The Pioneer, Vol. 52, Issue 5

thepioneer

The March 4, 2019 issue of The Pioneer — Pierce College Fort Steilacoom's student news publication in Lakewood, Washington.

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s student news publication, Est. 1974

A SINGLE MOTHER’S

JOURNEY

PG. 16

THE BAN ON

TRANSGENDER

SERVICE MEMBERS

PG. 12-13

HOW PIERCE IS

GETTING STUDENTS TO

SCHOOL

PG. 8-9

FILM STUDENTS

SHADOW

REAL-LIFE DIRECTOR

JAMES WINTERS

PG. 10-11


THE

2

Editorial

STUDENT BUS PASS GIVES

YOU FREEDOM

Everyone from time to time has had the unpleasant

experience of asking a friend or parent

for a ride to school, work or wherever.

Everyone wants the freedom to get to and from

places without the relying on others, especially

when they require you to chip in for gas.

When not able to chip in gas money that can

put a strain on relationships.

Not everyone is blessed to own a car, let alone

drive one.

A medical or mental condition can prohibit

driving. Others choose not to for personal

reasons.

This quarter a partnership between Pierce

College and Pierce Transit creates the opportunity

for free monthly bus passes. Students are not

limited to just getting to and from campus.

The bus pass can be used to go to Seattle,

Owens beach and the Ruston waterfront, just to

name a few examples. There are plenty of places

to go and roam.

Springtime will soon be here and spring break

is right around the corner. Do something new,

perhaps go downtown on St. Patrick’s Day and

check out the parade.

Though at times riding a bus can be crowded,

it is one of the most convenient ways to get

around town.

The bus pass program here at Pierce may only

be for students enrolled in classes, but Pierce

Transit does offer reasonably priced ORCA cards

and reduced-priced cards for seniors and those

that are disabled.

Have a great rest of the winter quarter, The

Pioneer looks forward to seeing everyone back

for spring quarter!

/ piercepioneernews.com

Editorial Manager

Calvin Beekman

cbeekman@pierce.ctc.edu

Production Manager

Carl Vincent Carallas

ccarallas@pierce.ctc.edu

Web Manager

Alyssa Wilkins

awilkins@pierce.ctc.edu

Social Media Manager

Malia Adaoag

madaoag@pierce.ctc.edu

Office Manager

Jenn Burgess

jburgess@pierce.ctc.edu

Cover: Marji Harris/Staff Photo

James Winters/Courtesy Photos

Web: piercepioneernews.com

Email: pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu

Facebook: piercepioneernews

Twitter: @piercepioneer

Phone: 253-964-6604

Room: CAS 323

Staff

Find Victoria: Victoria will

make an appearance in each

of our cover photos. Can you

find her in this one?

Nick Nelson/Staff Photo

Letters to The Editor

Have an opinion on our articles or about campus events, policy?

Write a letter to the editor and send to:

pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu.

We cannot publish letters that are anonymous.

THE PIONEER MISSION STATEMENT

Candee Bell

Marji Harris

Jorge Higuera

Khuong “Finn” Quoc Ho

Diane Russell

Maxwell Smith

Karley Wise

Nick Nelson

Alexander Horen

Sophiya Galanesi

Jed Brewer

Insert name here_

This

could

be you!

Interested in working for

The Pioneer? Stop by

room CAS 323 to pick up

an application today.

The Pioneer is an official publication of the Associated Students of Pierce College and is

sanctioned as such by the college’s Board of Trustees and funded primarily by student fees.

It is a public forum for student expression since 1974.

The Pioneer’s mission is:

(1) to inform the student body of issues and events of interest, relevance and importance;

(2) to provide students with a forum for discussion, opinion and expression; and

(3) to provide the student body with editorial leadership.

In carrying out this mission, The Pioneer will use as its ethical guide the Statement of

Principles adopted by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Although it will strive

to represent the diverse views and interests of the student body, The Pioneer is not responsible

for representing, endorsing or promoting any person, group, organization or activity.

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


CONTENTS

Pg. 6-7 Pg. 10-11 Pg. 15

Pg. 8-9

Pg. 12-13 Pg. 16

Pg. 6-7 Pg. 10-11

International Women’s Day

Film Students Shadow A

Student thoughts on IWD

Real Director

Students got a first-hand look at

Pg. 8-9

filmmaking

Transportation For All

How the college is helping

students get to school

Pg. 12-13

The Transgender Military Ban

What students think of the

new White House policy

Pg. 14

St. Patrick’s Day Celebrations

The origin and traditions of

St. Patty’s day

Pg. 15

March Madness

68 college teams will compete

in a basketball tournament

Pg. 16

Single Parents’ Day

A single mother’s journey

Pg. 18-19

Coffee Break

Take a break; read

some extras

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 3


H

APPENINGS

March 8

March 8

March 11

March 12

Emerging Leaders

Academy (ELA)

Noon-1 p.m.

Where:

CAS 529

International

Women’s Day,

“Fight Like a Girl”

Noon-3 p.m.

Where:

Performance Lounge

“Let’s Talk About

Sex,” Sex

Awareness

11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Where:

Performance and

Fireside Lounge

FS Clubs

Council Meeting

Noon-1 p.m.

Where:

OLY 205

March 14

March 15

March 15

March 15

FS Concert Choir

7 p.m.

Where:

Centralia College

General

admission: $5

With Pierce ID: FREE

Multicultural

Leadership

Institute (MLI)

Noon-1 p.m.

Where:

CAS 529

FS Student

Government Meeting

1:15 p.m.-2 p.m.

Where:

Student Life Lobby,

4th floor

College Movie

Matinee featuring

Aquaman

2-4:30 p.m.

Where:

Performance Lounge

March 15, 16

March 18

March 19

March 21

Winter Film Festival

7 p.m.

Where:

Lecture Hall

(CAS 332)

Raider Review

4-8 p.m.

Where:

Performance and

Fireside Lounge

Puppy Cuddle

11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Where:

Fireside Lounge

Last day of

instruction for

Winter Quarter

All day

Finish strong!

March 22, 25, 26

Final Exams

4

/ piercepioneernews.com

Spring Break

March 27 - April 5

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


Men’s

Baseball

Olympic College

Clakcamas Community College

Skagit Valley College

Centralia College

Green River College

Bellevue College

March 10 | 11 a.m. March 16 | 2 a.m.

Everett Community College

March 23 | 12 p.m. March 26 | 4 p.m.

Shoreline Community College

March 24 | 12 p.m. March 30 | 2 p.m.

Edmonds Community College

March 31 | 1 p.m. April 6 | 2 p.m.

April 3 | 3 p.m.

Women’s

Softball

*All games are at Mt. Tahoma high

school’s baseball field in Tacoma,

Washington.

*All games are at Heritage

Recreation Center – Softball

complex in Puyallup, Washington.

Science Dome shows

Planet Nine

From Dream to Discovery

Black Holes: The Other

Side of Infinity

Mysteries of the Unseen World

Space School

Faster Than Light

Habitat Earth

March 8 at 7 p.m.

March 9 at 3:15 p.m.

March 15 at 7 p.m.

March 16 at 3:15 p.m.

March 22 at 7 p.m.

March 29 at 7 p.m.

March 30 at 3:15 p.m.

*The Science Dome is in Rainier 263. Students with Pierce

ID can enter for free. Non-student tickets are $6.

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 NASA/ Courtesy Photo

piercepioneernews.com / 5


Campus

SACRIFICING RIGHTS IS TRADITION

International Women’s Day is not celebrated

the same way in every country

By SOPHIYA GALANESI

Staff Writer

6

/ piercepioneernews.com

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

(IWD) IS A HOLIDAY that is meant to

be celebrated worldwide, yet some countries

still have not guaranteed women

their basic rights.

IWD celebrates women and how much

they have achieved over the years. The

topic of women’s rights cannot be discussed

without addressing the rights they

are deprived of.

Having a day that celebrates women’s

rights does not mean that all of them

have been achieved. There are still many

that women lack. Educating both men

and women on how much women have

achieved is essential to bridging the gap

between genders and creating an equal

standard. Not only is IWD about remembering

the rights women have achieved,

it is also a day to continue empowering

women all over the world.

Pierce College exchange student Linh

Tin explained that in Asia, they view

women as inferior to men and treat them

poorly because they have traditional values.

They think that men are the most

important in the family who can decide

everything, and I think we should change

that.”

Mina Wong, an exchange student from

Hong Kong, said,“I feel like International

Women’s Day is not that important in

Hong Kong. I feel like Hong Kong cannot

do gender equality.”

“We always think that (an) adult woman

is a housewife; we won’t think that she

has a job or anything, but all the time we

think that men are the ones who work.

The ones who earn money to support the

family,” she said.

Wong said that based on her experience,

Pierce gives women more rights

than her school in Hong Kong because

they were still in the process of improving

gender equality.

Even students who were born in America

but have immigrant parents also view

IWD in a different way. Although they

grew up in America and were influenced

by the society, it was not enough to break

down the traditions passed down from

older generations.

The men in the house take over

the woman’s responsibilities of doing

things and they just see how it is from

a woman’s perspective of what they do

on the daily,” Mariam Dzyk said when

asked how her family celebrates IWD.

Dzyk is a Pierce student with immigrant

parents who moved from Russia 26 years

ago. Despite the years, the tradition of a

woman being solely responsible for the

household still stands.

The perspective of men on IWD is just

as important as women’s. They also play a

role in the sense that for a long time, men

have had the rights that women are fighting

for. Along with women fighting for

their basic rights, men are also bringing

attention to themselves.

“It’s always been about men, so it’s

now shifting that focus equally to both

men and women,” said David Karcha, a

Pierce student working toward his engineering

degree. “It’s changing, with the

‘Me Too’ movement for example. Men

can’t get their way with everything now,

it’s like to show that they’re limited.”

Another student, Sammy Tang, said,

They (women) don’t have the same

things as we (men) do, like equal pay,

birth control – and it’s weird that men

have a say in everything.”

To empower women, Tang said, “Ensure

that they can have their rights. It’s

weird to say this, but I want them to have

basic rights.” The goal is not to surpass

men, but rather to create an equal playing

field.

Nick Nelson/Staff Photo Illustration

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


Perspectives from...

China

MINA WONG

“I FEEL LIKE

INTERNATIONAL

WOMEN’S DAY IS NOT

THAT IMPORTANT IN HONG

KONG. I FEEL LIKE HONG KONG

CANNOT DO GENDER EQUALITY.”

Mina Wong/Courtesy Photo

STUDENTS

GIVEN

OPPORTUNITY

TO “FIGHT

LIKE A GIRL”

Self-defense class

empowers women

Campus

Russia

MARIAM DZYK

“THE MEN IN

THE HOUSE TAKE

OVER THE WOMAN’S

RESPONSIBILITIES OF

DOING THINGS AND THEY

JUST SEE HOW IT IS FROM A

WOMAN’S PERSPECTIVE...”

Mariam Dzyk/Courtesy Photo

“Fight Like a Girl” is a phrase

commonly associated with females

being weak and inferior,

making them easy targets. Student

Life is using that phrase

to change that. On March 8, the

Lakewood police Department

will be bringing their Rape Aggression

Defense (RAD) self-defense

class to Pierce College.

America

DAVID KARCHA

“IT’S ALWAYS BEEN

ABOUT MEN, SO IT’S NOW

SHIFTING THAT FOCUS

EQUALLY TO BOTH MEN AND

WOMEN.”

Sophiya Galanesi/Staff Photo

When:

March 8

Noon - 3 p.m.

Where:

Fort Steilacoom Campus

Cascade Building

Performance Lounge

America

SAMMY TANG

“THEY (WOMEN)

DON’T HAVE THE SAME

THINGS AS WE (MEN) DO,

LIKE EQUAL PAY, BIRTH

CONTROL – AND IT’S WEIRD

THAT MEN HAVE A SAY IN

EVERYTHING.”

Sophiya Galanesi/Staff Photo

Contact:

Aidan Helt

ahelt@pierce.ctc.edu

253-964-6255

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 7


Campus

TRANSPORTATION FOR ALL

The free bus pass program is now

available to Pierce students

8

By CALEB HENSIN

Staff Writer

STUDENT LIFE ADMINISTRATIVE

SENATOR Connor Fredericks describes

the intent behind Pierce College’s recent

partnership with the Pierce County

Public Transportation Benefit Area Corporation

(Pierce Transit) as eliminating

socioeconomic barriers.

In early January, the college began

offering free ORCA card bus passes to

students for use on all Pierce Transit buses

and routes. In addition, as part of the

deal with Pierce Transit, the campus will

be beta testing (a trial for software in the

final phase of development) the “Pierce

Pass” app, which acts as a quarterly bus

pass using the Hopthru mobile ticketing

platform. Students who join the program

will receive an email containing a download

link for the app.

The free transit initiative was introduced

by Fredericks and two other

student government members: President

Raymond Power and Vice President

Caleb Bromley. “We realized we were the

only community college in the county

that didn’t have this contract with Pierce

Transit,” Power said. The Puyallup campus

already had such a contract since fall.

The proposal for a contract with Pierce

Transit was brought to the board of trustees,

and once accepted, Choi Halladay,

the Vice President of Administrative Services

who had worked with them on the

Puyallup deal, became a point of contact

with the company.

“Because they already had a working

model for this kind of contract with other

colleges such as Tacoma Community

College, it was simple to reach an agreement

using that established structure,”

Halladay said. The Board of Trustees

had already also authorized the college

/ piercepioneernews.com

to make such contracts previously with

the Puyallup campus, and would provide

funding.

“Surveys identified transportation as

a key issue, and there are approximately

fifty bus arrivals at Pierce a day,” Halladay

said.

The Senior Employer Services Coordinator

at Pierce Transit, Sharon Stockwell,

was the point of contact for what

they call the Student Pass Program. The

program had been in pilot for over a year

and in January was made a permanent

program by the company’s Board of

Commissioners.

According to Stockwell, the program

was created upon noticing that students

made up a significant amount of people

who use public transit. “We wanted to

strengthen our partnership with colleges,

and to encourage starting ridership

young.”

Clover Park Technical College was the

first college to join the program in

2017, and prior to the Pierce Pass app,

students used their school ID cards as

passes. Stockwell stated that the app

is more tailored to students than Pierce

Transit’s other apps due to it being

quarterly (matching Pierce’s quarterly

system), saying that it is a different

product. She emphasized that despite

“WE WANTED TO STRENGTHEN OUR

PARTNERSHIP WITH COLLEGES, AND TO

ENCOURAGE STARTING RIDERSHIP YOUNG.”

— CALEB BROMLEY,

ASPCFS VICE PRESIDENT

Alyssa Wilkins/

Staff Photo Illustration

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


Campus

“WE DON’T WANT STUDENTS WHO

ALREADY HAVE A DIFFICULT

TIME PAYING FOR TUITION

TO NOT BE ABLE TO PAY FOR

TRANSPORTATION TO CLASSES.”

— RAYMOND POWER,

ASPCFS PRESIDENT

these differences, the pass could be used

for any Pierce Transit route, and that

students could therefore use it for getting

to work and other places in addition to

school.

Bromley said the student bus pass

program was well received, although he

doesn’t know how many users are benefiting

from it yet. He said that the physical

passes offered at the Security Office

ran out very quickly after Pierce Transit

had a presence at the Welcome Day

events Student Life held at the beginning

of the quarter.

Powers agreed with Bromley’s conclusion,

adding that Student Life’s front

desk received many questions about the

program and how to use the Pierce Pass

app.

“We don’t want students who already

have a difficult time paying for tuition to

not be able to pay for transportation to

classes,” Power said.

Claudio, which is his full name, is a

student who has been commuting by bus

since before the Pierce Transit deal. “It’s a

game changer,” he said. “I live on a fixed

income, so saving $36.00 a month is a big

deal.”

He also stated that he had never used

one of Pierce Transit’s apps before the

Pierce Pass app was offered with the free

transit deal. “The free transit is totally the

only reason I use the Hopthru app.”

Student Connie Zhang also uses public

transit. She echoed Claudio on the money-saving

benefits of the program. “The

app is really easy to use; you basically

just tap it (to the bus fare console) and it

works automatically.”

The program is currently ongoing. It

is open to all students, requiring at least

five credits of classes, which includes

Running Start, ASL and ABE, but not

continuing education or community

classes.

ORCA Cards can be obtained at the

Security Office. Student Life members

stated that any questions can be directed

to their front desk in the Student Life

Office.

Carl Vincent Carallas/

Staff Photo

Nick Nelson/

Staff Photo

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 9


News

PIERCE COLLEGE

TRANSFORMS

Technical film students

shadow real-life director

By MARJI HARRIS

Staff Writer

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! These

are familiar director’s commands associated

with places like Hollywood, but they

are also becoming a regular part of the

Pacific Northwest.

This quarter, five Pierce College film

students have the opportunity to shadow

a local film director, and they do not have

to go any further than their own campus

to do it.

Film professor Fred Metzger is partnering

up with a local movie director

to create “The Hunt.” It centers around

two tweens who follow a phone app on a

scavenger hunt. Part of the film is being

shot on the Fort Steilacoom campus;

10

/piercepioneernews.com

some of the scenes have already been

shot in the library.

The project has been weeks in the

making. At the beginning of the quarter,

Metzger asked for film scripts from students

across the campus. From those submitted,

he chose projects for his students

in his technical film class to direct.

Then he got in touch with a local

director, James Winters, who just finished

another film project called “They Reach,”

a horror film set in Tacoma. Winters was

starting a new project and the two were

able to work out an arrangement to shoot

part of the film on campus.

Students in the film class are responsible

for seeing their scripts become a

motion picture. They have to pick those

who will be in the film, choose a location,

and do the final cuts.

With only six students in the class,

Student director Jackie Laverne (right) reflects on how the

camera becomes a storyteller. A scene through a camera

takes an instant that a book would take pages to describe.

“I THINK THAT IS A LOT

LIKE WHAT DIRECTING

IS; YOU’RE THE BOSS

AND WHAT YOU SAY

GOES: BE A LEADER.”

— RANDY JOHNSON,

STUDENT DIRECTOR

Metzger is able to do more than usual.

“I can spend more time one-on-one with

them, showing them editing and other

techniques that I usually do not have

time to do,” he said.

One of the benefits of shadowing

a director is the opportunity to see cutting-edge

technology at work. Much of

Winters’ projects are made for streaming

online, so he uses what is called a “red

camera.” Designed exclusively for digital

filming, it shoots in a higher resolution at

6-8K. Conventional camera equipment,

also known as the “black box,” results in

a grainy resolution, which is unusable for

movie outlets such as Netflix.

A director often will do more than one

“take” for a scene. The amount of work

that goes into creating just a 10-second

scene was a small surprise to one of the

students in the class, David Zink. “I was

blown away by at how much work there

is in this thing. I am sure that I do not

have any talent or patience for that direction.

I’m a writer, not a film technician,

he said.”

Jackie Laverne is one of the technical

film students. She found the use of a red

camera fascinating. “All the studios such

as Amazon and Netflix have to shoot at

higher resolutions. When edited, they

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


News

INTO A MOVIE SET

edit down into 4K for high definition, it

is what makes it crystal clear, makes it

crisp,” she said.

The project itself has a surprising result

for Laverne. She was expecting more emphasis

on the equipment. In shadowing

Winters, she discovered the camera does

not just record scenes. “It shows you how

to guide the viewer through the story [in

a way] that is easy to understand, enjoyable,

and helps with the creative part that

creates the suspension of disbelief within

a story line,” she said.

Finn Ho, one of the students in the film

technical class, is looking forward to the

partnership project. Watching how people

interact on set gives him a first-hand

look into what a director does. “I want to

get a sense of what it is like to work on

a professional set. I want to learn more

about the technical stuff like color, logistics,

and getting people together,” he said.

Randy Johnson is another student

in the film class. He likes the idea of a

shadow project because it provides a

model he can follow. “It teaches me what

to expect, what kind of a demeanor a director

should have; it’s work. The director

is the boss. Like in construction, there’s a

contractor. I think that is a lot like what

directing is, you’re the boss and what you

say goes. Be a leader. What I would like

to learn today the most is leadership,” he

said.

Winters’ film project will be wrapping

up sometime in the spring. As of yet, no

release date is available.

The students’ class projects will be

shown at the Pierce College Film Festival

on March 15 and 16.

FINN HO, STUDENT DIRECTOR

What is a good movie plot?

“I just like movies that as

soon as the twist is revealed,

I will go back and watch the

movie. It turns into a different

experience.”

JACKIE LAVERNE,

STUDENT DIRECTOR

Why be a director?

“Because I want the career

path that will pay my bills and

the career path that will make

my life fuller.... I would rather

tell the stories than be the

story.”

RANDY JOHNSON,

STUDENT DIRECTOR

Who is your favoirte director?

“Quentin Tarantino: He does

fun, exciting stories. First, he is

a writer. Then, he’s a director. I

feel that he is an expert in both

of those fields.”

Marji Harris/Staff Photos

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 11


Features

Alyssa Wilkins and Candee Bell/

Staff Photo Illustration

PIERCE COLLEGE STUDENTS REJECT WHITE HOUSE

POLICY ON TRANSGENDER SERVICE MEMBERS

Military transgender ban awaits Maryland judge’s decision

By ALEX HOREN

Staff Writer

IN THE MILITARY, an individual’s

background is irrelevant. Everyone is a

service member, with the only expectation

being service for country. Be it

on the frontlines or behind a desk, the

military values anyone with both the

motivation to work and the drive to help

their country.

For some, the military presents a way

out or a fresh start, an avenue of escaping

a troubled home or a difficult past.

However, for transgender people, this is

not an option. With the recent proposed

ban on transgender service members,

military service may be completely out

12

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of reach.

The Pentagon released a memo last

February, stating there were “substantial

risks” to allowing transgender people into

the military. The White House would

later come forth with a policy to ban

transgender service members from the

military.

The new ban faced numerous injunctions,

or authoritative warning, as it

circulated through the lower courts of the

legislative system and had been on hold.

In January, the Supreme Court voted to

remove most of the injunctions blocking

the ban. Currently, a Maryland judge’s

decision will determine whether the new

policy will go into effect, according to the

U.S Department of Defense’s Jan. 22 press

release.

Members of Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s

Queer Support Club voiced their

opposition to joining the military given

the ban on transgender service members

in the military.

Club president Isaac Morgan Pennoyer,

concurred with them, stating that he had

decidedly kept away from joining the

military after three of his aunts had suffered

severe mental and physical trauma

while serving.

Pennoyer also said the ban impacted

his opinion of the government in a

negative way. “I don’t think it’s a ‘liberal’

take or a ‘democrat’ take to say that a

president who doesn’t value all human

life is garbage.”

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


Prior to 2016, it was illegal for transgender

people to serve in the military.

President Barack Obama worked to

change that and succeeded, despite strenuous

opposition. In July 2017, President

Donald Trump went against this in a

tweet. “Our military must be focused on

decisive and overwhelming victory…and

cannot be burdened with the tremendous

medical costs and disruption that

transgender in the military would entail,”

he stated.

Trump put out a revised version of the

ban, which would allow people who were

serving as openly transgender before the

Pentagon memo’s release to continue.

Previously, the military’s policy towards

transgender and other members

of the LGBT community was “Don’t ask;

don’t tell.” In other words, transgender

soldiers would be treated the same as

everyone else so long as they appeared to

conform to their gender identity. However,

if a service member was revealed to be

transgender, their superiors would deal

with it as they saw fit, typically resulting

in discharge.

“I THINK THERE

SHOULDN’T BE A BAN.

THERE NEEDS TO BE

STIPULATIONS.”

— K.H., PIERCE

COLLEGE FORT

STEILACOOM

STUDENT AND ARMY

VETERAN

Marco Aguirre, an Army veteran currently

attending Pierce College Fort Steilacoom,

spoke about the climate around

transgender people in the U.S. military.

He stated that he believed much of the

military still harbored anti-transgender

beliefs. However, he also expressed

that treatment of transgender service

members had certainly improved since

when he first joined, and that they were

still making strides when he had left the

military.

Another Army veteran attending

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom,

going by the initials “K.H.”,

stated transgender service

members should be medically

cleared before deploying to

avoid complications during

active duty.

“I think there shouldn’t be a

ban. There needs to be stipulations,” he

said drawing on both personal experience

and educational training they had

received from the military in 2017 about

transgender service members.

Contrasting with Aguirre, K.H. stated

that he believed most of the military to

be rather accepting of transgender service

members.

According to RAND Corporation’s

2016 findings, there are between 1,320

and 6,630 transgender service members

serving in active duty. This does not

account for transgender personnel in

the military who are not open to sharing

information about their sexuality.

Features

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5

Candee Bell/Staff Photo

piercepioneernews.com / 13


Features

A beginner’s guide to

Saint Patrick’s Day

Four popular ways to celebrate the holiday

By KHUONG “FINN”

QUOC HO

Staff Writer

MARCH IS BACK after eleven

months of anticipation. While March

Madness is a quite a sight to behold,

people will still get excited when they

start seeing their peers all decked out in

green gear, dashing from one person to

another to pinch them. As Americans are

having “the Craic” (Irish slang for fun)

of their life bar hopping and picking up

shamrocks, it is important to take a look

at what the celebration is all about.

Pinch people

We all know that we should wear green

on Saint Patrick’s Day to avoid being

pinched. But it begs the question: Why?

The site Thrillist.com shared that the reason

why people wear green on this special

day is because it is one of the many

ways people show their Irish pride. Maddy

Shenton, a Pierce college student of

Irish descent, jokingly shared that one of

her traditions is to punch a person who

is not drowned in green. While there

are many debatable origins for wearing

green, the color helps people get into the

holiday spirit and pinching just adds to

the fun of it regardless. Another Pierce

Irish descendant by the name of Michael

Forbes shared that he likes to dress up as

a leprechaun and sing Saint Patty's cheer

with the kids in his neighborhood.

Find four-leaf clovers

The color green that is often associated

with the holiday is believed to have

originated from the color of the clover

leaf. The lore of Saint Patrick’s tells the

story of the Saint himself explaining

the Holy Trinity with a three leaf clover.

Candee Bell/Staff Illustration

History Professor Christopher Vanneson

pointed out that the story is not supported

by facts. But because of the legend,

the image of the plant has become the

most iconic symbol of the celebration.

And with the green hue, it does nothing

but go wonderfully well with the holiday

theme. With chances of finding a fourleaf

clover being 1 to 10,000, according

to The Science Explorer, one can try their

luck to find these rare plants.

Eat corned beef

No Saint Patrick’s Day dinner table

is complete without the sight of corned

beef and cabbage. Contrary to popular

belief, corned beef is not actually an Irish

food. According to Delish.com, when the

Irish immigrants first arrived in America,

they yearned for the comfort food of

their motherland, which was bacon. The

problem was that the price of pork was

relatively expensive, so they turned to

beef brisket as an alternative. They added

salt to help preserve the meat, and thus

corned beef was introduced. While it is

strange that corned beef is not Irish in

the first place, there is no denying that it

brings an Irish taste to the table.

Spot Saint Patrick

The first recorded St. Patrick’s Day parade

was held in the heart of New York in

1762, not Ireland, according to History.

com. Since then the parade has become

a staple for the holiday and happens

every year in big cities and small towns

alike. Americans often find themselves

cheering with the crowd on Saint Patty’s

Day to the floats and representations of

Saint Patrick himself. Seattle is hosting

the annual parade on March 16 this year,

and will feature pirates, bagpipers, Irish

dancers and many more.

As the day is “marching” closer, everyone

is recommended to have fun, whether

it be picking out some green attire or

indulging in some corned beef. Be safe

while you’re at it. With that being said,

happy Saint Patty's day!

14

/ piercepioneernews.com

March. 4, 2018 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


MARCH MADNESS IS COMING

A look at university brackets

Sports

By JED BREWER

Staff Writer

THE PHENOMENON THAT IS THE

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC

ASSOCIATION’S Division 1 basketball

tournament is set to run its course from

March, 17 to April 8.

Better known as March Madness, both

men’s and women’s tournaments will

feature a collection of the best 68 teams

in the country. Teams are ranked by a

committee and given a seed to reflect

their season’s success.

With a single elimination “bracket”

style format, 16 teams are placed into

four regions. The one seed or plays the 16

seed, the two seed plays the 15 seed, and

so on.

Pierce College Women’s Basketball

Head Coach Ariassa Wilson is headed

to the women’s Final Four this year in

Tampa, Florida. She says she has always

been a UConn fan, but enjoys watching

other teams such as Notre Dame, South

Carolina, Tennessee, and Oregon. She

gave some insight as to what makes the

tournament so special.

“How you perform November through

February determines your placement

in March. Then from there, it is almost

anyone’s game,” Wilson said. “Teams that

were not selected to win end up winning.

That’s what’s so great about basketball is

on any given night it is anyone’s game.”

The format style allows for “upsets”. An

upset occurs when a lower seeded team

wins against a higher ranked team. When

a low seeded team, such as Loyola-Chicago

last year, makes a run into the Final

Four teams, it is often called a Cinderella

story. This aspect gives a rags to riches

kind of feeling for these teams in a way.

This year’s tournament features a mix

of local and national talent for the men

and women.

Locally, the Gonzaga Bulldogs men’s

squad is ranked No. 4 in the nation and

sits with their current record at 25-2 Star

forward and potential NBA Draft lottery

pick, Rui Hachimura, leads the team,

averaging 20 points and 6.3 rebounds per

game.

The University of Washington Huskies

will also look to make a run in the

tournament for the first time since 2011.

With a record of 20-5 overall, and 10-1 in

the Pac 12 Conference, the team carries a

lot of senior leadership mixed with

See March Madness, page 18

Carl Vincent Carallas/Photo Illustration

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 15


Commentary

Who I tried to be and who I am

By DIANE RUSSELL

Staff Writer

How becoming a single parent helped me follow my dreams

IN 2014 I STARTED AT PIERCE

COLLEGE Fort Steilacoom with the intention

of becoming a Registered Nurse.

I was not one hundred percent happy

about my career choice. For seven years

I had worked as a Certified Nurses Aid

and I was burnt out.

I believed that my key to happiness

was stability. And stability meant a secure

job with reliable income. Happiness was

in the future and I had to hold on for a

while longer. I was right, but not in the

way I thought.

My son arrived two days after my

birthday in 2015. I became a single

parent two weeks later. It is an understatement

to say my life turned upside

down. It turned upside down, sideways,

and inside out.

I had left my job as a CNA and the

relief had been immediate. The nursing

field did not need one more burnt

out person only in it for the paycheck.

Gazing down at my son’s innocent face,

I knew I had to change my life to make

ours better. The arrival of my son had

fulfilled a dream I did not know I had. It

was time to realize all my dreams.

From an early age I had known I wanted

to be an artist. For my third birthday

I received the paint box and real acrylic

paints I had asked for. But as I grew older,

I was told more and more that artists are

called “starving artists” for a reason.

I did not want my son to be told that

his dreams were unrealistic. Or that

money mattered more than living the

life he wanted. I had to be an example

of someone that followed their heart.

I changed my degree focus to digital

design in 2016 and the relief was immediate.

Being a single parent is hard. Being a

college student is hard work. Add those

two together and you have a recipe for

overload, poverty, and massive sleep

deprivation. But there has not been a

single day that I regret my choices.

I have had some help as a single mom

and even more as a student. Without

the Basic Food Employment & Training

(BFET) program I would not have been

able to attend school. The Milgard Child

Development Center at the Fort Steilacoom

campus provides an unexpected

source of emotional support for my son

and me. I recommend Milgard to any

parent looking for daycare or preschool.

The instructors at Fort Steilacoom have

been hands down the best I have ever

had in my long school career. There are

days when I realize how lucky I am that I

chose Pierce. I am not the only one benefiting

from my choices; my son is too.

Sometimes, while driving to school I

wonder how I ever thought I needed to

be someone other than myself. Looking

back, I realize I believed that happiness

was not really an option for me. My son

made me happy in ways I never knew.

His love made me feel lovable.

How wonderful it is that I am the artist

I always wanted to be and have a wonderful

son with me on my journey. My life

might not have turned out the exact way

I dreamed, but in many ways it is much

better.

Diane Russell and her son

Alyssa Wilkins/Staff Photo

16 / piercepioneernews.com

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


THE

PIONEER

COME WORK

WITH US!

Photographer

Photographer Responsibilities:

In the role of photographer, you get to take photos of campus events,

students and other story-related content. Creative expression is your

inspiration! Photography is the #1 most desired graphic content.

Candee Bell, a photographer, enjoys her job at “The Pioneer.”

“Photographs are the first thing readers see when they open the

Pioneer Magazine. As a Photographer, I’m able to give our readers a visual

reference to help immerse them into a story. It’s also a great way to gain

your internship hours and have fun while making a few extra dollars.”

Writer Responsibilities:

As a writer, you get the chance to decide what content is in our magazine!

By creating stories and giving the students a voice at Pierce College, you

fulfill “The Pioneer” mission statement.

Caleb Hensin is a staff writer here at “The Pioneer.” He has been part

of the team intermittently since fall quarter of 2015.

Writer

Designer Responsibilities:

Designer

A designer creates the visuals, art and design aspects of the magazine.

You get to decide how pages look. With guided creativity, you can let your

passion for art and design flow freely!

Diane Russell, a designer, enjoys her job at “The Pioneer.”

“I fullfill my internship hours while preparing for my dream job/career,

she said. “I like working at ‘The Pioneer’ because I enjoy being part of a

team and sharpening my design skills.”

THIS COULD BE YOU!

STOP BY OUR OFFICE AND APPLY TODAY!

We are located in CAS 323

For questions about specific positions, please stop by or contact pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 17


From March Madness,

page 15

youth. Sophomore Jaylen Nowell

leads the Huskies with 16.4 points

and 5.4 rebounds.

Nationally, the Duke Blue

Devils are another strong contender.

Freshman Zion Williamson,

averages 22 points and 9.4

rebounds per game. Another freshman,

R.J. Barrett paces the team with 23 points

and 7.2 rebounds per game. The Blue

Devils are currently 23-2, ranked No. 2 in

the country.

Reign Hartman, a student at Pierce

College, has been impressed by Duke this

year.

“I watch Duke because of Zion (Williamson),”

Hartman said. “I love the fact

that he still dunks on people even though

they’re really good athletes, and he’s an

Coffee Break

overall beast.”

On the women’s side the Baylor Bears

are the top ranked team in the country

at 23-1 . They are led by senior center

Kalani Brown, who averages 16.3 points

per game and 7.5 rebounds.

They will face a strong opposition from

the University of Connecticut Huskies,

who are ranked No. 5 in the country.

The Huskies are led by senior Napheesa

Collier, who chips in 19.8 points and 10.2

rebounds per game.

The Bears will look for their first

championship since 2012, while the Huskies

will look for their first since 2016,

when they capped off a streak of four

titles in a row.

On the west coast, the Oregon Ducks

lead the way as the No. 3 ranked team in

the country at 24-1. Junior Sabrina Ionescu

leads the way averaging 19.7 points

and 7.2 rebounds for the Ducks. They

will look to build off of their top eight

finish in last year’s tournament.

Max Anderson, a student at Pierce

College, has bittersweet memories from

tournaments of the past.

“I am a huge Kentucky fan, and my

favorite year was when they went undefeated

but lost in the championship,”

Anderson said. “That was heartbreaking,

but I loved the run in college basketball

they had for about six or seven years”

With seeding still to come, teams will

look to head into the tournament strong,

playing their best basketball at the right

time. Seeding and brackets will be officially

set on March 17.

HALLWAY HASSLE

MARCH MADNESS:

“WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE COLLEGE SPORTS TEAM? WHO DO YOU

THINK WILL MAKE IT TO THE FINAL FOUR?”

“Duke, Duke Blue Devils.”

“All four teams? Duke,

North Carolina, Gonzaga and

Tennessee is probably the

four.”

“My favorite men’s Basketball

team for college is UW...”

“I think that the UW men’s

basketball team will make

it to the final four because I

remember one year, awhile

ago, we almost did good.”

“Taxes Longhorns.”

The Final Four will be the

Virginia Cavaliers, Duke,

Taxes, and Gonzaga.”

- EZEKIEL CARLSON - JOSEPH RASMUSSEN - YANG YANG

18

/ piercepioneernews.com

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5


Cartoon Corner

Coffee Break

Studious

A Desire To Be... ______________

created by Karley Wise

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5 piercepioneernews.com / 19


How do you like your movie popcorn?

1. Which actor or actress won Best Actor/Actress award for playing opposite sex?

2. Who was the first female director to win award for Best Motion Picture?

After you have written out your answers,

check the answer key below to see

how many you got right.

3. From which Queen song did Lady Gaga create her stage name?

4. The Wakanda scenes in “Black Panther” were shot in the Cape region of South

Africa, native home of Nelson Mandala. True or false?

5. How many Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movies have grossed over $1

billion?

6. Who said, “The streets of heaven are too crowded with angels; we know their

names.” in his Academy Award acceptance speech?

7. The Live Aid concert scene in the movie “Bohemian Rhapsody” was

shot on location at Wembley Stadium in England. True or false?

1-3 right answers: Your bag of

popcorn is plain.

3-6 right answers: Your popcorn has

butter

All answers are correct: Your popcorn

comes with a soda

Bonus: Unlimited refills

Answers: 1. Linda Hunt for “The Year Of Living Dangerously” (1982) 2. Kathyrn Bigelow won twice. The first was for “The Hurt Locker”

(2008); the second was for “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012) 3. “Radio Ga Ga” 4. False – they were shot on a film set in Georgia (the state, not the

country). 5. Five – “The Avengers” (2012), “Iron Man 3” (2013), “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2015), “Captain America: Civil War” (2016) and “Black

Panther” (2018) 6. Tom Hanks, Best Lead Actor in “Philadelphia” (1994) 7. This is a trick question. The movie recreation scene was shot on an exact

replica set of Wembley Stadium set up at Bovingdon Airfield. Bonus point if you said the movie scene was taken from the concert’s live footage.

BA

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/ piercepioneernews.com

CWU is an EEO/AA/Title IX Institution. For accommodation email: DS@cwu.edu.

March 4, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 5

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