Followers 2,332

5 $5.00m 103.4m

2019

3 $5.25m 98.2m

>> Super Bowl LIII proved to be a defensive slog

where the ever-competitive New England Patriots

defeated the Los Angeles Rams 13–3. Low-scoring

games tend to draw less interest from average

viewers, resulting in an overall average viewership

of 98.2 million: the lowest in over a decade.

Alternatively, the average ad prices for the big game

hit a record high of $5.25 million for a 30-second

spot. This year, only three films showcased trailers

during the broadcast: two from Disney—Captain

Marvel and Avengers: Endgame—and Universal’s

Hobbs & Shaw.

As is our annual tradition, we assess the impact

of the trailers on each film’s respective social media

footprint across the major platforms: Twitter,

Facebook, and Instagram. We’ve also taken into account

USA Today’s Ad Meter results and compare

them to last year’s trailers.

Our overarching question: what value do Super

Bowl trailers provide studios? Let’s look at the

recent history of viewership, costs, and number of

trailers per year to try to get a better feel for the

value this big expenditure holds for those willing to

shell out for the costly 30-second spots:

It was no surprise that Avengers: Endgame was

the cream of the crop of this year’s trailers. Tied at

first place among the three trailers (32nd overall)

in the Ad Meter poll with a huge 127,162 tweets,

76 MARCH 2019


26,152 new Instagram followers, and just under

4,000 new Facebook likes, Endgame is universally

expected to be one of the highest-grossing films of

the year; its Super Bowl spot lived up to that expectation.

Comparatively, Avengers: Infinity War aired a

trailer in last year’s Super Bowl, where it had an Ad

Meter score of 5.28, just 13,809 tweets, and 3,645

new Facebook likes. That means Endgame was up

across the board from last year’s broadcast. This was

especially the case on Twitter, which is a great sign

for both its potential and the investment of $5.25

million on the ad. Considering that Infinity War set

the current opening-weekend domestic box office

record of $257 million, the sky appears to be the

limit here for Endgame. A $5 million investment is

a drop in the bucket for a film with the potential to

earn $2 billion worldwide.

Captain Marvel also had a very strong showing

from its Super Bowl spot. Its Ad Meter rating was

tied for first among other trailers (31st overall)

with 5.34. The trailer generated 26,007 tweets,

708 new Facebook likes, and 9,933 new Instagram

followers—a welcome sign for the film’s chances

despite the muted Facebook numbers.

Captain Marvel has big shoes to fill, occupying

the Black Panther release slot that gave us the

highest-grossing domestic film of 2018. Like Black

Panther, Captain Marvel is appealing to a typically

underserved demographic, bringing the first

female-driven narrative in the franchise’s run.

Universal’s Hobbs & Shaw enjoyed an Ad Meter

rating of 5.15, registered 8,678 tweets, 4,611

new Facebook likes, and 2,332 new Instagram

followers. It is the studio’s first attempt at spinning

off its highly popular Fast & Furious franchise. The

previous entry in the series, The Fate of the Furious,

also had a Super Bowl ad back in 2017. Fate scored

a 5.1 Ad Meter rating, 21,131 tweets, and 12,131

new Facebook likes. Each of the last three Fast &

Furious entries has opened to over $95 million and

made more than $225 million domestically, which

is no doubt what Universal is hoping for with

Hobbs & Shaw.

The value that Super Bowl spots bring to the

studios appears to be on the decline. Over the last

five years, the number of studios choosing to shell

out money for a trailer has dropped by more than

half. The average viewership has dropped from an

average of 114.4 million to 98.2 million over that

period, while ad cost has risen from $4.5 million

to $5.25 million. Despite the drop in value, the

social media impact speaks for itself: the chance

to capture one of the largest television audiences

of the year to drive conversation around a new

release. How many studios will continue to spend

that money, however, remains to be seen.

MARCH 2019

77


EVENT CINEMA CALENDAR

CINELIFE ENTERTAINMENT CinelifeEntertainment.com

SALVADOR DALI: IN SEARCH OF IMMORTALITY Sat, 2/2 - Tue, 3/12 Documentary

HUNTER x HUNTER: THE LAST MISSION Fri, 2/1 - Tue, 7/30 Anime

BIG SCREEN SHORTS Thurs, 3/14 Short Films

BON VOYAGE, CHARLIE BROWN Spring 2019 Kids & Family

RACE FOR YOUR LIFE, CHARLIE BROWN Spring 2019 Kids & Family

FATHOM EVENTS fathomevents.com 855-473-4612

THE MET: CARMEN Sat, 2/2, Wed, 2/6, and Sat 2/9 Arts & Entertainment

I WANT TO EAT YOUR PANCREAS Thurs, 2/7 and Sun, 2/10 Anime

DIRTY DANCING Sun, 2/10, Tue, 2/12, Wed, 2/13 Classics

TCM: MY FAIR LADY Sun, 2/17 and Wed, 2/20 Classics

GUNDAM NT Tue, 2/19 Anime

GONE WITH THE WIND 80TH ANNIVERSARY Thurs, 2/28, Sun, 3/3 Classics

THE MET: LA FILLE DU RÉGIMENT Sat, 3/2 and Wed, 3/6 Arts & Entertainment

BOLSHOI: THE SLEEPING BEAUTY Sun, 3/10 Arts & Entertainment

DOCTOR WHO: LOGOPOLIS Wed, 3/13 Classics

FATE/STAY NIGHT (HEAVEN'S FEEL) II. LOST BUTTERFLY Thurs, 3/14 Anime

PATTERNS OF EVIDENCE: THE MOSES CONTROVERSY Thurs, 3/14, Sat, 3/16, Tue, 3/19 Documentary, Inspirational

TCM: TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD Sun, 3/24 and Wed, 3/27 Classics

DIANA ROSS: HER LIFE, LOVE AND LEGACY Tue, 3/26 and Thurs, 3/28 Music

THE MET: DIE WALKÜRE Sat, 3/30, Wed, 4/3 Arts & Entertainment

BOLSHOI BALLET: THE GOLDEN AGE Sun, 4/7 Arts & Entertainment

SIGHT & SOUND® PRESENTS: NOAH Tue, 4/9, Thurs, 4/11, Sat, 4/13 Inspirational

TCM: BEN-HUR 60TH ANNIVERSARY Sun, 4/14 and Wed, 4/17 Classics

THE PILGRAM'S PROGRESS Thurs, 4/18 and Sat, 4/20 Kids and Family

TCM: TRUE GRIT 50TH ANNIVERSARY Sun, 5/5 and Wed, 5/8 Classics

THE MET: DIALOGUES DES CARMÉLITES Sat, 5/11 and Wed, 5/15 Arts & Entertainment

BOLSHOI: CARMEN SUITE/PETRUSHKA Sun, 5/19 Arts & Entertainment

TCM: STEEL MAGNOLIAS 30TH ANNIVERSARY Sun, 5/19, Tues, 5/21 and Wed, 5/22 Classics

TCM: FIELD OF DREAMS 30TH ANNIVERSARY Sun, 6/16 and Tue, 6/18 Classics

TCM: GLORY 30TH ANNIVERSARY Sun, 7/21 and Wed, 7/24 Classics

TCM: HELLO DOLLY! 50TH ANNIVERSARY Sun, 8/11 and Wed, 8/14 Classics

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE roh.org.uk/cinemas cinema@roh.org.uk

LA FORZA DEL DESTINO Tue, 4/2/19 Opera

FAUST Tue, 4/30/19 Opera

WITHIN THE GOLDEN HOUR / NEW SIDI LARBI CHERKAOUI / FLIGHT PATTERN Thurs, 5/16 Ballet

ROMEO AND JULIET Tue, 6/11/19 Ballet

78 MARCH 2019


THE FUTURE IS

VENTLESS

MEET US AT

CINEMACON

BOOTH 100F

products.com

1-800-348-2976

AUTOFRY.COM

MULTICHEF.COM


ON SCREEN

BY KEVIN LALLY

SAMUEL L. JACKSON

MAR 8 / DISNEY / WIDE

>> Oscar winner Brie Larson

enters the Marvel Universe in the

title role of Captain Marvel, a former

U.S. Air Force fighter pilot

who acquires superhuman powers

after her DNA is blended with

that of a Kree, an advanced alien

race. Captain Marvel, aka Carol

Danvers, becomes key to human

survival when Earth is caught in a

war between two alien races. Indie

directors Anna Boden and Ryan

Fleck (Mississippi Grind) make

their big-budget action debut

with this 1990s-set adventure.

CAST BRIE LARSON, JUDE LAW,

SAMUEL L. JACKSON, BEN

MENDELSOHN, LEE PACE, DJIMON

HOUNSOU, GEMMA CHAN,

MCKENNA GRACE RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME 128 min.

BRIE LARSON

80 MARCH 2019


MAR 8 / A24 / LIMITED

>> Paulina Garcia won the Berlin Film

Festival’s 2013 Best Actress prize as Gloria, a

middle-aged divorcée in Santiago, Chile, who

spends her nights at dance clubs and finds

romance with a divorced man saddled with

two needy grown daughters. Sebastián Lelio,

who took home last year’s foreign-language

Oscar for A Fantastic Woman, returns for

the nearly scene-for-scene English-language

remake, with Julianne Moore filling the

multilayered central role.

CAST JULIANNE MOORE, JOHN TURTURRO,

MICHAEL CERA, ALANNA UBACH, BRAD

GARRETT, RITA WILSON, JEANNE TRIPPLEHORN,

HOLLAND TAYLOR, BARBARA SUKOWA

RATING R RUNNING TIME 102 min.

JULIANNE MOORE

ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD,

JASON CLARKE, AND KEIRA KNIGHTLEY

MAR 15 / FOX SEARCHLIGHT / LIMITED

>> In post–WWII Hamburg, Germany, a woman joins her

husband, a British colonel placed in charge of rebuilding the

devastated city. But to her dismay, they’ll be living in a mansion

with its previous owner, a German widower and his volatile

daughter. Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse adapted the novel

by Rhidian Brook; James Kent (Testament of Youth) directed.

CAST KEIRA KNIGHTLEY, ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD, JASON CLARKE,

KATE PHILLIPS, FIONN O’SHEA RATING R RUNNING TIME TBA

MARCH 2019

81


ON SCREEN

JOHN GOODMAN

MAR 15 / FOCUS / WIDE

>> E.T., go home! This thriller is set in a Chicago neighborhood

nearly 10 years after it’s been occupied by an extraterrestrial

force, which has found a surprising number of allies among the

human occupants. Director Rupert Wyatt’s last big-screen species

battle was 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

CAST JOHN GOODMAN, VERA FARMIGA, ASHTON SANDERS, D.B.

SWEENEY, BEN DANIELS, JONATHAN MAJORS, KIKI LAYNE RATING

PG-13 RUNNING TIME TBA

JESSE EISENBERG AND

ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD

MAR 15 / THE ORCHARD / LIMITED

>> Jesse Eisenberg and Alexander Skarsgård star as

brilliant cousins who embark on a scheme to run

a 1,000-mile fiber-optic cable between Kansas and

New Jersey, with the goal of shaving milliseconds

off high-frequency stock trades and making a

fortune in the process. Salma Hayek is their former

boss and cutthroat rival. Quebec writer-director

Kim Nguyen earned an Oscar nomination for his

searing 2012 Congo drama War Witch.

CAST JESSE EISENBERG, ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD,

SALMA HAYEK, MICHAEL MANDO, SARAH

GOLDBERG, FRANK SCHORPION RATING R

RUNNING TIME 111 min.

82 MARCH 2019


HALEY LU RICHARDSON AND COLE SPROUSE

MAR 15 / LIONSGATE & CBS FILMS / WIDE

>> If you’ve worn out your copies of The Fault in Our Stars and

Everything, Everything, take heart: There’s a new tearjerker on the

way about an ailing teenage girl who finds romance. Five Feet

Apart stars Haley Lu Richardson (Support the Girls) as a cystic

fibrosis patient whose circumscribed routine is shaken up when

she meets an irresistible young man also fighting CF (Cole

Sprouse). Actor Justin Baldoni (Rafael on “Jane the Virgin”)

makes his feature directing debut.

CAST HALEY LU RICHARDSON, COLE SPROUSE, MOISES ARIAS,

PARMINDER NAGRA, CLAIRE FORLANI RATING PG-13 RUNNING

TIME TBA

MAR 15 / FOCUS / LIMITED

>> Not to be confused with the acclaimed

2015 French-Turkish drama Mustang, this

drama from director Laure de Clermont-

Tonnerre stars Matthias Schoenaerts (Red

Sparrow, A Bigger Splash) as a violence-prone

Nevada convict whose outdoor rehabilitation

program entails taming a wild mustang.

Metaphor alert!

CAST MATTHIAS SCHOENAERTS, BRUCE DERN,

JASON MITCHELL, CONNIE BRITTON, JOSH

STEWART RATING R RUNNING TIME 96 min.

MATTHIAS SCHOENAERTS

MARCH 2019

83


ON SCREEN

84 MARCH 2019


MAR 15 / PANTELION FILMS / MODERATE

>> This sequel to a 2016 Mexican comedy finds convict-turned-high

school teacher Zequi battling to win back his onetime fiancée, whose

sweetheart from her youth has transformed into a hunk and is coaching

the opposing team in a school tournament. Will Coach Zequi

and the team from Frida Kahlo High triumph? ¿Necesitas preguntar?

CAST OMAR CHAPARRO, MARTHA HIGAREDA, AARÓN DIAZ RATING

NOT RATED RUNNING TIME TBA

SPANISH EYES

Statistically, the USA’s Latino population boasts

some of the most avid moviegoers in the nation.

But the majority of the highest-grossing Spanishlanguage

films in the U.S. are more than a decade

old. On March 15, Lionsgate partner Pantelion

Films releases a rare sequel to a Spanishlanguage

USA box office hit, No Manches Frida

2. With such untapped potential from Hispanic

audiences, we’re rooting for another success. In

the meantime, here are America’s top Spanishlanguage

performers, including two Almodóvar

classics and a great one from Alfonso Cuarón.

2013’S INSTRUCTIONS NOT INCLUDED (NO SE ACEPTAN DEVOLUCIONES) STARRED EUGENIO

DERBEZ AS VALENTIN, ACAPULCO’S RESIDENT PLAYBOY, UNTIL A FORMER FLING LEAVES A

BABY ON HIS DOORSTEP.

Instructions Not Included 2013 $

44,467,206

Pan’s Labyrinth 2006 $

37,634,615

Like Water for Chocolate 1992 $

21,665,468

The Motorcycle Diaries 2004 $

16,781,387

Y tu mamá también 2000 $

13,839,658

Volver 2006 $

13,839,658

Under the Same Moon 2007 $

12,590,147

No Manches Frida 2016 $

11,528,613

Talk to Her 2002 $

9,285,469

Un gallo con muchos huevos 2015 $

9,022,202

MARCH 2019

85


ON SCREEN

MAR 15 / PARAMOUNT / WIDE

>> A little girl named June imagines a spectacular amusement

park where anything is possible, and is thrilled to find her dream

park come to life. But the place is in shambles and only she can

fix it. This is Nickelodeon Movies’ first production since Teenage

Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows in 2016.

CAST JENNIFER GARNER, BRIANNA DENSKI, MATTHEW BRODERICK,

JOHN OLIVER, MILA KUNIS, KENAN THOMPSON, KEN JEONG

RATING PG RUNNING TIME TBA

MAR 22 / BLEECKER STREET / LIMITED

>> One of the deadliest terrorist attacks in the history of India is

recreated in Hotel Mumbai, a thriller directed by Anthony Maras.

In November 2008, 10 Pakistani men laid siege to six Mumbai

locations, including the railway station, the Jewish community

center, and the Taj Mahal Palace and Tower Hotel. In all, 164

victims died. Hotel Mumbai focuses on several extraordinarily

brave individuals, including famed chef Hemant Oberoi.

CAST DEV PATEL, ARMIE HAMMER, NAZANIN BONIADI, ANUPAM

KHER, JASON ISAACS RATING NOT RATED RUNNING TIME 125 MIN.

MAR 15 / UNIVERSAL / WIDE

>> Writer-director Jordan Peele won the Original Screenplay

Oscar for his very original and provocative take on the horror

genre, Get Out. His follow-up promises an equally disturbing

and terrifying movie experience, as a couple and their two

children encounter creepy doppelgängers while vacationing at

the wife’s beachside childhood home.

CAST LUPITA NYONG’O, WINSTON DUKE, ELISABETH MOSS, TIM

HEIDECKER, YAHYA ABDUL-MATEEN II, ANNA DIOP RATING NOT

YET RATED RUNNING TIME 120 MIN.

86 MARCH 2019


LUPITA NYONG’O

MAR 22 / SONY PICTURES CLASSICS / LIMITED

>> This drama set in 1913 Budapest centers on a young

woman newly arrived in the Hungarian capital and hoping

to launch a career as a milliner at the famed hat store once

owned by her late parents. Her search for a lost brother

takes her deeper into a city in turmoil. Director and cowriter

László Nemes won an Oscar for the harrowing Son

of Saul.

CAST JULIE JAKAB, VLAD IVANOV, EVELIN DOBOS, MARCIN

CZARNIK RATING NOT RATED RUNNING TIME 142 MIN.

JULIE JAKAB

MARCH 2019

87


ON SCREEN

TAKUMI SAITO AND SEIKO MATSUDA

MAR 22 / STRAND / LIMITED

>> A young ramen chef journeys from Japan to Singapore to

uncover secrets from his family’s past. That’s using your noodle. Eric

Khoo directed.

CAST TSUYOSHI IHARA, SEIKO MATSUDA, JEANETTE AW RATING

NOT RATED RUNNING TIME 89 MIN.

MAR 29 / PURE FLIX / WIDE

>> Faith-based distributor Pure

Flix brings us this drama about

Abby Johnson, one of the youngest

Planned Parenthood directors in the

nation, who left the organization in

2009 and became an outspoken antiabortion

activist.

CAST ASHLEY BRATCHER, BROOKS

RYAN, ROBIA SCOTT RATING NOT

RATED RUNNING TIME 106 MIN.

88 MARCH 2019


MAR 29 / NEON / LIMITED

>> Iconoclastic filmmaker Harmony Korine

(Kids, Spring Breakers) finds his ideal leading

man in Matthew McConaughey, who plays a

free-spirited Miami stoner named Moondog.

Rated R for “pervasive drug and alcohol use,

language throughout, nudity and some strong

sexual content.” All that, and Snoop Dogg and

Jimmy Buffett!

CAST MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY, ISLA FISHER,

ZAC EFRON, JONAH HILL, SNOOP DOGG,

MARTIN LAWRENCE, JIMMY BUFFETT RATING R

RUNNING TIME 95 MIN.

MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY

MARCH 2019

89


ON SCREEN

REANIMATING

THE CLASSICS

N I SAW A PEANUT STAND / HEARD A RUBBER BAND / I SAW A NEEDLE THAT WINKED IT’S EYE / BUT I THINK I WILL HAVE SEEN EVERYTHING WHEN I SEE AN ELEPHANT FLY

The Disney legacy runs deep,

and this year the studio is

going all in on its strategy

of producing live-action

versions of its

animated classics, a

run that began with

Alice in Wonderland in

2010 and continued

with the blockbusters

Maleficent, Cinderella, The

Jungle Book, and Beauty

and the Beast. In 2019, Disney

is releasing no fewer than three

live-action or motion-capture remakes

of beloved cartoons, beginning with

Dumbo on March 29 and continuing with Aladdin on

May 24 and The Lion King on July 19.

HERE’S A LOOK AT THE DISNEY

ANIMATION-TO-LIVE-ACTION TRACK RECORD

(DOMESTIC GROSSES):

The Jungle Book 1994 $

43,229,904

101 Dalmatians 1996 $

136,189,294

102 Dalmatians 2000 $66,957,026

Alice in Wonderland 2010 $

334,191,110

The Sorcerer’s Apprentice 2010 $

63,150,991

Maleficent 2014 $

241,410,787

Cinderella 2015 $

201,151,353

The Jungle Book 2016 $

364,001,123

Alice Through the Looking Glass 2016 $

77,041,381

Beauty and the Beast 2017 $

504,014,165

Disney’s Christopher Robin 2018 $

99,215,042

MAR 29 / DISNEY / WIDE

>> One of Disney’s most beloved animated classics gets

the live-action (plus CGI) treatment under the direction of

the wildly imaginative Tim Burton. It’s the tale of a baby

elephant who’s ashamed of his massively oversized ears until

he discovers he’s able to fly. Things take a dark turn when a

scheming impresario enters the picture.

CAST COLIN FARRELL, MICHAEL KEATON, DANNY DEVITO, EVA

GREEN, FINLEY HOBBINS, NICO PARKER RATING PG RUNNING

TIME 130 MIN.

90 MARCH 2019


DANNY DEVITO

MARCH 2019

91


ON SCREEN

DAKOTA JOHNSON AND ARMIE HAMMER

MAR 29 / ANNAPURNA / LIMITED

>> Armie Hammer is a New Orleans bartender who becomes

immersed in an eerie mystery thanks to the disturbing text messages

on a cellphone someone left behind. Will audiences say LOL or

OMG? Babak Anvari wrote and directed this Sundance 2019 entry.

CAST ARMIE HAMMER, DAKOTA JOHNSON, ZAZIE BEETZ, KERRY

CAHILL, BRAD WILLIAM HENKE, KARL GLUSMAN RATING R

RUNNING TIME 94 MIN.

MAR 29 / GUNPOWDER & SKY / LIMITED

>> Elisabeth Moss stars as a ’90s punk-rock star whose

excessive drinking leads to the cancellation of a national

tour. The acclaimed new film by Alex Ross Perry (Listen

Up Philip) follows her efforts to get sober and put her

career back on track.

CAST ELISABETH MOSS, CARA DELEVINGNE, DAN

STEVENS, VIRGINIA MADSEN, AMBER HEARD, ERIC

STOLTZ, AGYNESS DEYN RATING NOT RATED RUNNING

TIME 134 MIN.

ELISABETH MOSS

TARAJI P. HENSON

APR 5 / STX ENTERTAINMENT / WIDE

>> Best of Enemies was the title of a 2015 documentary about

the legendary enmity between conservative pundit William F.

Buckley and liberal author Gore Vidal, but the real-life pair in

writer-director Robin Bissell’s film is even more at odds. Civil

rights activist Ann Atwater and local Ku Klux Klan leader C.P.

Ellis were forced to work together on a plan to desegregate schools

in Durham, North Carolina, in 1971—and, remarkably, became

lifelong friends once their task was accomplished.

CAST TARAJI P. HENSON, SAM ROCKWELL, BABOU CEESA, ANNE

HECHE, WES BENTLEY RATING PG-13 RUNNING TIME TBA

92 MARCH 2019


APR 5 / NEON / LIMITED

>> Sydney Pollack’s filmed

document of the legendary

1972 concert by Aretha Franklin

at Los Angeles’ New Temple

Baptist Missionary Church

was in legal limbo for over four

decades, but is now free to reveal

the Queen of Soul at the height

of her powers. The LP that

emerged from the two-night

event remains the best-selling

live gospel record of all time.

FEATURING ARETHA FRANKLIN,

REV. JAMES CLEVELAND RATING

NOT RATED RUNNING TIME 87

MIN.

ELLE FANNING

APR 5 / LD ENTERTAINMENT &

BLEECKER STREET LIMITED

>> Twenty-year-old movie veteran Elle Fanning plays a shy teenager

who enters a singing competition in this modern-day Cinderella story

written and directed by actor Max Minghella (The Social Network).

CAST ELLE FANNING, REBECCA HALL, ELIZABETH BERRINGTON,

MILLIE BRADY, ZLATKO BURIC, JORDAN STEPHENS RATING PG-13

RUNNING TIME 92 MIN.

MARCH 2019

93


ON SCREEN

APR 5 / PARAMOUNT / WIDE

>> Thirty years after its first big-screen

adaptation, this 1983 Stephen King novel

gets a fresh look under the direction of

Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer. Jason

Clarke plays the patriarch of a family that

moves from Boston to a house in rural

Maine near a mysterious and creepy burial

ground. Don’t be surprised to find evil

spirits with no patience for spelling errors.

CAST JASON CLARKE, AMY SEIMETZ, JOHN

LITHGOW, JETÉ LAURENCE, HUGO LAVOIE,

LUCAS LAVOIE RATING NOT YET RATED

RUNNING TIME TBA

JOHN LITHGOW AND JETÉ LAURENCE

APR 5 / AMAZON STUDIOS

LIMITED

>> Veteran director Mike Leigh (Mr.

Turner, Vera Drake, Secrets & Lies) returns

with this re-creation of one of the most

notorious episodes in British history—the

1819 Peterloo Massacre, when government

troops in Manchester charged into a group

of protestors, killing 15 and injuring

hundreds. Rory Kinnear (Skyfall) stars

as Henry Hunt, the orator and political

reformer at the center of the conflict.

CAST RORY KINNEAR, MAXINE PEAKE, NEIL

BELL, PHILIP JACKSON, VINCENT FRANKLIN,

KARL JOHNSON, TIM MCINNERNY RATING

PG-13 RUNNING TIME 154 MIN.

94 MARCH 2019


APR 5 / WARNER BROS. / WIDE

>> Thanks to his encounter with an

ancient wizard, a 14-year-old foster kid

is able to transform into an adult with

very cool superpowers. Unfortunately, his

amazing new talents attract the attention

of the evil Dr. Thaddeus Sivana. Fun fact:

This DC Comics icon was also known

as Captain Marvel until the brand lost a

trademark fight with Marvel Comics.

CAST ZACHARY LEVI, ASHER ANGEL, MARK

STRONG, DJIMON HOUNSOU, JACK DYLAN

GRAZER, GRACE FULTON RATING PG-13

RUNNING TIME TBA

ZACHARY LEVI

MARCH 2019

95


BOOKING GUIDE

COMPILED BY DIOGO BUSATO

BLEECKER STREET

HOTEL MUMBAI

Fri, 3/22/19 LTD

C Dev Patel, Armie Hammer

D Anthony Maras

R · Dra/Thr

DISNEY

818-560-1000

Ask for Distribution

CAPTAIN MARVEL

Fri, 3/8/19 WIDE

C Brie Larson,

Samuel L. Jackson

D Anna Boden,

Ryan Fleck

PG-13 · Act/Adv/SF · 3D/IMAX

AVIRON PICTURES

AFTER

APRIL 12, 2019

DUMBO

Fri, 3/29/19 WIDE

C Colin Farrell, Michael Keaton

D Tim Burton

PG · Fan/Fam · 3D

JOSEPHINE LANGFORD

A24

646-568-6015

CLIMAX

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD.

C Sofia Boutella

D Gaspar Noé

R · Hor/Dan

GLORIA BELL

Fri, 3/8/19 LTD.

C Florence Pugh, Jack Reynor

D Sebastián Lelio

R · Dra/Rom/Com

WOUNDS

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Sunny Suljic, Lucas Hedges

D Ari Aster

R · Hor

ABRAMORAMA

914-741-1818

BOLDEN

Fri, 5/3/19 LTD

C Gary Carr, Ian McShane

D Dan Pritzker

NR

WHERE’D YOU GO

BERNADETTE?

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Cate Blanchett, Billy Crudup

D Richard Linklater

PG-13 · Com/Dra

AVIRON PICTURES

AFTER

Fri, 4/12/19 LTD

C Josephine Langford,

Hero Fiennes Tiffin

D Jenny Gage

NR · Rom/Dra

PENGUINS

Wed, 4/17/19 WIDE

D Alastair Fothergill,

Jeff Wilson

G · Doc

AVENGERS: ENDGAME

Fri, 4/26/19 WIDE

C Robert Downey, Jr,

Chris Evans

D Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

NR · Act/Adv/Fan/SF

ALADDIN

Fri, 5/24/19 WIDE

C Will Smith, Mena Massoud

D Guy Ritchie

NR · Act/Adv/Com

HIGH LIFE

Fri, 4/12/19 LTD.

C Robert Pattinson,

Juliette Binoche

D Claire Denis

R · SF/Sus

UNDER THE SILVER LAKE

Fri, 5/17/19 LTD.

C Honor Swinton Byrne,

Tom Burke

D David Robert Mitchell

R · Thr/Cri

THE SOUVENIR

Fri, 4/19/19 LTD.

C Andrew Garfield,

Riley Keough

D Joanna Hogg

NR · Dra

ANNAPURNA PICTURES

310-724-5678

Ask for Distribution

WOUNDS

Fri, 3/29/19 WIDE

C Zazie Beetz,

Armie Hammer

D Babak Anvari

NR · Hor

MISSING LINK

Fri, 4/12/19 WIDE

C Zach Galifianakis,

Hugh Jackman

D Chris Butler

PG · Ani

THE INFORMER

Fri, 8/16/19 LTD

C Joel Kinnaman,

Rosamund Pike

D Andrea Di Stefano

NR · Cri/Dra

BLUE FOX

ENTERTAINMENT

William Gruenberg

william@bluefoxentertainment.com

SAINT JUDY

Fri, 3/1/19 NY/LA

C Michelle Monaghan,

Leem Lubany

D Sean Hanish

NR · Dra

TOY STORY 4

Fri, 6/21/19 WIDE

C Tom Hanks, Tim Allen

D Josh Cooley

NR · Ani · 3D/IMAX

THE LION KING

Fri, 7/19/19 WIDE

C Donald Glover, Beyoncé

D Jon Favreau

NR · Fan

ARTEMIS FOWL

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Ferdia Shaw, Josh Gad

D Kenneth Branagh

NR · Fan · 3D

96 MARCH 2019


JUNGLE CRUISE

Fri, 10/11/19 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson, Emily Blunt

D Jaume Collet-Serra

NR · Act/Adv

FROZEN 2

Wed, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Idina Menzel, Kristen Bell

D Jennifer Lee, Chris Buck

NR · Ani · 3D

STAR WARS: EPISODE IX

Fri, 12/20/19 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv/SF

3D/IMAX/Dolby Dig

UNTITLED DISNEY LIVE

ACTION

Fri, 2/14/20 WIDE

NR

ONWARD

Fri, 3/6/20 WIDE

C Chris Pratt, Tom Holland

D Dan Scanlon

NR · Ani · 3D

DISNEY

MULAN

MARCH 27, 2020

LIU YIFEI

MULAN

Fri, 3/27/20 WIDE

NR · Fan/Act/Adv

3D/IMAX

UNTITLED MARVEL FILM

Fri, 5/1/20 WIDE

NR · 3D

MALEFICENT 2

Fri, 5/29/20 WIDE

NR · Fan

ENTERTAINMENT

STUDIOS MOTION

PICTURES

310-277-3500

Ask for Distribution

47 METERS DOWN:

UNCAGED

Fri, 6/28/19 WIDE

C John Corbett, Nia Long

D Johannes Roberts

NR · Hor/Thr

ARCTIC DOGS

Fri, 11/1/19 WIDE

C Jeremy Renner, James Franco

D Aaron Woodley

PG · Ani

FOCUS FEATURES

424-214-6360

GRETA

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD

C Chloë Grace Moretz,

Isabelle Huppert

D Neil Jordan

NR · Dra

THE MUSTANG

Fri, 3/15/19 LTD

C Matthias Schoenaerts,

Bruce Dern

D Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre

NR · Dra

CAPTIVE STATE

Wed, 3/15/19 WIDE

C John Goodman,

Ashton Sanders

D Rupert Wyatt

PG-13 · SF

DOWNTON ABBEY

Fri, 9/20/19 WIDE

C Hugh Bonneville,

Laura Carmichael

D Michael Engler

NR · Dra

FOX

310-369-1000 / 212-556-2400

BREAKTHROUGH

Fri, 4/17/19 WIDE

C Chrissy Metz, Josh Lucas

D Roxann Dawson

NR · Dra/Bio

AD ASTRA

Fri, 5/24/19 WIDE

C Brad Pitt

D James Gray

NR · SF/Thr

X-MEN: DARK PHOENIX

Fri, 6/7/19 WIDE

C Sophie Turner,

Jennifer Lawrence

D Simon Kinberg

NR · Act/Adv/SF

UNTITLED JAMES MANGOLD

Fri, 6/28/19 WIDE

C Matt Damon, Christian Bale

D James Mangold

NR · Dra

STUBER

Fri, 7/12/19 WIDE

C Dave Bautista,

Kumail Nanjiani

NR · Act/Com

THE NEW MUTANTS

Fri, 8/2/19 WIDE

C Anya Taylor-Joy,

Maisie Williams

D Josh Boone

NR · Act/Hor/SF

SPIES IN DISGUISE

Fri, 9/13/19 WIDE

C Will Smith, Tom Holland

D Nick Bruno & Troy Quane

NR · Ani

THE ART OF RACING IN THE

RAIN

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

NR

THE WOMAN IN THE

WINDOW

Fri, 10/4/19 WIDE

C Amy Adams

D Joe Wright

NR · Cri/Dra/Mys

UNTITLED KINGSMAN

MOVIE

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

D Matthew Vaughn

NR · Act/Adv

THE CALL OF THE WILD

Wed, 12/25/19 WIDE

NR · Dra

MARCH 2019

97


BOOKING GUIDE

OUT OF BLUE

Fri, 3/15/19 LTD

C Patricia Clarkson, Toby Jones

D Carol Morely

NR · Thr

DIANE

Fri, 3/29/19 LTD

C Mary Kay Place, Jake Lacy

D Kent Jones

NR · Dra

THE WIND

Fri, 4/5/19 LTD

C Caitlin Gerard,

Julia Goldani Telles

D Emma Tammi

NR · Dra/Wes

IFC FILMS

OUT OF BLUE

MARCH 15, 2019

PATRICIA CLARKSON

NIMONA

Fri, 2/14/20 WIDE

D Patrick Osborne

NR · Ani

GAMBIT

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

C Channing Tatum

NR · Act/Adv/SF

FOX SEARCHLIGHT

212-556-2400

THE AFTERMATH

Fri, 3/15/19 WIDE

C Keira Knightley,

Alexander Skarsgård

D James Kent

R · Dra/War

TOLKIEN

Fri, 5/10/19 LTD

C Nicholas Hoult, Lily Collins

D Dome Karukoski

PG-13 · Dra/Bio

FREESTYLE RELEASING

310-277-3500

Ask for Distribution

SHARKWATER EXTINCTION

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD

D Rob Stewart

NR · Doc

GOOD DEED

ENTERTAINMENT

LOVING VINCENT:

THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM

Fri, 3/8/19 LTD

C Dorota Bobjela,

Hugh Welchman

D Miki Wecel

NR · Doc

STORM BOY

Fri, 4/5/19 LTD

NR

BREAKING HABITS

Fri, 4/19/19 LTD

NR

TELL IT TO THE BEES

Fri, 5/3/19 LTD

NR

NIGHTMARE CINEMA

Fri, 6/7/19 LTD

NR

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

Fri, 6/28/19 LTD

NR

GUNPOWDER & SKY

kg@gunpowdersky.com

LORDS OF CHAOS

Fri, 4/8/19 LTD

C Rory Culkin, Emory Cohen

D Jonas Åkerlund

NR · Thr

HER SMELL

Fri, 4/12/19 LTD

C Elisabeth Moss,

Cara Delevingne

D Alex Ross Perry

R · Dra/Mus

KINO LORBER

BABYLON

Fri, 3/8/19 LTD

Franco Rosso

NR · Doc

IFC FILMS

bookings@ifcfilms.com

THE WEDDING GUEST

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD

C Dev Patel, Radhika Apte

D Michael Winterbottom

R · Thr

RED JOAN

Fri, 4/12/19 LTD

C Judi Dench, Sophie Cookson

D Trevor Nunn

NR · Dra/Thr

I TRAPPED THE DEVIL

Fri, 4/26/19 LTD

C AJ Bowen, Jocelin Donahue

D Josh Lobo

NR · Hor

NON-FICTION

Fri, 5/3/19 LTD

C Juliette Binoche,

Guillaume Canet

D Olivier Assayas

NR · Dra/Com

CHARLIE SAYS

Fri, 5/10/19 LTD

C Suki Waterhouse,

Hannah Murray

D Mary Harron

R · Dra

JANUS FILMS

THE EYES OF ORSON WELLES

Fri, 3/15/19 NY

D Mark Cousins

NR · Doc

LD ENTERTAINMENT

FAST COLOR

Fri, 3/29/19 LTD

C Gugu Mbatha-Raw,

David Strathairn

D Julia Hart

PG-13 · SF/Thr

TEEN SPIRIT

Fri, 4/5/19 LTD

C Elle Fanning, Rebecca Hall

D Max Minghella

PG-13 · Dra/Mus

98 MARCH 2019


LIONSGATE

310-309-8400

TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA

FAMILY FUNERAL

Fri, 3/1/19 WIDE

C Tyler Perry, Cassi Davis

D Tyler Perry

PG-13 · Com

THE KID

Fri, 3/8/19 MOD

C Ethan Hawke, Dane DeHaan

D Vincent D’Onofrio

R · Act/Dra/Wes

NO MANCHES FRIDA 2

Fri, 3/15/19 WIDE

C Martha Higareda,

Omar Chaparro

D Nacho G. Velilla

NR · Com

FIVE FEET APART

Fri, 3/15/19 WIDE

C Haley Lu Richardson,

Cole Sprouse

D Justin Baldoni

PG-13 · Dra/Rom

HELLBOY

Fri, 4/12/19 WIDE

C David Harbour, Milla Jovovich

D Neil Marshall

NR · Act · IMAX

LONG SHOT

Fri, 5/3/19 WIDE

C Seth Rogen, Charlize Theron

D Jonathan Levine

NR · Com

JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 –

PARABELLUM

Fri, 5/17/19 WIDE

C Keanu Reeves, Halle Berry

D Chad Stahelski

NR · Act

SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN

THE DARK

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Zoe Colletti, Michael Garza

D André Øvredal

NR · Hor/Sus

MY BOYFRIEND’S MEDS (LAS

PASTILLAS DE MI NOVIO)

Fri, 8/30/19 WIDE

C Jaime Camil,

Sandra Echeverría

D Diego Kaplan

NR · Com

LIONSGATE

LONG SHOT

MAY 3, 2019

CHARLIZE THERON AND SETH ROGEN

MIDWAY

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C Woody Harrelson,

Patrick Wilson

D Roland Emmerich

NR · Act/Dra/War

KNIVES OUT

Fri, 11/27/19 WIDE

C Daniel Craig, Chris Evans

D Rian Johnson

NR · Dra/Sus

RUN

Fri, 1/24/20 WIDE

C Sarah Paulson, Kiera Allen

D Aneesh Chaganty

NR · Sus

I STILL BELIEVE

Fri, 3/20/20 WIDE

C Jon Erwin, Andrew Erwin

NR · Dra

MAGNOLIA PICTURES

212-379-9704

Neal Block

nblock@magpictures.com

WOMAN AT WAR

Fri, 3/1/19 WIDE

C Halldóra Geirharðsdóttir,

Jóhann Sigurðarson

D Benedikt Erlingsson

NR · Act/Thr

DOGMAN

Fri, 4/12/19 LTD.

C Marcello Fonte,

Edoardo Pesce

D Matteo Garrone

NR · Cri/Thr/Dra

MGM

310-724-5678

Ask for Distribution

THE HUSTLE

Fri, 5/10/19 LTD.

C Anne Hathaway,

Rebel Wilson

D Chris Addison

NR · Com

THE ADDAMS FAMILY

Fri, 10/18/19 WIDE

C Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron

D Conrad Vernon

NR · Ani

UNTITLED JAMES BOND 25

Fri, 4/8/20 WIDE

C Daniel Craig

D Cary Joji Fukunaga

NR · Act/Thr

LEGALLY BLONDE 3

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

C Reese Witherspoon

NR · Com

MYCINEMA

480-430-7017

K9 WORLD CUP

Thu, 3/21/19 LTD

NR · Ani

WILD FAITH

Sat, 3/23/19 LTD

NR · Wes

WILLA, INTERARIO DE UNA

PASIÓN

Fri, 4/19/19 LTD

NR · Bio/His

THE CHRIST SLAYER

NR · Dra/Rel

NEON

hal@neonrated.com

APOLLO 11

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD.

D Todd Miller

G · Doc · IMAX

THE BEACH BUM

Fri, 3/29/19 LTD.

C Matthew McConaughey,

Snoop Dogg

D Harmony Korine

NR · Com

MARCH 2019

99


BOOKING GUIDE

DORA THE EXLPORER

Fri, 8/2/19 WIDE

C Isabela Moner,

Eugenio Derbez

D James Bobin

NR · Adv

CRAWL

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

NR · Hor

ARE YOU AFRAID OF THE

DARK?

Fri, 10/4/19 WIDE

NR · Hor

GEMINI MAN

Fri, 10/11/19 WIDE

C Will Smith,

Mary Elizabeth Winstead

D Ang Lee

NR · Act/Thr

SONY

BRIGHTBURN

MAY 24, 2019

ELIZABETH BANKS

AMAZING GRACE

Fri, 4/5/19 LTD.

C Aretha Franklin,

James Cleveland

NR · Doc

LITTLE WOODS

Fri, 4/19/19 LTD.

C Lily James, Tessa Thompson

D Nia DaCosta

R · Dra

THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM

Fri, 5/10/19 LTD.

C John Chester, Molly Chester

D John Chester

PG · Doc

WILD ROSE

Fri, 5/10/19 LTD.

C Julie Walters, Jessie Buckley

D Tom Harper

NR · Dra/Com/Mus

THE ORCHARD

Richard Matson

323-540-5476 rmatson@

theorchard.com

THE HUMMINGBIRD

PROJECT

Fri, 3/15/19 LTD.

C Jesse Eisenberg,

Alexander Skarsgård

D Kim Nguyen

R · Dra

MEETING GORBACHEV

Fri, 5/3/19 LTD.

D Werner Herzog, Andre Singer

NR · Doc

THEM THAT FOLLOW

Fri, 6/21/19 LTD.

C Olivia Colman, Kaitlyn Dever

D Britt Poulton,

Dan Madison Savage

NR · Thr

ORION PICTURES

CHILD’S PLAY

Fri, 6/7/19 WIDE

C Aubrey Plaza,

Brian Tyree Henry

D Lars Klevberg

R

BAD TRIP

Fri, 10/25/19 WIDE

C Eric Andre, Lil Rel Howery

NR · Com

OSCILLOSCOPE

LABORATORIES

212-219-4029

THE HOURS AND TIMES

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD

C David Angus, Ian Hart

D Christopher Munch

NR · Dra/Mus

COMBAT OBSCURA

Fri, 3/15/19 LTD.

D Miles Lagoze

NR · Doc

PARAMOUNT

323-956-5000

WONDER PARK

Fri, 3/15/19 WIDE

C Mila Junis, Jennifer Garner

D Dylan Brown

PG · Ani/Adv/Com

PET SEMATARY

Fri, 4/5/19 WIDE

C Jason Clarke, Amy Seimetz

D Kevin Kölsch and Dennis

Widmyer

NR · Hor

ROCKETMAN

Fri, 5/31/19 WIDE

C Taron Egerton, Jamie Bell

D Dexter Fletcher

NR · Bio/Dra

LIMITED PARTNERS

Fri, 6/28/19 WIDE

C Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne

NR · Com

TERMINATOR: DARK FATE

Fri, 11/1/19 WIDE

C Arnold Schwarzenegger,

Linda Hamilton

D Tim Miller

NR · Act/SF

SONIC THE HEDGEHOG

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C James Marsden, Ben

Schwartz

D Jeff Fowler

NR · Ani/Adv/Com

RHYTHM SECTION

Fri, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Blake Lively

D Reed Morano

NR · Thr

THE LOVEBIRDS

Fri, 3/6/20 WIDE

NR · Rom/Com

PLAYING WITH FIRE

Fri, 3/20/20 WIDE

NR · Com

GI JOE

Fri, 3/27/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv

UNTITLED A QUIET PLACE

SEQUEL

Fri, 5/15/20 WIDE

NR

100 MARCH 2019


ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

323.882.8490

JUDY

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

C Renee Zellweger

D Rupert Goold

NR · Bio

SONY

212-833-8500

THE INTRUDER

Fri, 4/26/19 WIDE

C Dennis Quaid Meaghan Good

D Deon Taylor

PG-13 · Thr

THE ROSIE PROJECT

Fri, 5/10/19 WIDE

NR · Rom/Com

BRIGHTBURN

Fri, 5/24/19 WIDE

C Elizabeth Banks,

David Denman

D David Yarovesky

NR · Hor

MEN IN BLACK:

INTERNATIONAL

Fri, 6/14/19 WIDE

C Chris Hemsworth,

Tessa Thompson

D F. Gary Gray

NR · SF/Act/Com

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM

HOME

Fri, 7/5/19 WIDE

C Tom Holland, Michael Keaton

D Jon Watts

NR · Act/Adv/SF/Com

ONCE UPON A TIME IN

HOLLYWOOD

Fri, 7/26/19 WIDE

C Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt

D Quentin Tarantino

NR · Dra

ANGRY BIRDS 2

Fri, 8/16/19 WIDE

NR · Ani

OVERCOMER

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

NR · Dra/Rel

BLACK AND BLUE

Fri, 9/20/19 WIDE

C Naomie Harris

D Deon Taylor

NR · Act

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

ALL IS TRUE

MAY 10, 2019

KENNETH BRANAGH

ZOMBIELAND 2

Fri, 10/11/19 WIDE

C Emma Stone,

Woody Harrelson

D Ruben Fleischer

NR · Act/Hor/Com

CHARLIE’S ANGELS

Fri, 11/1/19 WIDE

C Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott

D Elizabeth Banks

NR · Act/Com

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE

NEIGHBORHOOD

Fri, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Marielle Heller

NR · Dra

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE

JUNGLE SEQUEL

Fri, 12/13/19 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson

NR · Com/Act/Adv

MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE

Fri, 12/18/19 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv/Fan

LITTLE WOMEN

Fri, 12/25/19 WIDE

Greta Gerwig

NR · Dra

GRUDGE

Fri, 1/3/20 WIDE

D Nicolas Pesce

NR · Hor

MILLER/LORD PRODUCED

SPA MOVIE

Fri, 1/10/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

BAD BOYS FOR LIFE

Fri, 1/17/20 WIDE

NR · Act

PETER RABBIT 2

Fri, 2/7/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

BLOODSHOT

Fri, 2/21/20 WIDE

NR · Act

UNTITLED SPA ANIMATED

FRANCHISE

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

GREYHOUND

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Aaron Schneider

NR · Dra/War

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Tom Prassis

212-833-4981

SUNSET

Fri, 3/22/19 LTD

C Juli Jakab, Vlad Ivanov

D László Nemes

NR · Dra

THE WHITE CROW

Fri, 4/26/19 LTD

C Oleg Ivenko,

Adèle Exarchopoulos

D Ralph Fiennes

NR · R

ALL IS TRUE

Fri, 5/10/19 LTD

C Kenneth Branagh,

Judi Dench

D Kenneth Branagh

PG-13 · Dra

FALL OF THE AMERICAN

EMPIRE

Fri, 5/31/19 LTD

C Alexandre Landry,

Maripier Morin

D Denys Arcand

R · Dra

MARCH 2019

101


BOOKING GUIDE

THE HUNT

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

D Craig Zobel

NR · Act/Thr

UNTITLED BLUMHOUSE

PRODUCTIONS

Fri, 10/18/19 WIDE

NR · Hor

WILL PACKER COMEDY

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

NR · Com

LAST CHRISTMAS

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

C Emilia Clarke, Henry Golding

D Paul Feig

NR · Rom/Com

UNIVERSAL

YESTERDAY

JUNE 28, 2019

HIMESH PATEL AND LILY JAMES

QUEEN & SLIM

Fri, 11/27/19 WIDE

NR · Dra/Rom

UNTITLED BLUMHOUSE

PRODUCTIONS

Fri, 12/13/19 WIDE

NR · Hor

MAIDEN

Fri, 6/28/19 LTD

D Alex Holmes

NR · Doc

STX ENTERTAINMENT

310-742-2300

THE BEST OF ENEMIES

Fri, 4/5/19 WIDE

C Taraji P. Henson,

Sam Rockwell

D Robin Bissell

NR · Dra

UGLYDOLLS

Fri, 5/3/19 WIDE

C Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas

D Kelly Asbury

NR · Ani

POMS

Fri, 5/10/19 WIDE

C Diane Keaton, Pam Grier

D Zara Hayes

NR

17 BRIDGES

Fri, 7/12/19 WIDE

C Chadwick Boseman

D Brian Kirk

NR · Cri/Thr/Act

UNCORK’D

ENTERTAINMENT

THE CANNIBAL CLUB

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD

D Guto Parente

NR · Com/Hor

UNIVERSAL

818-777-1000

US

Fri, 3/22/19 WIDE

C Lupita Nyong’o,

Winston Duke

D Jordan Peele

R · Thr

LITTLE

Fri, 4/12/19 WIDE

C Regina Hall, Issa Rae

D Tina Gordon

PG-13 · Com

A DOG’S JOURNEY

Fri, 5/17/19 WIDE

C Josh Gad, Dennis Quaid

D Gail Mancuso

NR · Fam

MA

Fri, 5/31/19 WIDE

C Octavia Spencer,

Diana Silvers

D Tate Taylor

NR · Hor

THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2

Fri, 6/7/19 WIDE

C Lake Bell, Hannibal Buress

D Chris Renaud

NR · Ani · 3D

YESTERDAY

Fri, 6/28/19 WIDE

C Lily James, Himesh Patel

D Danny Boyle

PG-13 · Com/Mus

FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS:

HOBBS & SHAW

Fri, 8/2/19 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson,

Jason Statham

D David Leitch

NR · Act/Adv

GOOD BOYS

Fri, 8/16/19 WIDE

C Jacob Tremblay

D Lee Eisenberg & Gene

Stupnitsky

NR · Com

ABOMINABLE

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

C Chloe Bennet

D Jill Culton

NR · Ani

CATS

Fri, 12/20/19 WIDE

D Tom Hooper

NR · Mus

1917

Fri, 12/25/19 WIDE

C George McKay,

Dean-Charles Chapman

D Sam Mendes

NR · Dra/War

UNTITLED BLUMHOUSE

PRODUCTIONS

Fri, 1/3/20 WIDE

NR · Hor

THE VOYAGE OF DOCTOR

DOLITTLE

Fri, 1/17/20 WIDE

C Robert Downy, Jr.,

Ralph Fiennes

D Stephen Gaghan

NR · Com

UNTITLED WILL PACKER

ROMANCE

Fri, 2/14/20 WIDE

NR · Rom

UNTITLED BLUMHOUSE

PRODUCTIONS

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

NR · Hor

102 MARCH 2019


FAST & FURIOUS 9

Fri, 5/22/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv

TROLLS WORLD TOUR

Fri, 4/17/20 WIDE

C Anna Kendrick,

Justin Timberlake

D Walt Dohrn

NR · Ani

WILL PACKER COMEDY

Fri, 5/15/20 WIDE

NR · Com

VERTICAL

ENTERTAINMENT

GIANT LITTLE ONES

Fri, 3/1/19 LTD

C Darren Mann, Josh Wiggins

D Keith Behrman

NR · Dra

DRUNK PARENTS

Fri, 4/19/19 LTD

C Alec Baldwin, Salma Hayek

D Fred Wolf

R · Com

WARNER BROS.

818-977-1850

SHAZAM!

Fri, 4/5/19 WIDE

C Zachary Levi, Asher Angel

D David F. Sandberg

PG-13 ·Act/Adv/Fan

IMAX/3D

THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA

Fri, 4/19/19 WIDE

C Linda Cardellini,

Raymond Cruz

D Michael Chaves

R · Hor

POKÉMON DETECTIVE

PIKACHU

Fri, 5/10/19 WIDE

C Ryan Reynolds, Justice Smith

D Rob Letterman

NR · Adv

THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR

Fri, 5/17/19 WIDE

C Yara Shahidi, Charles Melton

D Ry Russo-Young

PG-13 · Dra/Rom

GODZILLA: KING OF THE

MONSTERS

Fri, 5/31/19 WIDE

C Vera Farmiga,

Millie Bobby Brown

D Michael Dougherty

PG-13 · SF/Act

SHAFT

Fri, 6/14/19 WIDE

C Samuel L. Jackson

Jessie T. Usher

D Tim Story

NR · Act

UNTITLED CONJURING

UNIVERSE FILM

Fri, 7/3/19 WIDE

NR · Hor

BLINDED BY THE LIGHT

Fri, 8/14/19 WIDE

NR · Bio/Com/Mus

IT CHAPTER TWO

Fri, 9/6/19 WIDE

C James McAvoy,

Jessica Chastain

D Andy Muschietti

NR · Hor · IMAX

THE KITCHEN

Fri, 9/20/19 WIDE

C Melissa McCarthy,

Tiffany Haddish

D Andrea Berloff

NR · Cri/Thr

JOKER

Fri, 10/4/19 WIDE

C Joaquin Phoenix

D Todd Phillips

NR · Act

THE GOLDFINCH

Fri, 10/11/19 WIDE

R · Dra

DOCTOR SLEEP

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C Ewan McGregor,

Rebecca Ferguson

D Mike Flanagan

NR · Hor

MARGIE CLAUS

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

NR · Com/Mus

MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN

Fri, 11/1/19 WIDE

NR · Dra

THE GOOD LIAR

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

C Ian McKellen,

Helen Mirren

D Bill Condon

NR · Dra

SUPERINTELLIGENCE

Fri, 12/25/19 WIDE

C Melissa McCarthy,

Bobby Cannavale

D Ben Falcone

NR · Act/Com

JUST MERCY

Fri, 1/17/20 WIDE

C Brie Larson,

Michael B. Jordan

D Destin Daniel Cretton

NR · Dra

OUR SPONSORS

ARTS ALLIANCE MEDIA 1

BARCO/CINIONIC

INSIDE FRONT COVER

CARDINAL SOUND 104

CHRISTIE 2–3

CINEEUROPE 67

CINEMACON 39

DOLPHIN SEATING 63

ENCORE BY PALLISER

BACK COVER

ENPAR AUDIO 73

FRANKLIN DESIGNS 47

GDC 33

HARKNESS SCREENS 9

IRWIN SEATING 21

LIGHTSPEED/DEPTHQ 104

MOC INSURANCE SERVICES 7

MTI/AUTOFRY 79

OMNITERM 47

QSC 13

READY THEATER SYSTEMS 79

RETRIEVER SYSTEMS 75

SENSIBLE CINEMA 104

SONIC EQUIPMENT 15

SPOTLIGHT CINEMA NETWORK 27

TELESCOPIC SEATING SYSTEMS

UNTITLED BIRDS OF PREY

PROJECT

Fri, 2/7/20 WIDE

C Margot Robbie,

Mary Elizabeth Winstead

D Cathy Yan

NR · Act/Adv

UNTITLED DC FILM

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv/SF

SCOOBY-DOO ANIMATED

FEATURE

Fri, 5/15/20 WIDE

NR · Com

GODZILLA VS KONG

Fri, 5/31/20 WIDE

NR SF/Act

INSIDE BACK COVER

TIVOLI LIGHTING 57

VIP CINEMA SEATING 11

WEBEDIA MOVIES PRO 43

MARCH 2019

103


MARKETPLACE

Passive Polarization

for 3D Digital Cinema

Fast, Bright, Reliable...

Quality you can Trust.

Over 2,500

locations worldwide.

Patented in the US, EU, CAN & CHINA

HELP WANTED

SENIOR LEVEL CHANNEL ACCOUNT

MANAGER wanted by NEC Display Solutions

for expanding Digital Cinema group.

Seeking minimum 8 years’ experience within

hi-tech, cinema or Pro A/V industry to

drive strategic growth. Field-based, travel

throughout US & Canada required. Apply:

www.necdisplay.com/careers

FOR SALE

VINTAGE TWO-SCREEN MOVIE THEATER,

484 seats with the iconic marquee characteristic

of old movie theaters with updated

digital technology, 2k and 7.1 sound system.

Excellent opportunity for exhibitors

to invest in Puerto Rico in an iconic classic

movie theater. Serious inquiries only. For a

Powerpoint presentation and equipment

list, email to cecilesola46@gmail.com or

call 787-398-0912.

HISTORIC CENTRAL ILLINOIS, 5-SCREEN

MOVIE THEATER. Many upgrades including

digital projection and new seats. Free

municipal and theater-owned parking.

Serious inquires contact Peter (217) 652-

9700.

USED DIGITAL PROJECTORS AND

SOUND EQUIPMENT. 3 Solaria One Plus

projectors with NAS and projector base. 14

JBL stage speakers, 12 JBL surround speakers.

Processors and monitors. Contact:

boothmw@chakerestheatres.com or call

Mark at (937) 323-6447.

USED DIGITAL PROJECTORS, Five complete

booths including sound equipment.

Three years old. Contact seller at moviescope1000@gmail.com.

BISTRO CHAIRS FOR SALE: (392) Red vinyl

and (328) gray vinyl seven year old Seating

Concepts Palermo style in-theatre bistro

chairs to be available in early Spring 2018.

All chairs equipped with tray tables. Some

of the seats will require covers/repairs.

Please contact mhooker@aztcorporation.

comor 972-428-2943 for more information.

TWO BRAND NEW 3000 watts Christie Xenon

lamps for 35mm projectors. Contact:

Atul Desai 949-291-5700.

PREFERRED SEATING COMPANY, your

source for new, used and refurbished

theater and stadium seating. Buying and

selling used seating is our specialty. Call

toll-free 866-922-0226 or visit our website

www.‐preferred-seating.com.

18 SETS OF USED 35MM AUTOMATED

PROJECTION SYSTEM (comes with Projector,

Console, Automation Unit and Platter)

comprising of 10 sets of Christie and 8 sets

of Strong 35mm system available on ‘as is

where is’ basis in Singapore. Contact seller

at engthye_lim@cathay.com.sg

APPROXIMATELY 2,000 SEATS FOR SALE.

MOBILIARIO high-back rockers with cup

holders. Located in Connecticut. Contact

(203)758-2148.

www.depthq3d.com

6 PLEX EQUIPMENT PACKAGE. Six complete

booths digital projectors/sound, 72

speakers, seats, screens/frames, concession

equipment, computers, led signs/marquees,

safe/misc equipment. Serious inquiries

only. For equipment list email contact@digitalequipmenttechnologies.com

or call 801-548-0108 or fax 801-281-0482.

HELP WANTED

TRI STATE THEATRE SUPPLY in Memphis,

TN has openings for experienced Digital

Cinema Techs nationwide. Please send

your resume to include qualifications, certifications

and salary requirements to fred@

tristatetheatre.com

THEATRE MANAGEMENT POSITIONS

AVAILABLE Pacific Northwest Theatre

Company. Previous management experience

required. Work weekends, evenings

and holidays. Send resume and salary history

to movietheatrejobs@gmail.com

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

The three-screen Stavros Niarchos Foundation

Parkway Film Center in Baltimore

is seeking an OPERATIONS DIRECTOR to

oversee all aspects of running the theater

and concessions. The Film Center, a partnership

among the Maryland Film Festival,

Johns Hopkins University and MICA will

open in spring of 2017 and offer a broad

range of the world’s best art-house, independent,

documentary, and classic cinema.

The full job description and application

instructions are found at mdfilmfest.com/

about-the-festival/jobs.php.

104 MARCH 2019

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