Saturday, March 30, 2019—Garrick Ohlsson plays Brahms—CAMA's Masterseries at The Lobero Theatre, Santa Barbara

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SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 2019, 8:00 PM

CAMA's Masterseries at The Lobero Theatre
Season Sponsorship: Esperia Foundation

Garrick Ohlsson, piano

ALL-BRAHMS PROGRAM:
Piano Sonata No.2 in F-sharp minor, Op.2
6 Klavierstücke, Op.118
3 Intermezzi, Op.117
Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel, Op.24

Since his triumph at the 1970 Chopin Piano Competition, Garrick Ohlsson has established himself worldwide as one of the great American piano masters of the past 50 years, a musician of magisterial interpretive and technical prowess. Though long regarded as a leading exponent of the music of Frédéric Chopin, he commands an enormous repertoire, including more than 80 concertos ranging from Haydn and Mozart to works of the 21st Century. He returns to the Lobero for an all-Brahms recital on the heels of his virtuosic
March 2017 performance for CAMA of the Brahms Piano Concerto No.2 with the St. Petersburg Philharmonic.

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G A R R I C K O H L S S O N

piano

Photo by Dario Acosta

Saturday, March 30, 2019, 8:00 PM

Lobero Theatre, Santa Barbara


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CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

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Johannes

Brahms

masterseries at THE LOBERO THEATRE

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

GARRICK OHLSSON PIANO

Saturday, March 30, 2019 at 8:00 PM

Lobero Theatre, Santa Barbara

JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata in F-sharp minor, Op.2

(1833–1897) Allegro non troppo energico

Andante espressione

Scherzo: Allegro

Finale: Allegro non troppo

INTERMISSION

Six Pieces, Op.118

Intermezzo in A minor

Intermezzo in A major

Ballade in G minor

Intermezzo in F minor

Romanze in F major

Intermezzo in E-flat minor

Three Intermezzi, Op.117

Intermezzo in E-flat major

Intermezzo in B-flat minor

Intermezzo in C-sharp minor

Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel, Op.24

Steinway Piano

Exclusive Management: Opus 3 Artists • 470 Park Avenue South • 9th Floor North • New York NY 10016

CAMA thanks our generous sponsors who have made this evening’s performance possible:

Masterseries Season Sponsor: Esperia Foundation

Co-Sponsors

Anonymous • Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris • The CAMA Women's Board

Program subject to change.

We request that you switch off cellular phones, watch alarms and pager signals during the performance. The photographing

or sound recording of this concert or possession of any device for such photographing or sound recording is prohibited.

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

7


Photo by Dario Acosta.

GARRICK OHLSSON

pianist

Since his triumph as winner of

the 1970 Chopin International

Piano Competition, pianist Garrick Ohlsson

has established himself worldwide

as a musician of magisterial interpretive

and technical prowess. Although long regarded

as one of the world’s leading exponents

of the music of Frédéric Chopin,

Mr. Ohlsson commands an enormous

repertoire, which ranges over the entire

piano literature. A student of the late

Claudio Arrau, Mr. Ohlsson has come to

be noted for his masterly performances

of the works of Mozart, Beethoven and

Schubert, as well as the Romantic repertoire.

To date he has at his command

more than 80 concertos, ranging from

Haydn and Mozart to works of the 21st

century, many commissioned for him.

This season he launches an ambitious

8 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


project spread over two seasons exploring

the complete solo piano works of

Brahms in four different programs. The

cycle will be heard in New York, San Francisco,

and Montreal with individual programs

in London, Warsaw and a number

of cities across North America. In concerto

repertoire ranging from Beethoven

to Brahms, Rachmaninoff, Barber and

Busoni, he will return to the New York

Philharmonic; Cleveland Orchestra; Philadelphia,

Boston, Baltimore, Houston

and Seattle Symphonies, concluding the

season in Indianapolis with all the Rachmaninoff

concerti programmed in one

weekend.

A frequent guest with the orchestras

in Australia, Mr. Ohlsson has recently visited

Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney,

Adelaide and Hobart as well as the New

Zealand Symphony in Wellington and

Auckland. An avid chamber musician, Mr.

Ohlsson has collaborated with the Cleveland,

Emerson, and Tokyo string quartets,

and in the spring will tour with the

Takacs Quartet and the Boston Chamber

Players in Istanbul, Berlin, Munich, Warsaw,

Luxembourg and Prague. Together

with violinist Jorja Fleezanis and cellist

Michael Grebanier, he is a founding member

of the San Francisco-based FOG Trio.

Passionate about singing and singers,

Mr. Ohlsson has appeared in recital with

such legendary artists as Magda Olivero,

Jessye Norman, and Ewa Podleś.

Mr. Ohlsson can be heard on the Arabesque,

RCA Victor Red Seal, Angel, BMG,

Delos, Hänssler, Nonesuch, Telarc, Hyperion

and Virgin Classics labels. His ten-disc

set of the complete Beethoven Sonatas,

for Bridge Records, has garnered critical

acclaim, including a GRAMMY® for Vol.

3. His recording of Rachmaninoff’s Concerto

No. 3, with the Atlanta Symphony

and Robert Spano, was released in 2011.

In the fall of 2008 the English label Hyperion

re-released his 16-disc set of the

Complete Works of Chopin followed

in 2010 by all the Brahms piano variations,

“Goyescas” by Enrique Granados,

and music of Charles Tomlinson Griffes.

Most recently on that label are Scriabin’s

Complete Poèmes, Smetana Czech Dances,

and ètudes by Debussy, Bartok and

Prokofiev. The latest CDs in his ongoing

association with Bridge Records are

the Complete Scriabin Sonatas, “Close

Connections,” a recital of 20th-Century

pieces, and two CDs of works by Liszt. In

recognition of the Chopin bicentenary in

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

9


2010, Mr. Ohlsson was

featured in a documentary

The Art of Chopin”

co-produced by Polish,

French, British and

Chinese television stations.

Most recently,

both Brahms concerti

and Tchaikovsky’s second

piano concerto

were released on live

performance recordings

with the Melbourne and Sydney

Symphonies on their own recording labels,

and Mr. Ohlsson was featured on

Dvorak’s piano concerto in the Czech

Philharmonic’s recordings of the composer’s

complete symphonies & concertos,

released July of 2014 on the Decca

label.

A native of White Plains, N.Y., Garrick

Ohlsson began his piano studies at

the age of 8, at the Westchester Conservatory

of Music; at 13 he entered The

Juilliard School, in New York City. His

musical development has been influenced

in completely different ways by a

succession of distinguished teachers,

most notably Claudio Arrau, Olga Barabini,

Tom Lishman, Sascha Gorodnitzki,

Photo by Bartek Sadowski

Rosina Lhévinne and

Irma Wolpe. Although

he won First Prizes at

the 1966 Busoni Competition

in Italy and

the 1968 Montréal

Piano Competition, it

was his 1970 triumph

at the International

Chopin Competition

in Warsaw, where he

won the Gold Medal

(and remains the single American to

have done so), that brought him worldwide

recognition as one of the finest

pianists of his generation. Since then

he has made nearly a dozen tours of Poland,

where he retains immense personal

popularity. Mr. Ohlsson was awarded the

Avery Fisher Prize in 1994 and received

the 1998 University Musical Society Distinguished

Artist Award in Ann Arbor,

MI. He is the 2014 recipient of the Jean

Gimbel Lane Prize in Piano Performance

from the Northwestern University Bienen

School of Music, and in August 2018 the

Polish Deputy Culture Minister awarded

him with the Gloria Artis Gold Medal for

cultural merit. He is a Steinway Artist

and makes his home in San Francisco. n

10 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


ALL-BRAHMS PROGRAM

Notes by Howard Posner

Brahms likely composed his Sonata

in F-sharp minor, along with four others,

in 1852, when he was 19, but the first specific

mention of it is in a November 1853

letter in which he told Robert Schumann

that he would “select the sonatas in C

major and F-sharp minor to be [published

as] my opus 1 and 2” now that his music

was suddenly in demand.

Schumann was the reason his music

was suddenly in demand. Brahms had

spent all of October in the Dusseldorf

home of Robert and his wife Clara, who

was then a mother of seven, manager of

Robert’s affairs, and one of the best pianists

in the world. Both Schumanns were

entranced with the 20-year-old, recognizing

him as a genius as soon as they heard

him play his music. Even before Brahms

left Dusseldorf, Robert, one of the more

prominent musical journalists of the day,

had written a short article for the Neue

Zeitschrift für Musik that all but anointed

Brahms as the next Beethoven, “who

would bring us mastery not in gradual

developments, but rather, like Minerva,

spring fully armored from the forehead of

Jove.”

Brahms' Grave in the Central Cemetery, Vienna. Juliane Jacobs photo.

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

11


“Sitting at the piano, he began to reveal

wonderful regions. We were drawn into

ever more magical spheres. There came

about an entirely brilliant performance,

that made the piano into an orchestra of

lamenting and jubilant voices. There were

sonatas, or rather veiled symphonies…”

News of “Schumann’s young Messiah”

spread quickly. Berlioz wrote a few

weeks later of meeting “this diffident,

audacious young man who has taken it

into his head to make a new music. He

will suffer greatly.”

Indeed, the overnight stardom seems

to have enhanced Brahms’ already acute

faculty for self-criticism. Three of his

five early piano sonatas never saw the

light of day. The sonata on this program,

which Brahms did not destroy, had to

be one of the “veiled symphonies” that

so impressed the Schumanns. It’s not

hard to see why. Apart from the level of

invention and mastery of technique, the

sonata stands out for its sheer audacity.

It explores expressive extremes, explores

harmonies that would have been ultramodern

in the 1850’s, and reshapes form.

For example, in the turbulent first

movement, the sense of turmoil is maintained

even in places that were traditionally

points of release, such as the beginning

of recapitulation section, a revisiting

of the movement’s opening that was expected

to be a homecoming. In this sonata,

it is another storm without a port.

The second movement is a set of

variations on a theme loosely based on

an old German song. The scherzo that

follows is a new treatment of the same

theme, so the “A” section of the third

movement’s ABA form is actually the

fourth variation or the second movement.

The epic finale is notable both for its

wealth of ideas and for its adventurous

use of dissonance. Brahms here uses

the clash of semitones (an adjacent

black and white key on the piano played

simultaneously, for example) as part of

the texture rather than a special event.

The middle of the program offers

works of Brahms’ maturity, or as he

might have put it, decline. By 1891, he

had convinced himself that he was in the

autumn of his years, would not live much

longer, and was at the end of his composing

days. He would indeed succumb

to liver cancer in six years, but he was far

from played out. He would produce significant

music, including the four chamber

works with clarinet and his last piano

12 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


pieces. He had written virtually no piano

music in 13 years and, having now written

four of the more important symphonies

of his era, was not about to return

to the “veiled symphony” piano sonatas

that had made his reputation as a young

man. The 20 pieces published as opus

numbers 116–119, are relatively brief

and introverted. They are all in ABA form,

which makes them appear formally simple

on the surface, however complex

they actually are. The three intermezzi

(with Brahms, a fairly uninformative title,

which probably meant that he didn’t

have strong feelings about what to call

the piece) of opus 117 were published in

1892; the six pieces of opus 118 in 1893.

Your program tells you that the first

intermezzo of opus 118 is in A minor, but

take it with a grain of salt. There might

be two actual A-minor chords in its 42

measures, but mostly its harmonies drift

without settling into any particular tonality,

in a way that seems strikingly modern,

or at least very Late Romantic. The

piece is a signpost to the sort of music

Vienna would be producing soon after: it

would be only another six years before

Arnold Schoenberg composed Verklärte

Nacht. (Schoenberg himself saw Brahms

as a forebear; he published an essay titled

“Brahms the Progressive” in 1947.)

The other five pieces are less surprising.

The second is a sensuously lovely

nocturne. The third is in the manner of

scherzo with a lyrical middle section.

The fourth displays Brahms’ lifelong

love of cross-rhythms, pitting three-note

groups against two-note groups in great

proliferation. The fifth features a hymnlike

melody in the outer sections and

flighty arabesques in the middle section.

The sixth is a dark journey in the dark key

of E-flat minor. It focuses on one theme,

with more than passing resemblance to

the Dies Irae chant about judgment day

from the Catholic Requiem Mass. The

mood goes from sepulchral to heroic

and back again.

The three Intermezzi of opus 117

have been described as a sequence of

lullabies. Brahms made it obvious in

the first one, at the head of which he

had printed a quote from Johann Gottfried

Herder’s 1779 collection Volkslieder:

“Sleep softly my child, sleep softly

and sweetly. It makes me so sad to see

you cry.” Brahms notes that it is “Scottish,”

which is more or less true: the

words are from a song known as Lady

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

13


Anne Bothwell’s Lament, so called because

it includes some not-very-specific

complaints about how the baby’s father

treated the mother (any Scot would have

known that Lord Bothwell married Lady

Anne in Denmark, abandoned her and

the baby in Flanders, then went on to

abduct and marry Mary Queen of Scots,

get driven out of Scotland, and spend his

last decade in a dungeon in Denmark.)

This particular Brahms lullaby has the

lilting triple rhythm and drone bass of

the sicilienne, long a cliché for lullabies

and Nativity scenes.

The second intermezzo is more tonally

definite than the first piece of opus

118, but it does not arrive in the home

key of B-flat minor until the very end.

Brahms described the third intermezzo

as “the lullaby of all my griefs,”

with moments of starkness and darkness,

but a middle section of light.

Brahms composed the Variations

and Fugue on a Theme of Handel in 1861,

when he was emerging from something

of a downturn in a career that had been

rising since he met the Schumanns. His

first piano concerto had been badly received

in 1859, as had a “manifesto” he

had co-authored condemning the “New

German School”—essentially, the followers

of Liszt and Wagner—that had been

leaked in 1860 while it was still being

circulated among prominent German

musicians for signatures. Brahms would

avoid written polemics for the rest of his

life, but he had put himself permanently

at the head of the school of musicians

who felt that the future of music lay in

pure music: well-constructed forms that

took Beethoven’s symphonies and sonatas

as their model. The New German

Schoolers also saw themselves as the

heirs of Beethoven, but specifically the

Beethoven of the Ninth Symphony’s choral

celebration of brotherhood: following

Wagner’s lead, they believed music

needed to be about something other

than itself, and the future lay in musical

drama and programmatic tone poems.

So it is no coincidence that a year

after the fizzled manifesto, Brahms produced

a major work in the very traditional

variations and fugue form, on a theme

by Handel, a revered master who had

been dead for a century. (Brahms’ interest

in older music was always unusual

for the time. He was a collector of pre-

Baroque music, gave public performances

of works by Gabrieli and Schütz, and

14 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


edited a published edition of Couperin’s

music.) He gave the Handel Variations

to Clara Schumann that September as a

42nd birthday present, and she gave the

first public performance in December.

The piece was an unqualified success

that even impressed Wagner. The

one time he and Brahms met, in 1864,

Brahms played it for him (which was a

provocative thing to do, Wagner being the

person most likely to disapprove of a set

of variations), and Wagner remarked that

it was an example of what could still be

done with the old forms by someone who

knew how to use them. It was the only

nice thing he ever said about Brahms.

The theme, from Handel’s suite in B-

flat for harpsichord, is remarkable for its

limitations: it consists of short, repetitive

phrases and goes nowhere in particular.

This would be a drawback in most

contexts, but it works particularly well as

the basis for a set of variations, which is

how Handel used it in the suite. Brahms

was thus one-upping one his idols in

composing a vastly grander set of variations,

an act of supreme confidence.

Brahms’ treatment of the theme has

its own limitations. It stays largely in B-

flat major, with rare excursions to B-flat

minor and G minor, and confines itself to

the structure of Handel’s theme: two sentences

of four measures, each repeated,

although some variations have a writtenout

varied repeat of one or both strains.

And yet it explores a wealth of possibilities

and styles. Most of them are pure

Brahms, but there are some tributes to

his forebears. Variation 11, with its 18thcentury-style

arpeggiated “Alberti bass,”

is Brahms doing Mozart. The perkily canonic

variation 17 is Brahms doing Bach.

The chimey French elegance of variation

22 is Brahms doing Couperin. The epic

fugue, with its insistent exploitation of

the opening four-note figure, is Brahms

doing Beethoven to bring the whole set

to a powerful end. n

Notes © 2019, Howard Posner

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

15


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Anne-Sophie Mutter

Esa-Pekka Salonen

Santa Barbara Band

Community Arts String Orchestra

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Peggy & Kurt Anderson

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Louise & Michael Caccese

Stephen Cloud

Edward DeLoreto

Elizabeth Karlsberg &

Jeff Young

Jill Doré Kent

ALLEGRO

$2,500–$4,999

Helene & Jerry Beaver

Shelley & Mark Bookspan

Bob Boghosian &

Beth Gates Warren

Suzanne & Peyton Bucy

Roger & Sarah Chrisman, Schlinger

Chrisman Foundation

Fredericka & Dennis Emory

Ronald & Rosalind A. Fendon

Mary & Raymond Freeman

Priscilla & Jason Gaines

Dorothy & John Gardner

Shirley Ann & James H. Hurley, Jr.

William H. Kearns Foundation

Connie & Richard Kennelly

Mahri Kerley/Chaucer's Books

Chris Lancashire &

Catherine Gee

Raye Haskell Melville

Craig & Ellen Parton

Irene & Robert Stone/Stone

Family Foundation

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

Winona Fund

Lynn P. Kirst

Lois Kroc

Stefanie Lancaster Charitable

Foundation

MaryAnn Lange

Shirley & Seymour Lehrer

Dona & George McCauley

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Diana & Roger Phillips

Ann M. Picker

Dorothy Roberts

Santa Barbara Foundation

Judith F. Smith

Carrie Towbes & John Lewis

Steven Trueblood

(Continued next page.)

CAMA’s Centennial spans two concert seasons, 2018/2019 and 2019/2020.

The CAMA Board gratefully acknowledges and thanks the generosity of the

CAMA community. Donor lists will be fully updated February 2019.

All cummulative donations of $250 and above through

the 100 th and 101 st Seasons will be listed.

Please call Elizabeth Alvarez should you notice any errors on these pages – (805) 276-8270.

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

19


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION DONORS

(Continued from previous page)

ADAGIO

$1,000–$2,499

Todd & Allyson Aldrich Family Charitable Fund

Diane Boss

Wendel Bruss

Karen Bushnell

Annette & Richard Caleel

Patricia Clark

Joan & Steven Crossland

Gregory Dahlen III & Christi Walden

Jan Davis-Hadley

Margaret & Ronald Dolkart

Wendy & Rudy Eisler

Nancy Englander

Katina Etsell

Nancyann & Robert Failing

Margo & Bob Feinberg

Jill Felber

Catherine H. Gainey

Andrea & Ron Gallo

David Hamilton

Renee & Richard Hawley

Maison K

Karin Nelson & Eugene Hibbs/Maren Henle

Gerhart Hoffmeister

Joanne C. Holderman

Jackie Inskeep

Diane Johnson

Gerd & Peter Jordano

James Kearns

Sally Kinney

Karin Jacobson & Hans Koellner

Kathryn Lawhun & Mark Shinbrot

Dora Anne Little

Cynthia Brown & Arthur Ludwig

Nancy & James Lynn

Gloria & Keith Martin

Maureen Masson

Ruth & John Matuszeski

Karine & Donald McCall

Frank McGinity

Sally & George Messerlian

Russell Mueller

Northern Trust

Ellen Lehrer Orlando & Thomas Orlando

Gail Osherenko & Oran Young

Patti Ottoboni

Anne & Daniel Ovadia

Donald Rink

Tiffany & Justin Rizzo-Weaver

Regina & Rick Roney

Ada B. Sandburg

Santa Barbara Foundation

Anitra & Jack Sheen

Barbara & Wayne Smith

Marion Stewart

Milan E. Timm

Mark E. Trueblood

UCSB - Department of Music,

University of California, Santa Barbara

Esther & Tom Wachtell

Barbara & Gary Waer

Sheila Wald

Nick & Patty Weber

Dr. Robert Weinman

Judy L. Weisman

Westmont College

Victoria & Norman Williamson

Nancy & Byron Kent Wood

Cheryl & Peter Ziegler

Ann & Dick Zylstra

ANDANTE

$250–$999

Sylvia Abualy

Antoinette & Shawn Addison

Jyl & Allan Atmore

Howard A. Babus

Becky & William Banning

Patricia & Richard Blake

Edith M. Clark

Lavelda & Lynn Clock

Betsy & Kenneth Coates

Michael & Ruth Ann Collins

Nancy Donaldson

Michael K. Dunn

Ann & David Dwelley

Meg & Jim Easton

Julia Emerson

Thomas & Doris Everhart

Eunice & J. Thomas Fly

Ghita Ginberg

Nancy & Frederic Golden

Robert Hanrahan

Lorna S. Hedges

Glenn Jordan & Michael Stubbs

Debbie & Frank Kendrick

June & William Kistler

Christie & Morgan Lloyd

Barbara & Ernest Marx

Phyllis Brady & Andy Masters

Jeffrey McFarland

Patriicia & William McKinnon

Christine & James V. McNamara

Andrew Mester

James P. And Shirley F. McFarland Fund of

The Minneapolis Foundation

Peter L. Morris

Mrs. Raymond King Myerson

Maureen O'Rourke

Hensley & James Peterson

David & Dottie Pickering

Minie & Hjalmar Pompe van Meerdervoort

Patricia & Robert Reid

Rotary Club of Montecito Foundation, Inc.

Lynn & Mark Schiffmacher

Naomi Schmidt

Maureen & Les Shapiro

Halina W. Silverman

Paul and Delia Smith

Linda Stafford Burrows

Beverly & Michael Steinfeld

Jacqueline & Ronald Stevens

Elaine Sweet

Carol Vernon & Robert Turbin

Mary H. Walsh

Lorraine & Stephen Weatherford

Grace & Edward Yoon

20 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

The CAMA Women’s Board Presents

A PRE-CONCERT LECTURE SERIES

2018/2019—CENTENNIAL SEASON

Doors to The Granada Theatre will open

for the lecture 15 minutes before lecture.

Lecture seating is limited to the first 100

patrons. First come, first served.

CAMA's Women's Board gratefully

thanks the following supporters!

Symphony Level $5,000

Patricia Yzurdiaga

Sonata Level $1,000

Peter & Rebecca Adams

Mrs. Richard H. Roberts

George & Judy Writer

Rondo Level $100–$500

Anonymous (2)

Bridget B. Colleary

Edward DeLoreto

Karin Nelson & Eugene Hibbs, Jr.

and Maren N. Henle

Joanne C. Holderman

Lois Kroc

Ellen & Craig Parton

Andre & Michele Saltoun

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

Nancy & Byron Kent Wood

April 5, 2019

Friday, Lecture begins at 7:00 PM

ROYAL SCOTTISH NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

THOMAS SØNDERGÅRD, CONDUCTOR

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

ROBERT KOENIG, Professor and Vice Chair,

Department of Music, UC Santa Barbara.

Lecture will begin at 7:00 PM; doors to The Granada

Theatre will open for the lecture at 6:45 PM.

Lecture seating is limited to the first 100 patrons.

First come, first served.

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

21


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CENTENNIAL

BIRTHDAY BASH

FREE TO THE COMMUNITY

This event is made possible through the generous support of

SAGE Publishing

The Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

City of Santa Barbara

SUNKEN GARDENS

at the Santa Barbara County Courthouse

Sunday, May 19, 2019

1:00 PM–4:00 PM

While this event is free and open to the public, for planning purposes we ask that you

RSVP to events@camasb.org with the number in your party. Thank you!

22 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

OUR BUSINESS PARTNERS

Serving the public at the May 19 event!

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

23


MUSIC EDUCATION

$25,000 and above

The Walter J. & Holly O. Thomson Foundation

$10,000–$24,999

Ms. Irene Stone/ Stone Family Foundation

Mary Lloyd & Kendall Mills

$1,000–$9,999

CAMA Women's Board

William H. Kearns Foundation

Stefanie L. Lancaster Charitable Foundation

Sara Miller McCune

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr. /

The Henry E. & Lola Monroe Foundation

Performing Arts Scholarship Foundation

Westmont College

$100–$999

Becky & William Banning

Lynn P. Kirst

James P. and Shirley F. McFarland Fund

of the Minneapolis Foundation

CAMA Education Endowment

Fund Income

$10,000 AND ABOVE William & Nancy Myers

$1,000–$4,999 Linda Stafford Burrows –

This opportunity to experience great musicians excelling is

given in honor and loving memory of Frederika Voogd Burrows

to continue her lifelong passion for enlightening young people

through music and math.

Kathryn H. Phillips, in memory of Don R. Phillips

Walter J. Thomson/The Thomson Trust

$50–$999

Lynn P. Kirst

Keith J. Mautino

Performing Arts Scholarship Foundation

Marjorie S. Petersen

In honor of

Joan Crossland

NancyBell Coe & Bill Burke

Carolyn & Dennis Naiman

Nancy Lynn

Carolyn & Dennis Naiman

David Malvinni

Carolyn & Dennis Naiman

Volunteer docents are trained by CAMA’s Education Committee Chair, Joan Crossland, to deliver this program to

area schools monthly. Music enthusiasts are invited to learn more about the program and volunteer opportunities.

Call the CAMA office at (805) 966-4324 for more information about the docent program.

MEMORIAL GIFTS

Dr. Robert Failing

Mrs. Betty Meyer

Dr. Walter Picker

Ann M. Picker

Tita Lanning

Keith Mautino

Jim Ryerson

Christine Ryerson

Sharon Felber Taylor

Bridget Colleary

Cornelia Chapman

Ellicott Million

Dr. Eric Boehm

Judy Pochini

Michael Towbes

Bridget B. Colleary

Gerd & Peter Jordano

Else (Leinie) Schilling Bard

Joanne C. Holderman

Frederica Vogle Burrows

Linda Stafford Burrows

Professor Frederick F. Lange

MaryAnn Lange

Harold M. Williams

Nancy Englander

Sybil Mueller

Lynn P. Kirst

Dr. Robert Sinsheimer

& Karen Sinsheimer

Bob Boghosian &

Beth Gates Warren

Lynn R. Matteson

Lynn P. Kirst

Robert S. Grant

Robert L. Grant

Nan Burns, Dr. Greg Dahlen,

Robert S. Grant

William S. Hanrahan

Susie Vos

Bridget B. Colleary

24 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


BUSINESS SUPPORTERS

We thank the many businesses that support

CAMA's programs and events!

Laurel Abbott, Berkshire

Hathaway Luxury Properties

Alma Rosa Winey

American Riviera Bank

Babcock Winery

James P. Ballantine

Belmond El Encanto

Bertling Law Group

Bibi Ji

Black Sheep Restaurant

Blue Star Parking

Bon Fortune Style & Events

Brander Vineyard

Wes Bredall

Heather Bryden

Ca' Dario Ristorante

Camerata Pacifica

Casa Dorinda

Cebada Wine

C'est Cheese

Chaucer's Books

Chocolats du CaliBressan

Chooket Patisserie

Cottage Health System

Custom Printing

Eye Glass Factory

Felici Events

Finch & Fork

First Republic Bank

Flag Factory of

Santa Barbara

Frequency Wine

Gainey Vineyard

Grace Design Associates

Grassini Family Vineyards

Grimm’s Bluff

Colin Hayward/

The Hayward Group

Steven Handelman Studios

Hogue & Company

Holdren's Catering

Indigo Interiors

Inside Wine Santa Barbara

Islay A/V

Jardesca

Le Sorelle

Lumen Wines

Maravilla/Senior Resource

Group

Michael's Catering

Microsoft® Corporation

Mission Security

Montecito Bank & Trust

Montgomery Vineyard

Northern Trust

Oak Cottage of Santa

Barbara

Oceania Cruises

Olio e Limone/Olio Crudo

Bar/Olio Pizzeria

Opal Restaurant & Bar

Opera Santa Barbara

Pacific Coast Business Times

Pali Wine Co.

Peregrine Galleries

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Pete Clements Catering

Presqu’ile Winery

Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Renaud's Patisserie & Bistro

Rose Story Farm

Sabine Myers Design

SAGE Publishing

Santa Barbara Choral

Society

Santa Barbara Foundation

Santa Barbara Travel Bureau

Santa Barbara Winery

Stewart Fine Art

The Tent Merchant

The Upham Hotel

UCSB Arts & Lectures

Via Maestra 42

Westmont Orchestra

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

25


MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM

LIFETIME GIVING

DIAMOND

$500,000 and above

Anonymous

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and

The Becton Family Foundation

Suzanne & Russell Bock

Linda Brown*

The Andrew H. Burnett

Foundation

Esperia Foundation

The Stephen & Carla Hahn

Foundation

Judith L. Hopkinson

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

The Samuel B. & Margaret C.

Mosher Foundation

Sage Publications

The Elaine F. Stepanek

Foundation

Michael Towbes/The Towbes

Fund for the Performing Arts

SAPPHIRE

$250,000—$499,999

The CAMA Women's Board

Leni Fé Bland

Sara Miller McCune

The Wood-Claeyssens

Foundation

Patricia & Joseph Yzurdiaga

RUBY

$100,000—$249,999

Anonymous

The Adams Family Foundation

Joan C. Benson

Deborah & Peter Bertling

Virginia Castagnola-Hunter

NancyBell Coe & William Burke

Robert & Christine Emmons

Mary & Raymond Freeman

Raye & Melville H. Haskell, Jr.

Hollis Norris Fund

Dolores M. & Immanuel Hsu

Shirley Ann & James H. Hurley, Jr.

Ann Jackson Family Foundation

Janet & Thomas Kelly/Winona

Fund

Shirley & Seymour Lehrer

John & Lucy Lundegard

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr./

The Henry E. & Lola Monroe

Foundation

Montecito Bank & Trust

Bob & Val Montgomery

Kathleen & John Moseley/

The Nichols Foundation

Nancy & William G. Myers

Michele & Andre Saltoun

The Santa Barbara Foundation

Jan & John G. Severson

Judith F. & Julian Smith

Jeanne C. Thayer

The Walter J. & Holly O.

Thomson Foundation

Union Bank

Marilyn & H.Wallace Vandever

The Wallis Foundation

Nancy & Byron Kent Wood

George & Judy Writer

EMERALD

$50,000—$99,999

Anonymous

Anonymous

Anonymous

Ruth Appleby

Linda & Peter Beuret

Edward & Sue Birch

Dan & Meg Burnham

Louise & Michael Caccese

Jane & Jack Catlett

Roger & Sarah Chrisman,

Schlinger Chrisman Foundation

Bridget & Robert Colleary

Suzanne & Maurice Faulkner

Arthur R. Gaudi

Sherry & Robert Gilson

George H. Griffiths and Olive J.

Griffiths Charitable Fund

Janette "Dotsy" Main Hellmann

& Richard Hellmann

Joanne C. Holderman

Natalia & Michael Howe

Hutton Parker Foundation

Ellen & Peter Johnson

Lynn P. Kirst & Lynn R. Matteson

Lois Sandra Kroc

Betty & Max Meyer

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

Craig & Ellen Parton

Austin H. Peck

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Marjorie & Hugh Petersen/

La Arcada Trust Corp

Diana & Roger Phillips

Kathryn H. Phillips

Theodore Plute & Larry Falxa

Lady Leslie & Viscount Paul

Ridley-Tree

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

TOPAZ

$25,000—$49,999

Barbara & Edward Bakewell

Helene & Jerry Beaver

Bob Boghosian &

Beth Gates Warren

Alison & Jan Bowlus

Helen & Andrew Burnett

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Huguette Clark

Cecelia & Leonard Dalsemer

Edward DeLoreto and

William DeLoreto

Patricia & Larry Durham

Nancyann & Robert Failing

Priscilla & Jason Gaines

Preston B. & Maurine M.

Hotchkis Family Foundation

The George Frederick

Jewett Foundation

Patricia Kaplan

Elizabeth Karlsberg &

Jeff Young

William H. Kearns Foundation

Jill Doré Kent

As of February 14, 2019

26 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


Otto Korntheuer/The Harold L.

Wyman Foundation

Laura & Robert Kuhn

Chris Lancashire & Catherine Gee

Lillian & Jon Lovelace

Leatrice & Eli Luria

Marilyn & Frank Magid

Ruth McEwen

Frank McGinity

Sheila Bourke McGinity

Mary & James Morouse

Pat Hitchcock O'Connell

Efrem Ostrow Living Trust

Outhwaite Foundation

Carolyn & Ernest Panosian

John & Ellen Pillsbury

Mary Dell Pritzlaff & John Pritzlaff

Mary Louise & Kenneth W. Riley

The Shanbrom Family Foundation

Anitra & Jack Sheen

Linda Stafford Burrows

Marion & William Stewart

Irene & Robert Stone/Stone Family

Foundation

The Walter J. & Holly O. Thomson

Foundation

Ina & Martin Tornallyay

Carol & Edward R. Valentine

Susie & Hubert Vos

The Elizabeth Firth Wade

Endowment Fund

Marjorie K. & Roderick S. Webster

Westmont College

AMETHYST

$10,000—$24,999

Anonymous

Rebecca & Peter Adams

Christina & David Allison

Peggy & Kurt Anderson

Bernice & Mortimer Andron

Sally & Robert Arthur

Marta Babson

Marjorie & J.W. Bailey

Else Schilling Bard

Joan C. Benson

Leslie & Philip Bernstein

Frank Blue & Lida Light Blue

Toos & Erno Bonebakker

The CAMA Fellows

Margo & Charles Chapman

Chubb Sovereign

Carnzu A. Clark

Nan Burns & Dr. Gregory Dahlen

Karen Davidson, M.D.

Fredericka & Dennis Emory

Julie & William Esrey

Ronald & Rosalind A. Fendon

Audrey Hillman Fisher Foundation

David W. Fritzen/DWF Magazines,

DWF Media

International

Catherine H. Gainey

Tish Gainey & Charles Roehm

Dorothy & John Gardner

Kay & Richard Glenn

Corinna Gordon, Larry Dale Gordon

Dorothy & Freeman Gosden

Dianne & Robert S. Grant

Beverly & Bruce Hanna

Dolores & Robert Hanrahan

Lorraine C. Hansen

Margret & David F. Hart

Betty & Stan Hatch

Renee & Richard Hawley

Ruth & Alan Heeger

Karin Nelson & Eugene Hibbs/

Maren Henle

Mary & Campbell Holmes

Elizabeth & Gary Johnson

Glenn Jordan & Michael Stubbs

Martha & Peter Karoff

Mahri Kerley/Chaucer's Books

Linda & Michael Keston

Kum Su Kim

Catherine Lloyd/Actief-cm, Inc.

MaryAnn & Frederick Lange

Dora Anne Little

Cynthia Brown & Arthur Ludwig

Leatrice Luria

Ruth & John Matuszeski

Keith Mautino

Dona & George McCauley

Jayne Menkemeller

Sybil & Russell Mueller

Myra & Spencer Nadler

Fran & John Nielsen

Joanne & Alden Orput

Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Partridge

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Patricia & Carl Perry

John Perry

Justyn & Ray Person

Susan & James Petrovich

Anne & C.Wesley Poulson

Susannah Rake

Jaquelin & Frank Reed

Jack Revoyr

Betty & Don Richardson

Grace Jones Richardson Trust

Dorothy Roberts

The Roberts Bros. Foundation

Regina & Rick Roney

Rebecca Ross

Betty Barrett & John Saladino

William E. Sanson

Maryan & Richard Schall

Nancy & William Schlosser

Pat & Roby Scott

Sally & Jan E.G. Smit

Constance & C.Douglas Smith

Betty J. Stephens

Diane & Selby Sullivan

The Godric Foundation

Joseph Thomas

Milan E. Timm

Carrie Towbes & John Lewis

Mark E. Trueblood

Steven Trueblood

Drs. Shirley & Kenneth Tucker

Barbara & Gary Waer

Lisa Bjornsen Wolf &

David Russell Wolf

Ann & Dick Zylstra

*promised

CAMA AT THE LOBERO THEATRE - GARRICK OHLSSON

27

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