April Newsletter

greenwoodvillage

Greenwood Village

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GOVERNMENT

MAYOR RON reports

MY HEALTH

While one’s personal health is typically a private matter, and

because I have been using a walker or a cane to get around

lately, my health has come into question. In response to

many inquiries, I would like to let everyone know that I have

been undergoing successful treatment for Stage 4B prostate

cancer since late last year and expect a full recovery. My

recent use of a cane or walker is due to an

accidental fall unrelated to my cancer treatment.

I am committed to continue my duties as

Mayor until my term concludes this November.

Thank you all for your thoughts and prayers.

STOP ON RED CAMPAIGN

You may have noticed the past few weeks on

social media messaging urging people to stop on

red as red light violations continue to be a

major traffic safety issue in our Village. Our

education campaign is focused to encourage safe

driving at red lights and reduce the number of

photo red light tickets issued to motorists.

Contrary to current stereotypes of government

using photo red light cameras for revenue, I can assure you

that Greenwood Village doesn’t want to give out any photo

red light camera tickets! Zero tickets mean that everyone is

following the law, stopping on all red lights, hence, our

streets are safer for drivers and pedestrians.

Ron Rakowsky

rrakowsky@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-486-5741

I congratulate Greenwood Village residents as the majority of

photo red light violators do not live in the Village. Our

campaign is aimed at spreading awareness outside of our

community in the hopes of changing driver behavior and

reduce the number of photo red light tickets issued to people

who travel through our Village.

So as a reminder, please continue to follow these rules of the

road to avoid getting a photo red light ticket in Greenwood

Village:

• All you have to do is STOP when the light turns red.

That’s it! Just STOP.

• Going straight through? STOP when the light turns red.

• Making a right turn on red? STOP at the red light, look

for pedestrians, and proceed when it’s clear.

• Turning left against traffic? Wait behind the crosswalk

until oncoming cars have passed, then make your turn on

green. If the light changes while you’re waiting, STOP at

the red light.

You can find more tips and information about how to avoid

a red light camera ticket by following City of Greenwood

Village on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. If you have any

questions about the City of Greenwood Village photo red

light camera campaign, please reach out to Melissa Gallegos,

Communications Officer at 303-486-5749 or email

mgallegos@greenwoodvillage.com.

SPRING COYOTE BEHAVIOR

It’s that time of year when coyote and human conflicts may

arise. Wildlife experts indicate that most conflicts are a direct

result of human behavior such as feeding coyotes, walking a

dog without a leash, or leaving food or water outside for your

pets.

I thought it would be timely to provide some helpful tips on

what you can do to prevent a negative coyote encounter:

• Never feed coyotes! Intentionally feeding coyotes is

illegal and these laws will be enforced.

• Keep pet food and water inside.

• Do not touch young coyotes. A coyote that appears

orphaned most often is not; the mother is usually nearby.

• Teach children not to feed, play with, or pet coyotes.

• Do not give coyotes the opportunity to get into your

garbage; keep garbage in sealed containers with secure lids.

• Remove attractants from your yard such as pet food, water

sources, bird feeders and fallen fruit.

• Fully enclose gardens and compost piles.

• Keep pets on a 6-foot leash when walking at all times. It

is illegal to have your dog off a leash and the law will

be enforced.

• Never allow your pets to “play” with a coyote.

• Pick up small pets if confronted by a coyote.

• Always supervise your pet when outside, especially at

dawn and dusk.

• Never leave cats or dogs outside after dark.

• If you must leave your pet outside, secure it in a fully

enclosed kennel.

• Keep your pets up to date on vaccinations.

PG. 2 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


GOVERNMENT

CITY council

NOT SURE WHO YOUR

ELECTED OFFICIALS ARE?

Obtain a list of your state and national government

representatives at www.arapahoevotes.com

DISTRICT 1 DISTRICT 2 DISTRICT 3 DISTRICT 4

Dave Bullock

dbullock@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4137

Anne Ingebretsen

aingebretsen@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4135

Steve Moran

smoran@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4133

Judith Hilton

jhilton@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4131

Jerry Presley

jpresley@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4138

Dave Kerber

dkerber@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4136

George Lantz

glantz@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4134

Thomas Dougherty

tdougherty@

greenwoodvillage.com

303-804-4132

RECOGNIZING VILLAGE HEROES

This month, we honor Susie Roy in our community. What a

lady! Please join us in congratulating her and celebrating her

many accomplishments and contributions to the Greenwood

Village community!

If a coyote approaches you, be as big, mean and loud as

possible. You can wave your arms and throw objects at the

coyote, or shout in a deep, loud, authoritative voice.

Please call the Greenwood Village Police Department at

303-773-2525 with information on coyote sightings. The

Police Department is actively keeping a record of coyote

activity in the Village which will assist the Village in tracking

the coyote population.

• Susie and Gordon Roy moved into Cherry Creek Village

North in 1991 with their young children, Brittany and

Tony. She immediately started Village Star which

recognized neighborhood students and featured them in

the Cherry Creek Village North Newsletter. In addition,

she started and participated in several Secret Santa events

in the neighborhood.

• From 1996-2007 she was on the Board of her

Homeowners Association and she and Gordon rewrote

new covenants to guide the neighbors with home

improvements and local governing structures.

• Susie volunteered from 1998-2002 with the Learning

Disabilities Association of America where she served as an

advocate for students without parents.

continued on page 4

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 3


GOVERNMENT

Mayor Ron

continued from page 3

• In 2007, Susie’s dear friend and neighbor Lisa Nichols

was diagnosed with ALS so she formed a group called

Band Together, which raised $120,000 to benefit Lisa

and her family.

• In addition, Susie served as a member of the ALS

Association from 2007-2015 where she provided meeting

locations and supported various fundraising events.

• Susie started the Cherry Creek Village Ice Cream Social

from 2008-2010, which brought neighbors together in

the summer with donations from Dreyer Ice Cream.

• She served as a Planning and Zoning Commissioner for

Greenwood Village from 2006-2007.

• In 2018, Susie was determined to lead the July 4th

Celebration, so she brought together many neighbors to

cook, decorate, socialize and see what a neighborhood

could enjoy together.

• The Sock it to ’Em 2018 National Sock Drive for the

homeless saw Susie’s address as a neighborhood drop off

site for donations. The City of Greenwood Village won

this multi-governmental contest!

• She regularly offers ideas and suggestions to the Village on

ways to engage residents through social media.

If you would like to nominate a Village Hero — someone

who has done a great deed or made a remarkable

contribution in the Village in a big or small way, please send

your nomination to mgallegos@greenwoodvillage.com.

We want to make sure these people’s stories of making a

positive impact in Greenwood Village do not go unnoticed.

For questions, please call 303-486-5749. GV

RAMBLE WITH RON

Due to the winter season, Ramble with Ron will be suspended

until at least June. If you have some ideas or suggestions about

living or working in Greenwood Village that you would like to

share with Mayor Ron Rakowsky, send him an email at

rrakowsky@greenwoodvillage.com or call the Mayor’s Office at

303-486-5745.

Twitter

www.twitter.com/greenwoodgov

Facebook

www.facebook.com/greenwoodgov/

Instagram

www.instagram.com/cityofgreenwoodvillage

LinkedIn

www.linkedin.com/cityofgreenwoodvillage

YouTube

www.YouTube.com/greenwoodvillage

PG. 4 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


VILLAGE CALENDAR

Visit

WWW.GREENWOODVILLAGE.COM

for more information

Information is subject to change

may 2019

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

29 30

31 1 2

3 4

5 6

7

8 9 10 11

City Council

Study Session

6 p.m.

Meeting

7 p.m.

City Hall

P&Z Commission

7 p.m.

City Hall

★ SINGLE FAMILY HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING ★

12 13 14

15

16

17 18

PTR Commission

7 p.m.

City Hall

GVAHC Meeting

6 p.m.

Curtis Center

19 20

21

22 23

24 25

City Council

Study Session

6 p.m.

City Hall

P&Z Commission

7 p.m.

City Hall

BOAA Meeting

6:30 p.m.

City Hall

26

27

Memorial Day

Village Facilities

Closed

★ SINGLE FAMILY HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING ★

28

PTR Commission

7 p.m.

City Hall

29

30

1 2

NO TRASH SERVICE

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 5


GOVERNMENT

Greenwood Village

AVAILABLE ON COMCAST CABLE IN GREENWOOD VILLAGE, GVTV CHANNEL 8

IS AVAILABLE 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK PROVIDING

PROGRAMMING REGARDING IMPORTANT LOCAL, STATE AND NATIONAL TOPICS.

Don’t have Comcast cable?

You can watch GVTV 8 programs on the

Village Website at greenwoodvillage.com

or on The City of Greenwood

Village Channel on YouTube.

NEW ON GVTV 8 IN MARCH

VILLAGE

EATS

Get ready for

some Cajun

flair, with

resident

guests, Bill

and Maribeth

Hanzlik.

GV KIDS, INK! ® NEWS — Take a tour of South Metro Fire

Rescue’s new Station 32 that opened in December 2018.

GV KIDS, INK! ® NEWS — Find out what is happening

with the Maintenance Facility and services of the Public Works

and Parks, Trails, and

Recreation Departments.

GV KIDS, INK! ® NEWS —

Hear from the news team on

the city’s recent campaign to

encourage safe driving at red

lights and reduce the number

of photo red light tickets

issued to motorists.

GIVING BACK TO

THE COMMUNITY

COMMISSION

REAPPOINTMENT

The following citizen was reappointed by

the Greenwood Village City Council to serve

on the Board of Adjustments and Appeals:

Ralph Wieleba, District 2

(reappointment)

Ralph Wieleba has

been reappointed to

the Board of

Adjustments and

Appeals for another

term. He has been a

member of the

BOAA since

February 2015.

Ralph and his wife Cindy have been

residents in District 2 since 1980. All of

their children attended Greenwood

Elementary, West Middle School, and

Cherry Creek High School. They now have

five grandchildren and are fortunate to have

them all in the Denver Metro area.

Ralph attended Michigan State University

where he met his wife Cindy. Both are

graduates of MSU and loyal Spartan alums.

Ralph opened his first mortgage banking

office for Manufacturers Hanover Mortgage

in the Triad Building doing residential and

commercial loans. He subsequently opened

an office in the Solarium building and

expanded into the Plaza 7000 building all in

the Village for another company he coowned.

For the past 25 years he has been

president and owner of Hanover Mortgage

Corp. also located in the Village. His

professional designations include his CMB

(Certified Mortgage Banker/ MBA) CML

(Certified Mortgage Lender/ CMLA) GRI and

RAM certificate from University of

Michigan.

Ralph has been a charter member of Club

Greenwood formerly known as Greenwood

Athletic Club. His family enjoys all the

wonderful amenities that Greenwood Village

has to offer and he is honored to represent

the Village for another term on the BOAA.

PG. 6 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


GOVERNMENT

KEEPING OUR

NEIGHBORHOOD beautiful

GREENWOOD VILLAGE RESIDENTIAL

NEIGHBORHOOD CODES

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

& OWNER RESPONSIBILITIES

This article summarizes some of the most common issues related

to property maintenance in residential areas. Our goal is to

ensure clean, attractive, safe neighborhoods and to maintain a

peaceful and enjoyable community. Every property owner has

the responsibility to maintain their property in a clean and

attractive manner.

Residential property concerns are addressed on a complaint basis

only. Once the City has validated the reported concern, the

property owner/tenant is contacted and given a period of time to

address the violation. The City initially seeks voluntary

compliance, with follow-up by an officer as necessary to ensure

compliance with the Municipal Code. Residential construction

and residential properties with reoccurring code violations will

be monitored proactively and addressed in an accelerated

manner.

Weeds And Grass Growth — It is the responsibility of the

property owner or resident to keep weeds and grass below eight

(8) inches, unless the property is in the rural area of the Village.

Noxious weeds are weeds which aggressively invade landscape or

are detrimental to the environment. Unlike regular weeds, these

weeds are required to be effectively controlled by pulling,

spraying or mowing.

Litter And Refuse — Residents must promptly remove any

accumulated materials, litter or refuse on the property such as

but not limited to: household appliances, cardboard, yard

clippings, leaves, abandoned or damaged household furnishings,

old fencing, vehicle tires and parts.

Trash and recycling containers are required to be stored in garage

or screened location. Containers may not be left at the curb for

more than one day before the scheduled trash pick-up day and

removed from the curb no later than midnight following a

scheduled pick-up.

Contractors are required to keep the property in clean and

orderly manner at all times. All building materials shall be neatly

stored and promptly removed or discarded when they are no

longer needed. All dumpsters, port-o-lets, equipment, trailers,

construction materials, and landscape materials must be stored

on site. Storage on city streets and right-of-way is strictly

prohibited.

Dead Or Overgrown Landscaping — Trees, shrubs, or other

vegetation which are dead, broken, or infested by insects shall be

be moved from the property. Branches of trees, shrubs or any

other plant material

should never obstruct

sidewalks or streets. This

includes landscaping

that overhangs in

manner that interferes

with the safe and

unobstructed movement

of pedestrians or vehicles

on any street or rail. (Trimming guidelines must be followed to

prevent overgrown landscaping in the Village right-of-way.)

• Streets — 14 feet above

• Equestrian trails — 10 feet above

• Sidewalk and trails — 8 feet above

Any overgrown trees or shrubs located in the right-of-way, such

as parks, open space areas, and roadways that need to be trimmed

to avoid obstructions should be completed by the Village.

Outdoor Storage — The storage of any items not normally

associated with the primary use of the property in an outdoor

location is prohibited. This includes unused furniture, storage

racks, broken and unused appliances, tires,

“junk,” and discarded items.

Inoperable Vehicles — Inoperable vehicles are not allowed on

private or public property unless the vehicle is completely

enclosed within building or structure on private property.

Inoperable vehicles are defined as vehicles not displaying valid

license plates; or vehicles lacking any part necessary for legal

operation on public street, including flat tires.

Recreational Vehicles — Recreational vehicles, boats, campers

and trailers may be parked or stored in a single family residential

property when the vehicle is completely concealed from view of

any public street or adjacent residence.

Exterior Maintenance — The exterior elements of a residence

shall be maintained in good condition. exterior maintenance

violations include: substantial peeling or faded paint; broken or

missing shutters or facia; damaged or missing roof shingles;

missing windows; or broken and damaged fencing.

Homeowners Association (HOA) Rules And Regulations —

The City does not enforce private HOA covenants. Please refer

to your Homeowners Association or additional rules related to

residential property maintenance in your neighborhood.

Village Contact — To report residential property maintenance

issues in your neighborhood, please contact the Neighborhood

Services Program of the Community Development Department

at 303-486-5783, email comdev@greenwoodvillage.com, or

complete the online form at greenwoodvillage.com/community

developmentcontactus. GV

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 7


GOVERNMENT

MAKING A difference

2019 BUDGET

WHAT DOES THE

BUDGET SAY ABOUT

THE VILLAGE’S

FINANCIAL CONDITION?

This past November, City Council

adopted the 2019 Annual Operating

and Capital Improvement Budget.

The primary purpose of the Village’s

Budget and budgetary process is to

develop, adopt and implement a

fiscally sound and sustainable plan to

accomplish the established goals of

the upcoming year, while remaining

consistent with the long-term vision

of the community. Development of

the 2019 Annual Operating &

Capital Improvement Budget focused

on maintaining the existing levels of

service, reinvesting in the

infrastructure of the community, and

ensuring the financial health of the

organization without the addition of

new taxes or issuance of debt.

WHERE DOES THE

MONEY COME FROM?

The Village receives revenue from

several sources. Taxes and assessments

represent the largest category,

accounting for more than 80% of all

Village revenue. Other sources

include intergovernmental revenues

comprised of sources which are

collected and shared with the Village

by other governments, as well as

federal, state and/or county grants,

the sale of various licenses and

permits, user charges and fees

intended to offset certain costs,

punitive fines and forfeitures for the

commission of minor crimes, and

lastly, investment earnings and

miscellaneous revenues. For 2019,

the above sources are expected to

continued on page 16

REVENUE SOURCES 2019 Budget % of Total

Taxes & Assessments

Property & Specific Ownership Tax $3,760,000 7.1 %

Sales Tax 29,500,000 55.9 %

Use Tax (General & Building Materials) 5,500,000 10.4 %

Lodging Tax 1,575,000 3.0 %

Occupational Privilege Tax 2,025,000 3.8 %

Special Assessments & Audit Collections 1,305,000 2.5 %

Intergovernmental 3,013,270 5.7 %

(Highway Users Tax, Tobacco Tax, Grants, etc.)

Licenses and Permits (Business Licenses, 1,276,000 2.4 %

Liquor Licenses, Building Permits, etc.)

Charges & Fees (Planning and Zoning Fees, 2,847,500 5.4 %

Participant Fees, Franchise Fees, etc.)

Fines & Forfeitures (Court Costs, Fines, etc.) 1,250,000 2.4 %

Investment Earnings & Miscellaneous Revenue 765,500 1.4 %

TOTAL REVENUE $52,817,270 100.0%

EXPENDITURE ALLOCATION 2019 Budget % of Total

Operations & Maintenance

Mayor & City Council $440,757 0.9 %

City Management (City Manager’s Office, 1,096,549 2.2 %

Community Outreach)

City Attorney 420,676 0.8 %

Municipal Judge 38,143 0.1 %

Administrative Services (City Clerk, 4,099,629 8.1 %

Human Resources, Technology)

Finance (Accounting, Payroll, Taxpayer Services) 2,185,969 4.3 %

Community Development (Planning, 2,851,407 5.6 %

Building Safety, Code Enforcement, Facilities)

Parks, Trails & Recreation (Recreation, 7,580,153 14.9 %

Cultural Arts, Parks, Open Space, Trails)

Police (Dispatch, Patrol, Detectives) 11,726,904 23.1 %

Public Works (Fleet, Transportation, 8,635,600 17.0 %

Snow & Ice Control, Storm Water)

Capital Improvement Projects

Building Projects 600,000 1.2 %

Recreation Projects 4,915,000 9.7 %

Street & Transportation Projects 6,125,000 12.1 %

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $50,715,787 100.0%

PG. 8 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


GOVERNMENT

SAVE OUR EARTH

SINGLE FAMILY RECYCLING TIPS

All single-family household in the Village are eligible to

receive free recycling services with your trash service. Residents

interested in recycling may request a 95-gallon or 65-gallon

polycarts by calling Public Works at 303-708-6100. Here are

a few important things for residents to remember:

• Recycling services will be provided every other week on

the same day as your regularly scheduled trash pickup.

Refer to the 2019 Republic Services Recycling Program

Schedule.

• Please do not place any trash in the recycle polycarts. The

polycarts with a green lid indicates recycling, the trash

trucks cannot pick it up. If the cart is contaminated it will

be left at the curb for proper sorting by the resident.

• To prepare your items to be recycled, please rinse out

containers to remove as much of the food residue as

possible. In addition, please make sure there are no plastic

bags mixed in your recyclables.

• Please, do not include any oil, pesticide, or hazardous

material bottles in the polycarts. To dispose of your

hazardous materials, residents may participate in the

Village’s Residential Household Waste Collection Program

by calling 1-800-449-7587.

• Your polycarts may be placed at the curb (1) day prior to

a scheduled pickup and must be removed from the curb

no later than midnight following a scheduled pickup. This

means trash and recycle containers cannot be placed at the

curb more than 2 days a week. Trash and recycling

containers must be stored in such a position on the

property as to be reasonably screened from public view.

• Please adhere to the following as acceptable items for

single stream recycling services in the Village:

PAPER

Please note that due to the single stream sorting process it’s

very difficult to sort shredded paper at the recycling facility.

Please place shredded paper in your trash cart. Examples of

accepted paper includes newspapers including inserts,

magazines, junk mail, white and colored paper, posters, postit

notes, manila folder, phonebooks.

CARDBOARD

Items made of cardboard, chipboard, and paperboard are

recyclable. Examples of accepted items include flattened

GREENWOOD VILLAGE

DIVERSION RATE

In 2018, Greenwood Village residential service recycled 1,677

tons of material. GV’s diversion rate (the percentage of recycled

material out of the total amount of waste) was 26.5%. Per the

EPA, the National average recycling diversion rate, excluding

composting, is 26%, so GV is tracking with the national average.

cardboard, cereal boxes without the plastic inside, soda carrier

boxes, and tissue holders.

METAL CONTAINERS

All containers made of aluminum, steel, and tin are

recyclable. Examples of accepted items include soda cans,

food cans, pie tins. Please do not crush these items.

GLASS BOTTLES AND JARS

All food and beverage jars are accepted, but please be sure to

rinse them to remove as much residue as possible. Examples

of acceptable bottles include beer, soft drink, and wine

bottles. Please do not include any glass that is not a bottle or

jar such as window glass, drinking glasses, ceramics, Pyrex,

light bulbs.

PLASTICS #1-#7

Typically, a #1-#7 plastic only pertains to the bottles and

tubs. As the industry evolves things are changing, so please

check the bottom for a #1-#7 HDPE logo indicating whether

the item is recyclable. Examples of acceptable items include

condiment bottles, butter and yogurt tubs, water, soda, and

juice bottles, shampoo bottles and liquid soap dispensers,

liquid detergent and/or cleaning supply bottles.

For more tips and guidance on recycling, please visit

www.recyclingsimplified.com. For more information on trash

and recycling services in the Village, please call Public Works

at 303-708-6100 or visit www.greenwoodvillage.com. GV

DID YOU KNOW!

Colorado throws away nearly $265 million worth of recyclable

material such as aluminum, cardboard, paper, glass, and plastic

in our landfill.

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 9


GOVERNMENT

MAKING A difference

CENTENNIAL

AIRPORT NOISE ISSUES

UPDATE ON METROPLEX

Over the last few months, there have been a number of news

media stories concerning the Federal Aviation Administration’s

(FAA) Metroplex — Denver project and its possible impacts

to Denver area communities including Greenwood Village.

While the project has not yet been approved and is many

months from potential implementation, provided below are

some Q&As on the project.

What is Metroplex?

Metroplex is part of the FAA’s NextGen effort to modernize

the national air transportation system with the goal of

increasing aviation safety, efficiency, capacity, predictability,

and resiliency. The FAA defines a Metroplex as “a geographic

area covering several airports, serving major metropolitan

areas and a diversity of aviation stakeholders.” Denver is one

of 11 current Metroplexes around the country being studied

or implemented by the FAA. In general, Metroplex

implementation uses new technologies to enable aircraft to

fly shorter routes and enables air traffic controllers and pilots

to track aircraft more precisely.

Why is the FAA pursuing this project?

The metro Denver area is served by multiple airports and has

complex air traffic flows. The FAA has explained that

Metroplex is intended to “enhance the way aircraft navigate

this complex airspace to improve airport access and make

flight routes more efficient.” The FAA believes that this new

way of managing air traffic in the Denver area may reduce

aircraft fuel usage and exhaust emissions while also improving

on-time aircraft arrivals and departures. To put this in

perspective, based on preliminary data, the FAA estimates

that implementation of the Metroplex – Denver project will

result in $1.8 million in annual fuel savings and will annually

avoid 5,400 metric tons of carbon emissions.

How will Greenwood Village be impacted?

At this time, the short answer is, “We don’t know.” If

Metroplex – Denver is implemented, it will change the routes

that aircraft fly into and out of Denver International Airport.

It will also impact the routes that aircraft fly into and out of

Greeley — Weld County Airport, Fort Collins — Loveland

Municipal Airport, Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport

and, most important to Greenwood Village residents,

Centennial Airport. Centennial Airport is the second busiest

general aviation airport in the country with over 340,000

flight operations in 2018, this is of particular concern to

Greenwood Village residents. Until the federal

Environmental Assessment for the project is completed and

further project details are determined, we don’t know

whether these route changes will result in a greater or fewer

number of aircraft flying over Greenwood Village and at

what altitude.

What is the City doing about Metroplex at this time?

The Mayor, City Council, and Village staff have been

carefully monitoring this project as it evolves. Village

representatives have participated in recent meetings with FAA

staff concerning the status of and future plans for Metroplex

– Denver. Additionally, the Village and other representatives

of south metro area municipalities have met with U.S.

Senator Cory Gardner’s office to discuss the project and

request the Senator’s assistance in ensuring the FAA provides

PG. 10 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


GOVERNMENT

timely and accurate information and considers the potential

impacts of Metroplex on local communities.

WHAT IS THE CACNR AND HOW ARE

THEY ADDRESSING THIS ISSUE?

The Centennial Airport Community Noise Roundtable

(CACNR) was created in May 2009 with the intent to

reduce and mitigate noise impacts from users of Centennial

Airport. Membership of the Roundtable consists of local

elected officials, airport staff, community representatives, the

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and airport users.

This forum provides a mechanism that attempts to ensure

cooperation between the Airport and local communities in

achieving noise reductions wherever possible. CACNR is very

focused on Metroplex – Denver and provides another

platform for potential coordinated efforts among local

communities. Greenwood Village is represented on CACNR

by City Councilmember Tom Dougherty who can be reached

at 303- 804-4132 or tdougherty@greenwoodvillage.com.

WHAT CAN RESIDENTS DO?

The most important thing you can do at this time is stay

informed. Specific information about the proposed

Metroplex – Denver project is available at

https://www.faa.gov/nextgen/snapshots/metroplexes/?

locationId=8. Additional information is available on the

Centennial Airport website at http://www.centennial

airport.com/index.php/en-us/2016-03-01-21-53-30/aboutmetroplex.

It is anticipated that the FAA will hold public

information meetings and community workshops this

summer at which members of the public can learn more

FRUSTRATED OVER

AIRPORT NOISE?

GET INVOLVED!

Visit Website — www.centennialairportnoise.com

Find information on noise abatement outreach to pilots, noise

monitors that measure and report decibel levels of overhead

aircraft, tutorials, and frequently asked questions. You can also

complete the noise complaint form accessible on the Website

— click on “Noise Abatement” and then click on “Track and

Report Noise.”

Track Flights — www.webtrak.bksv.com/apa

To track overhead aircraft activity and/or report noise incidents,

residents can use WebTrak which allows residents to access

information about flights taking off and landing in the Denver

region. WebTrak keeps a 60-day history of air tracks, including

flight identification, aircraft type, origin, destination, height and

speed.

Noise Hotline — 303-790-4709

To file a noise complaint within seven days of occurrence, call

the Centennial Airport Noise Hotline.

about the project and provide comments. As more

information becomes available about the project and its

proposed impacts on Greenwood Village, it may also be

appropriate for you to get involved by communicating with

the FAA and your federal and state elected officials. GV

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 11


GOVERNMENT

OF interest

LIGHTNING

PREPAREDNESS:

WHEN THUNDER

ROARS,

GO INDOORS

Lightning strikes the ground in our

state more than a half million times

each year and with many of us

participating in outdoor activities, we

need to learn how to protect ourselves

from lightning hazards.

OUTDOOR SAFETY

Outdoors is the most dangerous place

to be during a thunderstorm. Each

year nearly all people in the United

States who are injured or killed by

lightning were involved in an outdoor

activity. Unfortunately, there is no

place outside that is safe from

lightning. The only safe place to be

when lightning is occurring is either

inside a substantial building or an

enclosed automobile.

Here are some important things to

remember before venturing outdoors:

• An informed decision will help you

avoid being in an area where

lightning is expected to occur.

Before heading out get an updated

weather forecast.

• Stay tuned to NOAA Weather

Radio and check National Weather

Service websites or access your

favorite weather apps on your cell

phone for the latest forecast.

• In Colorado it is important to

remember that thunderstorms

typically develop in the mountains

after 11 a.m. That is why it’s best to

plan your climbing or hiking so

you are coming down the

mountain by late morning.

• If thunderstorms are in the forecast,

consider planning an alternate

indoor activity or make plans

which will allow you to quickly get

into a safe shelter.

Once you are outside keep these tips

in mind if you have a safe location

nearby:

• Know where the nearest safe

location is located.

– A safe location is any substantial

building, such as a business, a

home, or a church.

– Any enclosed hard-topped

automobile also offers protection

from lightning.

• Once you hear thunder or see

KNOW THE SOUNDS OF THE LIGHTNING

DEVICES AT MAJOR VILLAGE PARKS

During the summer storm season, Village park users and visitors may be exposed to potential dangers of a lightning storm while being

outside. In efforts to provide a safer environment while attending events at Village Greens Park, Curtis Park, Westlands Park, Silo Park, and

Tommy Davis Park, the Village has installed lightning prediction and warning systems to alert

park users of the potential for lightning before it strikes.

The lightning systems in designated Village parks are prediction systems not detector systems.

These systems measure the shift of the positive and negative ions in the atmosphere and in the

ground that could create an energy flow that may result in a lightning strike once a conductive

cloud to ground path is available. The lightning prediction and warning system senses and

evaluates these shifts and changes in the electrostatic field that precede the occurrence of an

actual lightning strike and activates an audible, as well as, visual warning alerting of the

dangerous conditions.

The systems are set to monitor a 2.5 mile radius from its location. When the conditions are ripe

for lightning at the parks or within the 2.5 mile radius, a continuous audible horn is activated for

a period of 15 seconds alerting users of the potential for lightning and activating yellow strobes

on the roofs of the structures located within the parks. These strobes will stay activated

throughout the period of potential lightning activity and will shut off only after an all clear signal

consisting of three five second audible horn blasts. The systems are operational between the

hours of 7 a.m. and 9 p.m., seven days a week, through the spring and summer months.

For more information, please call Dustin Huff, Parks Manager, at 303-708-6155.

PG. 12 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


GOVERNMENT

lightning — immediately stop what you are doing and

quickly get to the safe shelter. Do not wait until the rain

starts to seek safe shelter.

• Once inside a safe shelter it is recommended you stay

there for 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder.

• Do not wait to seek safe shelter when lightning threatens.

When you hear thunder or see lightning it is important

for you, and your family, to act quickly.

– Past history has shown that most people who were

outdoors and were injured or killed by lightning had

access to a nearby safe shelter.

• Avoid shelters that are not safe from lightning including

picnic shelters, bullpens, tents and any other small

buildings that are open to the elements.

• NEVER... NEVER... get under a tree to seek shelter from

lightning.

If you are outside with no safe shelter nearby:

• In this scenario there is not much you can do to reduce

your risk from being struck by lightning.

• The best thing to do is move away from tall, isolated

objects such as trees.

• Stay away from wide open area.

• Stay as low as possible with your feet close together if

lightning is nearby.

• If you are with a group of people, spread out. This way if

someone is struck by lightning the others can offer first

aid.

• If camping in the backcountry, place your tent in a low

area away from tall, isolated trees.

INDOOR SAFETY

Remember when thunder roars, get indoors! Once you are

indoors keep these additional indoor safety tips in mind:

• Avoid corded electronics, electrical equipment and

plumbing.

• Avoid contact with water such as taking a shower, bath,

washing dishes or doing laundry.

• Stay away from windows, doors, garages and porches.

• Do not lie on concrete floors or lean against concrete

walls.

• If a substantial building is not nearby an enclosed

automobile offers excellent protection from lightning.

For more information, visit www.readycolorado.com/

hazard/severe-weatherthunderstorm. GV

Information provided by Colorado Division of

Homeland Security and Emergency Management

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 13


BUSINESS

BUSINESSspotlight

EPIC ESCAPE GAME

9600 East Arapahoe Road, Suite 212 • 303-284-9610 • www.EpicEscapeGame.com

Open: Thursday-Monday 1 to 9 p.m. • Reservations by phone or online

Think…solve…escape.

Words to live by when you are locked in a room with only

your wits, problem solving skills and teamworking ability to

set you free. Let the mind whirl with analytical and creative

thought in hopes to solve the puzzle of the room, but don’t

take too long as time is running out! This exhilarating

journey can be experienced in Greenwood Village at Epic

Escape Game. Just two blocks east of I-25 on Arapahoe Road

lives the interactive live escape room adventure. A fun,

unique experience that is the perfect solution to the ultimate

question: “What should we do tonight?” You walk in and

immediately notice one peculiar wall that prominently

displays several different styles of locks and a cupboard of

unique puzzle games. Continue spanning the lobby and you

also notice four enticing posters next to closed doors.

Hmmm…very curious indeed. Exciting thoughts spark and a

sense of wonder seems to fill the space. Initial ideas and

observations are shared amongst your group of family and

friends while questions swirl about what is to come next.

Don’t let the minimal information and cues outside of the

closed doors fool you. Inside lay four immersive rooms

packed full of themed décor, objects and locks to interact

with and intriguing storylines that will transport you to

another time and place. A place where instead of watching

the action, you are now IN THE ACTION! Currently, there

are four different games to choose from with varying skill

levels. The room options and themes are designed to

accommodate all who wish to accept the challenge from the

beginner to the advanced player. These escape rooms are ideal

for anyone looking for a new and fun experience, from the

couple on date night, friend group’s night out, a family

celebrating a birthday or special occasion to the office group

out for a team building exercise. All groups or parties are

welcome to come experience the fun and put their skills to

the test.

Owners Rebecca and Arthur Ross decided to set up shop in

Greenwood Village and enjoy the bustling energy that flows

around their convenient location. They decided to take a

hands-on approach to the business, which differentiates their

engaging model from any other live action experience. All

room design and game concepts are led by their creative drive

and problem-solving prowess. Each setting is thoughtfully

decorated and layered with several props to provide a very

immersive environment. One finds themselves immediately

continued on page 15

PG. 14 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


BUSINESS

business spotlight

continued from page 14

present in the game space scenario as the clock ticks down

and minds race to find clues and solve the puzzle to freedom.

Epic Escape Game focuses on having a special room available

for everyone to enjoy regardless of the age or skill level. The

entire experience is designed to be shared by all and bring

people together.

The four game options you can choose from right now are

The Cursed Vault, Lab Disaster, The President’s Briefcase or

The Teddy Bear Workshop. There can be 2 to 8 players per

room at a time with 60 minutes on the clock to escape. Once

the game choice has been made, you are led to the specific

room, given basic instructions and left to strategize and

problem solve as the door is locked behind you. It is

important to mention that you are not truly locked in as

emergency exit buttons on the doors allow you to exit and reenter

the room as needed. Still nervous about being locked

in? Epic Escape Game offers two mission based rooms where

the doors are not locked. To ensure a fun and safe time, there

is also one dedicated “clue master” assigned to oversee each

game in progress and act as a resource to divulge hints if

requested. You may utilize them for help or assistance as

much or little as desired.

Ever growing and evolving the game concept, Rebecca and

Arthur are rolling out a brand-new escape experience this

summer. They have developed a new way for 50-100 person

groups to play the escape game all together with a portable

table top version. The Epic Escape crew will soon be able to

bring the fun directly to you! The clues and puzzles are

contained within locked mobile boxes and will be a perfect

option for larger groups to enjoy. They will bring mystery,

excitement and the newly designed theme of The Mustache

Thief, to the location of your choice, be it the office,

conference room, school, church or community gathering

space.

For more information about Epic Escape Game, please visit

www.EpicEscapeGame.com or contact by phone at

303-284-9610. The business is located at 9600 East

Arapahoe Road in Suite 212, Greenwood Village, CO 80112

and is open Thursday through Monday from 1 p.m. until 9

p.m. Reservations can be made by phone or online. An

exclusive offer of 10% off an Escape Room is available until

May 31, 2019. Please use Promo Code: EPIC-FUN to

receive this offer. Don’t wait to unlock the fun and book your

Epic Game experience now! GV

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 15


BUSINESS

NEW GV

businesses

CABLE SERVICES

Comcast of Colorado IX, LLC

5900 South University Boulevard,

Suite C

215-286-7940

CONSULTING

NuView Analytics

6400 South Fiddlers Green Circle

719-468-0026

Trova, Ltd.

5994 South Holly Street, Suite 245

720-722-3355

Williams Consulting

& Accounting

8400 East Prentice Avenue,

Suite 200

303-337-0607

COUNSELING

Brightside Counseling

5650 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard,

Suite 144-145

720-257-1752

COWORKING SPACE

Enterprise Coworking, LLC

5500 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard

303-296-7550

DATA ANALYTICS

DataRobot

6855 South Dayton Street

857-208-0603

DATA MANAGEMENT

Doculynx Operations, LLC

5660 Greenwood Plaza Boulevard,

Suite 400-N

303-390-4353

2019 BUDGET

continued from page 8

generate $52.8 million as illustrated in

the table.

WHERE DOES

THE MONEY GO?

The Village’s budget is composed of an

operating budget, which details

expenditures for the upcoming year, and

a capital budget, which shows the

financial plans for current and long-term

capital improvements, facilities, and

equipment. Additionally, revenue streams

collected by the Village are often

EDUCATION SERVICES

Learning Foundations

5340 South Quebec Street,

Suite 330-S

720-583-0073

FINANCIAL SERVICES

America AgCredit FLCA

6312 South Fiddlers Green Circle,

Suite 420

707-521-6147

Douglas B Kiel Chapter 13 Trustee

7100 East Belleview Avenue,

Suite 300

720-398-4444

Providence Capital

Partners, Incorporated

5299 DTC Boulevard, Suite 1350

303-261-8015

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Profile by Sanford

8575 East Arapahoe Road, Suite G

720-457-6924

HEALTHCARE

The Fitness Lab

8755 East Orchard Road, Suite 604

303-800-2829

HUMAN RESOURCES TRAINING

Taylor Corporation, Incorporated

7100 East Belleview Avenue

507-625-2828

INSURANCE AGENCY

Centerpoint Insurance Group

8400 East Prentice Avenue,

Suite 735

303-333-0375

Edgewood Partners

Insurance Center

6400 South Fiddlers Green Circle,

Suite 1430

925-822-9141

QBE Insurance Corporation

5619 DTC Parkway,

Suite 200&300

303-337-5500

MANAGEMENT SERVICES

ReCept Healthcare Services, LP

8200 East Belleview Avenue,

Suite 416-C

303-771-3254

MORTGAGES

Citywide Home Loans, LLC

7400 East Orchard Street,

Suite 2900-N

720-644-5566

Finance of America

Mortgage, LLC

8400 East Crescent Parkway,

Suite 554

855-850-2248

NONMEDICAL HOME CARE

Assisting Hands

Home Care Centennial

6565 South Dayton Street,

Suite 1500

720-662-9969

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Strive Communities

Management, LLC

5600 South Quebec Street,

Suite 220-A

970-808-0800

restricted for specific purposes, as

determined by existing laws and/or

regulations. The table on Page 8

illustrates how available resources are

allocated so as to continue providing the

community with the services it has come

to expect.

For more information, please call

Shawn Cordsen, Finance Director,

at 303-486-8290 or email

scordsen@greenwoodvillage.com.

Citizens are encouraged to perform a

more detailed review of the complete

2019 Budget document at

www.greenwoodvillage.com. GV

REAL ESTATE

True North Development, LLC

5762 South Jasmine Street

720-626-1994

RESTAURANT

Corner Poke

4666 South Yosemite Street

303-638-7757

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

Dingo Mining

8400 East Prentice Avenue,

Suite 745

303-662-9103

Seed Innovations, LLC

8400 East Crescent Parkway,

Suite 674

719-306-5814

STAFFING AGENCY

Favorite Healthcare

Staffing, Incorporated

5690 DTC Boulevard, Suite 275-W

720-256-2121

Friendly Advanced

Software Technology

6399 South Fiddlers Green Circle

303-200-1560

TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT

C.H. Robinson

Operations, Incorporated

5555 DTC Parkway, Suite 240

952-683-6949

BUSINESSES

UNDER NEW

MANAGEMENT

CHILD CARE

Bright Beginnings

6625 South Dayton Street

303-790-1160

CONSULTING

Alan Plummer

Associates, Incorporated

5325 South Valentia Way

303-300-3464

CPA FIRM

Williams & Company, LLC

5200 DTC Parkway, Suite 350

303-796-7286

HEALTHCARE

Healthfirst

8400 East Prentice Avenue,

Suite 301

303-488-0034

Thomas Vertrees MD, LLC

7400 East Orchard Road,

Suite 240-S

303-300-6635

PG. 16 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


GENERAL INTEREST

ENSURING A SAFE

community

DO NOT BECOME A

VICTIM OF MAIL THEFT

It’s Spring and criminals have sprung! Many people do not

realize that the once simple convenience of putting outgoing

mail in an unsecured curbside mail box and lifting the red

flag to notify the postman has also become a signal to mail

thieves that there is outgoing mail. This represents easy access

to credit card information, tax payments and other types of

personal information to be used for fraudulent activity. Mail

thieves are aware that it may take some time before a victim

realizes that something is amiss. When outbound letters

vanish, it may take weeks before it is discovered that the mail

did not reach its intended destination. At the same time, the

disappearance of inbound mail can easily go un-noticed; the

first sign of fraud might come as quickly as the next credit

card or bank statement.

What can you do to minimize exposure to mail theft?

• Make sure your personal mailbox is secure and can lock at

all times.

• Use the letter slots at your post office to mail letters, or

give them to a letter

carrier.

• Pick up your mail

promptly after delivery.

Don’t leave it in your

mailbox overnight.

• Don’t send cash in the

mail.

• Ask your bank for “secure”

checks that can’t be altered.

• Tell your post office when

you will be out of town so they can hold your mail.

• If you don’t receive a check or other valuable mail you are

expecting, contact the issuing agency immediately.

Check your credit reports regularly. If you find accounts

that don’t belong to you or other incorrect information,

follow the instructions for disputing those items. Visit

www.consumer.gov/idtheft for step-by-step advice about

what to do if you’re a victim of identity theft.

For more information or if you believe your mail was stolen,

please call the Police Department at 303-773-2525. GV

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 17


ARTS AND RECREATION

RECREATION programs

Register online at

www.greenwoodvillage.com/rec

RECREATION

REIMBURSEMENT

TIDBIT

Did you know that Recreation

Reimbursement requests can be

submitted year-round? Now that

you’ve pulled out your golf clubs and

scheduled a tee time or signed your

children up for Greenwood Village

summer activities, submit your

reimbursement form and put some

summer fun dollars back in your

pocket.

Reimbursable entities include Parks

and Recreation Districts, Metropolitan

Districts (offering recreation activities),

municipal golf courses, City of

Greenwood Village art and recreation

programs and nonprofit youth sports

agencies. All agencies must be located

in the Denver metro area. Receipts

must include the name of the

organization, the activity and the date

paid.

You will find a reimbursement request

form in the middle of this newsletter.

For more information about the

program, visit

www.greenwoodvillage.com/

recreimbursement or call

303-486-5773.

PG. 18 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


ARTS AND RECREATION

RECREATION programs

Register online at

www.greenwoodvillage.com/registration

GARDENING

QUESTIONS?

ASK A COLORADO

MASTER GARDENER SM

SATURDAY, MAY 11,

NOON TO 3 P.M. AT

CITY HALL PARKING LOT

The CSU Extension — Arapahoe

County Colorado Master Gardeners

(CMGs) who are responsible for

growing the amazing abundance of

produce in the Silo Park garden will be

available to answer your home

horticulture questions in the City Hall

parking lot on Saturday, May 11 from

12-3 p.m. You can bring plants for the

CMGs to identify or problem solve

any gardening issues. This event

corresponds with the Garden in a Box

pickup at the same location.

CMG Volunteers in Arapahoe County

are a group of about 80 volunteers

who foster community development

through gardening. They offer expert

advice about insects, plant

identification, landscape planting,

growing vegetables and any other yard

For more information call the Arts and Recreation Division at 303-486-5773.

and garden questions you may have.

If you are unable to attend this event,

CMG Volunteers are available to

answer questions on Tuesdays from

9-11 a.m. at Silo Park during the

summer.

For questions about this event,

please contact Julie Liggett,

Administrative Supervisor, at

303-486-5750 or email

jliggett@greenwoodvillage.com.

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 19


ARTS AND RECREATION

PG. 20 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


ARTS AND RECREATION

ART events

GALLERY HOURS

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

CURTIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 2349 EAST ORCHARD ROAD, GREENWOOD VILLAGE, CO 80121 • 303-797-1779

YOUTH ART MONTH

March was Youth Art Month at the

Curtis Center for the Arts. Youth Art

Month encourages support for quality

school art programs. The program raises

awareness of the skills developed through

visual arts experiences that are unlike any

other curriculum subjects, including:

Problem Solving, Creativity, Observation

and Communication. Art shows, special

exhibits, fundraisers, and school and

community activities take place annually

to celebrate visual art education for

grades K-12. The exhibit at the Curtis

Center featured works from 32 Arapahoe

County schools with over 1,000 pieces of

work in the show from students K-12.

The Curtis Center hosts two receptions

to celebrate the exhibit.

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 21


ARTS AND RECREATION

ART

programs

Register online at

www.greenwoodvillage.com/art

For more information call the the Curtis Center for the Arts at 303-797-1779.

ART CLASSES AT THE CURTIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Greenwood Village’s cultural arts center offers a variety of art classes for preschoolers, children, teens and adults.

We have something for all ages and all artistic levels. Come and create with us!

View our current and upcoming classes at the Curtis Center for the Arts by going to www.greenwoodvillage.com/art.

For questions or more information about art classes at the Curtis Center call 303-797-1779.

ADULT ART CLASSES

Ages 16 and older with a

10% senior discount

SILK PAINTING FOR

MOTHER’S DAY

Come and experience the beauty of

hand dying luxurious silk. Participants

will be designing their own scarves to

give to Mom as a Mother’s Day gift.

Day and Date: Saturday, April 27

Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Maggie Stewart

BEGINNING WATERCOLOR

ADVENTURES!

Spring is the perfect season to be

inspired by and to learn about

watercolor. The flowers and trees

are bursting with colors that

you’ll want to sketch and paint.

Day and Dates: Mondays,

April 29 through May 30

Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Fee: $80

Instructor: Renee Reese

ABSTRACT COLORADO

LANDSCAPE PAINTING

Create your own memorable abstract

portrayal of the Colorado landscape

meshing nature into your own

distinctive moment.

Day and Dates: Tuesdays,

April 30 through May 21

Time: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

Fee: $80

Instructor: Christian Dore

PAINTING BASICS

This class will welcome beginning and

practicing students to explore the

materials and methods of painting the

still life from both observation and

photographic reference.

Days and Dates:

Wednesdays,

May 1 through

May 29

Time:

6:30 to 9 p.m.

Fee: $100

Instructor:

David Lukens

PORTRAIT

PAINTING

This class welcomes

beginning and

practicing students to

explore the materials

and methods of

painting the portrait

from a live model.

Day and Dates: Thursdays,

May 2 through May 30

Time: 6:30 to 9 p.m.

Fee: $100

Instructor: David Lukens

HOT ART: BASIC

ENCAUSTIC TECHNIQUES

This is a

high

energy,

hands-on

two-day

encaustic

workshop.

We will

explore a

variety of

encaustic

techniques,

including making medium and paint,

prepping substrates, fusing wax,

layering translucent color, adding and

reducing texture, masking, stencils,

mark making, image transfer

techniques and more.

Day and Dates: Saturday, May 4 and

Sunday, May 5

Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fee: $200

Instructor: Victoria Eubanks

PG. 22 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019


ARTS AND RECREATION

LANDSCAPE WORKSHOP:

OIL OR PASTELS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS

Advance your skills in painting the Landscape with

expressive, and loose

styles. Gain ideas on

color and

composition to

express your vision.

Day and Dates:

Tuesdays, May 14

through June 25

Time: 1 to 4 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor:

Cliff Austin

CASUAL WATERCOLOR:

SKETCHING YOUR LIFE

Begin your own

sketchbook journal

in this class! Your

creative journey

starts here inside the

pages of a

sketchbook that

goes where you go.

Learn to sketch

loosely and

watercolor

expressively as you

slow down to see the

beauty in that

moment.

Day and Dates: Thursdays, May 16 through June 20

Time: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Fee: $120

Instructor: Renee Reese

PAINTING COLORFUL AND

EXPRESSIVE BARNYARD ANIMALS

Join contemporary artist,

Anita Mosher Solich, for

a one-day journey

painting expressive,

colorful barnyard

animals in the Russian

Impressionist style.

Explore bold, vibrant

color and thick, juicy

brushwork with focus on

a direct painting

approach to produce works rich in rhythm and emotion.

Day and Date: Saturday, May 18

Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Fee: $100

Instructor: Anita Mosher Solich

YOUTH ART CLASSES

PEE WEE ART

Pee Wee Art is a fun hands-on art program that introduces

preschoolers to the arts and allows for parents to assist with

their child’s creative process.

Day and Time: Wednesdays, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

April 10 — Collage Bunny

April 24 — Elmer the Elephant

May 8 — Art for Mom

May 22 — Puffy Paint Rainbow

Fee: $15 per program

Ages: 3 to 5 years old with adult

Instructor: Lauren Brant

POP ART SOFT

SCULPTURES

Explore the world of Pop Art

through the works of Claes

Oldenburg as we create large

soft sculptures!

Day and Dates: Tuesdays,

April 30 through May 21

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $50

Ages: 9 to 12 years old

Instructor: Maggie Stewart

TEEN ART CLASSES

MIXED MEDIA FOR TEENS

Create beautiful artwork using multiple

mediums! Students will draw, paint,

collage, layer and add found objects to

a series of canvases that combined will

create a finished work of art.

Day and Dates: Mondays,

April 29 through May 20

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $75

Ages: 12 to 16 years old

Instructor: Maggie Stewart

CREATIVE PRINTING TECHNIQUES

Come and learn about print making! This class will involve

using several printing

methods and participants

will learn about and make

their own prints using

each of the different

printing methods.

Day and Dates: Fridays,

May 3 through May 24

Time: 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Fee: $75

Ages: 11 to 16 years old

Instructor: Susan Maxwell

APRIL 2019 | GV NEWSLETTER PG. 23


6060 South Quebec Street

Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111-4591

PRSRT STD

US POSTAGE

PAID

ENGLEWOOD, CO

PERMIT #799

ARTS AND RECREATION

ART events

GALLERY HOURS

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

CURTIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 2349 EAST ORCHARD ROAD, GREENWOOD VILLAGE, CO 80121 • 303-797-1779

PG. 24 GV NEWSLETTER | APRIL 2019

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