NZPhotographer Issue 18, April 2019

nzphotographer

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ISSUE 18, April 2019

INTERVIEW WITH

EMRE SIMTAY

PLANNING & CAPTURING

A PHOTO STORY

BY JAMES GILBERD

MIND GAMES:

HIDING BEHIND THE LENS

FRESH SHOOTS:

SPRING PEOPLE'S CHOICE

AWARD WINNER

HOW TO CAPTURE:

AUTUMN COLOURS

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

April 2019

1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 18 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

In this issue, we are putting the

focus on Street Photography.

Get inspired to walk the streets

with your camera to capture

everyday life at home and

abroad in our interview with

Emre Simtay and in Behind the

Shot with Mary Hutchinson where

you'll learn what makes street

photography so interesting.

If you've always been shy of

taking candid photos on the

street, Ana gives some insight

into getting more comfortable in

approaching people so you've

no excuse not to give it a go!

Think you've got a great street

photography shot already?

Read our photo review and see if

you could improve your own shot

with the tips and tricks offered.

We also have James Gilberd sharing his thoughts on how to put together

a photo story, explaining that a set of 6 images can convey an event,

emotion, or place better than a single image. Plus, Brendon takes us on

a return journey to Punakaiki as he enjoys time out in nature walking the

river and beach. We also get to learn about the photographer who won

the Fresh Shoots People's Choice Award with her 'After the Storm' poppies

photo.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 18

April 2019

Cover Photo

Emre Simtay

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

ana@excio.io

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone 04 889 29 25

or Email hello@excio.io

2 NZPhotographer


REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He is an avid tramper

who treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio,

Ana's photography

journey started many

years ago with one of the

first Kodak film cameras.

She loves exploring the

unseen macro world and

capturing genuine people's

emotions.

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer who

teaches photography

workshops and runs

photography tours. He

is the founder of New

Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2019 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

April 2019

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CONTENTS

18

10

6

9

10

14

18

26

28

30

32

9

INTERVIEW WITH EMRE SIMTAY

PUNAKAIKI 2.0

by Brendon Gilchrist

HOW TO CAPTURE: AUTUMN COLOURS

by Richard Young

IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

FRESH SHOOTS: SPRING PEOPLE'S

CHOICE AWARD WINNER

INTERVIEW WITH EMRE SIMTAY

PLANNING AND CAPTURING A PHOTO STORY

By James Gilberd

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Mary Hutchinson

MIND GAMES: HIDING BEHIND THE LENS

by Ana Lyubich

PORTFOLIO: BEST READERS'

SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

IMPROVING YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

MIND GAMES:

HIDING BEHIND THE LENS

HOW TO CAPTURE: AUTUMN COLOURS

30


F2.8, 20s, ISO10000

Punakaiki 2.0

by Brendon Gilchrist

In Issue 4, I touched on the small west coast town of

Punakaiki, or what I called Jurassic Park. Well, I’ve been

back! It is rare for me to be on the West Coast aka the

Wet Coast but thankfully, I got lucky with the weather

with only a little bit of rain.

Punakaiki is surrounded by limestone landscapes of

many different forms including the mysterious and

popular pancakes rocks, so perfectly stacked upon

each other that no one knows how/why they formed

exactly like that. These pancake rocks and the blowholes

are the main attraction of Punakaiki and amazingly are

still free to walk around and enjoy.

By day this place is always busy, usually busier at high tide

just in case the swells are coming from the right direction

to create an updraft of water and air for the blowholes

to activate. But at night there are very few people

around, maybe 1 or 2.

I decided to visit the platform that overlooks the

pancake rocks one night to capture the milky way over

the mountains. It was a good night to continue playing

with my new Nikkor 14–24 2.8g. I have been missing out

on that extra 14mm of focal length for a long time now

and am happy to be able to shoot ultra wide angled

shots.

On the one rainy morning I got when I visited, I walked

beside the river on the beautiful and well maintained

Pororari River Track with the towering limestone cliffs

that rise up to 100 metres above the water. I don’t know

about you but I find walking in the rain so refreshing, the

smell of fresh rainwater pattering on the tree leaves,

slowly dripping down to the forest floor, it’s refreshing to

be in that moment when nothing else matters but that

sense of being in nature and enjoying what you are

about to do – Capture some moody landscapes!

6 NZPhotographer


F11, 1/250s, ISO64

F16, 1/3s, ISO31


As the track weaves besides the river, taking you

on a magical journey through a land locked in time

that only nature can touch, you come to viewing

points overlooking the river and there are a couple of

opportunities to get down to the river edge or even walk

into the river to take some photos looking up the river

from a completely different angle that many won’t see.

There’s so much to photograph and marvel at from the

nikau palm trees to the native flaxes and the walls of

limestone leading you out up the river into an unknown

world not forgetting the wildlife with the native Kereru

munching on the berries. I found an amazing looking

tree to photograph, it sits right beside the river and towers

above all the other trees in an iconic location of this

area.

Sunsets can be very epic on the West Coast but on my

last evening it was raining on and off and I thought about

not going out to shoot at the pancakes as it seemed like

no light was going to shine through and that it would be

a boring dull grey sunset – I’m so glad I went out anyway!

The sunset was perfect with a gap in the cloud allowing

enough light to shine through creating some epic light

rays and a hint of golden sun colours. It was hard to

believe there were only a few other photographers here

witnessing this event but I’m glad to have captured this

and have my personal take on Punakaiki at sunset as

I love storms and sunsets and I’ve been wanting a sunset

shot like this for a long time but actually thought it was

too easy and not my style. As I grow as a photographer

and a person I learn to appreciate the easy and the not

so easy locations, everything is unique and different for its

own different reasons.

Driving from Punakaiki on the Great Coast Ride you get

the sense that you’re in a forest driving beside the coast.

It’s hard to keep your eyes on the road at times because

the impressive view is always evolving into something

new, the coastline changing from charming calm bays

to rugged coastline with large rock outcrops.

This small area has everything you need to survive and

everything you want as a photographer. I assure you that

unique inspiration awaits so pack your bags because this

place will blow you away, whether it’s raining or not!

A TIP FOR SEEING THE BLOW HOLES:

• Photography is about planning so if you want the

shot you need to plan to get it. To see the Punakaiki

Pancake rocks blow holes in action the best swells

you need to look for are at high tide though not

when there is a south-westerly swell. Saying this, they

are not always blowing at high tide so luck, patience,

and perseverance are required!

ASTRO PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS:

• Always shoot in raw, the level of detail, especially in

the shadows, will outweigh anything shot in JPG or

any other format.

• To find focus in the pitch black is very hard. Use

the live view and zoom in (on the screen) onto the

brightest star, manual focus and twist the focus ring

until the star is nice and sharp.

F16, 1/5s, ISO64


HOW TO CAPTURE: AUTUMN COLOURS

Capture the best of this year's Autumn colours with tips by Richard Young

Autumn offers one of the best times for photography with landscapes that are full of burnt oranges, warm

yellows, and other beautiful autumn shades. Shooting during the ‘golden hour’ in autumn will add a soft, warm

glow to colours that are already vibrant and also increases the sense of atmosphere that is conveyed by the

scene. Mood is often key when photographing in autumn, so don’t be afraid to go out with your camera on

rainy days. Forests, lakes, and rivers are good options to photograph in overcast conditions.

Reflections: Bright colours and bold shapes become

abundant in autumn, reflections can be used to

enhance these elements.

Abstracts: Instead of photographing a grand view,

try capturing a smaller more intimate shot. Make the

most of the fallen leaves and look for little details,

taking time to scout the scene trying to find a subject

that catches your eye.

Autumn Colours at Lake Wanaka

Trees: Look for a single tree in a wide sweeping

landscape, this can create a dramatic shot. Also, try

shooting under the forest canopy looking up at the

foliage or using natural features to frame your subject.

Use a Circular Polariser: This filter is your best friend

in autumn whether you’re in the forest or capturing

an open scenic view. On rainy or overcast days a

polariser will remove unwanted glare from wet shiny

leaves.

VISIT SOME OF THE SOUTH ISLAND BEST AUTUMN LANDSCAPE LOCATIONS ON A 7-DAY SOUTH ISLAND

PHOTOGRAPHY TOUR IN APRIL WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


Improving Your Photography

Photo Review Session

by Excio

F9, 1/800s, ISO400

REVIEW BY:

Almin Vranac

THE BEGINNING OF THE DAY BY DEJAN KIJEVCANIN

THE MAIN STREET IN THE OLD TOWN IN BELGRADE, SERBIA

INITIAL THOUGHTS AND PLUS POINTS

The first thing I like about this photo is that it's done

in black and white which enhances the edges of

the buildings and the patterns. Shooting street and

architecture photography in black and white is a

really common and well received technique in the

photography world.

The second thing which I also love is the lighting in

this picture. To be precise, the great thing about it is

how the centre of the scene is lit by natural sunlight,

making it a bit overexposed (but not too much)

while the sides of the photo are in the shadows and

a bit darker. This gives you the feel like you're really

there, giving the viewer a better experience, which is

something that we should strive for with every photo.

10 NZPhotographer


POSSIBLE

IMPROVEMENTS

The first thing that catches

my eye right away about

this photo is the mistake of

not using the rule of thirds

properly or not using it at

all. Let's take a look at the

photo explanation:

We should always aim to

put our objects on vertical

lines or on the meeting

points where vertical and

horizontal lines meet (this is

for smaller objects). For this

particular photo, we should

be putting the ends of the

side by side buildings on

each of the vertical lines

to make it more visually

pleasing.

Another pretty significant thing

to improve in this photo is the

asymmetry.

As we can see from the photo

explanation, we should base

our symmetry around the

imagined line that is set in the

middle of the gap between

the two parallel buildings.

What does that mean? It

means that this line should

go through the center of

our scene, slicing it into two

identical halves. We should

always tend to recreate what

is on the left side of the line on

the right side too. Of course,

this is only applicable if the

scene is set up to allow us to

do that but this photo with the

two parallel buildings of similar

sizes is the perfect occasion.

April 2019

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In this photo there are two main

ways we can achieve this:

1. For the first option, the best one,

we should adjust the scene setup

before we take the shot. What

do I mean? Well, in this case, that

means that we should move a few

steps to the left so the centre of the

gap between the two buildings is

right in the middle of our scene.

Since this way of achieving a

symmetrical scene isn't always

an available option (for various

reasons), there's an alternative.

2. Cropping. When the photo is

already taken and we don't have

another one that is shot better, the

only way to achieve symetry is to

crop the photo according to our

reference line. That means that

we should crop the photo until our

imaginary symmetrical line gets to

the middle of our newly cropped

photo. See the photo explanation

on the right.

As we can see, the cropped photo below looks a lot more professional

and more visually appealing.

Ready to take your photography to the next level? Get friendly yet informative tips and advice when you join Excio.


A new generation community

for passionate photographers and image lovers

Proven to increase awareness of your photography,

improve your skills and give you

the confidence to succeed.

LEARN MORE

www.excio.io


FRESH SHOOTS: SPRING PEOPLE'S C

Vandy Pollard

14 NZPhotographer


HOICE AWARD WINNER:

POPPIES

F2.8, 1/1000s, 70mm

‘Beauty after the storm’

April 2019

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INTERVIEW WITH VANDY POLLARD

HI VANDY, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF...

I live in Wellington on the South Coast, Lyall Bay and

have always been a keen amateur photographer.

I completed a Bachelor of fine arts (BFA) and majored in

Graphic Design/Photography back in 1985 at Canterbury

University Art School where I was using an Olympus OM2n

which was a single lens reflex film system camera.

I have become more serious about my photography

in the last couple of years since purchasing my first

DSLR, a 80D Canon.

I have a post-graduate diploma in Secondary

teaching but work as a regional manager covering

Central North Island for the National Advocacy Trust/

Health and Disability Consumer Advocacy Service

which is a service provided under the Health and

Disability Commissioner Act 1994.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS A

PHOTOGRAPHER?

I consider myself a serious amateur photographer and

in my spare time photograph most days.

I’m a keen gardener but despite my winning shot for

the people’s choice awards, flowers/plants are not my

usual subject matter.

My main inspiration comes from nature as I live on the

South Coast of Wellington, love walking and enjoy

varied landscape and birdlife on the coast. I also

frequently visit Zealandia Ecosanctuary in Wellington

to photograph the wildlife/birds.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR POPPIES SHOT...

I had purchased an EF 70-200mm f 2.8L IS II lens and

was keen to try it out with my 80D.

I entered this particular photograph of the last of the

poppies with just a few petals precariously hanging onto a

hint of summer colour as the change of seasons intrigued

me. I found such beauty in the spent blooms in sharp

contrast to the richness of the trees in the background.

I chose to use a shallow depth of field to focus on the

poppies in the foreground and to achieve a soft focus

for the background trees. My composition is almost as

shot in camera with only minor cropping/editing.

HOW DID YOU FEEL WHEN YOU FOUND OUT

YOU HAD WON THE PEOPLE’S CHOICE?

I was incredibly excited as I haven’t entered many

competitions before and I had actually forgotten I

had entered this photograph! Winning the people’s

choice was special as people liked the photo I had

entered.

HOW DID YOU FIND OUT ABOUT THE

COMPETITION AND WHAT MOTIVATED YOU

TO ENTER?

I attended a Wellington Photography meet up

group hosted by yourselves at the Wellington

Botanic Gardens in October last year as I

wanted to push myself out of my comfort zone of

photographing wildlife and landscape, but had

also learned of the Fresh Shoots photography

competition through the Wellington Photographic

Society. I entered a few photographs from this

meetup walk and another workshop run by the

Wellington Photographic Society at the Botanic

Gardens that month.

HAS WINNING THE PEOPLES CHOICE

INSPIRED YOU TO TAKE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY FURTHER?

Winning has definitely inspired me to take a few

more risks with my photography, to not become

complacent with my usual subject matter, and to

explore other places with my camera.

Since submitting my photo to the competition I

have completed a few workshops. One with wildlife

photographer Chris Helliwell on a trip to Zealandia

and most recently a one day long exposure

workshop hosted by Richard Young.

Learning new techniques and photographing/

learning from others has helped me grow as a

photographer and I am keen to find an opportunity

to enter more competitions and share my

photographs.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO OTHER

PHOTOGRAPHERS?

Don’t be afraid to get out of your comfort zone.

Find other people who also enjoy photography and

who share your passion - join a local photography

group or society, find local meetups, don’t be

afraid to ask for help, exchange ideas, share your

photos, explore, and experiment. Be brave, push

your own boundaries, and continue to challenge

yourself and grow.

www.instagram.com/coastal_wanderer_nz

The Fresh Shoots Autumn season competition is now open - Submit your photos from Wellington

Botanical Gardens and it could be your photo featured here in a future issue!


FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

We’re inviting photographers to highlight all the wonderful things that make the Wellington

Botanic Garden much more than a garden, while encouraging photographers to focus on

the garden season by season.

For prizes and full Terms & Conditions see: www.excio.io/freshshoots

The competition is split into quarterly competitions based on each of the seasons:

Summer Autumn Winter

15 December -

22 March 2019

23 March -

21 June 2019

22 June -

20 September 2019

CATEGORIES

NATURE

PEOPLE &

EVENTS

CREATIVE

PARTNERS

April 2019

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Interview with

Emre Simtay

EMRE, PLEASE TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOU…

I was born in Germany, but returned to my parents’ native

Turkey in my late childhood and studied there. I came out

to New Zealand in 2005 and attended Victoria University in

Wellington to study Computer Science and upon graduation,

began a career as a software developer.

WHEN AND HOW DID YOU START LEARNING

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I developed an interest in photography with my wife’s

encouragement about seven years ago. I taught myself all about

taking photos and since then I have been constantly taking

photos and documenting what’s happening around me.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE OF

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I don’t think I ever really focused on one particular style or

category. I just enjoy taking what attracts my eye and adjust to

the current environment. As I am mostly out shooting in the

city, I usually do street, documentary style, urban and portrait

photography. Extraordinary things never fail to catch my eye.

I constantly observe my surroundings and anything that tells a

story about society or the world around me will get captured on

my camera.

WHAT CAMERAS DO YOU HAVE?

Currently, I have a full frame Sony A7ii with Zeiss 35mm F2.8

and Canon FD f1.2 lens. The camera I always carry with me is

an APS-C Fujifilm XF‐10. It has f.28 18mm fixed prime lens with

APS-C crop sensor and the snapshot feature, very small and very

light compact camera with all the features I can find on a DSLR.

I also have film cameras, a medium format Yashica 635 and a

35mm Canon AE‐1 with 50mm f1.8 prime lens but I don’t do film

photography very often as I am not a patient person and usually

do it only on weekends when I have the time to fiddle around!

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO PICK UP YOUR

CAMERA, ESPECIALLY WHEN ‘LIFE’ TAKES

OVER…

The thought of looking through my photos in the future and

seeing how life around us has evolved motivates me. It makes

me go out to do photography and makes me feel like I should be

shooting even more.

TELL US ABOUT THE COVER PHOTO.

This was taken whilst we were showing our Wellingtonian

friends around Istanbul. We went to the Hagia Sophia museum

and there was a tourist lady posing for her friend. I liked how

the light was highlighting her dance with the sunlight so took a

photo!

WOULD YOU SAY THAT YOU’RE ALWAYS

LEARNING AND PUSHING YOURSELF TO

CAPTURE BETTER IMAGES? HOW DO YOU DO

THAT?

I guess so! Yes, I try to push myself to capture better images.

I sometimes take a short break from photography and go

through all my photos and re-evaluate them. I always ask myself

what makes a good photo and the answer to this question has

changed many times since I started shooting.

When I first started photography, I mostly focused on using

negative spaces correctly, having the right exposure and making

one nicely composed beautiful photo then I realised I needed

to study my subject better and try different perspectives and

I believe this improved my photography a lot.

Once I started feeling confident, I decided I needed to shoot

more often so I did photography walks every day for couple

years and focused on just taking photos – I mean without much

thinking, whatever I found interesting I took a photo of. I would

then go through all my photos to analyse them and think about

how I could improve them and what I would do differently next

time.

WE DID A BEHIND THE SHOT FEATURE WITH YOU

IN ISSUE 6 (APRIL 2018), HOW WOULD YOU

SAY YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY HAS CHANGED/

IMPROVED SINCE THEN?

My photography has changed a little. I carry more lightweight

cameras and focus less on the aesthetic and more on the story

aspect of photography, trying to produce more meaningful

photos.

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April 2019

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I prefer my photos tell a story and leave people imagining what is

going on behind the scene however, I still photograph beautiful

looking landscapes and whatever takes my attention but my goal

is to make a photo that tells a story.

YOU’VE RECENTLY RETURNED FROM A TRIP TO

TURKEY, HOW DID STREET PHOTOGRAPHY IN

TURKEY DIFFER FROM STREET PHOTOGRAPHY IN

NEW ZEALAND?

Taking photos in Turkey is much easier than New Zealand. You

can be way more productive because cities like Istanbul are

much more dynamic than here, there is a lot happening. In

Turkey, people don’t seem to care when their picture is taken.

I would say it’s like a heaven for photographers!

I find street photography is more comfortable for myself and

others around me when my camera is always ready in my

hand in a semi-pointing position. This way I don’t get so much

attention when I take the shot because I am already in position.

I have had situations where people didn’t want their photo taken

(you can tell from their body language) and in that case, I point

my camera somewhere else and don’t take the photo. Also

sometimes people tend to shield their faces when they don’t feel

comfortable. However, if I’m not sure, I always take the risk of

taking the photo when I think it’s worth it instead of regretting

not taking it later.

WHAT WAS YOUR OVERALL FAVOURITE PHOTO

FROM TURKEY?

I have two favourites – First the one with a boy selling

bottles of water on the street. I like the colours with

blue dominating and the frame with the body of

another water seller. I also like the photo of a random

guy having dinner on the street with his friends, but

his friend was too shy on this occasion and did not

want to be in the photo – probably the only time this

happened while we were there.

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April 2019

21


TELL US ABOUT YOUR ‘WORKING PORTRAITS’ –

WHY DO YOU ENJOY CAPTURING THESE?

I notice people who are focused on their work, so focused that

they’re isolated from the outer world and will immortalise

this moment with my camera. I like it when I can make natural

looking, candid photos that capture peoples emotions and this is

much easier done when people are working, lost in the moment,

not knowing that they’re being observed. I think my Working

Portraits are important because one day the job might disappear

so I like to document this just in case for future audiences.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST LEARNING

CURVE IN TERMS OF PHOTOGRAPHY?

I think being ready and acting fast while I’m out. Adjusting to the

changing light (having the correct shutter and aperture settings

to avoid blurry shots), getting a good composition, predicting

your subject’s next move, focusing on the right spot, trying not

to attract attention and figuring out when to press the shutter

and doing all this in less than 3 seconds – otherwise you probably

missed the opportunity!

WHEN DO YOU THINK PEOPLE CAN MOVE

FROM PRACTICING PHOTOGRAPHY TO

HELPING OTHERS/TEACHING?

I think when you shoot regularly and start feeling comfortable

with your camera even when it’s on manual mode, I guess you

can help/teach beginners how to do compositions and set up a

camera correctly for likely situations. However, I believe that to

become a good photographer is a very hard thing to teach, you

need to shoot regularly and experiment with different things on

your own and not limit yourself in any way.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/wellington.nz/

www.instagram.com/perspektif.nz/

albums.excio.io/profile/Emre%20Simtay

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April 2019

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Planning and Capturing a Photo Story

In what is now known as the Golden Age of

Photography – loosely the 1930s‐1950s, the picture

story was king. The best photographers, such as Henri

Cartier-Bresson, W. Eugene Smith, and Margaret Bourke-

White were household names (try thinking of a current

photographer who’s a household name!) and magazines

such as Vu (France), Life (USA) and Picture Post (UK) were

people’s main source for images of world events. That

was until television came along and ruined it!

These magazines all had specialised picture editors,

whose craft was to edit (select, size, crop) the photos

into picture stories. Examples of famous picture stories

are W. E. Smith’s ‘Minamata’ and ‘Spanish Village’,

and our own Brian Brake’s ‘Monsoon’.

Once colour photography took over, picture editors

would place the photographer’s developed slides

(transparencies) on a light box and examine them in

detail using a loupe magnifier before selecting which

photos to print. As you can imagine, photographers and

picture editors often argued over the published story.

“How dare you crop that photo, the composition was

perfect in camera!” Or “You left out my best shot!”

Nowadays, we photographers can do our own postproduction

work so no clash of egos need occur!

If you’re a photographer who is always working towards

capturing that one perfect shot, consider putting that

approach aside and try using your camera to describe

an event or location using a number of images. Initially,

six photos is a good number to aim for.

TV programmes and movies are put together using a

variety of shots:

• Long Shot, or Wide Shot: the overall location and

people (establishing shot).

• Full Shot: a person head to foot, and surrounds.

Mid Shot: a person from the waist up.

Close Up: head and maybe shoulders.

Extreme Close Up: just the eyes, or some other

small detail.

By James Gilberd

We can use the above list as a starting point to

make our own photo story more interesting. Shoot

in both portrait (upright) and landscape (horizontal)

frames and include compositional techniques such

as high viewpoint (looking down), low angle, wide

and telephoto shots as well as including foreground

elements to frame your subject.

Before you cover an event (such as Wellington’s

CubaDupa festival), write yourself a shot list by

imagining some of the photos you might aim to get.

Try to make this as varied as you can. Having a shot list

is a professional tip to help cover-off the assignment

with varied and interesting images.

Once you have your photos, you can select the

ones for final consideration digitally. Try this: use your

software to edit down to your 20 or so photos and

print them out, postcard size (10x15cm). This is cheap

as chips. Then lay them out on a clear table and

start moving them around, putting this one next to

that, and you will see that some photos ‘talk to each

other’ while others don’t. Gradually pare it down to six

photos that tell your story.

There should be variety in your final six; an establishing

shot, a strong close up, and other things between.

Remember:

• No photo should do the same job as another.

• Find graphic and formal relationships between

shots.

• It helps if there’s some visual harmony between

them all.

• Be prepared to exclude your best shot if it doesn’t

fit the series!

By planning to work in series, editing down from a

wide selection of photos to a coherent set of images

that conveys a strong sense of the event or location,

you will quickly develop your photographic eye, your

editing skills, and learn to pre-visualise images as well

as being alert and in the moment to capture that

‘must have’ image when it presents itself.

Get your final selection together, tweak the files a

bit and go make a decent sized print of each (A4 or

larger). You’ll have a small portfolio of photos that

work together to tell a story that reaches far beyond

what a single image can tell.

Remember that the best photographers are the

ones who have learned to recognise what they’ve

shot and to know how to select and present their

photographs in their own way. This is an important

aspect to achieving a personal photographic style.


April 2019

27


Behind the Shot with Mary Hutchinson

MARY, TELL US WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU DO!

I was fortunate enough to retire a few years ago which has

given me more energy for photography which I got back

into around 2012.

I started off trying to do macro nature photography

but wasn’t good at it! However, as a result of gaining

knowledge and confidence from Wellington High

community classes and my local camera club, (Wellington

Photographic Society), I read all I could about famous

art photographers and tried my hand at capturing street

scenes. I found I liked the contrasty historic ‘look’ when

converting them to B&W.

I’m motivated by an interest in the never ending variety

of human behaviours and features, especially faces; also

clothing, quirky juxtapositions, and humorous things that

‘happen’ in everyday life in the street. I attempt to show

the common humanity we all share by making images of

members of my local community, some of whom are very

different to me.

I have a Nikon D610 with a 50mm prime and a 60mm

macro lens. I also occasionally use my phone to take

photos. I shoot in RAW and in manual mode though use

autofocus.


F8, 1/320s, ISO400

the left. I was struck by the front row, middle row, back row

positioning of the three lots of contrasting people, perhaps

reflecting their apparent ‘success’ in society?

At the time, I noticed the central seated man’s cool gear,

with labels & wording, but I only saw the interesting detail

of these, and the bonus of ‘Truly Madly DEEPLY’ on the left

hand shoppers bag later. Can retail consumerist activity

really facilitate love-like experiences?

I like the middle (horizontal) band of hands doing different

things, and the inverted ‘V’s’ formed by the shoppers legs &

their bag handles; triangles being a favourite shape for me.

It was luck that two people were drinking from cups at the

same moment; here I enjoy the (non-inverted) ‘Vs’ made

by their arms, which provides balance across the image as

well as lying across a diagonal, adding to dynamism in the

scene.

As I am familiar with this stretch of street, the line of trees

(background upper left) probably registered unconsciously

as a pleasing lighter leading line, together with the

receding overhead shop signs, to take the viewers eye from

the front to the back of the image, which adds interest to

the story told in this snapshot.

THERE ARE RARELY ANY SECOND CHANCES IN

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY, HOW DO YOU DEAL WITH

NOT MISSING THE MOMENT?

I take a lot of images if its a moving or evolving scene and

then delete & crop! Also, if seeking consent to potentially

use the images with recognisable people, I talk to the

subjects AFTER taking the shots, and also offer to send or

post them small copies to keep.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST LEARNING CURVE

IN PHOTOGRAPHY?

Two things come to mind; I’m slowly learning to ask for

consent to use images at the time of making them – saves

a lot of walking the streets searching later!! (Though of

course, it is legal to photograph in public without asking

for consent). And secondly, working out dimensions for

hanging an exhibition, or a pasting layout, as in the project

mentioned below, continue to tax my non-mathematical

neurons!

TELL US ABOUT THIS PARTICULAR STREET SCENE…

WHAT CAUGHT YOUR EYE AND MADE YOU TAKE

THE SHOT?

I took this photo in a busy part of Wellington – Te-

Whanganui-a-tara’s CBD (Willis St.) where there is a bus

stop, seating, and often interesting light though at this time

of day, 1:40pm this is less of a feature.

I liked the ‘thirds’ arrangement of people across the image

and was particularly interested in the man sitting on the

footpath behind the seat, and his contrast in position, dress

style, and posture in comparison to the seated man in

cool attire and the chatting shoppers with their bags on

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING ON RECENTLY?

I have recently completed a temporary public ‘pasteup’

installation of cut out life-sized people onto a shipping

container, in Newtown, Wgtn., called ‘…a footpath near

you.. ara hīkoi pātata..’

I am interested to do more large scale public art but first,

want to complete a colour photo book about my own

suburb; Mt Cook – Pukeahu.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.maryhutchinson.co


Mind Games: Hiding Behind The Lens

Overcoming the fear of looking ‘strange’ when photographing people in the street.

One of the genres that involve photographing

people “impromptu” is street photography

which is closely related to photojournalism.

In the blink of an eye, a scene may unfold right in front

of you that you want to capture and that scene will

very likely involve having people in the frame. Street

or documentary shots may happen anywhere – on or

off the street, but the good ones have a story to tell,

30 NZPhotographer

by Ana Lyubich

show emotion and authenticity, evoke empathy and

provoke people to pause and think.

Most blogs and articles discussing how to overcome

a fear of photographing strangers suggest you start

talking to people on the streets if you want to take a

photo of them. In pure street photography however,

you rarely have a chance to approach people as you


TALK

Unless you feel that you are likely to be punched in

the face in the next few seconds, stay where you

are and acknowledge you took a photo of them.

There is nothing wrong with it. The person you just

photographed may simply be curious about what you

are doing, why you chose them, and where the photo

might end up, even where they can access it later as

if they see and like the photo they might want to share

it with friends and family. You never know, you might

have just captured a perfect moment in their life that

they would be thrilled to get a copy of. So tell them

your story, why you like street photography, where you

come from, and perhaps even hand them a business

card or share your social media name with them. In

most cases, what could have been a sticky situation

will end up well and in the best case scenario, it will

also help you spread the word about what you are

doing and hopefully get lifetime appreciators of your

talent!

BEWARE OF KIDS

While kids are the most genuine models you can find

(often until they become aware of your presence),

you should never cross the line there. Their parents or

guardians are likely to approach you if they notice

you photographing them to ask to remove the photo

you just took of their child. There may be many

reasons for that and there are many cases where a

random photo of a child at a public place was shared

on SM that then triggered the attention of custodians,

courts and so on so tread with extreme caution where

minors are involved, photography is not about ruining

your own or other people’s lives.

are “all in” that perfect moment of clicking the shutter

button.

Turning the tables, it’s easy to appreciate why a

person who is minding their own business as they walk

or drive down the street could feel stressed when they

see a person with a camera photographing them – All

sorts of thoughts will pass through their mind; “Why are

they photographing me?”, “Is there something wrong

with me?”, “I’m not in my best shape/clothes/mood

today”, “What’s going on?!”. So what do you do and

how do you behave if you are approached by the

subject of your photo?

BE POLITE & TAKE RESPONSIBILITY

Always be polite and responsible. It is worth

remembering that in such cases you as a

photographer represent the whole photography

community and should something go wrong

and the upset subjects of your photographs take

it to social media or it leaks into the news, the

photography community as a whole is affected. “The

photographers these days have no respect…”, “These

photo snappers need to be stopped” are phrases

we need to nip in the bud. If you are asked to delete

the photo – it is always better to do so, no questions

asked.

Here in NZ, you are legally allowed to take

photographs of people in public places where no

privacy is expected but always check the rules of

other countries and states if you are going overseas.

For general guidelines take a read of

https://nzlaw.co.nz/news/how-private-is-privatewhen-taking-photos-in-a-public-place.

April 2019

31


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


LIGHTHOUSE

ISO100, 116mm

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

A rainbow competing with the bright

colors of a decorative lighthouse at

Monterey's Fisherman's Wharf.

Andy Popadiuk

April 2019

33


FASHION ON THE BEACH

F2.8, 1/640s, ISO200

KAREKARE BEACH, AUCKLAND

Photographer / Retoucher:

Anupama S. Wijesundara

Model / Makeup Artist : Danisha

Anupama

34 NZPhotographer

S. Wijesundara


April 2019

35


36 NZPhotographer


CAMBRIDGE CHERRY BLOSSOM

F4.5

CAMBRIDGE AVANTIDROME

Stunning Spring Cherry Blossoms.

Ben Langton Burnell

April 2019 37


38 NZPhotographer


SPIDER

F7.1, 1/250s, ISO200

During a visit to Owharoa Falls, I decided to get out my macro lens

and take a closer look at the Monbretia growing wild. I spotted this

spider against the bright orange of the flowers.

Carole Garside

April 2019

39


40 NZPhotographer


JEKYLL ISLAND

F8,1/2s, ISO64

JEKYLL ISLAND, GEORGIA, USA

Dawn at Jekyll Island. This kind of light is magical and makes the

Island seem magical too.

Chick Piper

April 2019

41


42 NZPhotographer


EMPEROR PENGUIN MOULTING

F8,1/2s, ISO64

SCOTT BASE, ANTARCTICA

An Emperor Penguin in full moult outside Scott Base.

Dan Poulton

April 2019

43


44 NZPhotographer


MATAURI BAY

F11, 1/160s, IS0100

NORTHLAND

We spent a couple of nights at Matauri Bay in our motorhome and

loved this view taken from a high point on the road from Whangaroa.

Diane Beguely

April 2019

45


ABSTRACT

F16. 1/200s, ISO200

TAUPO

A stunning colourful

abstract against a clear blue sky.

Gary Reid

46 NZPhotographer


FEA OF THE SLEEPING NATURE

Photographer & Retoucher: Tanya Mishchuk

Model: RuiJie Tang

Makeup Artist & Hair Stylist: Sabrina Begum

Costume Designer: Marz Court / The Baroness Creates

Tanya Mishchuk

April 2019

47


48 NZPhotographer


CHEETAH LAZING AROUND

F6.3, 1/320s, IS0400

TAUPO

This photo was taken on a recent trip to Nambiti Game

Reserve in South Africa.

Jessi-Lee Long

April 2019

49


50 NZPhotographer


THE BEAUTIFUL PEST

F2.8, 1/2000s, IS0200, 400mm

ROTOTAWAI, FEATHERSTON.

Numbers make the Rabbit a National Pest,

but their beauty is undeniable.

Greg Arnold

April 2019

51


52 NZPhotographer


FAMILY

F8, 1/180s, ISO200

KAREKARE BEACH, AUCKLAND.

I went for a photo shoot of a young girl and her whole family came to

support her. I got this candid shot while they were going to the beach.

Harendra Bahadur

April 2019

53


54 NZPhotographer


THE RIGHT ANGLE

F7, 1/40s, 132mm

As my friends pose and take pictures, the

camera man keeps saying he can't get a good

angle. Little did he know that it was just the right

angle for me!.

Gwyndolyn Domino

April 2019

55


56 NZPhotographer


A BLUE AND YELLOW

MORNING IN THE MOUNT

F5.6, 1/100s, ISO200

MOUNT MAUNGANUI

An early morning walk was well worth it when I

was greeted with colours like this.

Jo Mohi

April 2019

57


58 NZPhotographer


THE GATHERER

F5, 1/1000s, IS0800

WAIKANAE, KAPITI COAST

One of the many tireless worker bees visiting the

pohutukawa tree this summer.

Kelly Pettitt

April 2019

59


60 NZPhotographer


MILKYWAY

8s, ISO3200

MOERAKI CAMPING GROUND

This photo was taken 2 weeks back at

Moeraki on the way to Christchurch.

Nihad Mahamood

April 2019

61


62 NZPhotographer


MY EDEN

F7.1, 1/56s, ISO 200

MT EDEN SUMMIT

This iconic volcanic cone was my home for

many years. The views from the summit are some

of the best in Auckland.

Olga Macagon

April 2019

63


NO SWIMMING TODAY

F18, ISO100, 23mm

MURRAYS BAY JETTY, AUCKLAND

An 8 minute long exposure taken at the end of Murrays Bay Jetty on

Auckland's North shore with a 10 stop filter.

Wayne Boardman

64 NZPhotographer


April 2019

65


"PHOTOGRAPHY IS ABOUT

FINDING OUT WHAT CAN

HAPPEN IN THE FRAME.

WHEN YOU PUT FOUR

EDGES AROUND SOME

FACTS, YOU CHANGE

THOSE FACTS."

GARRY WINOGRAND

66 NZPhotographer

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