BeatRoute Magazine BC Edition April 2019

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a monthly arts and entertainment paper with a predominant focus on music – local, independent or otherwise. The paper started in June 2004 and continues to provide a healthy dose of perversity while exercising rock ‘n’ roll ethics.

Currently BeatRoute’s AB edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton (by S*A*R*G*E), Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

PLUS! MORRISSEY • BILLIE EILISH • WEEZER • MORMOR • RUSSIAN TIM AND THE PAVEL BURES • EMILY ROWED AND MORE!

APRIL 2019

ELISABETH

MOSS GOES

FULL ON

PUNK

ROCK

ALEX ROSS

PERRY’S FILM

HER SMELL

WHISTLER’S

LAST PARTY OF

THE SEASON

WSSF

KICKS OUT

THE JAMS

BC EDITION • FREE

DISCOVER

THE PORT

MOODY

MILE

THESE 4/20

GIFT IDEAS

ARE DOPE!

KOREAN

HIP HOP

HEROES

EPIK

HIGH


SPRING HAS

SPRUNG!

(TELL YOUR PANTS!)

Contents

Up Front

Music

4

7

8

9

10

13

The Guide

Morissey seals the deal

with his return to Canada

The Agenda

VanCity Places

Get ready to Sing Sing for

your supper

That’s Dope

4/20 gift guide that won’t

get you high

The Moody Mile

A suburban craft beer hub

takes flight in Port Moody

Exploits

World Ski & Snowboard

Festival gets big air with

end of season bash

14

29

35

Concert Previews

Weezer, White Denim,

MorMor, La Dispute, Ape

War, Godsmack, Partner,

The Murlocs, Emily

Rowed and more!

Album Reviews

Billie Eilish, The Cranberries,

Foxygen, Blessed,

The Mountain Goats,

Priests, Weyes Blood and

more!

Live Reviews

Foals, Cherry Glazerr,

ACTORS and Noname

PLUS! MORRISSEY • BILLIE EILISH • WEEZER • MORMOR • RUSSIAN TIM AND THE PAVEL BURES • EMILY ROWED AND MORE!

APRIL 2019

Cover Story

24

ELISABETH

MOSS GOES

FULL ON

PUNK

ROCK

ALEX ROSS

PERRY’S FILM

HER SMELL

WHISTLER’S

LAST PARTY OF

THE SEASON

WSSF

KICKS OUT

THE JAMS

BC EDITION • FREE

DISCOVER

THE PORT

MOODY

MILE

THESE 4/20

GIFT IDEAS

ARE DOPE!

KOREAN

HIP HOP

HEROES

EPIK

HIGH

EPIK HIGH

South Korean hip-hop

wwsupergroup cement

their own legacy above and

beyond the world of K-Pop

Movies|TV

37

38

39

40

Film review

Carmine Street Guitars doc

tunes into the legendary vibe of

NYC’s East Village

This Month In Film +

The Binge List

Film review

Bella Ciao! Director Carolyn

Combs harnesses diversity of

Commercial Drive

Film review

Her Smell: Elisabeth Moss

brings chaos to centre stage in

Alex Ross Perry’s experimental

rock drama Her Smell

Vince Staples, Friday March 22 at

the Harbour Events Centre. Read our

review of this show and more online

at beatroute.ca

The Arts

42

43

44

Horoscope

47

Books Verses Festival invites

Vivek Shraya to discuss their

graphic novel Death Threat

Art qaʔ yəx w - water honours

us: womxn and waterways celebrates

expression of identity,

culture and knowledge

Fashion Clarie Carreras

launches White Rhino Bags,

a fashionable line of vegan,

cruelty-free accessories for the

modern age

No matter your sign, there’s

always a song for you here

DARROLE PALMER

JOHN FLUEVOG SHOES 837 GRANVILLE ST 604·688·2828 65 WATER ST 604·688·6228 FLUEVOG.COM

2 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 3


The Guide

Editor-In-Chief

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

Managing Editor

Jordan Yeager

jordan@beatroute.ca

UPCOMING SHOWS

Morrissey:

Seals the

deal with

Canadian

tour

Sunday, April 14 & Monday, April 15

Orpheum Theatre

With the city collectively recovering

from seasonal depression, spring

seems like the appropriate time for

Morrissey to come to Canada. Moz

fans all over the country are rejoicing

that the sardonic musician can’t keep

his promises. Fifteen years ago, the

boy with the thorn in his side vowed

never to set foot on Canadian soil

until the annual seal hunt was abolished.

Luckily he has come to terms

with the fact that Inuit are not going

to give up an important part of their

struggling economy. Instead Morrissey

will be touring across Canada

performing in six major cities with

part of the profits going to support

several animal charities.

Morrissey is touring his 2017 album

Low in High School, and getting

some hype before the release of his

California Sun album, which covers

artists like Buffy Sainte Marie, Bob

Dylan and Joni Mitchell. But nobody

needs a reason to go see the former

Smiths member, it’s fucking Morrissey.

He’s one of the best songwriters

of all time. This is a show you

don’t want to miss, because who

knows what his next beef with Canada

will be.

Randee Neumeyer

4 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

On my return to

Canada I feel that

I can be of more use

by making sizeable

donations to animal

protection groups in

each city that

I play.

City

Yasmine Shemesh

yasmine@beatroute.ca

Exploits

Jessie Foster

jessie@beatroute.ca

That’s Dope

Jamila Pomeroy

jamila@beatroute.ca

Music

Johnny Papan

johnny@beatroute.ca

Music

Joey Lopez

joeyy@beatroute.ca

Live Music

Darrole Palmer

darrole@beatroute.ca

Comedy

Graeme Wiggins

Graeme@beatroute.ca

Film

Hogan Short

hogan@beatroute.ca

Web

Jashua Grafstein

jashua@beatroute.ca

Social Media

Mat Wilkins

mat@beatroute.ca

Contributing Writers

Raunie Mae Baker • Sarah Bauer

Jonny Bones • Leyland Bradley

Sebastian Buzzalino • Kira Clavell

Emily Corley • Esmée Colbourne

Lauren Edwards • Rachel Fox

Kathryn Helmore • Willow Herzog

Robann Kerr • Brendan Lee

Christine Leonard • Rhys Mahannah

Dayna Mahannah • Maggie McPhee

Noémie Attia • Randee Neumeyer

Sean Orr • Jennie Orton

Court Overgaauw • Joshua Shepherd

Leah Siegel • B. Simm

Austin Taylor • Quinn Thomas

Cole Young

Contributing Photographers

& Illustrators

Kelli Anne • Lindsey Blane

Jo Bongard • Richard Brodeur

Kira Clavell • Pooneh Ghana

Kate Killet • Tenzing Lama

Emily Nicole • Pat O’Rourke

Alana Paterson • Ian Schram

Laurin Thompson • Tanja Tiziana

Olivia VanDyke • Sergio Vera-Barahona

Ben Weeks• Barbara Zimonick

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Distribution

Gold Distribution (Vancouver)

Mark Goodwin Farfields (Victoria)

BeatRoute Media

Group editor/ publisher

Michael Hollett

Creative Director

Troy Beyer

beatroute.ca

REAL ESTATE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 25

AJJ & ANTARTIGO VESPUCCI

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

APRIL 11

KT TUNSTALL

W/ JOE PAORO

MAY 6

AMERICAN FOOTBAL

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 16

PLANTREA X COFRESI

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

APRIL 12

BRUNO MAJOR

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 10

PLANET SMASHERS

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 31

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT IMPERIALVANCOUVER.COM

CHRIS WEBBY

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

APRIL 30

KEVIN MORBY

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 15

LONG BEACH DUB ALL STARS

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

JUNE 5

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 5


LA DAN DISPUTE MANGAN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FEB MAY 6

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SMINO

WITH PHOELIX

APRIL FEBRUARY 5 7

STEEL PULSE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

APRIL FEBRUARY 7 25

UPCOMING SHOWS

SCOTT HELMAN

THE MUSICAL BOX

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

A GENESIS EXTRAVAGANZA

APRIL FEBRUARY 9 26

The

APRIL

Agenda

6

Catvideofest

Saturday, April 20

Vancity Theatre

All those adorable

and hilarious cat

videos you spend

countess hours watching

online finally have a whole

festival dedicated to them.

CatVideoFest is

a compilation reel of the

best cat vids around,

sourced from a combination

of submissions, music

videos, and the World Wide

Web. Proceeds donated

to Vancouver Orphaned

Kitten Rescue (VOKRA).

20

25

Art Vancouver

Thursday, April 25-Sunday, April 28

Vancouver Convention Centre

Now in its fifth year, the global art fair showcases select

galleries and the works of a variety of both national and

international artists. It also features lectures, artist-led workshops,

and a gallery crawl. Make sure you don’t miss artist

Richard Brodeur — yes, the same legendary Brodeur who

goal tended for the Canucks.

MATTHEW GOOD

LENNON STELLA

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

LOVE ME TOUR

MARCH APRIL 10 18 (SOLDOUT) - APRIL 11

THE WHITE BUFFALO

MICHAEL SCHENKER

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

APRIL MARCH 22 23

THE CRYSTAL METHOD

EPIK HIGH

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY

MARCH

2

30

Vancouver International Burlesque Festival

Wednesday, April 3 to Saturday, April 6 • Various venues

The Vancouver International Burlesque Festival is back

for its 14th iteration, celebrating sexuality and diversity

through a wide array of performances. Along with intimate

talks and workshops are performances by some of

North America’s top burlesque artists, including

Lou Lou la Duchesse de Rière — the first Indigenous

performer to be named the Queen of Burlesque.

23 22

30

RIVAL SONS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY APRIL 4 10

YANN TIERSEN

WINTERSLEEP

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 143

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT VOGUETHEATRE.COM

SHANE KOYZCAN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY MAY 3 24

7

Made In The 604

Sunday, April 7• Heritage Hall

This seasonal pop-up market

celebrates all things

hyper local and crafty,

with a mission to connect

Vancouver-based creators

with their communities.

This spring market will

include more than 40

makers, including Drift and

Grow — purveyors of driftwood

decor for plants.

Emerge On Main 2019:

Spotlight On Rising Musicians

Tuesday, April 23 • Fox Cabaret

Part of the Month of Tuesdays

concert series, this event features

three talented and innovative

up-and-coming local musicians:

percussionist Julia Chien, composer

and interdisciplinary artist Alex

Mah and improvisational composer

Matthew Ariaratnam.

Capture Photography Festival

April 3-30 • Various locations

This year, the not-for-profit photography festival places an

emphasis on both female-identifying and Indigenous artists.

Among a diverse lineup of local and international talent,

highlights include BC photojournalist Alana Paterson’s

“Skwxwú7mesh Nation Basketball” series and Moving Still:

Performative Photography in India, a group exhibition exploring

themes of gender, religion, and sexual identity in India.

6 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 7


VanCity Places

Food&Drink

City

Briefs

wBy YASMINE SHEMESH

That's Dope

THIS

MONTH

IN CANNABIS NEWS

AND VIEWS

4

What’s Up? Hot Dog! Launches

New Hot “Fricken” Sandwich

2481 E Hastings Street

East Van punk rock diner What’s

Up? Hot Dog! seems to thrive on

making amazing vegan versions

of their favourite meat dishes. Inspired

by a trip to Nashville and the

birthplace of spicy, Prince’s Hot

Chicken, they have announced the

addition of their Vegan Nashville

Hot “Fricken” Sandwich. The Nashville

hot craze is at a fever pitch

right now, and What’s Up? have

nailed their vegan version of the

comfort food dish of the moment.

4/20

GIFT

GUIDE

SOMETHING

TO SING

ABOUT

Welcome to the new Sing Sing Beer

Bar, your new neighbourhood mainstay

By GRAEME WIGGINS

While it might be named

make for a comfortable

SING SING

after New York State’s BEER BAR

and welcoming space.

infamous maximum-security

prison, new Main

Street eatery/beer parlour

2718 MAIN STREET

11 am -to late, daily

It also has a large garage

door window that opens

onto the street, making

Sing Sing Beer Bar shares noth-

ing but the name with the penitentiary.

It’s a beer- focused, bright,

open space with food that complements

the drinks. Sing Sing just

opened in February on Main, replacing

Kiso Island Sushi, and is a collaboration

between Regan Truong, the

brains behind ping-pong bar Back &

Forth, and well-known bar entrepreneur

Jeff Donnelly.

Truong is straightforward about

his intentions: “An awesome craft

beer bar that Main hasn’t really seen

yet. When people ask me what it is, I

say, ‘24 craft beers, 20 rotating taps – a

craft beer bar first and foremost that

just happens to serve pizza and pho.’”

The roomy 3,000 square foot

room was designed by Ricky Alvarez

from Tinto Creative, one of the

designers behind the look of Bells

& Whistles – and Sing Sing shares

a similarly simple, modern design.

It’s got spacious, high ceilings, and

its emphasis on light birch wood

combined with lots of natural light

it a welcome spot for summer beers.

Shared seating tables encourage a

social environment.

The food, curated by head chef Jo

Hognestad, is tailor-made for beer.

There are five kinds of pizza, three

kinds of pho, and a variety of appetizers.

While they are still finalizing

the menu, a highlight is the kimchi

grilled cheese, a spicy, crispy delight.

The chicken pho is another standout,

with a flavourful broth and quail

eggs – a perfect mix with one of the

many beers on tap. There are also a

number of vegan options.

“Nothing on the food menu is over

15 bucks,” Truong says. “It’s easy to

execute, so you’ll get your food in a

timely manner. And we’ll change the

menu seasonally. We want people

to come back two or three times a

month. We want it to be affordable,

comfortable, warm. Relaxed.” They

are working on getting a patio going

as well, so this spring and summer,

Sing Sing should be a mainstay in

your neighbourhood bar rotation. ,

A Month of Tuesdays

April 2-30, Fox Cabaret

Music on Main presents this series

of concerts held every Tuesday

throughout the month of April at

the Fox Cabaret. The organization

— a champion of post-classical

composition — will feature both

local and international performers,

from emerging artists to legendary

composers. Attendees will be

treated to a versatile program, that

spans solo percussion to Bach.

CONTINUED ON PG .12 k

JORDAN ADAMS

1 2 3 5

Five new cannabis products (that don’t get you high) By Jamila Pomeroy

1

FeelCBD

As an elevated vape pen experience,

FeelCBD combines

non-psychoactive full-spectrum

CBD with organic essential

oils. The companies “Calm” pen,

features the relaxing and delicious

essence of vanilla, lavender and

mint. The pens sleek design, which

is no bigger than the width of an

iPhone, fits conveniently in your

pocket making transport for public

use hassle-free. While CBD on

its own is known for its calming,

anti-anxiety properties, the addition

of carefully curated essential oils

sets a new precedent for holistic

health these calming oils, known

to carry similar properties to CBD,

add depth to the experience,

eliminating the often talked about,

“metallic,” aftertaste CBD can

carry, while expanding further into

the realm of holistic health.

2

Fluers

“I used the ‘WOKE’ blend

throughout college to help

with studying. I lose focus really

easily and it completely helped

me with retention and focus,” says

Tee Krispil about her company Fluers.

Integrating herbs and tea into

the cannabis experience, Fluers,

the CBD tea company, delivers a

high-end product with real results.

The “Woke” tea features spearmint,

lemongrass, ginkgo biloba,

horsetail, and CBD (among many

other beneficial herbs;) leaving tea

drinkers refreshed, focused and

sharp, while providing a boost without

a burn-out, like coffee. Fluers

also carries “DOZE,” as a sleep aid;

“CHILL,” to help lessen anxiety;

and “CLEAN,” as a detox tea.

3

Delush

While it may be easy to fall

in love with the companies

wide-range of beauty

products, which boasts heavenly

scented bath bombs, creams and

body scrubs, the Delush “Liger

Balm” is the sure cure to your

aches and pains. Whether you are

in recovery-mode post-workout,

our battling chronic pain, this is

your new BFF. This magic stick

contains 300mg of CBD, a potent

blend of active natural herbs, and

velvety smooth butters. While there

are a few “magic sticks” on the

market, the Liger Balm takes the

cake. Combining the effects of the

well-known Tiger Balm, with cannabis,

the stick is ideal for immediate

pain-relief-- perhaps after a bath

with their Blue Raspberry scented

bath bomb.

4

ICaria

With so many CBD tincture

brands to choose

from, it’s easy to become

overwhelmed and unsure. Icaria,

is the holistic supplement brand

that helps busy professionals

reduce stress and anxiety so they

are free to enjoy their life. “I am a

nutritionist, so you can imagine I’m

very particular about what goes

into my body,” says owner Nadya

Pecherskaya. ICaria CBD tinctures

includes hemp seed oil, organic

MCT coconut oil, cannabidiol

extract; offering an aftertaste-free

experience, in a convenient easyto-use

eyedropper.

5

Fashionably High

While their products may not

contain cannabis, Fashionably

High aims to elevate

the cannabis experience and help

end the stigma around cannabis

culture. With the pursuit of creating

a product that could be marketed

to mature women, not fitting in with

the “babes and bongs” culture,

the tea cup was born. Featuring a

wide-range of designs, the cups

are helping empower women to

not be ashamed of consuming

cannabis, in the boys club that is

the cannabis industry. In complementary

fashion, the company

has expanded into other lifestyle

products such as stash boxes, tote

bags, pillows and leggings.

8 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 9


VanCity Places

THE

MOODY

MILE

A Suburban Craft Beer

Hub Takes Flight in

Port Moody

By KATHRYN HELMORE

Taps and Tacos

To say that Taps and Tacos serves

Mexican food would be an understatement.

The 40-seat restaurant with a

modern glass exterior, BC craft beers

on tap and an open concept kitchen

strives to offer diners a unique and

fresh experience.

“We are saturated with tacos,” says

head chef Jordan Braun. “Here, we are

trying something different. We use the

taco as a base and get creative on top.

Only raw, fresh ingredients, seasonal

fish. We are introducing ceviche.”

The restaurant’s not-so-basic

offerings include Korean Pork, a 6 inch

flour tortilla that features red cabbage

and black sesame. And try the Yellowfin

Tuna, a fresh dish loaded with

seared Ocean Wise tuna, wasabi aioli,

pickled wakame and cucumber slaw.

The spot also offers vegan BBQ

Jackfruit Street Tacos, Pulled Pork

Burritos and a selection of house

made hot sauces.

Certainly not your average Mexican

food.

O

n a wooden boardwalk

suspended above an

ocean inlet teeming

with life, imagine a

woman with electric red

hair beating an acoustic guitar

to the sound of Sia’s “Titanium.”

The squawks of seagulls, the

laughter of children and the lapping

of waves play background

vocals.

The redhead is Port Moody

City Congresswoman Amy Lubik,

and the boardwalk is where

the ocean meets the Moody

Mile, a newly chartered track

of restaurants, craft breweries,

bakeries, ice cream parlours and

fish and chip stalls, hidden near

the last stop on the Millennium

skytrain line.

Originally conceived as the

terminus for the Canadian Pacific

Railroad in 1879, Port Moody

was set to become a major west

coast metropolis. Much to the

vexation of locals, though, these

hopes were dashed when the

rail line was extended several

kilometers farther west to a new

town called Vancouver.

Yet Port Moody is no longer

the abandoned child of west

coast expansion. Benefitting

from Vancouver’s boom, the

community is making a comeback

that started with a number

of craft breweries and has

resulted in lip-smackingly good

food and award-winning craft

Gabi & Jules

Handmade Pies

and Baked Goodness

Walking through the fabulously

pink front door of Gabi & Jules,

one is welcomed by the aroma

of fresh baked flour, ridiculously

friendly staff, an assortment of

locally crafted gifts and, of course,

displays overflowing with delicate

and decadent pies.

“Pie is just a vessel,” says

co-founder and owner Lisa

Beecroft. “You can do so much

with it. There is also something

warm, fuzzy and nostalgic about

pie. We go back to these roots by

using real, whole foods with ingredients

you can pronounce.”

This joint is not scared to get

creative. New pies come to the

display counter every Friday. A new

addition is the Espresso Cream Pie,

a graham cracker base loaded with

creamy espresso dulce de leche,

chocolate whipped cream and

toasted almonds.

Gabi & Jules aims to foster a

collaborative environment inclusive

of all individuals. Of their 24 employees,

seven are on the autism

spectrum.

“Our autistic employees bring a

unique flavour to the kitchen,” says

Beecroft. “One of our employees

was stuck slicing bread all day.

Now he has diversity. He plays

K-pop at the end of the day and

gets creative. He is in a culture of

kindness and acceptance. This is

not just a job.”

Moody Ales

Founded by home brewers Adam

Crandall and Dan Helmer, Moody Ales

sticks to its moonshine roots with

weekly experimental casks and small

batches. Lusty Chocolate Oatmeal

Stout, Bourbon Barrel Aged Russian

Imperial Stout and Sublime Pineapple

Hefeweizen are three of the beers on

tap at Moody Ales.

Needless to say, this brewery

gets creative.

Yet, when pressed, “creative

brewery” is not how the Moody Ales

crew defines their location.

“What defines us?” ponders Operations

Manager Nick Andersen.

“Community. Moody Ales is the ideal

place to feel like part of a community,

to chat with strangers on long

shared tables. Whoever you are.”

Locals know Moody as part

brewery and part community venue.

Dwarfed by immense, stainless steel

fermenters that reach to Moody’s

refurbished warehouse ceiling, live

bands entertain crowds every Friday

and Saturday night. On Wednesday

nights, eggheads flock to the location

for Simpsons, Family Guy and

Friends themed Trivia Nights.

Much like the Moody Mile itself,

beer is only half the story.

As the sun sets across the Burrard

Inlet and fairy lights start to pick

up in breweries across the Moody

Mile, the skytrain can be heard

whooshing to a stop in the station

above. Friends and lovers wander

across the bridge that connects the

hidden Moody Mile to Highway 7,

escaping to a collection of unique

tacos, lovingly made pies, a rich selection

of homebrewed craft beers

and, of course, community.

Parkside

Known for its neon pink and teal

sign, Parkside is a craft brewery

that’s been leaving a mark across

Vancouver and BC since its inception

in 2016. Co-owners Sam Payne and

Vern Lambourne are veterans of

Vancouver’s homebrewing scene.

“We came out here and found this

old building,” says Payne. “It was a

machine shop. We tore it up, cleaned

it up, and rebuilt it into this.”

Armed with experience and

passion, the 30-hectare brewery

has won multiple awards including

second place in the Belgian Ale

category and third place in the North

American IPA category at BC Beer

Awards 2017.

The location offers a full range

of imaginative concoctions on tap,

including West Coast Pale Ales,

Imperial Stouts and German-style

Pilsners.

The location is not all beer, though.

With a sundeck out front, pop up

stalls selling grub such as fresh

oysters, a shuffleboard round back

and vintage decor, the brewery has

a family vibe, yet is nevertheless

buzzing with energy.

10 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 11


VanCity People

wCity

Briefs

Exploits

IAN SCHRAM

FOR MUSICIANS,

BY MUSICIANS

Fulfilling a 20-year dream Rufus Guitar

and Drum Shop opens a second location

By YASMINE SHEMESH

Rufus Guitar and Drum Shop is

opening a new location this month,

in the old Wonderbucks Trading

Company building on the corner

of Commercial Drive and East 2nd

Ave. For Blaine McNamee and

Allan Harding — the owners of

RUFUS GUITAR AND

DRUM SHOP

1803 Commercial Drive

Mon-Fri 10-8, Saturday

10-6, Sunday 12-6

Rufus Guitar Shop and Rufus Drum Shop, respectively —

it’s a realization of something they’ve been steadily working

towards, and, indeed, dreaming about, for almost 20 years.

Rufus’ first location, the guitar shop on the edge of

Kitsilano on Alma Street, has been a massive success:

fully-booked music lessons, a stop where touring rockstars

marvel at the merchandise, and a local go-to for the best

sound advice around. Their drum shop is right around the

corner, on 10th and Alma. The sprawling new Commercial

Drive space will have nine lesson rooms – six for guitar and

three for drums. Across both locations, Rufus now employs

over 60 local musicians. It all comes back to a community-driven

ethos that McNamee and Harding abide by.

Ahead of Commercial’s grand opening, BeatRoute met

McNamee and Harding for coffee on the Drive. Before

sitting down to chat, Harding, after ordering his brew, took

a moment to look out the window at the building across the

street. “It just feels surreal,” he smiles.

You were saying this was your

dream 15 years ago. Tell me more

about that.

Blaine McNamee: I started working

at a guitar store when I was

15. My teacher at the time opened

his own guitar store. I went to go

work for him when I was 20 and I

realized I could open my own store.

And then I moved from Edmonton

when I was 24, because I felt like

Vancouver was a better opportunity,

and I started working for Rufus

Guitar Shop [Alma St.]. I bought

that store in 2014.

What’s been the coolest drum set

or guitar that you’ve had come

through so far?

BM: We sold a 58 Fender P bass to

Scott Shriner from Weezer. I love

Weezer, so that was very cool. We

went to meet him in Seattle and

got to see Weezer play. That was

an online sale. Tom Waits came

into the shop once and I sold him

a guitar.

Allan Harding: You really see the

difference between a big prairie

town and an international Olympic

city. Justin Timberlake was in town

– his drummer came in, Brian Frasier

Moore. Bob Seger was in town

and his drummer came in. And the

regular locals who pass through,

like Bryan Adams. It’s a real pro

vibe too, which is unique.

BM: I think that’s because we sell

so much vintage. We’ve got some

really crazy pieces, like Fenders

from the 60s, really old Gibsons.

Blaine McNamee (left) and Allan

Harding expand their musical vision

to Commercial Drive this month.

When people come to town, they

come see us for that stuff. I don’t

know what’s the coolest thing

we’ve had in. I usually take them

home. [laughs]

How do you feel right now,

looking at the new shop and

considering everything that

you’ve worked towards?

AH: When I moved here, Blaine

and I were doing a late night walk

up and down the Drive, having

some drinks, and Blaine said to

me, ‘That’s my dream location.’

He always said, ‘It’s going to

happen. We’re doing it.’ I don’t

know many people like Blaine. I

actually don’t know anyone like

Blaine – Blaine’s one of a kind.

BM: You’ve got put your hours in.

I worked for 13 bucks an hour for

a long time.

AH: It’s hard to see the forest

when you’re in the trees.

Everyone’s like, ‘You must be so

jacked!’ and it’s like, “I’m worried

about the freakin’ printer!’ It’s

hard to appreciate what we’ve

accomplished sometimes,

because we’re in the fire. But

the cool thing is stepping back.

I’m sure 15 years ago we’d be

freaking out if we saw into the

future. We wouldn’t even believe

it. I couldn’t even imagine. There

I am, sitting on Whyte Avenue,

Edmonton, running my tiny little

shop. It’s beyond words. It makes

me a little emotional, actually.

And we’re just getting going.

KELLI ANNE

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

Ponytails

Friday, April 12 at Fox Cabaret

The Vancouver surf-pop band are

still wrapping up the recording

of their full-length LP, but, in the

meantime, they’re celebrating

the release of a new single, “Just

Yours,” and an accompanying

music video.

Vancouver Tattoo

And Culture Show

April 19-21 at Canada Place

Celebrating their 11th year, the

Vancouver Tattoo and Culture

Show showcases the work of

talented local and international

tattoo artists and provides a

unique opportunity to meet them.

The festival also features a huge

array of unique vendors to peruse

for inspiration while you contemplate

that tramp stamp you keep

meaning to get.

WSSF:

LAST

CHANCE

TO KICK

OUT THE

JAMS

World Ski &

Snowboard Festival

gets big air with end

of season bash

By LAUREN EDWARDS

T

he World Ski and

Snowboard Festival

(WSSF) is the last big

bash of the ski-snowboard

season and

Whistler Blackcomb is

gearing up for another celebration

with a wide array of music, arts

and athleticism on the program.

Sporting categories like the

Slush Cup and Monster Boarderstyle

Championships, paired

with the WSSF After Dark programming

ensures the action

continues from morning to

night. Rounding out the music

component, the Outdoor Concert

Series is welcoming Snotty

Nose Rez Kids, Michael Franti

and Spearhead, Little Destroyer,

Old Soul Rebel and more to the

stage this year.

More than 17,000 spectators

migrated to Whistler last year and

Snotty Nose Rez Kids

this year is expected to

keep that momentum going

with their focus now

on the local talent that

makes their community

the vibrant place

that it is.

WORLD SKI &

SNOWBOARD

FESTIVAL

APRIL 10 TO 14

Whistler, BC

wssf.com

“We’re really focused on local

athletes, local artists, and

bringing everyone together

at the end of the season as a

big wrap up party,” says Megan

Wilson, one of the World

Ski & Snowboard Festival’s

organizers.

The Saudan Couloir Race

Extreme features both men’s

and women’s snowboard categories.

The 2500 ft. vertical drop

— one of the steepest races in the

world — becomes a “thigh-burning

slugfest,” describes Wilson. Spectators

can watch competitors from

a cliff-viewing area and from the

Rendezvous Lodge.

Returning to the festivities are

2018 winners, recent Olympians,

and athletes coming fresh off the X

Games — including female snowboarder

Laurie Blouin who won

Gold in Big Air at the X Games and

Silver in Slopestyle at the 2018 PyeongChang

Olympics.

This year also weaves in more

Indigenous culture, renaming the

Big Air competitions — a 60 ft.

jump — to Sp’akwus Ski Invitational

(from the Squamish nation) and

the Halaw Snowboard Invitational

(from the Lil’wat Nation). Both

“sp’akwus” and “halaw” translate

to “eagle,” and each nation will use

traditional imagery and folklore.

Medals won are engraved with

eagles, and the event’s opening

ceremonies include ambassadors

from the Lil’wat Nation, Squamish

Nation, and the Squamish Lil’wat

Culture Centre (SLCC).

“This festival is about the people

involved, and whether you’re

visiting or you’ve been here for

10 years, you’re with your chosen

family, coming together through

an activity,” says Wilson.

And just like any family, any beef

between skiers and snowboarders

is just “like brothers and sisters,”

says Wilson, a snowboarder

herself. “I was

pretty happy we got a

lot of snowboarders

in, because it’s different

to race on skis and

snowboards in terms

of strategy. What’s

easier, what’s harder, what’s faster…

it’s apples to apples, considering

when this event launched

[in 1996] it didn’t even have snowboarders.”

“It’s a true mountain culture

festival, not just about sports or

music,” Wilson explains. “It’s a mixture

of both local heroes and big

names competing together. It’s a

well-rounded event. If you’re young

and you’re here to party, you can ski

in the sun all day and party all night.”

With only so many days left in

the season, this is the best time to

soak it in, go all out, and make it

count. ,

12 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 13


MUSiC

Our theme

PAINT IT

BLACK

Weezer guitarist Brian Bell looks

back on the band’s sonic hurdles

By JAMILA POMEROY

I

f you ask Weezer’s Brian Bell what’s the best way

to drink coffee is he’ll undoubtedly reply, black. Bell

spent the morning at home fixing his espresso machine

and explains that after too many bad brews,

he had to take matters into his own hands.

“It has to be dark, thick and drip slow like

chocolate,” says the ’90s defining California

band’s guitarist, backing vocalist and keyboardist.

After recently hitting a coffee shop to risk

outsider espresso, Bell heard a record that

changed everything. “It was so classic to

me and I was like ‘Who is this guy covering

Black Sabbath?’ I thought it was a classic

record,” says Bell, recounting first hearing

Charles Bradley cover Black Sabbath’s,

“Changes.”

Taken by Bradley’s ability to make music

sound simultaneously current and classic,

Bell has been playing the album on tour

with a portable record player, further inspiring

him to get back into analog technology.

With band-longevity based on blending

classic and current sounds, there’s pressure

for bands to tick both boxes, while

maintaining a sonic entity of their own.

Something that for Bell, Bradley mastered.

In their own way, Weezer have been

has always been

not fitting in and

looking at the world

as an outsider.

Weezer’s Brian Bell

crafting classically current

what side you’re on, the album

WEEZER

albums throughout their entire with The Pixies

features a strong narrative of

career as a band, lifting the Sunday April 7 unacceptance, revealing the

spirits of wounded dorks

struggle between the freedom

Rogers Arena

around the world. While they

to create and complying with

Tix:$45-$120, Ticketmaster

may have had the craze of

the bounds of a record company—

preventing Weezer to age

teenage Weezer fandom backing

them up in their 90s Blue Album era, with grace and be themselves, unapologetically.

those fans appear to have grown up and

checked out. The band’s hunger to have “Our theme has always been not fitting

a seat at the cool kids table in 2019 is a in and looking at the world as an outsider,”

little off-putting, their awkward efforts to fit says Bell. While this is perhaps true for

in, like a dad trying to sing Ariana Grande Weezer (The Black Album), in a lyrical

while driving his kids to school.

sense, sonically, the band fits in perfectly

Prior to their latest release, Weezer with today’s pop music. If approached as a

(The Black Album), the band put out a concept album or social statement reflecting

on the state of the music industry and

collection of covers hinting at what was to

come. Weezer (The Teal Album), features

remakes of TLC, Toto, and just like be understood and enjoyed. Weezer (The

the evolution of Weezer, there is more to

Charles Bradley, a Black Sabbath track. Black Album) is a response to the industry

While Weezer (The Teal Album) generally not allowing the band creative freedom,

received positive reviews, Weezer (The and in turn, being outsiders to their own

Black Album) fell flat in comparison to its creative process.

amuse. With conflicting reviews it may be “It’s about observing people and situations

and trying to figure out how to fit in,”

confusing as to whether or not the album

is a hit, or terrible miss. Regardless of he says.

While the struggle for the 90s rock

band aging into 2019 can be felt, there are

serious narratives based in mental health

and overcoming depression, pushing

movements of empowerment onto their

fans. During a serious battle with depression

in 1998, lead singer Rivers Cuomo

was rumoured to have painted the walls,

ceiling and windows of his Los Angeles

apartment black. He withdrew from the

band and the world for months on end,

supposedly due to poor reviews of the

band’s Pinkerton album.

“I don’t know what triggered that, but

I remember that period and it was when

him and Mikey (Welsh, former Weezer

bassist) were living together. Rivers got

himself a pet lizard, I know that much,”

Bell recalls. Despite the media coverage

of the trying time, Bell says he never saw

the place painted black. “I stayed away

from it and just met them at the rehearsal

space. We were experimenting with very

riffy songs, very metal sounding songs,

way darker than what The Black Album

is now. A lot of those songs never saw

the light of day, we just jammed them

at the rehearsal space. It scared our

manager at the time, to death, that we

were going in that direction.”

Although far from heavy metal,

Weezer (The Black Album) does carry

the capacity of chaos—indirectly.

The album is eclectic and sometimes

confusing, with more aggressive

lyrics than expected, including “Die

You Zombie Bastards.” This confusion

and chaos may very well have

originated from the band’s pressure

to conform to today’s pop music,

pulling them far from their dreams of

ever being a heavy band.

And when asked if we will ever see

the band veer towards heavier tones,

Bell says, “I never say never.” ,

WHITE NOISE

White Denim stay fresh and embrace the Side Effects

WHITE DENIM

Friday, April 19

The Rickshaw

Tix: $20, Ticketweb.ca

By EMILY CORLEY

W

hite Denim bassist

Steven Terebecki

is fresh

from the band’s

latest SXSW appearance.

“It’s

still fun!” he laughs, fondly. He’s well placed

to reflect upon SXSW’s recent history, having

played there with White Denim every single

year since their inception in 2006.

The band’s distinctively upbeat,

dance-friendly rock and roll is influenced

by a vast range of genres, making them ideal

ambassadors for the many styles offered by

these Texans’ ‘local’ festival.

“In the past we’ve tried to categorize it and

someone came up with grog-rock, which is

nice. I guess like, a garage-y prog-rock? But

that doesn’t work for quite a few of our songs.

We just like so many different styles.”

After all these years, SXSW must feel like a

second home to Terebecki and White Denim’s

other remaining founding member, James Petralli.

“SXSW has evolved continuously.” Terebecki

says, unaware that he could easily be

describing his own band. “It’s actually a lot

smaller than it used to be. There are definitely

less pop-up backyard parties; no matter where

you went, there would be people set up in the

streets with a PA playing. But it seems a little

bit more controlled now.”

Controversially, Terebecki also mourns the

loss of corporate sponsors and their associated

promotional merchandise. “Around 2010

- 2012 huge corporations like Taco Bell started

throwing parties, but that’s

over now, which kind of makes

me sad. I have the best Doritos

SXSW shirt; it’s a guitar and the

body is a Dorito. I mean, it was

worth going to SXSW just to get

something like that!” One positive change he

cites is that the festival now puts greater emphasis

on record labels supporting showcases

for up-and-coming acts. “But there’s still a

lot of the square-peg-round-hole thing happening

- they’ll try to put on events in spaces

where there just shouldn’t be events. That’s

always been a part of SXSW.”

Because they’re veteran rock, White Denim

exude a palpable and seemingly effortless energy,

captured both in their live shows and on

every record they’ve ever released. Their latest

album, Side Effects (out March 29), is no

exception. It seems that their secret is closely

linked to their high productivity:

“We’ve definitely tried our hand at a bunch

of stuff that we don’t ever end up playing live,

so we decided to stick to writing songs that

would really come across in our live show.”

White Denim are a band with a passion for

just jamming together and the lack of preciousness

over their ideas is refreshing. Terebecki

admits that the relatively recent additions

of Greg Clifford on drums and Michael

Hunter on keys have helped the band keep it

fresh. “You kind of get a new spark; the whole

band does. The drummer we have right now

- he’s 22, and he has nothing but energy. He’s

keeping us old guys young!” ,

JO BONGARD

14 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 15


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

WE WANT MOR

T.O. alt pop breakout star

MorMor acts on instinct

and intuition By JOEY LOPEZ

M

orMor, real name Seth Nyquist,

practically came out

of nowhere. Coalescing

onto the alt pop mainstage

with a fresh and familiar

sound, his 2018 single, “Heaven’s

Only Wishful,” racked up millions

of streams within days. Nyquist’s

bouncing falsetto backed by emotionally

evocative synth and simple

guitar riffs lends itself perfectly to

any coming of age drama. His vocals

are controlled and almost sheepish,

as if he were avoiding eye contact.

Nyquist practically grabs you by the

face, as he stares into your eyes and

shouts exactly how he feels, pushing

his voice to its limits.

Nyquist channeled the energy of

his hometown of Toronto into the

song about how the city made him

feel. The popularity of the song came

from a string of lucky coincidences,

getting into the right hands and being

passed around and played at Toronto

parties, eventually getting into the

hands of the label, Don’t Guess, who

gave MorMor his start. He even landed

Adele’s manager within his first

year of releasing music.

Since then, life has quickly

changed for Nyquist, releasing his

first EP, Heaven’s Only Wishful,

FLEMISHEYE.COM

16 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

shortly after the release

of the titular single, winning

acclaim from fans

and critics alike.

“It’s been special and

surreal. I’ve definitely

been on more planes,” Nyquist

laughs, telling BeatRoute how much

has changed in the past year, “It’s just

been really surreal.”

His latest single “Outside” is a

powerful demonstration of the kind

of artist MorMor is becoming. In

only a year, his arrangements have

become more complex, and nuanced.

He sounds like he’s caught in a rushing

current, face turned up for air,

seeing the sky for the last time, content

with what’s about to come. Mor-

Mor has a mature understanding of

his own fear and accepts that there’s

no point in turning away. His songs

have always been personal and “Outside”

takes on the subject of mental

health.

“I was trying to talk about the

anxiety of going outside and dealing

with depression. I wouldn’t say it’s

necessarily any more personal than

my other songs but I think this one

is definitely special to me. I think

at first it was subconscious. I think

maybe now I’m more expressive,

but it goes way back. When I was a

kid I would hum melodies when I

was nervous and I would drum on

my desk. My teachers would always

get mad and tell me to stop banging

MORMOR

Tuesday, April 30

The Biltmore Cabaret

Tix: $23, eventbrite.ca

‘THE SAME BUT BY DIFFERENT MEANS’

OUT NOW

“He stitches his micro-songs and abbreviated

epics into a sprawling opus that’s as comforting

as it is uncompromising”

PITCHFORK (8/10)

on the desk. Something

in that energy calms me.

I’m kind of defining that

inner child in my music.”

Nyquist still lives in

Toronto, where he’s been

playing music since before he can remember.

Although his music can be

an expression of his city he doesn’t

necessarily feel like he needs to express

love for it, just explore his experience

of it. His songs are not love

letters, but more an explorer’s notes

on a journey through the diverse and

fast paced environment. His methods

of pulling inspiration are unique;

instead of looking to other musicians

he looks to artists of other disciplines

and how they expressed themselves

through their individual crafts.

“I’m sort of inspired by what I’m

feeling or what’s around me, what a

day feels like and I like to interpret

those feelings. I wouldn’t say I’m

like Basquiat but there was so much

information in his paintings and feelings

expressed through the way he

painted and what his collages represented

compared to his actual paintings.

The way I like to do things is to

not think about it too much and let

the feelings come and let the music

come from that. I just let happen as it

happens. In “Heaven’s Only Wishful”

the entire end of that song is freestyled.

All the little inflections and

everything I didn’t even think about

them, I just let it happen naturally.”

MorMor is a stand out because he

acts on instinct. Allowing the music

to flow from him the way a paintbrush

moves across a canvas and

building on improvisation to create

a natural and honest sound. MorMor

has crafted a musical identity unlike

‘NOVEL’ OUT NOW

“N0V3L’s guitar lines are a wonder to behold.”

NME

“The angular riffage and existential

socioeconomic mires of the self-titled debut EP

is post-punk updated for a modern audience.”

BEATROUTE

anyone else. It might prove difficult

not to disappear into the wash of Canadian

talent erupting from the East

and taking over the mainstream, but

MorMor is proving that completely

being yourself is the best way to go.

,

O

POONEH GHANA

SURREAL LOVE

Post-hardcore heavyweights La Dispute

wrestle with grief and embrace accountabilty

By JOEY LOPEZ

LA DISPUTE

Saturday, April 6

Vogue Theatre

Tix: $22.50, eventbrite.ca

bserving grief secondhand through someone you love

can feel like being trapped in a perpetual Sunday evening:

Monday steadfastly approaches, and the bloom

of a beautiful sunset becomes a gradient of dread. Everything

feels eerily silent, as if you were trapped in a

soundproof bubble with only an echo of sadness

bouncing around you. It isn’t your sadness, but an

aura that latches on and conjures hopelessness – you

can’t fix grief. You can only sit and watch.

Grand Rapids, Michigan-based post-hardcore

band La Dispute puts a voice to that feeling, often

tackling heavy subjects of loss and despair in a way that feels

like a powerless observer screaming from the sidelines into the

faces of those who choose to turn a blind eye toward the injustices

around them. La Dispute’s expressiveness and emotion is a

product of vocalist Jordan Dreyer’s shouts of desperate protest

poetry that come as if they were spoken through a megaphone

at a rally. With their latest record Panorama, Dreyer wanted to

express grief in an almost surrealist sense.

“Panorama” is about experiencing grief directly and experiencing

it in proximity – you will have

two different perspectives,” says Dreyer,

taking time to weigh each word as

he speaks. Panorama came into being

during long drives Dreyer would take

with his partner across Michigan into

her hometown, where they saw memorials

for those who died on that stretch

of road. She would tell him stories of

the effects those deaths had on the

community and those in her life who

knew them. The album plays out like

a road trip through the seven stages

of grief with periodic points that jump

into the lives that were taken too soon.

“Part of my intention on this record

is to talk about how grief is intangible

and, as a result, doesn’t obey the rules

of space and time,” he says. “It will provoke

a past memory of trauma that will

almost bring you back to that memory

in a very real way. I wanted the record

to feel otherworldly and a break in the

reality of everyday, so that was very

deliberate to make it feel a bit more

ephemeral, a bit more cosmic than

maybe our last albumRooms in the

House, where everything is very directly

related to recountable events.”

Panorama has the same sense of

frustration as La Dispute’s previous

records. Anger accumulated over time

by a lack of control one has over the actions

of others and the consequencs. .

Dreyer believes we all hold responsibility

for what happens in our communities

and, by not taking action, we allow

avoidable tragedy to occur. “I think we

all bear culpability to death that occurs by some preventable fashion

whether or not we’re all “King Park,” one of La Dispute’s most

famously emotional and politically charged tracks, has the same

sense of anger towards the death of a young person that permeates

through Panorama. “I guess it’s hard to not be more affected

by those stories, but I think in general that’s something that’s always

very morbidly fascinated me,” says Dreyer. “Not necessarily

those stories specifically, but just the general inevitability of our

death, the randomness of it all and who goes and who doesn’t. I

think that’s something that’s always been there for me subconsciously

, whether or not I’m actively thinking about

it. Stories of people who have been taken too early by

some preventable fashion are devastating and worth

discussing.”

This time around, La Dispute takes a less direct approach

with the message they are trying to convey. In

previous records, they smashed their ideas into our heads until

we understood what they were trying to tell us, peeling back our

eyelids and forcing us to watch the horrors before us. With Panorama,

Dreyer doesn’t want to tell us what to do or how to feel,

instead expressing what he thinks he could be doing better with

the direction of his emotions.

“This is a record about healing and about how grief is cyclical

and about how I needed to be better. Ultimately, I think it’s about

making a declaration of love and what that means in a tangible

sense.” ,

RIO

THEATRE

1660 EAST BROADWAY

APRIL

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APRIL

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APRIL

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APRIL

Paul Anthony’s Talent Time:

Renaissance Faire!

First Thursday of Every Month!

Oscar-winners!

*FREE SOLO

*BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

CANDYMAN

Friday Late Night Movie

Peter Jackson’s

THEY SHALL NOT

GROW OLD

STORY STORY LIE

The Hangover Edition

The Gentlemen Hecklers present

CATWOMAN

THE HANGOVER

Friday Late Night Movie

20th Anniversary Screening

THE MATRIX

The Fictionals Comedy Co. Presents

IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY

Superhero Comedy Special! #IAHATRIO

Fundraiser screening for

Dude Chilling Park

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

The 20th Annual

*ANIMATION SHOW OF SHOWS

Luke Perry Tribute!

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER

Friday Late Night Movie

WILLY WONKA & THE

CHOCOLATE FACTORY (1971)

FLEETWOOD MAC BURLESQUE!

“Oh, hai, Mark!”

*THE ROOM

16th Anniversary Screening

With Greg Sestero Live!

THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW

A #DNDLive Improv Comedy Adventure

Elizabeth Moss in Alex Ross Perry’s

*HER SMELL

David Lynch’s

FIRE WALK WITH ME

Friday Late Night Movie

The Geekenders Present

TALK NERDY TO ME!

27

APRIL

A ‘Nerdlesque’ Variety Show

UWE BOLL Double Bill!

APRIL

Documentary

*F*CK YOU ALL: THE UWE BOLL STORY

29 RAMPAGE

Plus Live Q & A with UWE BOLL!

The Geekenders Present

MAY

A NUDE HOPE

A Sci-Fi Burlesque Adventure *Also May 4 & 5

3 TALKING HEADS: STOP MAKING SENSE

Friday Late Night Movie

MAY An Evening of Corporate Drag

With Mike Bonanno!

12

(The Yes Men)

*www.riotheatre.ca for additional times

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA

S

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 17


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

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DAN BRITTAIN

GOING

APE

Ape War find their voice (again)

and prepare for the looming

apocalypse By JONNY BONES

W

alking the razor’s edge

APE WAR

between crust, thrash

and grindcore, Ape

War has been offering

an auditory onslaught

to the city’s underground music

scene since their inception more

than seven years ago. Within that

time the band has gone through

multiple members, released four

albums and is prepping for the end of days

with their newest offering, War Ape.

“There’s been steady evolution,” says

guitarist Jonny Bumknee. “OG Ape War

dissolved a few years ago. Waves of jobs,

weddings, breeding, the usual stuff. You

know that feeling where you dread going

to jam, rather than get pumped and end up

making excuses to skip it a lot?”

Suffering another exodus of members in

the summer of 2016, just as Bumknee had

brought second guitarist, Squealy Dan, into

the Ape War army, things were looking grim.

Pub 340

Friday, April 5

with Old Iron,

Mess & Nehushtan

Avant-Garden

Friday, April 19

with Balance, Terrifying

Girls High School &

Shearing Pinx

Refusing to submit, the band began to

reach out. “I started asking friends if they’d

be into helping to continue Ape War,” Bumknee

says. “It reassembled really quickly, like

within a month of it being mostly dead. It was

refreshing to jam with new input and talent.”

Having been through battle, Ape War have

emerged with a new roster, new songs, and

a refinement of their annihilistic sound, the

results of which can be heard in the new

album. “We really try to write quickly,” says

Bumknee. “Overthinking songs tends to take

all the energy out. We’re all pretty equally

involved. There’s not one person showing up

with riffs.”

As the new album began to take shape,

a new challenge arose with the departure

of vocalist, Doug Gregoire, leaving the band

without a voice only a week

before they headed to the studio.

“No hard feelings” Bumknee explains.

“They just didn’t have the

time, which was a real bummer.”

Never ones to say die, the

position was filled by longtime

friend and fan of the band, Dylan

Aine.

“Dylan was at pretty much

every show. Always got the pit

going, just amped up the gigs, so it was a no

brainer to ask him to step in,” Bumknee says.

“We’d been rehearsing without vocals for so

long, once we heard vocals, it was like a new

fire was lit.”

With the final piece in place, Ape War has

once again found its voice and the result

is 17 minutes of auditory assault. You can

catch them ushering in Armageddon with

this month’s release of War Ape. If you ever

wanted to listen to the apocalypse, now is

your chance. ,

BEN WEEKS

IN

GOD

WE

TRUST

After 20 years,

Godsmack rise up and

turn the page on a new

chapter

By JOHNNY PAPAN

W

hen Godsmack first

hit the scene with

their self-titled debut

in 1998, fans

were bathed in the

raw-aggression

of downtuned guitars and guttural

vocals pushed forth by a young and

pissed off Sully Erna.

Godsmack’s sound connected with

angsty teens of the new millennia

and, alongside a multitude of award

wins, their 2003 breakthrough, Faceless,

earned the band several Grammy

nominations. With the taste of

success came a whirlwind of substance

abuse and anger issues that

followed the band for much of their

career. For years, Godsmack was consistent

with their sound and lifestyle.

But now, 20 years after their debut,

the band has found a new zen, which

is reflected in their songwriting.

When Godsmack first announced

that their then-upcoming album,

When Legends Rise, was going to

see them explore more commercially

friendly stylings, purist fans hated

the idea of the band selling out. The

debut single, “Bulletproof,” stayed

true to Godsmack’s intentions. It was

catchy, simple and crafted for radio,

but the album as a whole is much

heavier and still retains their fundamental

core, layered with polished

evoluti

“It was risky,” frontman Sully

Erna admits. “Sometimes you have

to take those steps. Even though it’s

scary, a lot of great things can happen

from it and you can find yourself in

a much better position later. That’s

kind of the theme that runs through

GODSMACK

Friday, April 26

Abbotsford Centre

Tix: $79.50, ticketmaster.ca

this whole album: rebirth

and transition. It also

gave us an opportunity

to put something out that

people weren’t expecting.

I really like the element

of surprise. I don’t want to be predictable.

I thought ‘Bulletproof’ was

a good way to tell the fans that we’re

not going to be making the same record

over and over again.”

When Legends Rise gave Godsmack

a chance to break everything

down and rebuild from scratch. Erna

compares the album to a phoenix rising

from the ashes. Lyrically, it’s one

of the band’s most intimate releases

to date. And as much as the record

is a look towards the future, it’s also

an introspective dive into paths once

followed.

“I went through this transitional

period a couple years ago where

I realized there were a lot of people

who were there for the wrong reasons,”

Erna says. “As we

talk about crossing paths

in our lives, coming to

crossroads, people coming

in and out of your life,

one of the main things

that I realized is that everybody is

in search of love. Whether it’s from

your parents or your wife or your

kids or whatever. Unfortunately, we

go through some damage in our relationships.

Because of that, sometimes

you meet someone that could

be great for you, but you fuck it up

because of the scars that you carry.

The song ‘Under Your Scars’ is a

representation of meeting somebody

who could really be a positive influence

in your life and understanding

that they have their damage. It’s

about basically telling them ‘I’m willing

to live with your scars as long as

you’re willing to live with mine,’ because

we all have our own baggage.”

Erna concludes: “I think this is like

I think

this is like a

gateway album for

us, a new beginning.

We’re hoping people

come along for

the ride.

Godsmack’s Sully Erna

a gateway album for us, a new beginning.

Whatever we did from zero to

20 is one chapter in our lives, and

from this point forward could be a

whole new sound, but we’re trying

to be sensitive to not going too far

that it’s going to alienate our core audience.

You have to be able to grow

with your fans, and the fans have to

grow with us because we’re different

people now. I’m not that same angry

guy I was when I wrote the first record.

This is where we are musically

right now, and we’re hoping people

come along for the ride.” ,

18 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 19


Media partner

second show added!

chris

D’elia

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2019 TOUR

May 19 . 7 & 9:30 pm

Victoria Royal Theatre

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250-386-6121 OR 1-888-717-6121

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MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

IT’S A LOC

Austrailian psych rock masterminds,

The Murlocs will

make you squirm with their

latest episode By COLE YOUNG

W

ith two members

THE MURLOCS

of Austrailian powerhouse

King Giz-

Saturday, April 13

The Fox Cabaret

zard and the Lizard

Tix: $17.50, Ticketweb.ca

Wizard in the mix,

it’s no surprise

that the Murlocs are making waves with their

unique take on psychedelic-soul.

Frontman Ambrose Kenny-Smith is an absurdly

talented harmonica player, keyboardist

and vocalist and based off of the amount of

amazing records that he’s majorly contributed

to he’s also easily one of the hardest working

people in the business.

Although the band put out their debut EP,

simply titled EP, nearly a decade ago, it seems

their real run has just begun. Manic Candid Episode

is the Australian outfit’s most recent and

strongest release to date, packed full of captivating

modern psych rock without getting trapped

by repetition like so many of their peers.

The album is full of surprises and a wonderful

palate of styles that are tastefully layered

throughout the 40-minute adventure. At times

you’ll be banging your head completely enthralled

by the power of rock and roll, at others

you’ll be deep in melancholic thought, provoked

by frontman Ambrose Kenny-Smith’s

potent poetry.

There are the expected inspirations, ever-present

’60s rock, and R and B sounds

piercing through various songs, met kindly

with grooves that could easily slide into funk

and soul territory. A deeper dig also unveils

hip-hop as a point of inspiration for the band.

“The first kind of music I got into after blues

was Grandmaster Flash, Wu-tang, Cypress Hill

and NWA,” says Kenny-Smith, “I’ve just found

it hard not to rhyme things. I’ve done it a bit

unintentionally. Naturally I kind of relate more

to types of rhymes that might be unexpected.”

A hard edge to the Murlocs

emerges in the video for their latest

classically cool single, “Comfort

Zone.”

“I think the lyrics are crawling

back into you while you’re sitting

in a chair, squirming while seeing the point of

view of a psycho,” says Kenny-Smith. “Which,

uh, is unpleasant. I think it made sense to

have something shocking to go along with that

track.”

The deeply soulful piece explores how the

modern world is becoming alarmingly numb

to constant violence. The brilliant video

switches back and forth between a Clockwork

Orange-esque scene of Kenny-Smith twitching

slowly, yet frantically in a seat and a POV shot

of a clearly disturbed man going around committing

increasingly violent and destructive

crimes. The quick turn to darkness shocks the

viewer although it’s done in a certain manner

to not scare you away. It keeps the audience as

appalled as it does intrigued. It suggests modern

media is keeping the public stupefied or

morbidly entertained by depictions of everyday

violence.

Seems to be a running theme with this gang.

The Murlocs are lots of things but they’re never

predictable. ,

KATE KILLET

KATE KILLET

HOWDY PARTNER

East Coast queer duo Partner go country and save the date on new EP By EMILY CORLEY

L

ucy Niles and Josée Caron of Partner are

I think the spirit is fun loving and experimental.”

PARTNER

quickly becoming everybody’s favourite, with Wintersleep Caron nails it when she says, “You know how Will

loveable light-hearted lesbians with their Friday, April 26 Smith plays Will Smith in The Fresh Prince? Well

irresistible mix of country corn and cutting The Commodore

Partner is Lucy and Josée playing Lucy and Josée.

commentary all wrapped up in charmingly Tix: $30, Ticketmaster.ca The root of it is our shared experience, but what usually

ends up coming out is silliness, because when we

catchy pop-punk.

Their latest single, “Tell You Off,” embraces their shared rural

roots (Niles hails from Goose Bay, Labrador and Caron is from

Summerside, PEI). “I’ve heard it described as hipster country

and shit, but it’s not. It’s real country,” insists Niles with peppy

indignation. The new release comes ahead of their first “official”

five track EP, Saturday the 14th, which lands April 5. “But our first

actual EP was called Healthy Release and it’s only available on

tape,” explains Niles.

“It’s actually not available at all. Because we’ve run out,”

get together we just have a lot of laughs.”

Partner are fresh from their latest tour, already heading back

on the road with Wintersleep this month. There’s a smile in

Niles’ voice when she says, “I can’t wait to get back on the road.”

Both admit touring can be emotional and sometimes even boring,

but their excitement for life on tour is palpable, especially

when they discuss playing the Commodore Ballroom. “Our manager

is from Vancouver and she keeps saying the Commodore is

‘the place to be.’ So I would say we’re honoured,” enthuses Niles.

Caron pitches in. The duo go on to explain the surreal experience

of trying to listen to their own music online and drawing a blank

because their original output was only ever released on tape. “It’s

weird! We’re like the Nardwuars of the world,” laughs Niles.

Partner are known for experimental sound and observational

comedy, lavishly exemplified by the farmyard medley at the beginning

of “Tell You Off.” “It’s about the sketchy places we grew

up in. It’s about being a kid and some other

kid pisses you off.” For Caron and Niles,

songwriting often takes the form of retribution.

It’s about allowing yourself the

opportunity to consider how you “wish”

you’d have responded to a situation.

“Writing a song is getting to say exactly

what you want to say, after taking the

time to think about it,” laughs Caron.

“It’s that ‘get off my lawn!’ energy.”

Despite their latest foray into

“real life country,” Partner describe

their sound as post-gothic

rock though they agree the

description doesn’t cover the

many facets of their musical

personality.

“I guess what unifies

it isn’t the sound, but

the spirit. And that’s

hard to describe.

,

20 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 21


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

VERBODEN

FEST: A

LABOUR

OF LOVE

Rob Katerwol sacrifices

his car for the love of his

dark wave music fest

By ESMÉE COLBOURNE

At its conception,

Verboden was a

conversion of many

catalysts. Most

notably, the absence

of a fitting Vancouver

music festival for

post-punk, EBM and

Coldwave. Four years later, Rob

Katerwol, the enigmatic organizer,

musician and all around music

VERBODEN

MUSIC FESTIVAL

April 11 to 14

The Astoria and the Rickshaw

Tix: $75 (festival pass),

$20-22 (individual tickets)

brownpapertickets.com

fan is wearing a lot of hats, organising

international names like Boy

Harsher, Light Asylum and Mr. Kitty.

Katerwol, while funding most of the

festival out of pocket.

“I’m selling my sins. I’ve got my car

up for sale,” he says.

Luckily every year the festival has

managed to break even. “I’m going to

do it until I completely drown and go

bankrupt probably,” he jokes. “I used

to have fine art on the walls.”

Dedication to genre and Katerwol’s

grassroots approach to

collaboration has brought one of the

most exciting acts, Brooklyn-based

electronic music duo Light Asylum,

which currently consists of Shannon

Funchess and Raphael Radna, to

Vancouver. “I always get so excited

when somebody doesn’t know one

of the headliners, especially with

Light Asylum.” Funchess’

voice is big and crazy

and Light Asylum’s dark

and tense synthpop will

definitely blow the audience

off their feet.

“Verboden is so

fulfilling on the day of,”

Katerwol says. “That’s really why I do

this. It feels really nice to be around

bands you really like and know

they’ve travelled here to bring people

together. It’s the closest thing

that I have to a family reunion in a

weird way too, a reunion of friends.”

Through Katerwol and his team’s

thoughtful curation, friendship and

fan-like approach to the music community,

Verboden 2019 promises to

Boy Harsher

be a spectacular event featuring a

smorgasbord of some of the best

local and international darkwave,

EBM and post-punk talent.

NEDDA AFSARI

LAURIN THOMPSON

FROM

RUSSIA

WITH

LOVE

Pop punks on a mission,

Russian Tim and the

Pavel Bures break out the

Greatest Super Hits

By COURT OVERGAAUW

T

im Bogdachev AKA Russian

Tim is the sort of guy

who gets genuinely excited

at the prospect of tossing

on some short shorts and

exposing his legs to the

cold, just to recreate a hockey card

from 1991.

It might be because the card in

question features another Vancouver

legend of Russian origin, Pavel

Bure, and the namesake of the

band he sings in, Russian Tim and

Pavel Bures. It might just be that it’s

a fun thing to do, and Bogdachev

loves fun.

For the unacquainted, Bogdachev

is a man who wears many

ushankas. Lead singer, host of the

weekly Rocket from Russia radio

show on CiTR, and organizer of

the annual Rocket from Russia

Festival, which brings together

what Bogdachev believes to be the

best of Vancouver punk rock over

the course of a weekend every

summer.

To get an idea of Russian Tim

and the Pavel Bures’ sound,

imagine Fat Wreck’s pop

punk cover junkies Me First

and the Gimme Gimmes if

they only played covers of

Russian standards, and only

sang in Russian, the way

Bogdachev would have

heard them as a kid back in

Siberia.

Siberia is big. Like,

humongous big. At 13.1

million square kilometers,

it’s humongous enough

that if it were a country

on its own it would be

the earth’s largest. Yet to

most of us in the west,

Siberia is known primarily

for being cold, and for

being the sort of place

people are sent to as a

punishment.

It certainly seems

like an unlikely starting

point for Bogdachev, a

man who’s established

himself as

being one of the

hardest working and

most prolific members

of Vancouver’s

punk rock community

(20 shows as

a performer locally in 2018, along

with organizing and promoting his

weekend long festival).

Get to know Bogdachev a little

better however, and it all starts to

make sense. If you’re a young kid

getting into punk rock without an

established infrastructure or scene,

you can either quit, or you can

create. Bogdachev chose the latter

and his early experiences played

a major role

in the development of

the skill set he brings

to bear on all of the

projects he’s involved

in, and his commitment

to developing a scene

where people feel

welcome.

A strong sense of

community make up a

RUSSIAN TIM AND

PAVEL BURES

with The Corps, You Big

Idiot, Aanthems, The

Greatest Sons and Modern

Terror

Saturday, April 20

The Wise Hall

Tix: $15, showpass.com

part of Russian culture that Bogdachev

wishes was better understood

in the West, where our

perceptions

are shaped

by a media

which focuses

on politics

rather than

people.

“Russian

people are

very warm and

will go out of

their way to

be hospitable

and make you

feel special,” he

says.

Bogdachev is

pragmatic. His

approach is to do

what works in a

practical sense,

and not waste

time worrying

about things that

are out of his control.

Doing things

this way allows

him to maintain an

optimism about the

long-term viability of

punk rock in Vancouver.

As he puts it, his

vision is always “glass

half full.”

“I come from an

environment where we

had only one or two

small clubs. Coming

here where there’s five

or six, I’m just amazed

there’s an opportunity,”

he says.

Even when asked about his

band’s new album, Greatest Superhits,

he resists the obvious opportunity

for self-promotion and

chooses instead to describe the

record as a collection of songs

that were “the most ready.”

He goes on to say that the

album “won’t be life changing for

anybody, but serves as an advertisement

for our live shows, which

for us is the key.”

The songs on the record

capture some of the feeling contained

in what the band describes

as their “superFUN and megaENERGETIC”

live performance.

Letting everyone in on that fun,

and the exchange of energy

that arises from performing and

connecting with his audience is

something he’s grateful for, inspiring

him to give his all with every

show. It’s also the key to keeping

it fun for Bogdachev.

Keeping it fun is the key to

his continued involvement in the

punk rock community in Vancouver,

both as a musician and as a

promoter of new music. “I want to

have fun while I do this stuff, and

as soon as I stop having fun, this

will stop the next moment.” ,

22 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

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APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 23


SUPERSTAR BOY BAND TURN THE PAGE

TO A NEW CHAPTER IN THEIR OWN CEMENTED

LEGACY IN THE WORLD OF KOREAN HIP-HOP

BY JORDAN YEAGER

M

ass-marketed, carefully controlled

was released in 1990. Ever since, Korean hip-hop

EPIK HIGH

K-pop, with its slick dance moves

has evolved to stand alongside American hip-hop as

May 2 and 3

and studio scripted tunes, has been

a fully-fledged, storied genre in its own right. At the

Vogue Theatre

taking over the music world for decades.

But an edgier sound with in-

Epik High consists of Tablo, Mithra Jin, and DJ

forefront of Korean hip-hop is Epik High.

Tix: $57.50: eventbrite.ca

fluences gathered from tracks that U.S. soldiers Tukutz. According to frontman Tablo, they’re “a trio made up of

were listening to was also emerging: Korean hiphop.

Clubs like Seoul’s Moon Night Dance & Night Club in the pany your lonely nights. Mithra is the Drax of the group, Tukutz

three wildly different personalities that makes music to accom-

Itaewon neighbourhood located near the American military base is Rocket, and I’m Star-Lord. All of us together are Groot.”

in Yongsan were home to these burgeoning beats and often catered

to American tastes. It’s no wonder, then, that Korean music acters offers a glimpse into their senses of humour, which have

The Guardians of the Galaxy-based description of their char-

as a whole came to have such audibly American influences. Korean

hip-hop is no exception.

ing. They’ve also refined their sound, which is alternative and

been collectively honed in the 16 years they’ve spent collaborat-

Rather than being rap- and lyric-focused, early Korean hiphop

of the mid to late 80s was centred around dance music. It growth. Some of their lyrics are written in Korean, and others

soulful, examining topics like community, identity, and personal

had catchy, energetic beats that inspired dancers to face off in in English; being bilingual allows them to encapsulate a wider

competitions that attracted attendance from people across the range of feelings within their words. Together, they’ve watched

city. Lee Soo-man of SM Entertainment, who would go on to the Korean music industry become the international monolith it

represent some of the country’s most prolific acts, discovered is today, all the while playing a pivotal role in helping to shape it.

some of his first stars at Moon Night – the first was Hyun Jinyoung,

whose premiere album as Hyun Jin-young and Wawa feels inadequate to encapsulate it,” says Tablo. “All you have

“It’s become so big and so diverse that the moniker ‘K-pop’

do

Epik High’s Mithra Jin (left), Tablo and DJ Tukutz

is hear it and you’ll see what I mean. Epik High albums are a good

place to start because we have the most eclectic collaborations.

We honestly don’t care what people categorize us as. It’s a great

entrance into the wonderful rabbit hole that is Korean music today;

we don’t fit snugly into any realm anyway.”

As true entrepreneurs as well as artists, Epik High knows

that to survive as long as they have, it’s imperative that they

adapt with the times. Right now, that means leaving the safety

of a labwel behind and pushing forward independently. The last

three of their 11 studio albums were released through one of Korea’s

“big three” labels, YG Entertainment. Their latest venture,

Sleepless in ____, was produced and released independently, and

in their words is “very Epik High.”

“I believe that a life, like a book, should have chapters,” says

Tablo. “It was time to turn the page and once again thrust ourselves

into uncertainty. That’s when the best art manifests itself.

Some musicians make club music, and Epik High makes the music

you listen to on that strangely serene Uber ride home after

the club. This is that kind of album.”

It wasn’t until 1998 that Korean hip-hop as it exists today truly

came to be. The group Drunken Tiger, which originally consisted

of Tiger JK and DJ Shine, went against the norms of K-pop – like

rigorously practiced choreography and lyrics written by studio

execs – stirring up controversy and securing themselves a place

atop the public radar. In 2005, DJ Shine left the group; Tiger JK

continued making music under the Drunken Tiger moniker until

2018.

Of the three members of Epik High, Tablo is probably the

most excited to embark on this North American tour. He spent a

significant portion of his youth in Vancouver and credits the city

with shaping him into the artist he is today.

“I lived in Vancouver since I was eight years old, and my last

year there, I went to St. George’s for eighth grade,” he says. “It

was a very strict school, at least at the time, with uniforms and

a million old-fashioned rules. My friends and I were considered

troublemakers. I constantly rebelled. What I’m trying to say is

that I think the artist part of me was birthed there. It was the

grain for me to go against. Vancouver will always be a part of me

because it was the last place where I was just a kid and where I

began to grow up. I can’t wait to meet the Vancouver fans.”

Tiger JK also started the Movement Crew in 2000, a hip-hop

collective that provided a community for aspiring artists. Epik

High found a home with the Movement Crew, whose members

were often influenced by message-centric ‘90s hip-hop from

the U.S. Rather than focusing on making their music danceable,

members of the Movement Crew starting thinking instead about

rhyme schemes, lyrical structure, and, above all, the meaning

they wanted their lyrics to convey. They were taking inspiration

from the American art they were surrounded by while adapting

it into something all their own – more than anything, Korean

hip-hop was a response to the environment they found themselves

in. Since the Movement Crew’s inception, hip-hop artists

in Korea have set their own precedents, no longer referring to

American hip-hop for inspiration and influence. While there are

parallels, a comparison between the two genres is not really necessary.

“When done right, hip-hop, or any art at all for that matter,

is unique to each individual doing it,” Tablo says. “I don’t think

geographical grouping means anything in the world we live in

now. Our fans everywhere happen to be intelligent, kind people

with great taste and an awesome sense of humour. Impeccably

dressed. Super energy. With that said, Korea has many, many

wonderful individuals worth paying attention to.”

No matter where in the world you go, boy bands prevail. Tablo,

for one, embraces the title: “I thank you from the bottom of

my heart for calling us a boy band.” ,

A BRIEF HISTORY OF

KOREAN HIP HOP

By Sebastian Buzzalino

1980s

1993

Deux debuts in

1993 with “Turn

Around and

Look at Me,”

popularizing

hip-hop-influenced

choreography

and fashion in

Korea.

2001

Epik High forms

in 2001 after

Tablo returns

from his studies

in Vancouver.

Their debut

album, Map of

the Human Soul,

comes out in

2003.

2005

Epik High

releases their

mainstream

breakthrough

album, Swan

Songs, in 2005.

The title track,

“Fly,” quickly

tops domestic

charts.

2016

Epik High becomes

the first

major Korean

hip-hop act to

play at Coachella

in 2016.

Korean hip-hop

begins with club

dancers in the

1980s performing

to New Jack

Swing in Itaewon

clubs, known for

their proximity

to the American

Yongsan military

base

1998

Drunken Tiger

emerges in 1998

as Korea’s first

commercially

successful hiphop

act. Their

first album, Year

of the Tiger,

changes the

landscape of

K-pop forever.

2004

Dynamic Duo

releases Taxi

Driver in 2004,

going on to

sell more than

500,000 copies

for the first time

in Korean hiphop

history.

2014

Epik High tops

the Billboard

World Albums

Chart in 2014

with Shoebox.

2019

By 2019, notable

acts like Red

Velvet, BLACK-

PINK, WINNER,

and MXM all

announce

extensive North

American tours,

including a stop

at Coachella

2019 for

BLACKPINK.

24 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 25


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

NEW KID

ON THE

BLOCK

High School Confidential:

Zoey Leven wins Nimbus

battle of the bands and

drops a colourful debut on

the world By JORDAN YEAGER

I

ndie rock singer-songwriter

Zoey Leven sits in a booth at

Timbertrain Coffee Roasters in

downtown Vancouver, flanked

by her mom-turned-momager,

who’s sipping a latte. The

18-year-old always knew she’d be a

musician. Growing up in the Disney

Channel era, she wanted to be the

next Selena Gomez – and really, who

among us wasn’t inspired by the likes

of Gomez, Hilary Duff, and the Jonas

Brothers? Dreams of international superstardom

saw Leven’s aunt giving

her piano lessons as a child. Singing

lessons followed, and once Leven realized

she could combine the two to

compose her own songs, she started

chasing those dreams full throttle.

She began competing in singing and

songwriting competitions at age 12.

Now, in her final year of high school,

Leven just won the Nimbus Battle of

the Bands.

“Once I wrote my first song, I was

like, this is something I could actually

do with my life,” says Leven. “The

dream has changed a little bit [from

the Selena Gomez days] – a little

more realistic, now that I’m getting

more familiar with the industry and

what it’s really like. I’m on a small record

label, so the goal is to get a booking

agency, to book shows to get me

more well-known, and maybe be an

opening act for a bigger name.”

ZOEY LEVEN

harnessing her competitive side for a series of

wins

Zoey Leven Harnesses Her Competitive Side

for a Series of Wins

Tags: local, indie rock, blues, Zoey Leven,

Messy

That small record label is Amalien

Records, and they discovered her after

she placed third in a Vancouver songwriting

competition. They recently

released Leven’s promising premiere

six-song album, Messy. Leven is a

multi-instrumentalist and usually

hires a drummer to keep the beat

while she records vocals, guitar, bass,

and keyboard on her own. She credits

her family for her talent.

“My mom’s side is very musical.

My nonno was a very musical guy. He

would go play the accordion at Italian

banquets in Burnaby growing up, and

everyone knew who he was. So I say

that I got my musical abilities from

him, and maybe it skipped a generation,”

says Leven, looking at her

mom with a sly grin.

Leven knows perseverance is key

to success and has performed in

competitions, local venues and breweries

for six years. She finally feels

like she’s beginning to break into the

business.

“All those years doing competitions,

it never really felt like I was

going anywhere,” says Leven. “In the

past year, I met my record label guy,

and he introduced us to all these different

connections and possibilities.

It just blossomed from there. I did a

music video, which was a first time,

cool thing. It was pretty surprising

seeing it come together and watching

it for the first time.”

“We didn’t get to watch it with

her for the first time,” adds Leven’s

mom, Lisa. “She’s like, ‘I need to

watch it first, by myself,’ and then we

get to watch it without her, by ourselves.”

“None of this would be possible

without my support system,” Leven

says, gesturing towards her mom.

She says the best advice she has

ever received “is probably from my

mom. Nothing is guaranteed in this

business, and you shouldn’t get discouraged

from that. Even if people

promise you something, it’s not a 100

per cent sure thing, so just don’t go in

with any expectations.” ,

RESISTANCE

IS FUTILE

Emily Rowed wakes up and writes

a love letter to herself, puts her

unpolished journal entries to song

By KATHRYN HELMORE

V

ancouver has escaped the clutches of

a viciously dreary winter as streaks of

unadulterated

sunlight and warm EMILY ROWED

springtime breeze Thursday, April 25

titillate residents The Fox Cabaret

with the promise of life,

Tix: $15, 604records.com

clear horizons and freedom

from gore tex.

Emily Rowed sits in Turks coffee shop on Commercial

Drive, perched on a wooden chair, clad in pastels,

‘Budapest’ printed on a light, pink T-shirt. As the

sunlight sneaks through the window and casts a halo

around her bleached blonde hair, Rowed talks about

waking up.

“If nothing else, I’ve become intrigued to be alive,”

she says. “I’m here and adventure awaits on my

finger tips.”

Yes. Emily Rowed makes electro-pop music but

she ain’t no basic bitch. Her music trades drugs,

clubs and chandeliers for lyrics tracing those familiar

scars that mark the psyche of our human experience.

“If you want to change you’ve got to let your heartbreak,”

says Rowed.

April, a 10-track album set to release on April 12,

is raw, emotional voyeurism that talks about just this;

heartbreak.

“I think this is a delicate, cinematic and intimate

album,” she says. “It has a documentary quality with a

vinyl, watery texture. It is unpolished journal entries.”

The album begins on the corner of Frances Street

and Commercial Drive in Vancouver where Rowed

finished a pivotal phone call and cut ties with the past

to embark on a new journey. In the following days, she

would give up her car, her apartment, a plethora of

relationships and take a trip to Maui. Two and a half

years later, Rowed remains comfortably uncomfortable,

fliting across North America equipped with just a bag

of clothes, a computer, a cell phone and mini keyboard.

No car keys and no permanent address.

“The first of April 2017 marked the first day of

freedom,” says Rowed. “I traded things for experiences.

For movement, exploration, stories and feeling. It

was temporary destruction for a rebuild. It felt like I

was asleep before. There is something magical about

actually observing life.”

But ‘April’ is not some ‘Minimalism for Idiots’ textbook

in auditory form. It’s impossible to paint Rowed as a self

righteous hippie chick demanding you chug the kool

aid. The album is not a sermon. It is not a parable. It is

just a personal story from a naked, vulnerable, honest

artist.

“The album is the story of my return to being

human. I choose deep feelings rather than attempts

to ‘get ahead’ or ‘gather things’. If nothing else, it is a

bare record. It’s all there. Every struggle. It’s all true.

And yes, telling strictly the truth is one of the most

terrifying things I could do. But if it’s not scary, you’re

not telling the whole truth.”

For the most part, the album is chronological. The

first track talks about a phone call on the corner and

winds through the experience of saying goodbye to

everything.

“It’s bliss in the front, grief in the back,” says

Rowed. “It expresses a 360 degree view of myself.”

Such a rollercoaster story fits well into the album’s

release date. April is, afterall, a month of extremes:

pure joy, envy, gooey dreamy love, suffocation, destruction

and rebuilding.

The album’s story promises to meld into the genre

of electronic with poignant harmony.

“After I said goodbye to everything there was no

relief,” she says. “There was just a feeling of ‘here we

go’. A WHOOSH. Like an elevator. Like the rise to a

beat drop. There was a sense of ‘this is happening

weather I like it or not. I did not resist.”

The album was co-produced with La+ch,a Toronto-based

artist, across 21 days spent in his 9x9

apartment.

“La+ch was a chameleon,” Rowed says. “He

stepped in and listened to what I was trying to do

and made it a little cooler. He is intensely creative,

he used vocal mistakes for beats. The intention was

not to write an album. When we started we just wrote

about the weather. But the story came out. In some

sense, we were really diarying.”

After strolling down to Frances Street, Rowed

dons her plastic pink sunglasses and takes a Car2Go

back to her Airbnb, leaving an empty street corner.

The March pavement is remarkably dry with concrete

warmed by sunshine and a warm spring breeze.

Sunshine, suffocating rain showers, and breathtaking

sunsets are on the horizon.

April is coming. ,

26 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 27


A P R I L

MUSiC

Album Review

THURS 4

DOORS @ 8:00PM

HALEY BLAIS, BLUE J, JENNY

BANAI, AND THE LIVING

SUN 14

DOORS @ 8:O0PM

TEN FE

WITH EVAN KONRAD

FRI 26

DOORS @ 10:30PM

NO REQUEST FRIDAY

INDIE, ROCK, ALT, 80S, 90S, & 2000S

FRI 5

DOORS @ 10:30PM

NO REQUEST FRIDAY

INDIE, ROCK, ALT, 80S, 90S, & 2000S GEMS!

TUES 16

DOORS @ 8:00PM

ALICE MERTON

MINT TOUR 2019

SAT 27

DOORS @ 7:00PM

STRAND OF OAKS

WITH GUESTS WILD PINK

SAT 6

DOORS @ 10:30PM

BYE FELICIA

VANCITY ROYALTY DRAG PARTY!

WED 17

DOORS @ 7:00PM

SAWYER FREDERICKS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT 27

DOORS @ 10:30PM

NITE*MOVES

FOOLISH FAR BACK

DANCE BIG SHOES. PARTY BIG JAMS HAIR. FOR BIG THE ATTITUDES. YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

BILLIE EILISH

When We All Fall Asleep,

Where Do We Go?

Darkroom/Interscope

SUN 7

DOORS @ 8:00PM

TUES 9

DOORS @ 7:00PM

THURS 11

DOORS @ 7:00PM

FRI 12

DOORS @ 10:30PM

SAT 13 17

DOORS @ 7:O0PM

HOP ALONG

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MISSIO

WITH BLACKILLAC AND SWELLS

THE TROUBLE NOTES

LOSE YOUR TIES TOUR

NO REQUEST FRIDAY

INDIE, ROCK, ALT, 80S, 90S, & 2000S

GIRLPOOL

WITH HATCHIE AND CLAUD

THURS 18

DOORS @ 8:00PM

SAT FRI 1917

DOORS @ 7:00PM

FRI 19

DOORS @ 10:30PM

SAT 20 17

DOORS @ 10:30PM

SAT WED 17 24

DOORS @ 7:00PM

ONYX

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

EX HEX

WITH FEELS

NO REQUEST FRIDAY

INDIE, ROCK, ALT, 80S, 90S, & 2000S

BYE FELICIA

VANCITY ROYALTY DRAG PARTY!

KERO KERO BONITO

WITH GUEST JAKKO EINO KALEVI

SUN 28

DOORS @ 7:00PM

SAT MON 17 29

DOORS @ 7:00PM

TUES 30

DOORS @ 8:00PM

WED 1

DOORS @ 8:00PM

SAT THURS 172

DOORS @ 7:00PM

LAUREN FOOLISH RUTH FAR WARD BACK

BIG SHOES. BIG HAIR. BIG ATTITUDES.

WITH GUEST JESSE JO STARK

COAST 2 COAST LIVE ARTIST

SHOWCASE

MORMOR

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

NICK WATERHOUSE

WITH GUEST BEN PIRANI

LADY LAMB WITH KATIE VON

SCHLEICHER AND ALEX SCHAAF

Some people were born to perform,

and looking at Billie Eilish,

it’s evident that she’s among them.

From her often-silver hair to her

eccentric, neon-drenched brand

of personal style, Eilish commands

attention. She was only 14 when

her breakout single, “Ocean Eyes,”

took off unexpectedly. Three years

later, the singer-songwriter has

seen seven tracks hit the Billboard

100 and has amassed billions of

streams – without ever releasing an

album. Until now.

The world can’t get enough of

this angsty, irresistible performer

who seemingly came out of

nowhere (LA, actually), delivering

hit after hit since her unlikely debut.

Her first full-length release, When

We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We

Go? delivers on all of that promise,

building on her strengths – catchy

production underscoring cheeky

lyrics – while not afraid to go in new

directions. Finneas O’Connell is

the producer and co-writer of all of

Eilish’s music, and he also happens

to be her brother. On this record,

they take on a more experimental

CONTINUED ON PG. 32 k

SAT 13

DOORS @ 10:30PM

NITE*MOVES

DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED

FRI 26

DOORS @ 6:00PM

TURNOVER & TURNSTILE

WITH GUESTS REPTALIENS

FRI 3

DOORS @ 7:00PM

DIZZY

WITH GUESTS

28 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019 MARCH 2019 BEATROUTE 29


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

THE CRANBERRIES

In The End

BMG

In The End was always going to be

a tough listen; an album finished

posthumously after lead singer

Dolores O’Riordan’s tragic death in

January 2018, this was destined to

be part eulogy and part resurrection.

However, when you listen to

the obviously lovingly crafted album

you pick up on a resigned sadness

in the lyrics that rings, in hindsight,

like a warning bell.

The album is a selection of soft

and aching laments to loss and

regret and a seeping hopelessness

shrouded in self-medication. The

band has done a stellar job of embracing

the sadness of the material,

as if to give themselves and the

rest of us a place to put the grief

about O’Riordan’s pain and how it

ultimately got the best of her.

Songs like the anguished “Lost”

and “Summer Song” speak openly

about the fleeting reality of life’s

elements, while “The Pressure” and

“Got It” play with the notions of

coping and what we tell ourselves

in order to do so. And “Catch Me

If You Can” is a full tilt cry for help.

By the time the last strum closes

out the title track at the end of the

album, you feel goodbye happen

whether you are ready or not.

Fitting.


Jennie Orton

FOXYGEN

Seeing Other People

Jagjaguwar

“We’re never gonna turn time

back,” Foxygen’s co-creator Sam

France admits on Seeing Other

People. It’s a revelatory statement

for France, who with multi-instrumentalist

Jonathan Rado cemented

Foxygen like a Hollywood star on

the Walk of Fame for nostalgic and

uncanny pop-rock on early records

Take The Kids Off Broadway and

We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors

of Peace & Magic.

Their next grouping of albums

- …And Star Power and Hang,

drove gamely off-course, with

dense orchestration and fandangled

concept tracks. So to hear

France admit his powerlessness

against the eternal death march,

while bouncing with Rado between

Bruce Springsteen homage,

mid-eighties synth guitar and Mick

Jagger wails, is to experience the

band as wildly talented as ever, but

also a bit damaged.

Within the economy of nine

tracks (“…an album of singles,”

France reminds label Jagjaguwar in

his press letter), Rado and France

cook up delicious time warps,

demonstrating Rado’s intense

growth as a producer, who since …

And Star Power has influenced the

success of Whitney, The Lemon

Twigs, and others.

From the opening track “News”,

which barges in with France on

grand piano, to the “Conclusion” (a

sun-drunk soul track suggesting

“We should just be friends”), Seeing

Other People leaves few popular

genres between 1975 to 1985

behind, while keeping one foot

firmly in the present. The past is

celebrated, not investigated; a fine

strategy for maintaining sanity.

Sarah Bauer

BLESSED

Salt

Independent

“Let there be work and bread and

water and salt for all.” – Nelson

Mandela

On Salt, the latest LP from

Abbotsford’s Blessed, we see

the band’s tireless work ethic pay

off. The constant toiling of that

fertile Fraser Valley creativity has

finally reaped a full length’s worth

of material from a band that has

consistently strived to reinvent

themselves. Incredibly, they’ve

played 225 shows across North

America, including stops at Sled

Island and SXSW, plus supporting

slots with acts such as Preoccupations,

The Courtneys, Chastity

and The Austerity Program.

In a suburban garage somewhere

a dad’s Styx CD is skipping

while he’s working on his car.

Somewhere on Spotify there’s a

playlist with Omni and Uranium

Club and Ought. Suddenly, Salt

comes up in the algorithm and

some kid in rural Minnesota is

stoked.

Salt is smart and gritty, yet tightly

wound and expansive at the same

time. It’s ambitious but accessible.

It’s prog for people who like punk.

It’s punk for people who like jazz.

It’s classic rock for people who like

Echo and the Bunnymen. It’s for

people like me who grew up listening

to Black Rice, Minus the Bear

and Dismemberment Plan.

Sean Orr

CRAIG FINN

I Need a New War

Partisan Records

Both as singer for Minneapolis bar

rock legends The Hold Steady and

in his more recent solo material,

Craig Finn makes music about bad

decisions.

His characters smoke too many

cigarettes while seeking redemption

in the arms of their fellow

drugged out lonely people while

crashing on couches and scraping

together money to get another

drink and find a way to move their

life forward. If you’ve ever been

that dirt bag, seeking hope in the

despair of burned out after-hours

parties, Finn’s songs might be

your anthems. If not, it can be a

touch voyeuristic and grim, like the

character in “Her With The Blues”

that takes pictures of the grimy,

authentic side of city life.

It all might be a little too much if

the songs weren’t so good. Finn’s

writing is in top form here. The

way the idea of gratitude is played

within “A Bathtub in the Kitchen”

is nuanced and complex, while

the vivid description of a veteran’s

post-war life of the protagonist on

“Magic Marker” is neither patronizing

nor trite. Finn’s songs resist

simple answers or solutions.

Graeme Wiggins

GUIDED BY VOICES

Warp and Woof

Guided By Voices Inc.

With 24 songs that clock in at 37

minutes, there’s no escaping that

more is less. The impetus for Warp

and Woof stems from a “magical

boombox writing session,” in which

six “fully-formed” songs came flowing

out of Robert Pollard’s stream

of consciousness. After that, he

plugged in the band and knocked

off an album littered with joyous

gems that sparkle, shine and blaze

all through their 100-second romp.

While it seems dubious, even

ludicrous, to label such short snippets

as fully-formed, Pollard definitely

pulls the rabbit out of the hat

on most of these tracks, digging in

deep with infectious melodies and

golden guitar hooks that accentuate

GBV’s garageland glory.

His post-modern mind can’t

be overstated either. It’s one

thing to embrace minimalism as a

bare-bones production, and quite

another to stage mini-sagas that

each pack a mighty-big starburst

punch. In addition to the swagger

and three-chord crunch, Pollard

also roams down fleeting, folkpsych

pathways making Warp and

Woof a kaleidoscopic journey that

maintains its urgency and hypnotic

pull.

Tom Waits is an unlikely comparison,

but Pollard’s spin-on-a-dime

storytelling contains the same weirdo

charm when a love song called

“Cohesive Scoops” might just be

about a kitty and their litter box.

B. Simm

KEVIN MORBY

Oh My God

Dead Oceans

Kevin Morby’s first true concept

album is brimming with as much

grace, confession and glory as

any contemporary religious album

today.

It’s equally as bright and thoughtful

as the folk-meets-lo-fi singer/

songwriter’s previous albums, but

with a happy scoop of homecoming;

a nod to his Methodist roots.

Morby admits he and his family

were largely impartial to religion

growing up, and Oh My God is a

snapshot of someone who only just

acknowledged religion’s permanence

around them.

The album’s title track opens

with a 20-second piano warm-up

reminiscent of Sunday morning

worship before easing into the

voices of a backup gospel choir.

These voices permeate throughout

the album.

“OMG Rock and Roll “ is a reworked

version of the same song,

only at half the time and twice the

speed. Maybe Morby wanted more

to play with, expanding the song’s

potential with a change of genre, or

maybe he’s just having fun. Either

way, Oh My God might be Morby’s

most fully realized and enlightened

album to date.

Leyland Bradley

PRIESTS

The Seduction of Kansas

Sister Polygon

The Seduction of Kansas forms

itself as a wide-ranging critique,

reclamation and celebration of

Americana and its discontents. The

follow up to 2017’s Nothing Feels

Natural is a clearer, more confident

sonic and thematic progression for

the Washington D.C. outfit. Priests

are your tour guide through the

sunken and monochromatic strip

malls and drug addled dwellings

of the red states. As the name

suggests, location is the key thematic

element as it flows through

multiple American locales; from the

cornfields of Kansas, to the deserted

strip malls of Nevada and the

industrialized backwaters of Texas.

Each song feels like a mini essay

on the current cultural climate that

is facing the United States with a

brilliant sense of heart and nuance.

The rampant destructive force of

the military industrial-complex in

‘’Good Time Charlie’’ to the societal

weight of projected cultural propaganda

in ‘’68 Screens’’ run the

complete gambit of what you might

consider to be the ills facing American

society today. A gorgeous

sense of polish to the songs and

how each interweave with each

other makes for a solid mosaic of

art rock. This is the timeliest and

more intellectually sophisticated

album of the year thus far.

Joshua Shepherd

THE DRUMS

Brutalism

ANTI-

Jonny Pierce is back with

his fifth studio effort, Brutalism.

Prior to the album’s release, Pierce

went through a difficult divorce

and experienced depression and

anxiety. The recording of Brutalism

ended up being an outlet for him to

express his feelings.

On “Body Chemistry” Pierce

questions whether his persisting

feelings of woe are wired into

his DNA over frantic drums and

a groovy bassline. “626 Bedford

Avenue” is a bright and cheery pop

number where Pierce reminisces

about a past lover who didn’t reciprocate

his affection. “You might be

a psychopath / You might wanna

check that”, he croons.

The album gets a little more

serious on “Nervous,” an emotional

acoustic piece about an encounter

Pierce had with his ex-husband.

The next track, “Blip of Joy,” ends

the album on a high note. Pierce

sounds hopeful for the future when

he sings, “It’s just a little blip of joy /

Can I feel it again?”

Brutalism contains some of

Pierce’s most honest lyrics and

is more varied musically than

their previous output. It grows on

you, with each listen being more

rewarding than the last.

Robann Kerr

THE MOUNTAIN

GOATS

In League With Dragons

Merge Records

You might be forgiven for hoping

or expecting that In League With

Dragons would be a straightforward

Dungeons & Dragons themed

concept album. John Darnielle has

a penchant for statement albums

and playing with concepts. Goths,

his last, was playing with genre,

while Beat The Champ was a wrestling

themed album. This album

however plays with concept and

genre in a much more loose and

fluid way.

There are definite moments of

D&D influence (the “huge wings

blotting out the sun” and reference

to famous fantasy artist Boris

Vallejo on the title track, the hungry

older gods of “Younger” or “Clemency

for the Wizard King”). In interviews,

he’s expressed desire for

this genre, which he dubs “dragon

noir” to catch on. It’s a heady mix

of well told tales that all work as a

unified whole despite the initially

disparate timelines and characters.

Musically, the album is a little more

stripped down than the last few

previous albums, largely acoustic

guitar driven, with some horn

flourishes here and there. While

the stories are on the dark side of

things (there’s references to cadaver

sniffing dogs and strychnine) the

hopeful delivery helps temper the

darkness.

Graeme Wiggins

WEYES BLOOD

Titanic Rising

Sub Pop

Listening to the first couple of

songs from Titanic Rising, one

could imagine having come across

a tape of 70s AM radio greats. Not

only is the sound reminiscent of

some of the great songwriters of

the era, but the quality of the songs

is up to the game.

There are moments on the

album that move away from those

60s and 70s sounds that bring the

album into its own. The cinematic

build of (appropriately titled) “Movies”

sounds like nothing else on

the record and the sci-fi synth loop

centred “Mirrors Forever” manages

to fuse the moody undertones of

Weyes Blood while showing that

this is more than just a distillation

of influences. Even on “Andromeda,”

one of the more traditional

sounding songs, the subtle wobbly

distortion applied to the guitar both

manages to give the impression

of age, while still making it its own

distinctive thing.

All throughout is Natalie Mering’s

voice, a powerful instrument that

fills all empty space and demands

attention. It gives the songs

warmth and power that emphasizes

the hope behind some of the

sadder subject matter, keeping

them from dripping too deeply into

sentimentality.

Graeme Wiggins

30 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 31


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

LOCAL ALBUMS

PEOPLE PLUS

Third Space EP

Mood Hut

MELTT

Swim Slowly

Independent

TANGLERS

Tangled in Time

Independent

DAN’S HOMEBREWING SUPPLIES

kCONTINUED FROM PG. 29

CONTINUED ON PG. 32 k

Huge selection

of beer and

wine-making

equipment &

ingredients

835 East Hastings ST. Vancouver, BC • 604-251-3411 beermaking.ca

BILLIE EILISH

kCONTINUED FROM PG. 29

approach production-wise, lacing vocal samples

throughout and concentrating on heavier electro-pop

beats than we’ve heard from them in the

past. Instrumentation is sparing and intentional,

hitting in all the right places without being

overwhelming.

On When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We

Go? Eilish creates sonic landscapes that are

emotional and contemplative, yet still highly

danceable. Even the saddest-sounding songs

lyrically, like “bury a friend,” will make you want

to move. Her words are conversational, personal

and imaginative, often based on what she and

her brother are going through at any given time.

But Eilish doesn’t necessarily want the listener

to be in on that conversation – instead, she prefers

to leave her art open for interpretation.

Songs like “bury a friend” and “bad guy” are

bass-heavy and dance-ready, while “goodbye”

and “i love you” are more reminiscent of ballads,

pensive and dreamy, focusing heavily on vocal

harmonies. As a whole, the album is pop music

through and through, laced with Eilish’s own

distinctly edgy spin. On it, she examines topics

universally relatable to teenagers and adults

alike: love, heartbreak, and losing friendships.

Musically and personally, When We All Fall

Asleep, Where Do We Go? is a big step forward

for Eilish.

Jordan Yeager

WAND

Laughing Matter

Drag City

Los Angeles art-rock band Wand

have out done themselves with a

new double LP that connects the

dots of their discography like a trail

of harmonic breadcrumbs.

Tracing the pathways worn

through the tall grass by their EP,

Perfume, and previous full-length

release Plum, which both appeared

on the Drag City record label in

2017, the aptly named Laughing

Matter unpacks a bushel of happy

lawn-dancing creatures.

Chuckling up his sleeve, frontman

and master media manipulator

Cory Hanson ushers his fuzzy navel-gazing

quintet through fifteen

equally imaginative and emotive

pop rock ditties. Painting pastel

sunsets across a synthetic horizon,

tracks such as the capricious

“xoxo” and the atmospheric “Bubble”

offer up easy-to-get-alongwith

melodies adorned with breezy

instrumental and vocal outbursts.

Elsewhere, the aerodynamically

acoustic “High Planes Drifter”

breaks like a prairie dawn, drawing

up to the warm and sketchy sand

patterns of “Rio Grande,” as the

beat-hurried “Scarecrow” thumbs

a ride down the winding coastal

highway. Toing the line between

electronic pop and organic improv,

“Hare” captures the buzz of a noisy

mountain meadow, easily toppling

the plodding piano of the lop-sided

“Tortoise.”

Perhaps the brightest orb in the

entire constellation, the reluctant

“Evening Star” unveils itself slowly

before leaping into your arms with

a rose clenched in its teeth.

Christine Leonard

EMILY NICOLE

BLUE STRANGE

Wasting Time EP

Independent

It’s been a minute

since we’ve heard from

indie roots rock trio Blue

Strange. Following up

their 2018 debut, Farewell

To The Boys, with this

tight collection of four

foot-stomping tracks, it

would seem as though the

boys are indeed back in

town. Turning the volume

down slighting and dialing

it in, the Ladner lads have

honed a well crafted mix of

front porch soul, alt-country

kitsch and good old

fashioned classic rock

on Wasting Time. The

harmonica wails on nicely

in the mix as frontman

Max Stewart croons on in

a very Devandra Banhart

fashion. With varied

elements of Cotton Jones,

Ben Harper and even Kevin

Morby influencing their

sound, Blue Strange bring

this mixed bag back home

to make a sound that’s all

their own. Quinn Thomas

Put on some headphones

and listen to Mood Hut’s 021

release, Third Space EP, by

collaboration People Plus

(Joji B and CZ Wang). Spacy

in its expanse, buckle down

for an indulgent and wandering

downtempo mix prime for

small speakers. Both sides

are wavy and idyllic with all

five tracks encompassing a

sienna radiance best suited

to the more adventurous and

introspective DJ who enjoys

their haunting jazz piano.

Perfect for sundown warmup

sets, or at sunrise when

exhaustion strikes you after

dancing all night, Third Space

EP is quietly innovative while

encompassing the Vancouver

via New York sound — a

little bit rickety, a little train of

thought, but overall a good

time. Esmée Colbourne

Vancouver lovelies Meltt

(formally Mellt) are back with

a proper full length release,

Swim Slowly. Intriguing and

melodic, this album is crisp. A

combination of clean vocals

and good production value

give each track a made for

radio sheen, reminiscent of

bands like Tycho and Portugal

the Man. Songs “Deeper

Water” and “Footprints In

The Sun” are gold stars of

ear-catching melody and

indie pop wow factor. Swim

Slowly moves like pebbles

running in a beach wave,

roaming free and refreshingly

exploratory. Meltt is guaranteed

to make a splash with

this release.


Esmée Colbourne

Vancouver’s Tanglers

sound impossibly cool and

self-assured on their debut

full-length, Tangled in Time.

The four-piece comes forward

drenched in sunburnt

reverb and dank haze, all

that you could possibly want

from a psych-garage pop

album. Taking cues from the

Southern California/Burger

Records gang of bands

(Growlers, Foxygen, The

Black Lips), Tanglers craft

each of the ten tracks with

studied nonchalance, adopting

a sort of soulful aloofness

that adds to their charm and

mystique. Tangled in Time is

a strong debut from a young

band that bodes well for a

perfect summer ahead.

Sebastian Buzzalino

32 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 33


Live

MUSiC

KIRA CLAVELL

ON TOUR

22/4 – Kamloops, BC

23/4 – Kelowna, BC

25/4 – Vancouver, BC

26/4 – Calgary, AB

27/4 – Edmonton, AB

tickets: stubbyfingers.ca/tour

Available Now

“Canadian Matt Andersen

has an early entry for

soul-blues Album of the

Year with Halfway Home

By Morning…Andersen’s

commanding voice and

sturdy songwriting, teamed

with Dawson, make for an

album that is practically

flawless.”

—Jim Hynes, Elmore Magazine

“…one of the most soulful

singers, anywhere… many of

the songs seem torn from the

depths of feeling….”

– Frank-John Hadley, DownBeat

truenorthrecords.com

ZACHARY VAGUE

FOALS

March 18, 2019

Orpheum Theatre

There wasn’t an empty seat in

sight when Foals took the stage at

the Orpheum Theatre.

The stage was draped in red

lighting while everyone stood in

anticipation. As the band walked

out, the crowd erupted. The synth

from their track “On The Luna”

started playing and the band fell

into a chemistry-filled groove. As

the song went on the lighting got

more intricate, setting the scene

for the rest of the show.

The British alt-rock band rode

through the set as though the

whole audience was on stage

with them, playing songs from all

parts of their discography while

focusing on their recent album,

Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost

- Part 1.

The lights lit up the crowd

swaying like the palm leaves

on stage. When their frontman,

Yannis Philippakis, wasn’t in the

crowd, he was spinning around

the stage with his guitar. During

“What Went Down,” there were

crowdsurfers and photographers

reaching to get the best shots

possible. There wasn’t a corner

in the room that the sound wasn’t

filling.

Then there was silence. It took

a few moments for everyone to

accept the high energy show was

really over. Foals stole everyone’s

hearts and ran with it.

Raunie Mae Baker

ACTORS

March 15, 2019

The Biltmore

ACTORS show inside the velvet-clad

Biltmore kicked off an

80 plus city world tour that has

the band roaming from continent

to continent. A send-off and

gathering for everyone to say

hello, goodbye and fuck, we’ll

miss you. The line up consisted

of a trio of bands on the Artoffact

Records label with NYC’s Bootblacks

officially minted into the

ranks that day joining ACTORS

and Spectres.

The at-capacity crowd pressed

tight to the stage to be close.

Frontman Jason Corbett commented

that it was so hot that

his hair product was dripping into

his eyes, stinging them. The heat

was generated not only from the

mass of people but the genuine

warmth which radiated from the

band on stage and echoed by

that of the audience.

It was an audience filled with

friends, family and eager faced

fans. One and the same. It’s okay

not to fit into a single definition

wholly. ACTORS greatest

strength lies in Corbett’s drive

to create music as a pathway

for connection. Songs such as

PTL, We Don’t Have To Dance,

Slaves are conversations with the

listener filled with memories and

reflections.

All three bands fall into the

post-punk genre yet cannot be

defined solely as that. What they

do is create a safe place to feel

at home with them wherever

they play. You’re being welcomed

and taken along with them on an

emotional journey. Kira Clavell

34 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 35


MUSiC LIVE REVIEWS

CHERRY GLAZERR

March 18, 2019

Rickshaw Theatre

Cherry Glazerr lead singer Clementine Creevy screamed out “Vancouver,

you’re an awesome crowd!” to a roaring audience of people clad in

plaid and Doc Martens. She, rocking in leather pants and a red corset

top, shook, spun and fist pumped to the adoration of everyone in the

room.

The teenage bubblegum pop sounds of Cherry Glazerr were transformed

into powerful rock melodies. People were crowd surfing along

to all the old tracks. Newer tracks were slower and meandered along a

solid drum line and suspenseful harmonic guitar riffs reminiscent of a

punkier Cat Power. The mismatched sounds she played, from her iconic

version of rock to the slow, suspenseful tracks mixed were equally reflected

in the eclectic stage decor of giant cherry sculptures and neon

pink visuals.

The vibe of the show was confused, similar to the feeling of being

in your early 20s and not knowing who or what you’re supposed to be.

The fans loved the show though. It was inclusive and fun was had by

everyone—whether they were 19 (B.C.’s legal drinking age) or 50 (yes

there were rocker moms in the crowd too.)

Vice has nominated Creevy as “The Millennial Punk Feminist Icon”

and one can understand after seeing this show why they would proclaim

that. She has it and she hasn’t stopped working at it since she

started her career. That said, it would be interesting to see Creevy graduate

from her teenage pop-punk ways into a more mature rock sound.

Austin Taylor

MOViES|T.V.

TENZING LAMA

NONAME

March 12, 2019

The Commodore BallroA sold-out crowd

filled into the Commodore, eager

and willing to bask in Noname’s

sermon. The demographic was vast,

reminiscent of the topics she covers

in her songs – from elderly women

to punks fresh out of high school,

there’s truly something to be found

for everyone in the wisdom, lyricism,

and infectious positivity Noname

exudes. After opener Elton hyped

up the crowd, there was a palpable

energy as crew members prepared

the stage for Noname’s set. Finally,

she emerged to chants of her name

filling the air.

Bww etween her breakout

mixtape Telefone and sophomore

album Room 25, Noname, whose

given name is Fatimah Warner, has

amassed a significant collection

of songs that are both socially and

self-aware.

Where Noname’s cadence is

soft and contemplative, her stage

presence is anything but. She seems

to feel at home in front of a crowd,

welcoming the audience as friends

and giving them a glimpse into what

it’s like to be part of her inner circle.

Her set was barely an hour long, but

she made the most of that time, alternating

between songs from Telefone

for her “day ones” and newer releases

like “Song 31,” which came out on New

Year’s Day 2019. At the end of “Don’t

Forget About Me,” she squealed with

delight at the audience singing along.

“Yes, an emotional moment!”

On both personal and musical

levels, Warner’s growth since releasing

Telefone in 2016 has been exponential.

It’s clear she’s nowhere near slowing

down yet.

Jordan Yeager

LINDSEY BLANE

GUITAR HERO

Long-time Canadian documentary

filmmaker Ron Mann spent a week in

the guitar shop filming the comings

and goings of all the artists looking

Carmine Street Guitars

doc tunes into

the legendary vibe of

NYC’s East Village

By NOÉMIE ATTIA

T

here is a little guitar shop

in New York City at the intersection

of Carmine and

Bleecker Street, soberly

named Carmine Street Guitars.

For decades, Rick, its owner, has

built electric guitars from the wood

he has found in the city’s old buildings

for the greatest musicians of

the Village rock scene. They include:

Lou Reed, Lenny Kaye of Patti Smith

Group, and filmmaker Jim Jarmusch,

who has a band called SQÜRL.

for a new wooden axe.

Because of the director’s

age and the number of

Baby Boomers featured

in the documentary, one

might think Carmine

Street Guitars could be

stuck in the past. And in a

way, the film is nostalgic

for the Village’s culturally explosive

era, which Patti Smith describes so

well in her memoir, Just Kids, the

Village of Andy Warhol, the Velvets

and Bob Dylan. This much-admired,

fantasized-about period tends to perpetuate

a myth of a golden age and,

CARMINE STREET

GUITARS

Friday, April 5 to

Tuesday April 9

The Cinematheque

Tix, $12,

thecinematheque.ca

that we could never do better today

— according to old guys with long,

white hair.

However, Carmine Street Guitars

also leaves room for the present and

even for the future. Rick works every

day with his apprentice Cindy, a

young artist who burns her own art

onto the guitars she makes. She posts

pictures on social media and bridges

the gap between her mentor

and the modern age.

Mann shoots fascinating

close-ups of Cindy’s passion

for woodworking,

which she shares with her

mentor.

The documentary is

shot in a very poetic way:

the dialogues almost seem scripted

and all the characters are in a tranquil,

melodious mood that allows

music to arise in the middle of their

expressive yet simple conversations.

The film offers floating moments

where the spectator just stops and

listens to the sounds of these extraordinary

guitars played by talented

people. Christine Bougie’s cosmic

notes amaze as much as Eleanor

Friedberger’s vulnerable performance.

The artists are in a position

that one rarely gets to see, trying

new instruments. It makes their musical

game even more authentic, as it

happens on the spot.

Jamie Hince (The Kills) opens up

about his hand injury, Stewart Hurwood

pays homage to his deceased

friend Lou Reed, and Cindy talks

honestly about how men don’t take

her seriously when she mentions she

builds guitars. These open-hearted

moments make us forget about the

musicians’ fame, everybody is on the

same level. The artists ask questions

of Rick and Cindy, as if they were

interviewing them. The director is

completely absent from the film, and

everything happens spontaneously

and naturally.

If Carmine Street Guitars still

doesn’t quite convince you, Rick’s

mother will make you want to see

the documentary. Dorothy Kelly is a

very old woman, but stands straight

and dusts the store energetically and

almost carelessly. She does their accounting

and answers the phone

promptly, imposing her style. Her

calm yet vigorous presence seems to

hold the store together.

Carmine Street Guitars is dear

to people’s hearts. Cindy found her

passion in this place that accepted

her; Rick expresses his love of wood

and music, far from capitalist desires;

musicians find new five-string vehicles

while nostalgically conversing.

Charlie Sexton (Bob Dylan Band)

concludes: “I like this guitar. It’s got

a great vibe, much like this place.” ,

36 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 37


MOViES|T.V.

THIS MONTH IN FILM

PET SEMATARY

April 5

When a young girl disturbs

a withered burial ground for

long lost fluffy friends, she’s

overjoyed to find the animals

returning to earth from their

cold graves. But joy turns quickly

to terror with the realization

that, beneath frayed collars and

rusted bells, each resurrected

pet carries with them a terrible

darkness. It’s been 30 years

since the original adaptation of

the Stephen King classic made

its debut, and it’s about time to

be terrified all over again.

HIGH LIFE

April 5

A father and his infant daughter

are the last left alive on a lonely

journey to the edge of our solar

system as they hurtle towards

infinity and the bottom of a

black hole. A bleach-blonde

Robert Pattinson is nearly

unrecognizable in this Claire

Denis-directed space thriller.

THE MAN WHO KILLED

DON QUIXOTE

March 15

Terry Gilliam has spent 29 years

chasing his elusive dream of

adapting the epic Spanish novel

Don Quixote, first published in

the 1600s. Finally, that dream is

about to come true. A film stuck

in development hell (see the

documentary Lost in La Mancha,

which chronicles the horrendous

first time he tried to make it),

this loose adaptation of the original

text tells the story of a man

who believes himself to be Don

Quixote, and the mad adventure

that ensues.

STOCKHOLM

April 12

When a bank robbery turns into

a classic case of Stockholm

Syndrome, things get weird and

wild. In this new dark comedy

based on true events, Ethan

Hawke continues his rise upwards,

on an ascent that’s lasted

his entire career.


By Brendan Lee

BiNGEWORTHY

GAME OF THRONES /

SEASON 8

NETWORK:

HBO

AIR DATE: April 14

The fate of an entire realm of

fictional people rests near the

precipice of a soon-to-be-swinging

balance, and in the next few

months the hype and speculation

will blanket the internet, your

work, and even the friggin’ dog

park with a chattering snow so

furious it will mean the end of an

entire television era. Two years

since the enormous yet critically

less-than-adored seventh season,

it’s the Snows vs. Targaryens

vs. Lannisters vs. Greyjoys vs.

White Walkers for one last dragon-infested

shabang. The season’s

six episodes are rumoured

to have cost around 15 million

dollars a pop, and whether you’re

behind by two or eight years,

binge quickly, people – spoilers

(and memes) are coming.

RAMY / SEASON 1

NETWORK: HULU

AIR DATE: April 19

No matter how you look

at it, Hulu took a gamble

on Ramy Youssef. You

probably haven’t heard

of him (yet), but if

the name rings

a bell there’s

a chance you

might recall his

appearance on

the Colbert Show

in 2017, when the Muslim comedian

claimed (in a comedy routine) to

expect “a Hogwarts Letter from

ISIS” when he turns 30. That

appearance was only the beginning

of his tongue-in-cheek look at

Muslim people, which culminates

in April with the release of his new

10-part show based around similar

sorts of funny – yet real – conversations.

The show follows Ramy, a

young Muslim living in the suburbs

of modern-day New Jersey, as he

skirts all sorts of ideological lines

and boundaries. Youssef’s infectious

smile and comedic timing

makes Hulu’s bet on this dramatic

comedy something close to a sure

thing.

BLACK SUMMER / SEASON 1

NETWORK:

NETFLIX

AIR DATE: April 11

At this point in history, it’s abundantly

clear that stories about

viral plagues sending humans into

rage-stricken killing frenzies

can be extremely successful.

We’ve seen it

so often – and enjoyed

it so many times – that

something about that

struggle must evoke

feelings all but written

into our DNA. So, it’s

about time that Netflix

cashes in on the fun.

The prequel (or

companion

piece) to the

Syfy-produced

“Z Nation” tells

the story of the

catastrophic

Game of Thrones

returns April 14.

Trailer Park Boys –

The Animated Series

low point of a zombie apocalypse,

dubbed “the Black Summer.”

Centering around a mother who is

separated from her daughter, the

show is a self-proclaimed throwback

to old-school zombie thrillers,

delving into the tragic lengths to

which people might go to survive

an apocalypse.

TRAILER PARK BOYS –

THE ANIMATED SERIES /

SEASON 1

NETWORK:

NETFLIX

AIR DATE: MARCH 31

Ricky, Julien, Bubbles, and the

whole dope-smokin’ park is back

for a thirteenth season as the boys

continue to find ways of staying

fresh by dropping the cameras

and going animated. If, somehow,

you’ve managed to avoid the show

for the last two decades, “Trailer

Park Boys” is a mockumentary

created in 2001 by Nova Scotian

Mike Clattenburg that centers

around three delinquent buddies

as they try to live out their simple

lives at Sunnyvale Trailer Park –

while doing as little jail time as

possible. Season 12 actually ended

with the boys transforming into

animated characters, and previews

of season 13 make it clear they are

self-aware of their new colourful

forms. Knowing the show, there’s

a good chance this season (and

any subsequent animated ones)

could end up being a convoluted

mushroom trip – the possibilities

know no bounds.


By Brendan Lee

EAST VAN

DIARIES

Director Carolyn

Combs harnesses diversity

of Commercial

Drive in her epic drama

Bella Ciao! By NOÉMIE ATTIA

cial Drive, in the heart of Vancouver’s

Little Italy. “I liked that about the

song: it seemed fitting for the film,”

says Combs. “The Italians and the

Latin Americans and the Indigenous

cultures come together and resist.”

Bella Ciao! is etched with an endearing

realism, portraying a place

that is home for the director: East

Van. Combs envisions her environment

as a research topic that she has

to explore. “For me, that’s what making

a film is: une recherche. I wanted

to find out where I lived and who else

lived there. I really like the neighbourhood,

there seems to be cultural

resistance there.”

People Combs met

and interviewed

inspire all of her

characters. The

most notable

one is Costanza

(Carmen Aguirre),

a Chilean

woman who escaped

the coup

“B

ella Ciao” is a song of

resistance: its melody ignites

hearts, and its lyrics

touch rebellious souls. It

appeared in the 1940s, on Italian rice

fields where women laboured during

long, hot summers. They would sing

about their dreadful work conditions

– the long hours, the heavy-handed

bosses, and the insect bites.

The Partisans made it famous

during the Second World

War and, since then, it

has become an international

rallying cry

of all kinds of resistance

causes..

Carolyn Combs

gave the same title

to her film for a good

reason. Bella Ciao! takes

place on Commerin

1973 and tries to pass on

to her daughter, Soledad,

her culture of resistance

as she confronts her own

mortality.

“Some of the first people

I interviewed to find out

where it is that I live were members

of my co-op,” says Combs, who lives

in the Paloma Housing Co-operative,

just off the Drive. The co-op was

founded by Chilean refugees, recognized

as such by Canada, when the

States didn’t allow their immigration.

“There was a man named Bob Everett,

who was Carmen’s stepfather.

He was in Chile during the coup and

managed to get out. He petitioned

to the Trudeau government to allow

Chileans to come in as refugees.”

Combs even includes some

BELLA CIAO!

Vancouver premiere(19+)

Wednesday April 10,

7:30PM

The Cinematheque

Tix,$20, viff.org

shots from The Battle of

Chile, a film by Patricio

Guzmán documenting

Chilean activism against

the Pinochet government.

Despite these very

tangible elements, Bella

Ciao! has a deeply lyrical, magical

feeling.

“That’s one thing I wanted to capture,

to play with: those seemingly

unreal moments that are actually

quite real,” she says. “The surrealism

or the magic is within our reality. It’s

in our day-to-day experience, when

you look for it.”

This is no surprise coming from

Combs, who cites The Ballad of

Narayama among her inspirations

for shooting the beautiful metaphor

of Carmen’s final “journey up the

mountain.” Moreover, as they filmed

on Cypress Mountain, purple flowers

blossomed in front of them. perfectly

illustrating a lyric in “Bella Ciao” that

says “bury me in the shade of a flower

on the mountain.”

Oneiric and dramatic, fictional

and realistic, Bella Ciao! tells stories

about a community, first and foremost.

It includes marginalized people

and depicts generous acts and

incongruous situations; all exist in

daily life, but are “not part of the stories

we tell,” in Combs’ words.

“I think it’s important that we

share those stories about ourselves,

and that we’re capable of caring for

each other and that communities are

capable of coming together and creating

change,” she concludes. “I want

to keep that possibility alive.” ,

38 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 39


MOViES|T.V.

Elisabeth Moss gives a

go-for-broke performance in

Alex Ross Perry’s Her Smell.

PUNK ROCK

PSYCHODRAMA

Elisabeth Moss

meditates on the chaos

of fame and rock and

roll in Alex Ross Perry’s

experimental art film

Her Smell By RACHEL FOX

W

hen writer-director

Alex Ross Perry

(Christopher Robin,

Golden Exits),

best known for

reliably thoughtful

arthouse fare

and characters that explore varying

degrees of psychological unease,

looked for inspiration to fuel his

raucous new film Her Smell and his

fiery, post-punk alterna-rock heroine,

Becky Something (played by frequent

collaborator, Elisabeth Moss),

he turned to a surprising source.

Rather than mine the depths of

everybody’s favourite walking study

in demonology, Courtney Love, he

instead went all spandex and headbands.

“Possibly the biggest single influence

on the character of Becky was

Axl Rose – and, on her professional

trajectory, Guns N’ Roses.”

He was especially moved by the

format of a Rolling Stone piece that

charted GNR’s clashing personalities,

and how they ultimately bled

into colouring their own epic personal

and professional paths.

As such, Her Smell is told as a

chronological anthology, offering a

comfortably predictable yet no less

compelling rock and roll journey

told through five vignettes that cover

turning points in Becky’s tumultuous

life. In the first sweeping scene, we

meet a woman who has, personally

and professionally, piqued.

Moss, quietly edging into Meryl

Streep territory as the sizzling hot

actress who has comfortably moved

from Mad Men to oppressed women

in Handmaid’s Tale, takes on the role

of a washed up, former arena rocker.

The film hangs on Moss’ unhinged

bravura, which in itself honours the

unique musical era, the vignettes

progressively moving between her vicious

snarl and arresting moments of

contemplative substance.

She convincingly commits with a

whirling-dervish zeal as the wildly

strange, mysterious and enigmatic

Becky Something, frontwoman of

the all-female (former) arena rockers

“Something She.” Hers is a splintered,

multi-faceted persona that

moves between the public’s perception

of her and the private roles she

vacillates between. Unfortunately for

Becky, she can’t really get a handle on

any of them – rock star, bandmate,

mother, daughter, or whatever kernel

of authentic self is left after years

spent in the spotlight.

Beyond the usual culprits of drugs,

alcohol and infighting adding to the

wayward trajectory of rock stars,

Becky has something else - her own

personal shaman.

“Axl Rose supposedly came back

from some time spent in the desert

with a woman who functioned as

his spiritual in-between,” says Perry,

“You had to go through her. And

the band obviously viewed this as

something of an annoyance. I was

very intrigued by that, not because

it’s funny or it’s foolish, but because

Alex Ross Perry

it speaks to a deep sense of actual

belief on behalf of the person. If you

don’t cast judgement on it, that this

character has this ‘person’ next to

them at all times, then the question

is, ‘What does that say about Becky?’

She’s determined that this is necessary

for her. Stuff like that has always

been in the culture, you generally

only hear about it when those people

do something crazy and go to jail but

I just liked the idea that Becky had to

believe in something, she couldn’t be

an empty vessel of personality traits

and manias. She actually has to have

some sense of what her guiding principles

are, and setting them up via

Yaema [the shaman] who she not

only has around a couple of times but

refers to a lot when he’s not around,

shows that there is something that

she cares about and believes in. She’s

not just a crazy maniac who yells and

screams.”

There’s a lot to unpack between

the film’s many dialogues, which

at times feel almost Shakespearean

given the characters’ propensity

towards density of language. Perry

admits his writing was inspired by

parallel mediums; music, a Broadway

play, and yes, the Bard. It was important

that Her Smell not feel like a

filmed play, but instead come across

as a “hyper, camera movie.” On set,

Perry admits to finding a fun dichotomy

in marrying the script with the

actual shoot, which was approached

very technically, to allow for unlimited

spontaneity and chaos.

At times, it feels like an experimental

art film. “The chaos had to be

in front of the camera, not behind the

camera.

“In the grand scheme of theatrical

inspiration and plays that I was seeing

that excited me, you have these

moments when you’re sitting in the

theatre where you have pauses and

stumbles. You wonder, ‘Did they

mess up?’ And if you’re me you go,

“No, that’s how it’s written.” And I

wanted it to feel like that. I spent a

very long time tweaking Becky’s jargon

and her gibberish. There’s noth-

CONTINUED ON PG. 45 k

1

Sid and Nancy (1986)

Gary Oldman’s portrayal of

Sid Vicious will forever remain

unrivalled, with Chloe Webb’s,

Nancy, the perfect counterbalance

in this tragic depiction of Sex

Pistols lore. The film was directed

by Alex Cox, and shot in all its filthy

glory by legendary cinematographer,

Roger Deakins.

2

Hardcore Logo (1996)

This Canadian cult-classic,

Directed by Bruce Mac-

Donald, takes a hilarious

mockumentary look at the highs

and lows of life on the punk rock

road. It’s mandatory viewing as a

Canadian, and, like nearly all punk

rock tales, the film goes out with a

definitive bang.

TOP FIVE PUNK FLICKS

3

SLC Punk! (1998)

If 80s punk and quirky 90s

filmmaking had an awkward

yet beautiful love-child, we’d

call it SLC Punk. The film features

a young Jason Segel, and tells the

story of two nerds turned punks

who rebel against all of society’s

evil forces.

4

Suburbia (1983)

A film that wholly encapsulated

the gritty, frenetic,

thrash of the lifestyle that

punk offered a generation of misfit

runaways. Music-loving director

Penelope Spheeris went the extra

mile and cast real life street kids

and young punk musicians, one

of whom turned out to be Flea,

longtime bassist of the Red Hot

Chili Peppers.

5

Another State of Mind

(1984)

Look no further for a better

broken window into the early

80s DIY punk scene than this gritty

documentary. The film follows

Social Distortion and Youth Brigade

in 1982 as the two bands crash,

bang, and claw their way across

an inaugural cross-country tour of

America.


Brendan Lee

40 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 41


VIVEK

SHRAYA

THIS

MONTH

IN THEATRE

BUSH THEATRE (UK) AND NASSIM SOLEIMANPOUR

TANJA TIZIANA

Vivek Shraya recalims agency and confronts the trolls from

both sides in graphic novel Death Threat By DAYNA MAHANNAH

Multidisciplinary artist and

author Vivek Shraya recounts

the disturbing, true story

of receiving hate mail and

death threats in her new

graphic novel, Death Threat, illustrated

by Ness Lee and set for release in May.

BeatRoute talks with Shraya about life

and the fear of death in the age of trolls

ahead of her appearance at Verses

Festival – a Vancouver literary and

storytelling festival – this month. Shraya

will be appearing at the York Theatre on

Sunday, April 28.

This is your first graphic novel. What

inspired you to tell a traumatic experience

through this medium?

Vivek Shraya: A big part of it was the

letters themselves. They’re not your

average hate mail and they have a vivid

quality to them. Having somebody talk

about their Mom’s neighbours going

hunting for me in the woods – it was

hard not to picture that.

Are there any graphic novels that

inspired you?

VS: The person that I credit in a lot of

ways is Michael DeForge. I read his first

book, Big Kids, and I remember putting it

down and pacing around the house being

like, “Whoa,” – just feeling so excited

about his work and the medium.

VERSES FESTIVAL

Various locations

Tixs: versesfestival.ca

Death Threat is told from

not only your perspective,

but also the imagined

perspective of the person

sending you hate mail.

What did it feel like to put yourself in

their position?

VS: There was going to be more of

their narrative, but seeing the letters

illustrated by Ness, I was like, ‘These

are very strange things to say, let alone

send to a stranger.’ It was definitely

a challenge to try to understand that

perspective and, hopefully, that’s a

good thing.

Did you feel like you were in immediate

danger? How did it feel going

through that?

VS: The thing that scared me the most

about the letters was that they included

their address. This is something that

is so important to think about – because

trolling has become an everyday

occurrence, and therefore acceptable.

People are no longer attached to hiding

their identities. If we permit a behaviour,

we tell ourselves that that behaviour is

normal. Then why should hate have to

conceal itself? I think there’s a connection

there between this person using

their full name and their full address

because it’s like, you know, just another

day on the internet!

Did this change your relationship to

technology or social media?

VS: I don’t know that it changed my relationship

to it, but I don’t think I’m unique

in my experience getting these kind of

messages. There’s a scene in the book

with all these trolls on their computers,

and my character says, ‘Do I have a right

to complain? Doesn’t being trolled on

the internet go hand in hand with being

feminine?; I’m hoping the book instigates

more conversation about better support

and protective measures.

If this troll were to read Death Threat,

what would you hope they would glean

from it?

VS: I would be curious if, in seeing their

words illustrated, it would force them to

consider the ways in which what they

had stated is perhaps more disturbing

than they thought when they wrote the

text. You know, an apology never hurts.

I’m not really interested in hearing from

them. Just be more conscious of the

language that they’re using. I feel like

these are big asks from someone who

essentially wants you to die.

For me, the big intent around the project

was trying to find a way to work through

something traumatic. So reconnecting it

as an art project – and an art project that

features me eating chips and watching

goat videos – I felt like I was able to

reclaim a little bit more of my agency in

all of this and get a chuckle here and

there. It definitely felt empowering in that

sense. ,

The weather has been absolutely fantastic

lately — but given the nature of Vancouver’s

weather, that’s not likely to hold up for long.

Soak in the Vitamin D while you can, then

get your daily dose of Vitamin T (theatre) by

hitting up the shows below. Consider this

your prescription.

THE ORCHARD (AFTER CHEKHOV)

March 21- April 21 at the Stanley Industrial

Alliance Stage

In Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, a

bunch of Russian aristocrats come back to

their family’s orchard after years of neglect

in what was a metaphor for the Russian

Revolution. In Serena Parmar’s new adaptation,

we now find ourselves in the Okanagan

Valley following a family of Punjabi-Sikh

farmers.

1GLORY

April 4-13 at the Gateway Theatre; April

23-27 at the Evergreen Cultural Centre

It’s 1933 in Ontario and a group of women

join together to start the Preston Rivulettes

— Canada’s first all-women hockey

team. It’s like A League of Their Own,

but, you know, Canadian and, of course,

hockey.

CHERRY DOCS

April 5-28 at Pacific Theatre

A Jewish public defender in Toronto must

take on a skinhead client in this piece on

confronting hate and finding forgiveness.

It’s sad to think how timely this 20-yearold

production still is.

ACT OF FAITH

April 11-13 at the Historic Theatre

A young paraplegic girl can suddenly walk

and declares it to be a miracle. How does

the rest of her family take it? And how did

it happen? Inspired by true events, Janet

Munsil’s new play attempts to tackle those

questions. Look out for the wheelchair

choreography.

Leah Siegel

BARBARA ZIMONICK

MARIKA ECHACHIS SWAN

WATER

WAYS

Multimedia exhibition qaʔ

yəx w -water honours us:

womxn and waterways celebrates

expression of identity,

culture and knowledge

By MAGGIE MCPHEE

R

eMatriate Collective

qaʔ yəx w - WATER

and the Bill Reid Gallery

HONOURS US:

WOMXN AND

present qaʔ yəx w - water

WATERWAYS

honours us: womxn and

April 10 - October 2

waterways, a multimedia

Bill Reid Gallery

exhibition honouring Indigenous

womxn’s relationship to water as

child bearers, healers and doulas. Inspired

by the fluid and borderless nature of water

systems, the exhibition hopes to galvanize

the community at large to protect waterways

and Indigenous sovereignty.

“ReMatriate Collective aims to celebrate

Indigenous womxn’s expression of identity,

culture and knowledge by asserting

positive self-determined representation,”

the curators explain. ReMatriate formed in

2014 with the aim of challenging colonial

media by re-centering matriarchs, womxn,

elders, gender-non binary and Two-Spirit

individuals within our discussions and exaltations

of Indigenous experiences. “In light

of the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered

Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit

peoples,” they explain. “There is a need

to support womxn’s sovereignty, and to

educate the broader community about

matriarchal systems.”

ReMatriate’s mission culminates in

qaʔ yəx w , the collective’s most significant

exhibition project to date. Nine female-identifying

artists hailing from diverse

backgrounds and geographies — Gitxsan,

Stó:lō, Kaska Dena, Mohawk, Nuu-chahnulth,

Tlingit, Selkirk, Blackfoot, and Cree

— bring their worldviews and cultural

practices to explore womxn’s relationship

to water. Together they weave a patchwork

of divergent Northwest Coast Indigenous

mythologies and artistic traditions to acknowledge

our connections to each other

and the land, uniting us as we enter into an

era of ecological crisis.

Carrielynn Victor (Stó:lō) reflects upon

ancestral and colonial influences

on Indigenous cosmologies

to remind audiences to honour

womxn’s connection to the moon.

Veronica Waechter (Gitxsan)

uses a mask to draw parallels

between water and womxn, from

our gentle and nurturing qualities

to our dangerous and powerful ones.

Richelle Bear Hat (Blackfoot/Cree) - in light

of the UN declaring 2019 the year of Indigenous

Language Revitalization - anchors her

art around how Indigenous languages and

landscapes intersect.

“Indigenous people are as diverse as the

land,” and including an array of heritages

and mediums allows the exhibition to

embody its themes of inclusion, community,

and self-determination. By unearthing

pre-colonial knowledge and sharing ancient

frameworks through art, ReMatriate hopes

to inspire new approaches to increasingly

challenging political and environmental

issues.

“Our traditional lands includes all

non-human beings too, and these creatures

all deserve the right to live their lives

as much as humans do, to grow and roam

their home territories, undisturbed by the

encroachment of industries. The way we

treat the land is a reflection of how we treat

ourselves and each other. The land and

water and skies are sacred. Womxn’s bodies

are sacred.”

qaʔ yəx w - water honours us: womxn and

waterways also highlights Water Keeper Audrey

Seigl (Musqueam) who will be present

at the exhibition. ,

$24

TICKETS FROM

A sealed envelope.

A new actor at every performance.

And a few surprises.

May 07–19, 2019

HISTORIC THEATRE

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THECULTCH.COM

42 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 43


VanCity People

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

SUSTAINABILITY

IS IN THE BAG

Clarie Carreras launches a fashionable line of vegan,

cruelty-free bags and accessories for the modern age

By RHYS MAHANNAH

Claire Carreras never thought it

would be so challenging to find a

new hand bag.

Her old one had worn out, was

too small and it clashed with her

style. So, with three prerequisites,

she went shopping. Her new

bag needed to be cost-effective,

fashionable and cruelty-free – a

product with the look and feel of

leather, but without the requisite

animal victim.

The search ended in failure.

So, like any well-attuned entrepreneur,

she saw opportunity

in disappointment. In September

2018, she launched White Rhino

Bags, a line of vegan, cruelty-free

bags and accessories.

“I like my accessories to say

something about who I am,

including my moral and ethical

sensibilities, and I thought about

how I could offer others the same

choice,” says Carreras. “White

Rhino is the result.”

Talking to Carreras, it’s easy to

see how her business – not the first

she’s started – is a culmination of

life experiences and self-reflection.

Her passion for animal welfare

began in childhood, when she lived

in rural South America. She had

pets and loved them dearly, but

volunteering at a veterinary clinic

showed her another, grimmer reality.

“I saw the misfortunes that befall

animals when they’re unwanted and

neglected,” she says. “In Canada,

much of this stuff is behind closed

doors, but in South America, it was

obvious and immediate – and you

can’t unsee that.”

Her experience with the fashion

industry came later, when she was

in her early twenties. She’d moved

from Squamish to Vancouver to

pursue, with reasonable success,

modelling, acting, and stand-up

comedy. Then her mother encouraged

her to consider fashion.

The duo started a wholesale

clothing business. They were invited

to Vancouver Fashion Week, and

later opened a brick-and-mortar

location called The Secret Store.

It was one of the best periods of

her life.

Then, tragedy struck – her

mother passed away suddenly, she

separated with her husband,

and she developed a severe chronic

nerve injury that threatened her

creative outlets, including music

and fashion.

But Carreras would prove resilient.

Today, she’s doing well, and

her business, though only months

old, has seen a positive response.

Her most recent win? In February,

she announced that White

Rhino Bags had partnered with

World Animal Protection US, a

non-profit dedicated to animal welfare

worldwide, donating a portion

of the company’s proceeds from

each bag sold.

“To have a business that

allows me to support an organization

like this, something

that means so much to me

– it’s a dream come true,”

Carreras says.

White Rhino Bags is offering an exclusive

25 per cent discount to BeatRoute

readers until May 31. Use this code at

checkout: BEAT604

PUNK ROCK

PSYCHODRAMA

kCONTINUED FROM PG. 40

ing in the movie that’s not in the script. All

the dialogue, the stream of consciousness,

and the mispronunciations, every one of

those is precisely written and even more

precisely delivered, which is unusual.”

“Atmosphere” is an invisible, unheralded

co-star, supporting Moss at every turn.

The dizzying marriage between score and

soundscape, which announces itself in the

first vignette (along with Becky), carries the

film’s establishing scene from her introduction

through to her startling implosion.

“I promised everyone, myself included,

that this one would be a very big, very loud

movie.” Perry told composer Keegan Dewitt

that the film had to feel, “like a panic

attack. Be anxiety; a droning, throbbing, in

your ear.” As crazy as those scenes are, they

contrast with huge sections of the movie

where there’s no score at all, resulting in

a “quiet / loud conversation” between the

sequences.

“I want this to be a movie where you can

hear light, meaning that when the camera

moves past a light, I want it to be bright

and I want to hear the hum. The sounds

of being inside these big, concrete spaces.

There’s sound effects and droning noise in

the score, and there are tonal qualities in

the sound design. When the sound and the

noise goes away, it feels shockingly absent.

“The camera, the sound and the score are

basically forcing the audience to be subjected

to being in these spaces. It’s not so much

about Becky’s state of mind but, the camera

and what it’s doing when it’s being chaotic

or static are very much in conversation with

what Becky is going through.”

Given the current political climate relative

to a “new wave” of feminism, it’s hard

not to wonder about the timing of a film

that revisits the uniquely 90s moment in

rock music, when female-fronted bands like

L7, Bikini Kill, Babes in Toyland and yes, even

Hole ruled college charts in a way that had

never happened before or arguably, since.

“I’m not an expert on music culture, never

having been in that scene or community. But

the idea of the movie was in a vacuum, and

I was really inspired by things that meant a

lot to me when I was in high school. Somewhere

during the production of the film, The

New York Times wrote an article, ‘Rock is

not dead it’s just turned female, or some ridiculous

title, about all-female bands at the

moment in independent rock, accompanied

by 50 artists in a Spotify playlist. Once the

Times gets onto something it’s probably

been going on for four or five years and everyone

in the know is already sick of it! But,

them shining a light on innumerable, completely

independent underground artists

proved that there really was a lot of it at the

moment. I found that to be serendipitous.”

Becky’s tumultuous journey over the

course of the five vignettes is compelling and

exhausting, anticipating a spectrum of possible

endings right up until the final shot of

the film, when all is revealed and her story is

concluded. As a writer, Perry needed to carefully

consider it too, describing how he had

to sit with multiple drafts before landing on

the eventual, crucial conclusion in a way that

honestly reflected what he wanted for Becky,

her bandmates, and for the movie.

The final act is 20 minutes of backstage

band drama followed by a soaring, satisfying

crescendo that forces the audience towards

the conclusive, abrupt climax - which includes

having to question the lines between

public perceptions versus a private reality.

In one of the film’s emotional “quiet conversations,”

Ross waves the Canadian flag

while Moss plays Bryan Adams’ “Heaven”

at the piano. On the song choice, he says, “I

really like the song. In the script it was very

specifically this song, and there was no ‘Plan

B’ if we didn’t get the rights. I really believe

that it honours the song, which is great and

I’m happy to reclaim it for this one little narrative

moment.” ,

Media partner

AUGUST 17 • 7 PM

QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE

TICKETS AT TICKETMASTER.CA

HAHAHA.COM

44 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 45


Horoscopes

Messages from the Stars: A look into the cycles and cosmic

details of an unfolding forevermore, paired with a song

suggestion curated for your sign by Willow Herzog

Aries (March 21 - April 20)

In what ways are you reimagining

your life? How is the past showing

up so you can truly learn from it and

move on? If things are feeling stressful

and forced take note and don’t

be afraid to pause before choosing

a course of action. There is a surge

of new energy flowing in, make sure

perceptions are clear before any big

choices are made. Open space for

fresh flow and allow yourself to recalibrate.

Guard your immune system.

Song suggestion for the month: “The

Frontier (High Desert Synthapella)”

-Avalon Emerson

Taurus (April 21 - May 21)

Feel ease in letting go of old baggage.

There is a pent up sense of energy

to do, but to do what exactly? Take

time to check in with internal

structures so you can attend to

what is clearly going to serve and

bring alignment. Watch for signs

and synchronicities to help dictate

your path. Don’t let ego get in the

way and listen carefully to what you

hear from those you love and trust.

There is wisdom in your frustration,

unpack it so intuition may become

more clear.

Song suggestion for the month: “I Can

Treat You Better” -Part Time, Ariel Pink

Gemini (May 22 - June 21)

Potential challenges may come up

around self-esteem sandwiched with

great bursts of creative inspiration.

Rest and re-evaluate, taking time to

read the energy of a situation before

proceeding forwards. Unrealistic

thinking could abound alongside genius

and breakthrough. Seek truth at

all costs, with all the potential mess

involved. To truly heal we must be

genuine, allow truth to set you free.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Effemience” -Shabazz Palaces,

Quazarz, Chimurenga Renaissance

46 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019

Cancer (June 22 - July 23)

Setting precise goals and clearing

out the energetic clutter are

of utmost importance this cycle.

You have some big dreams and

manifesting them takes time, love,

effort and discernment. Claim the

path you are on and show up for

what life is asking of you. This is not

the time to be passive, though soft

wisdom and not taking on too much

responsibility are up for consideration.

Power, success, reputation

and public standing are highlighted

within a profession as well as in

peer groups and home structures.

Wield your power for the greater

good and lead by example.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Outside” -MorMor

Leo (July 24 - Aug. 23)

Thought and action are combining

for beautiful and shaping insights.

It could be a time to keep a journal

with you for when inspiration

strikes, write it down and honour

the creative muses. Be honest

about what you are feeling so your

feelings can heal, hold space and

pass as they need to. It is a time

of increased professional pursuits

but also deeper energetic understanding

of your unique blueprint.

Take time to look at what you don’t

understand and be willing to dive

into the inner emotions that cause

the outer/external patterns.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Daylight Matters” -Cate le Bon

Virgo (Aug. 24 - Sept. 23)

Look at where you can open when

you would habitually contract and

shut down. It is a month of drive and

action that could lead to a flurry of

energies looking to ground and catalyze

into something more. Movement

may seem like priority, but remember

that at times in the inactivity is the

action. Be willing to be slow at opportune

windows even if it may seem

that all life is asking of you is to do

and move. Be aware of your body and

pay extra attention to its care.

Song suggestion for the month:

“These Days” -Nico

Libra (Sept. 24 - Oct. 23)

This month carries with it some

awkwardness but is not without

its charm. Where to place chaotic

energies and how to help them

surface clear? Its an expansive time

that works well when you streamline

and channel energies with one

pointed focus. Concentrate on the

micro before the macro and unfold

as the universe would like to see you

unfold. Ask Who Am I to refuse the

Universe? Develop your skill set to

sit with what is changing and uncomfortable.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Lorelei” -Tim Presley, White Fence

Scorpio (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22)

Which situations are spreading

you too thin and which ones are

creating nourishment? Feeling

consistent support this month

from yourself and loved ones will

allow utilization of your abilities

on all levels. Don’t be afraid to

express you changing needs, you

too are a growing thing that has

permission to change its mind,

taste and boundaries. Speak up in

the ways the put you into honest

alignment with those you create

and collaborate with. Fewer placed

but brilliantly activated actions are

ones to strive for this cycle.

Song suggestion for the month:

“3D Dream (World Mix)” -Jerry Paper

Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec. 21)

Your healing process deserves your

attention. What is awakening in

you this cycle is digging deep into

old wounds and pushing you to assert

your power back into yourself.

Place yourself as a priority and feel

your feelings so you can heal your

pain. You don’t have to keep it all

inside, its an isolating journey to

traverse the emotional container

alone. Look to those you love and

trust and be willing to place your

healing not only in your hands but

in the hands of others. Reclaim

your capacity for joy and know you

are so deserving of love.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Licking An Orchid” -Yves Tumor,

James K

Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 20)

Creating deeper containers of

connection, exchanging dreams

with those who share your drive

and being completely honest with

yourself or someone else are all big

themes this cycle. Big conversations

that illuminate where and

how to place your energy come to

fruition. Try not to take it personal

while exploring what is happening

and know that sometimes life has

a greater plan conspiring. Work on

yourself and let the magic happen.

This is a time of cycling back and

deeper understanding.

Song suggestion for the month:

“The Bug Collector”

-Haley Heynderickx

TIM PRESLEY SHABAZZ PALACES

AVALON EMERSON HALEY HEYNDERICKX

Aquarius (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19)

External planes are asking you to

dive deeper into internal discovery.

Many forms are taking shape in

professional and personal endeavours

and there are some growing

pains. Healing your relationship

to self-worth, finances and how to

place your energy in an uncertain

future are all areas up for review

and consideration. Look for where

energy leaks and where it is held.

Are there outdated patterns lingering

that sabotage how you wish

to build your life? Obstacles and

conflict may arise but know you

have the power to be the curator of

your life. Trust in yourself and don’t

doubt your value.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Corridor of Dreams” -The Cleaners

from Venus

Pisces (Feb. 20 - Mar. 20)

Don’t allow others to interfere with

your gifts, relax into what’s working

and treat yourself with a compassionate

tenderness. You are reorienting

where you intend to place

your energy and everyone has an

opinion. Know yourself and trust in

a plan that is becoming visible from

reworking your life structure. Now

is a good time to focus on poetry,

song writing, dream journaling and

anything that allows you to create

from the emotional waters of your

heart. Stay connected to what helps

you come alive.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Hits of Sunshine (for Allen Ginsberg)”

-Sonic Youth

APRIL 2019 BEATROUTE 47


CANADA’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT CONCERT PROMOTER

UPCOMING SHOWS

MORMOR

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

April 30 - The Biltmore Cabaret

WICCA PHASE SPRINGS ETERNAL

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Apr 6 - The Fox Cabaret

HOP ALONG

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Apr 7 - The Biltmore Cabaret

GIRLPOOL

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Apr 13 - The Biltmore Cabaret

EX HEX

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Apr 19 - The Biltmore Cabaret

TURNOVER

WITH TURNSTILE & REPTALIENS

Apr 26 - The Biltmore Cabaret

NICK WATERHOUSE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 1 - The Biltmore Cabaret

DIZZY

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 3 - The Biltmore Cabaret

IONNALEE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 4 - Venue

TELEKINESIS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 4- The Biltmore Cabaret

48 BEATROUTE APRIL 2019 TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT MRGCONCERTS.COM

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