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RIC-20939 Early years Fairytales - Riding Hood

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EARLY YEARS THEMES

Fairytales

Little Red Riding Hood

A complete unit of lessons and activities


Early years themes—Fairytales

Published by R.I.C. Publications ® 2011

Copyright © R.I.C. Publications ® 2011

RIC20939

Titles in this series:

Early years themes—Places

Early years themes—People

Early years themes—Animals

Early years themes—Science

Early years themes—Fantasy

Early years themes—Fairytales

Early years themes—Special days and celebrations

Copyright Information

Only the blackline masters contained within this

publication may only be reproduced by the original

purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher

prohibits the loaning or onselling of these blackline

masters for purposes of reproduction. No other part

of this publication may be reproduced in any form or

by any means, electronic or mechanical, including

photocopying or recording, or by any information

storage and retrieval system, without written

permission from the publisher.

Accompanying resources available:

Early years themes—Fairytales Posters (set of 5)

Early years themes—Fairytales Stickers (set of 5)

Early years themes Interactive CD (Places, People,

Animals, Science)

Early years themes Interactive CD (Fantasy, Fairytales,

Special days and celebrations)

Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication,

the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class

teacher checks all URLs before allowing students to access them.

View all pages online

PO Box 332 Greenwood Western Australia 6924

Website: www.ricpublications.com.au

Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au


Teachers notes

The format of this series of books

This series of books is designed to cater for early childhood teachers who use learning centres and cross-curricular activities as

a basis for planning activities to develop key concepts and skills. Teachers will easily be able to locate activity-based learning

within this complete compilation of ideas.

All of the five themes within each book follow the same format over 20 pages. Each theme consists of:

1. A title or cover page with

appropriate artwork which the

teacher can utilise for themebased

activities.

2. A number of pages of cross-curricular learning activities to develop the

theme. Those themes which relate closely to a specific learning area may

have more activities in key learning areas such as science. All themes

have activities which are predominantly ‘hands-on’.

3. Background information with useful facts about the theme.

4. A list of concepts to be developed provides suggested developmentallyappropriate

learning outcomes to be achieved by completing the theme.

iv Early years themes—Fairytales www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Teachers notes

The format of this series of books

5. A small number of resource/blackline pages which can be used

to create games or oral language activities, as templates for art

and craft activities or as worksheets for more capable children who

are beginning to read and understand mathematical concepts.

6. Recipes relating to the theme—

simple cooking and non-cooking

recipes, including those for

manipulative play, such as ‘goop’.

7. Display ideas for art and craft or

specific learning centres.

8. A list of literature resources to

complement the theme, including

songs, action rhymes and fiction

and nonfiction books.

9. A notes section to enable the teacher

to record useful websites or resources

relating to the theme, or other

worthwhile activities or ideas etc.

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales v


Teachers notes

An explanation of the icons

A number of icons have been used throughout the cross-curricular activities sections to make it easier and quicker for teachers to

locate appropriate learning activities.

Fine motor activities—building with blocks, puzzles, sorting, sand and water play, sensory items

such as ‘feely boxes’, playdough or clay work, threading, chalkboards, construction using recycled

materials such as boxes

Outdoor play—sand and/or water play (see also ‘fine motor activities’); gross motor activities such as

climbing, balancing, bikes, scooters, jumping, throwing, obstacle course activities etc.; tracking activities

using balloons and bubbles etc.; other messy art activities

Dramatic play—home corner, dramatising stories, dressing up, puppets, shopping etc.

Art and craft—free painting, directed and supervised painting,

craft (assisted and independent)

Computer—suggestions for simple games or activities

(usually individual or pairs) or relevant internet activities

Cooking—supervised activities, some of which use heat

Games—indoor or outdoor games relating to literacy such as card

games, memory games etc.; mathematics, singing games, any

physical education games involving movement etc.

Writing—tracing, copying, writing on, and with, different things—cards, different types of paper etc.;

adding patterns or stripes etc.; tracking and following paths, dot-to-dot activities etc.

vi Early years themes—Fairytales www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Teachers notes

About the artwork

All the artwork in this series of books is:

• age-appropriate

• teacher- and child-friendly

• an additional resource to help develop the theme

• suitable for enlarging for:

~ colouring

~ handwriting

~ dot-to-dot sheets

~ use as templates for art and craft activities

~ visual texts to encourage oral language development.

Some artworks are based on simple shapes to support learning in the mathematics

area; others are more elaborate. It is anticipated that early childhood teachers will

view an illustration based on shapes and be able to use this idea to develop concrete

play activities using shapes or as a technology and design project. More elaborate

artwork is used to demonstrate a teaching resource which needs to be made, a recipe,

game or other activity.

Examples of artwork relating to art and craft activities have wide, bold, easily visible

cutting outlines to allow the children some variation in the cutting path they will use.

About the resource sheets/blacklines

Resource sheets/blacklines contain:

• simple, age-appropriate artwork

• prominent visual clues

• little or no text

• visual clues to support text pages

• few instructions, so as not to confuse beginning readers

• teacher instructions in the margins with a number of different

suggestions for using the resource sheet/blackline

• literacy and numeracy activities.

These resource sheets/blacklines are included as valuable time-savers

for teachers.

It is anticipated that the teacher will enlarge any pages to A3 size and

photocopy them onto more durable paper or card, to make them easier

for learners of this age group to manipulate.

The cross-curricular section of each theme includes a reference to

resource sheets/blacklines relating to specific activities.

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales vii


Teachers notes

Curriculum links

All the learning activities in this series of books support the key learning areas of the current curriculum documents.

In particular, one or more activities also support each strand of the new English and Mathematics National Curriculum. The

specific strands from the National Curriculum relating to each activity are denoted by the words in brackets in the English and

Mathematics learning areas of the cross-curricular section.

For example, in the ‘The three billy goats Gruff’ theme:

English Talk about the use of capital letters for the beginning of special names such as ‘Gruff’. Create a goat from

a large capital ‘G’. Use cardboard, paper, crayons and googly eyes. Alternatively, cover a lower-case ‘g’

with Easter grass. (Language)

Mathematics

Reference to both is shown below.

Provide coloured pattern blocks or coloured paper shapes for the children to create goat shapes from.

(Measurement and Geometry)

Relevant curriculum reference

NSW

Qld

SA

Vic.

WA

National Curriculum: refer to pages 6 and 11 of Shape of the Australian Curriculum: English

National Curriculum: refer to pages 6 and 7 of Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics

National Curriculum: Science learning activities also support pages 6 and 7 of Shape of the Australian

Curriculum: Science

Belonging, being and becoming: The early years framework for Australia (2009)

Refer to Early years curriculum guidelines page 55 (Table 9: A

summary of the learning statements in the early learning areas)

and pages 61–75.

Refer to ‘Early years band: Age 3–Age 5’. South Australian

Curriculum, Standards and Accountability at .

Refer to Victorian essential learning standards Level 1 at

.

Refer to K-3 scope-and-sequence charts at .

viii Early years themes—Fairytales www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Teachers notes

Sample social skills checklist

Date:

Student name

separates easily from

parents

interacts readily with

adults

interacts readily with

peers

shares with others and

takes turns

participates in group

activities

cooperates with others

accepts responsibility

for own behaviour

respects the property

of others

respects the feelings of

others

listens without

interrupting

expresses feelings

appropriately

solves simple problems

is developing an

awareness of the wider

community

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales ix


Teachers notes

Sample language skills checklist

Date:

Student name

communicates needs clearly

articulates most words correctly

relates personal experiences

contributes to discussions

uses age-appropriate

vocabulary

articulates most initial sounds

correctly

asks appropriate questions

speaks in complete sentences

relates events in order of

occurrence

able to tell a story from pictures

retells a familiar story without

pictures or clues

uses simple compound

sentences

responds appropriately to

questions about himself/herself

listens to a story for a given

length of time

follows simple two-step

instructions

knows his/her first and last

names

recognises rhyming words

answers simple oral cloze

questions

labels emotions such as happy,

sad, angry, scared …

x Early years themes—Fairytales www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Teachers notes

Sample fine motor skills checklist

Date:

Student name

completes simple puzzles

builds a tower of eight or more

small blocks

dresses himself/herself (apart

from buttons and shoelaces)

manipulates playdough to

create a specific object

places small pegs in small

holes

threads small beads

uses scissors to cut out simple

shapes and pictures

completes simple folding

activities

uses a knife, fork and spoon

correctly

holds a crayon or pencil

correctly

colours within lines

writes or copies own name

draws and copies simple

pictures

copies a sequence of letters or

numbers adequately

traces or recreates patterns

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales xi


Teachers notes

Sample fundamental movement skills checklist

Date:

Explicit teaching

Exposure

Student name

balances on one

foot (static balance)

runs

jumps vertically

catches a ball or

beanbag

hops

throws a ball or

beanbag using an

overarm movement

gallops sideways

skips

leaps

kicks a ball

strikes a ball or

object using a twohanded

strike

dodges a ball or

object

xii Early years themes—Fairytales www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Teachers notes

Sample mathematics skills checklist

Date:

Number and algebra Measurement and geometry Statistics and probability

Student name

recognises numerals 1 to

writes numerals 1 to

rote counts to

places numerals to

in correct order

understands one-to-one

correspondence

understands ‘more than’ and ‘less

than’

able to do simple addition and

subtraction using concrete materials

shares collections

creates or completes a pattern

measures using everyday items

makes comparison of size and

length

recognises basic shapes

identifies attributes of objects and

collections

is aware of use of devices used

for measuring (scales, tape etc.)

shows awareness of

(money, temperature, time)

sorts or orders objects

is aware of collections and

presentations of data

interprets data in a display

makes predictions about chance

events

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales xiii


xiv Early years themes—Fairytales www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Cross-curricular activities

English

• Complete activities to practise pencil control by tracing

patterns on Grandma’s quilt. Refer to the blackline on

page 96. (Language)

• Have the children help make a simple plot summary

of Little Red Riding Hood’s adventures. Write ‘Who?’

‘What?’ ‘Where?’ ‘When?’ and ‘Why?’ on a large

sheet of paper. The children can draw pictures to glue

under each word and help compose a short sentence.

(Language, Literacy)

• After reading various versions of the fairytale, the

children make up their own ending to the story. After

discussions, they can draw or paint their alternative

ending. They can verbally explain their ending to

others. A sentence can be scribed under the picture.

(Language, Literature, Literacy)

• Sort pictures of events in the story in sequence. Make

sentence strips to match each picture. Refer to the

blacklines on pages 90 and 91. (Language)

• Little Red Riding Hood had a red cloak. Draw and label

other objects that are red; e.g. strawberries, fire engine,

lips. Make a class book entitled: ‘What is red?’ Under

each picture, the children or teacher fill in the blank

space in the sentence: ‘A is red’. (Language,

Literacy)

• Create a list of rhyming words for ‘red’, either orally or

in written form. (Language)

• Introduce the ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ story to the

children by reading a version, preferably a big book.

Before reading, ask the children if they have heard the

story before. (During reading, ask them to predict what

might happen next.) (Literature)

• Ask the children questions about the setting, items and

characters in the story. Use labelled pictures of Little

Red Riding Hood’s house, the woods, the flowers she

picked, the wolf, the basket, Grandma’s house, her bed,

the woodcutter etc. to develop word recognition and

stimulate discussion. Refer to the blackline on page 92.

(Language, Literacy)

• Reinforce the identification of colours and their names.

Compile class booklets about different colours titled

‘What is blue?’, ‘What is yellow?’ etc. (Language,

Literacy)

• View various books showing the characters illustrated

differently. Identify and describe similarities and

differences in the drawings. (Language, Literacy)

• Play a memory game similar to ‘My grandmother went

to market’. A group of children sit in a circle. One child

begins by saying, ‘Little Red Riding Hood put a cupcake

in her basket’. The next child repeats the sentence and

adds another item to add to the basket. The game

continues with each child having to repeat all the items

before adding another. The rest of the children can help

if a child forgets an item. (Language)

• Create a story map of the fairytale. The children can

help to draw pictures of the setting to glue onto a chart.

It should have Red Riding Hood’s house, the path

to and through the woods, flowers and Grandma’s

house on the other side of the woods. A child or pair

of children can hold a Red Riding Hood cut-out and

retell the story as they follow the path. As an extension

activity, the events can be briefly labelled on the map by

the teacher or children; e.g. left for Grandma’s house,

met wolf, picked flowers, arrived at Grandma’s house.

(Language, Literacy)

• Draw and label food items that Red Riding Hood could

have carried in her basket to give to Grandma. Glue

them onto a large basket shape drawn on art paper.

(Language)

• Use the poster accompanying this unit to help the

children retell the story in their own words. It could

also be used to match flashcards with pictures of

characters and objects in the story to those on the

poster. (Language, Literacy)

• After the children are familiar with one version of the

story, introduce different versions. Talk about what

is the same and what is different in each. Ask the

children questions about what happened to Little Red

Riding Hood, Grandma or the wolf in each version.

(Literature)

82 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Little Red Riding Hood – 1

Mathematics

• Use the blacklines on pages 90 and 91 for ordinal

activities. The children can lay out the pictures of events

in the story. Ask them for the picture that comes ‘first’,

‘second’, ‘last’ etc. (Number and Algebra)

• Follow a maze to take Little Red Riding Hood from her

house and through the correct path in the woods to get

to Grandma’s house. Refer to the blackline on page 89.

(Measurement and Geometry)

• Provide a basket or a box to represent Little Red Riding

Hood’s basket. Collect a variety of items to put in it;

empty cereal boxes, various-sized tinned foods, plastic

fruit, magazines, empty plastic containers of various

sizes, empty egg cartons, books etc. Pairs of children

can pack them into the basket to see how many they can

fit in. Compare with another group who had identical

items and the same size of basket. (Measurement and

Geometry)

• Place different numbers of tinned food, small plastic

containers, plastic fruit etc. in Little Red Riding Hood’s

basket. A child takes out the items, one by one,

counting as he or she does this and checking again

when the items are placed in a row. He or she could

find the matching number on a flashcard. (Number and

Algebra)

• Expand to the activity above in the following ways:

−−Place a number of items in two baskets. A child has

to count the items in each basket to find the total.

−−Place an even number of items in one basket. A child

has to share the items evenly between two children.

Extend to sharing among three children with multiples

of three items.

−−Provide a variety of things to place in a basket. Give

a child a number on a flash card. He or she has

to place the same number of items in the basket.

(Number and Algebra)

• Create a colour-by-number picture of Little Red Riding

Hood or her basket of goodies for the children to

complete. (Number and Algebra)

• Use the poster provided with this

unit or pictures from the pages of

various books about the fairytale to

complete activities using positional

language and number. Ask the

children questions such as: ‘What

is next to Little Red Riding Hood?’

‘Who is behind the tree?’ ‘How many

flowers can you see?’ ‘What is above

the trees?’ (Number and Algebra,

Measurement and Geometry)

• Play a board game using a six-sided dice and different

coloured counters or buttons to travel along a path

through the woods from Little Red Riding Hood’s house

to her Grandma’s. Refer to the blackline on page 93.

(Statistics and Probability)

• Talk to the children about which book or version of

‘Little Red Riding Hood’ they liked the most. Construct

a pictograph to show results. Make photocopies of

the reduced covers of various books and glue them

along the bottom of a chart. Give each child a small

rectangular strip of paper that has his or her name

written on it (or the child can write own name). They

help to make a pictograph by gluing the cards in the

column above their chosen book. Talk about the results.

Ask them why they think a particular one was popular/

not popular. (Statistics and Probability)

• Play a game called ‘Wolf walk’. Make a set of wolfshaped

paw prints from strong coloured card. On

these, write numbers the children have been learning

to recognise. (There can be more than one of each

number.) Laminate for durability. Scatter the numbers

around the floor (or grassed area). The game begins

with each child standing on a numbered wolf paw print.

(The children can share if there is not one per child.)

Play some music. The children move around the area

like wolves. When the music stops, they must stand on

a paw print. The teacher calls out one of the numbers.

Any child/children standing on that number must sit

out. The game continues until one child is left. (Number

and Algebra)

• Provide a number of likely or unlikely

items that Little Red Riding Hood has

to decide whether or not to take to

Grandma. Pictures can be used if actual

items are not available. Examples:

apple, tin soup, vase, TV, cupcake, fruit

juice, sand, basketball. The children

have to decide which is ‘likely’ or

‘unlikely’ to be taken. (Statistics and

Probability)

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 83


Cross-curricular activities

Society and environment

• After completing an activity with a story map of Little

Red Riding Hood’s trail (see page 82), the children

draw a simple mud map showing how they get from

their house to school or vice versa.

School

Home

• Talk to the children how Little Red Riding Hood,

Grandma and the woodcutter shared the food she had

brought. Sharing makes people feel good. After helping

to make some of the recipes on page 97, the children

can share their ‘goodies’. Ask them about other times

when they should share.

• Children often have different names for their

grandparents; e.g. Grandma/Grandpa, Granny, Gran,

Oma, Opa, Nanna, Nan, Nannie, Pop, Grandad,

Nonna. Make a graph to show the different names the

children call their grandparents.

• Ask the children why they think Little Red Riding Hood

wore a cloak (e.g. to keep her warm, protection from

wind, keep her clothes clean). What other types of

clothing would do the same job? (hoodie, jumper, coat,

apron)

Science

• Talk about the woodcutter’s job in the fairytale. Do they

think he must have been strong to do that job? Ask

the children if woodcutters still chop wood with an axe.

Show them pictures of modern machinery used for

cutting down trees and sawing wood.

• The Little Red Riding Hood fairytale is a useful resource

for developing stranger danger concepts and protective

behaviours. Some suggestions for treating this topic

are:

−−talking about what a ‘stranger’ is (people we do not

know)

−−identifying which people are safe people to talk to if

children are scared or feel something is not right

−−using a puppet of Little Red Riding Hood and her

mother/grandma to have a conversation about what

she should have done to avoid the situation with the

wolf

−−role-playing what they learnt

−−discussing that not all strangers will harm them, but

it is always best not to trust a stranger

−−discussing how strangers don’t always look as scary

as the wolf—they can look like regular adults

−−talking about what to do if a stranger comes up

to them and asks them to go with them or to do

something they feel is not right.

• Little Red Riding Hood‘s favourite colour was red. The

children and teacher can bring in a sample of a red

fruit or vegetable. Think of words to describe them, talk

about the similarities and differences, cut them in half

to see what they look like inside, suggest what they

could be used for (salad, soup, school lunches, on top

of cakes) and taste-test unfamiliar ones. Examples:

red apple, strawberry, red capsicum, red plum, red

grape, tomato, radish, beetroot, cherry, blackcurrant,

watermelon, mulberry, blueberry, rhubarb. (Don’t taste

or touch red chilli once it has been cut as the seeds and

membrane are very hot to taste and the remnants on

fingers will burn the children’s eyes if they rub them.)

• Look at pictures of wolves and foxes and identify the

similarities and differences between them. Discover

where a real wolf lives, what it eats and how it behaves

in the wild.

• In the fairytale, Little Red Riding Hood notices the wolf’s

big eyes, ears and teeth. The wolf replies how they make

it better for him to see, hear and eat her. Investigate the

five well known senses and sense organs; i.e. eyes for

seeing, ears for hearing, nose for smelling, tongue for

tasting, skin for feeling. Complete a variety of activities

such as going outside to discover what they can see

and hear; being blindfolded and guessing what they

can smell or taste; and putting their hand in a ‘feely’

bag to guess the hidden object.

84 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Little Red Riding Hood – 2

Visual arts

• Make a simple wolf hand puppet from a small grey

sock. A child places his or her hand in the sock. Help

him or her make a mouth appear with the hand. Mark

where eyes and ears should be placed. Glue, sew or

staple on googly eyes, two egg carton section halves

painted grey for the ears, jagged teeth cut from an egg

carton lid and painted white for the teeth and a tongue

from a strip of red material. Use in drama activities.

• Using various books, show the children pictures of Little

Red Riding Hood’s grandma in her nightgown. They

can talk about their favourite pair of pyjamas, favourite

nightie or what they like to wear to bed. The children

can draw or paint a picture of themselves.

• Find pictures in magazines and catalogues of things

that are red like Little Red Riding Hood’s cloak. Glue

each on a large sheet of paper to form a collage. Extra

pictures can be drawn and coloured. The same could

be done with green (like the trees in the woods) or grey

(the colour of the wolf).

• Make Little Red Riding Hood’s house or Grandma’s

house from a milk carton. Cut off the top of a carton

to the required size. Assist the children to cover it with

paper, using craft glue. Paint the house the desired

colour. Help children cut out a door. Draw on windows

with coloured marking pen or use stickers. The house

can be glued onto a sheet of green art paper. It can be

used as a prop for the Little Red Riding Hood sand tray

setting display on page 98.

• Make a simple-designed flower to use as a prop in

the sand tray display. Slightly flatten two coloured

cupcake liners. Glue the bottom of one to the other. Use

a coloured cottonwool ball, coloured sprinkles, glitter

or similar to make the flower’s centre. Glue or staple to

half a green straw.

• Using wooden spoons as a basis for the body to make

puppets of the characters from the story. The children will

need assistance to complete some parts of the puppets.

Have groups make specific characters so there will be

approximately four to five difficult characters. These can

then be placed in the drama centre for the children to

use. Use the instructions below:

−−Little Red Riding Hood: paint the handle red; add

plaited or straight yellow/brown wool for hair, red

piece of material for cap part of cloak, triangle of

red material or paper folded around and glued on

for cloak.

−−Her mother: paint handle yellow; add short yellow/

brown wool for hair, triangle of floral material for

dress/apron.

−−Grandma: paint handle pale blue; add short white

wool for hair; triangle of blue material for nightgown/

shawl; glasses drawn on face.

−−Wolf: paint entire spoon grey; add fur material strip

for tail; pointy, grey fur material for ears; round black

nose; zigzag black teeth.

−−Woodcutter: paint handle light green; add brown

material cut in rough trousers shape, green piece

of material for cap, axe made from piece of tin foil

folded over a piece of craft stick.

− − For each human character, paint the spoon’s bowl

pink. Facial features can be drawn or googly eyes

added.

• The children paint their favourite scene from the fairytale.

They think about the type of picture they will paint and

work out if the paper should be placed portrait (up

and down) or landscape (across). A sentence can be

scribed, copied or traced under the picture when dry.

• Fold sheets of coloured A4-size card in half and use to

make ‘Get well’ cards for Red Riding Hood’s grandma.

Decorate by drawing or gluing pictures of flowers,

chocolates, cupcakes, a teapot and things they think a

grandma might like to look at to feel better. Words can

be scribed, copied or traced inside the card.

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 85


Cross-curricular activities

Health and physical education

• Play a variation of the game ‘Mother, may I?’, using

one of the characters’ names: ‘Little Red Riding Hood/

Mother/Grandma/Wolf/Woodcutter, may I?’ The teacher

should demonstrate how to be the leader before the

children have a turn. The leader stands about six

metres away from a line of four to six children. He or

she chooses a child at random, or in order, and gives

an instruction such as: ’Campbell, take three large wolf

leaps forwards’ (movements don’t have to be related

to the fairytale, but they add a fun element). Campbell

replies, ‘Little Red Riding Hood, may I?’ (or character’s

name). Little Red Riding Hood answers, ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. If

child forgets to ask ‘May I?’ and moves before asking,

he or she must go back to the starting line. First one to

touch Little Red Riding Hood (or character) takes over

as leader.

• Play the ‘old favourite’ game of ‘What’s the time, Mr

Wolf?’ The teacher or a child is Mr Wolf. He or she

walks along ahead of the rest of the children, who follow

cautiously behind. They chant: ‘What’s the time, Mr

Wolf?’ The wolf turns his or her head to face them and

replies with answers such as ‘3 o’clock’ or ‘12 o’clock’.

The children keep asking the question; however, if Mr

Wolf says ‘dinnertime’, they all have to run away. The

first child caught is the next Mr Wolf.

• The wolf in the fairytale was good at hiding. Have the

children play ‘Hide and seek’, pretending to be wolves.

The child who is chosen to be ‘it’ can be Little Red

Riding Hood, or the woodcutter who is trying to find

a wolf.

• Use carpet squares or rubber mats (something that won’t

slip) as stepping stones on a path through the ‘woods’.

Either place them at a distance where the children have

to leap from ‘stone’ to ‘stone’ or place them fairly close

together so the children can hop, jump, tiptoe, stamp or

simply step along the path.

• Attach a painting of a life-size Little Red Riding Hood

to a pin-up board. Have her hands in front of her as if

she is holding a basket. Photocopy pictures of a basket

to give to the children. They or the teacher writes their

name on the basket. Blindfold each child before they try

to pin the basket in the correct place on Little Red Riding

Hood. They then check to see which child was closest.

• The woodcutter used a sharp axe to kill the wolf. List

some sharp objects. Discuss the dangers of each and

safety procedures to follow if using them. Examples:

carry scissors with point facing down; children their age

should use rounded-end scissors.

• Plan a variety of healthy snacks and drinks which could

be put in Little Red Riding Hood’s basket to take to her

Grandma.

Music

• Make a soundscape (music to go with movements) of

a child pretending to be Little Red Riding Hood travelling

through the woods. For example, when she starts

skipping through the woods, a group of children can

shake maracas in time. When she meets the wolf, a

group makes drum beats. As she stops to pick flowers,

musical triangles are hit once as she picks each flower.

When she knocks on Grandma’s door, a group claps

in time. When she approaches Grandma’s bed, drum

beats are heard again. Finally, when she sees the

woodcutter using his axe, a cymbal can be clashed.

• The children skip around in a circle or along a path

like Little Red Riding Hood, shaking maracas or hitting

triangles as they sing (to the tune of ‘Skip to my Lou’):

Skip, skip, skip through the woods,

Skip, skip, skip through the woods,

Skip, skip, skip through the woods,

Skip through the woods to Grandma’s.

86 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Little Red Riding Hood – 3

Drama

• Assist children to make finger puppets of characters

in the fairytale. Refer to the blackline on page 94.

Photocopy onto white construction paper. Colour and

cut out sets of puppets for children to practise oral

language skills in small groups and develop a finger

puppet play of ‘Little Red Riding Hood’.

• Make characters and props (basket, woods, flowers,

house, bed) from felt for the children to use to retell the

fairytale on a felt board.

• Mime actions and events in the fairytale; e.g. Little

Red Riding Hood skipping through the woods with

her basket; Little Red Riding Hood picking flowers;

her mother making cupcakes for Grandma; the wolf

putting on Grandma’s glasses, nightcap and nightie,

then getting into bed. Practising movements from the

fairytale will help later if children dress up and perform

as characters in a play of the story.

• The wolf disguised himself as Grandma. Provide a box

of dress-up clothes, including wigs and glasses, for the

children to try to ‘disguise’ themselves and role-play

being someone or something else.

• The wolf tried to disguise his voice when pretending to

be Grandma. The children can practise trying to disguise

their voices in a game. One child stands out the front

with his or her back to the rest of the group, who are

sitting on the floor/mat. The child asks: ‘Grandma, what

big eyes/big ears/big nose/big teeth you have!’ Teacher

points to a sitting child who says in a disguised voice:

‘All the better to see you/hear you/smell you/eat you

with, my dear!’ The child standing has to guess which

child is speaking. Another suitable voice recognition

game is ‘Kangaroo, skippy roo’.

• The children could help to suggest lines to create a

simple playscript with which to practise and perform

the fairytale. The teacher can be the narrator while the

children act out the play. Ideas for simple costumes:

Red Riding Hood – red cloth material/blanket for cloak,

basket of food (scrunched paper with tea towel covering

contents); Wolf in woods – grey tracksuit pants and

top, tail cut from fur-looking material, mask (see page

95) or a simple headband with grey paper ears stuck

on; mother – dress or skirt and top, could have apron

on; Grandma – nightie, glasses frame without lenses,

cloth shower cap for nightcap, slippers; wolf dressed

as Grandma – same as Grandma but wearing mask

or headband under glasses or wearing fake costume

teeth; woodcutter – jeans, checked shirt, shoes, plastic

or cardboard axe.

• An often favourite part of the fairytale is the conversation

between Little Red Riding Hood and the wolf in

Grandma’s bed. One child can be the wolf dressed

up as Grandma (see above), laying in a beanbag

with a rug on. Another child is dressed as Little Red

Riding Hood. They can practise the conversation using

expression and emphasis.

Technology and design

• The children help to collect a variety of items such

as baskets, backpacks, plastic bags, paper bags,

handbags and laundry baskets that can carry things.

They can try to work out what each is made of. A

number of the same things can be placed in each

container to find out if the container is strong enough or

big enough. They could decide the most suitable things

each container could carry, according to its design.

• Play an interactive game on the following site, which

involves Little Red Riding Hood eating as many biscuits

as she can before the wolf catches her: .

• Play an interactive game on the following site, which

involves clearing a path in the woods to help Little Red

Riding Hood find her way to Grandma’s house: .

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 87


Teacher background information

‘Little Red Riding Hood’ is a classic fairytale with its origins dating back more than 400 years ago. However, it was the Brothers

Grimm who adapted the fairytale in the mid-19th century to create its most famous version. Over the years, the fairytale has been

rewritten or adapted by a number of authors.

A traditional version used in this unit is provided below.

Once upon a time, there was a girl called Little Red Riding Hood. She lived with her mother in a

house near the woods. She always wore a red cloak her grandma had made her.

One day, Little Red Riding Hood’s mother asked her to visit Grandma, who was sick in bed. Her

mother gave her a basket of food to give to Grandma. She lived on the other side of the woods. Her

mother told her to go straight to grandma’s house and not to stop or talk to anyone on the way.

Little Red Riding Hood started to walk along the path through the woods. Along the way she met a

wolf. The wolf asked her what she was doing. Little Red Riding Hood replied, ‘I’m taking this basket of

food to my grandma. She’s not feeling well’.

The wolf said, ‘What a kind girl you are. Why don’t you stop and pick some flowers for your grandma,

too?’

Little Red Riding Hood thought that was a good idea. While she was picking the flowers, the wolf

ran to Grandma’s house. He opened the door and went in. The wolf walked up to Grandma and

gobbled her up in one bite! Next, he put on one of Grandma’s hats, glasses and a nightie. Then he

jumped into bed and waited for Little Red Riding Hood.

When she knocked on Grandma’s door, a strange voice called out, ‘Come in, dear’.

Little Red Riding Hood went up to Grandma’s bed. She looked at her and said, ‘Grandma, what big

ears you have!’

The wolf replied, ‘All the better to hear you with, my dear.’

Then Little Red Riding Hood said, ‘Grandma, what big eyes you have!’

The wolf replied, ‘All the better to see you with, my dear.’

‘And Grandma, what big teeth you have!’ said Little Red Riding Hood.

‘All the better to EAT you with!’ the wolf shouted.

The wolf jumped out of bed and tried to eat Little Red Riding Hood.

She screamed and screamed. A woodcutter was in the woods.

He heard Little Red Riding Hood’s screams and ran to Grandma’s

house. With one swift chop of his axe the wolf was dead. Out jumped

Grandma, safe and sound!

Grandma and Little Red Riding Hood thanked the woodcutter for

saving them. They all shared the food Little Red Riding Hood had

brought. Then Little Red Riding Hood walked safely back home.

Some adaptations have Little Red Riding Hood being eaten as well as Grandma, with the woodcutter killing the wolf and rescuing

the pair. In other versions, Grandma gets locked in a cupboard or hides in the wardrobe instead of being eaten. The woodcutter

scares the wolf into running away where he is never seen again, instead of killing him with the axe. In a modern version, Little

Red Riding Hood wears a red ‘hoodie’ instead of a cloak, rides a bike through the woods and takes a backpack of food instead of

a basket.

The stranger danger concept in the fairytale provide a good basis for developing protective behaviours in children in a way they

can easily understand.

• ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ is a fairytale.

Fairytales are fictional stories containing

imaginary characters.

• Some things happen in fairytales that

can’t happen in real life.

• Different people have written different

versions of the fairytale.

Concepts to be developed

• The children should be able to:

−−

identify the characters in the story and its setting

−−

sequence the events in the story, verbally and pictorially, and with

matching sentences (according to ability level)

−−

compare and contrast different versions of the fairytale

−−

relate the stranger danger concept in the fairytale to their own lives.

88 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Little Red Riding Hood maze

Instructions: The children track the correct path through the maze from where Little Red Riding Hood stands to her grandma’s house.

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 89


What happens next? – 1

Instructions: Can be enlarged to A3. The pictures on pages 90 and 91 show eight events from the fairytale in correct sequence. Colour, cut out and laminate for the children to use in English and maths

sequencing and ordinal activities.

90 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


What happens next? – 2

Instructions: Can be enlarged to A3. The pictures on pages 90 and 91 show eight events from the fairytale in correct sequence. Colour, cut out and laminate for the children to use in English and maths

sequencing and ordinal activities.

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 91


Little Red Riding Hood labels

Little Red

Riding Hood wolf Grandma

mother woodcutter house

basket flowers woods

axe bed cloak

92 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®

Instructions: Can be enlarged to A3. Use with or without picture clues in word recognition activities or to talk about the character or item in the fairytale.


Little Red Riding Hood game

Instructions: This game is for 2 to 4 players. Each child needs a different coloured counter or button. The child with the highest roll of a six-sided dice begins. The children take turns moving the number

of spaces thrown on a dice. If they land on a wolf’s face, they miss a turn.

FINISH

START

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 93


Little Red Riding Hood puppets

Instructions: Photocopy onto white construction paper. Colour and cut out sets of finger puppets for children to use to practise oral language skills in small groups and develop a play about Little Red Riding Hood.

94 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Wolf mask

Instructions: Photocopy onto thick card. The children paint the wolf’s face with a mixture of black and white paint to make grey. When dry, cut around mask. Assist them to cut out the eye holes. Staple

elastic to fit children’s heads.

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 95


Grandma’s quilt

Instructions: The children use coloured pencils to trace the patterns on Grandma’s quilt. When complete, they can colour the rest of the picture.

96 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


Recipes

The recipes below are foods and a drink the children can help to make which Little Red Riding Hood could put in her basket to

take to Grandma.

Coconut balls for

Grandma

(makes about 40)

Ingredients

• 125 g margarine

• ¾ cup caster sugar

• 1 tsp. vanilla essence

• 1 egg

• 1 tbs. white vinegar

• 1 cup desiccated coconut

• 2 cups self-raising flour

• ½ cup extra coconut

Instructions

• Preheat oven to 180 °C. Line a baking tray with baking

paper. Beat the egg, margarine, sugar and vanilla essence

until smooth. Stir vinegar into the bowl. Add the coconut.

Sift in the flour. Stir until combined. Roll teaspoons

of the mixture into balls. Toss each ball into the extra

coconut. Place about 5 cm apart on the baking tray. Bake

approximately 15 minutes or until golden. Cool on a rack.

Apple muffins for

Grandma

(makes about 12)

Ingredients

• 1 cup wholemeal self-raising flour

• ½ cup brown sugar

• ½ cup oat bran

• ½ tsp. cinnamon

• ½ cup chopped pecans (optional)

• 2 large green apples

• 1 egg

• ²⁄ ³ cup milk

• 60 g melted margarine

Instructions

• Preheat oven to 220 °C. Grease muffin tray. Sift flour into

a bowl. Add bran, sugar, cinnamon and nuts (if desired).

Peel and grate the apples. Put into bowl and mix all

ingredients. Mix egg, milk and margarine in a separate

bowl. Add to the mixture and stir with a fork until still

slightly lumpy. Fill muffin tray with mixture. Cook for about

15 to 20 minutes or until golden.

Tasty sandwiches for

Grandma

Ingredients

• sliced brown and white bread

• margarine

• slices of ham

• curry powder (optional)

• hard-boiled eggs

• milk

• mayonnaise

• grated carrot, cheese

• gherkin relish

• chutney

• slices of tomato, cheese,

cucumber, lettuce

Instructions

• Combine the eggs with a bit of milk and mayonnaise and

curry powder if desired. Mix and mash well with a fork. Use

this egg mixture and a selection of the above ingredients to

make sandwiches cut into four squares or triangles.

Little red treat for

Grandma

Ingredients

• sweet pretzels

• melted chocolate

• red sprinkles

Instructions

• Dip the pretzels in the melted chocolate.

Cover with red sprinkles and allow to dry.

‘Get well’ smoothie

for Grandma

Ingredients

• 1½ cups low fat milk

• 1 tbs. skim milk powder

• ½ cup plain or flavoured yoghurt

• 1 tbs. honey

• 1 banana

• 6 strawberries (optional)

Instructions

• Put all ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth.

Pour into plastic cups. Makes 4 to 6 small servings. (Pour

some in an airtight jug for Grandma and keep refrigerated.)

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 97


Display ideas

Little Red Riding Hood coloured cloaks display

• Colour outlines of Little Red Riding Hood so she is wearing

different coloured cloaks. Label each for children to practise

identifying colour names.

Little Red Riding Hood sand tray setting

• The setting for the play can be created in a sand tray.

When complete, the children can act out the fairytale using

the finger puppets from page 94. Artificial greenery or trees

made from paper can be the woods. Little Red Riding

Hood’s house and her Grandma’s can be made from

painted and decorated shoeboxes or from the top of a milk

carton. (See page 85.) Use pebbles or gravel to make the

path through the wood. Artificial or paper flowers can be

placed along the way for Little Red Riding Hood to ‘pick’.

(See page 85.) Stick a small paper basket onto the Little

Red Riding Hood finger puppet.

A basket of goodies for Grandma

• Discuss the types of foods and other items Little Red

Riding Hood and her mother might have packed to give to

Grandma. The children can bring actual items from home,

draw pictures or make them from recycled materials.

Samples could include soup, cupcakes, fruit, potato

salad, a book or magazine, tea or coffee, freshly-made

sandwiches or freshly-squeezed orange juice. Provide a

large basket in which to place labelled items for display.

Red objects display

• Little Red Riding Hood’s favourite colour was red. The

children think of objects, fruits, vegetables, clothing and so

on that can be red. They find things (or pictures of them)

that are red and add them to a display. Label the items

with the name of the object. Examples of objects: grapes,

toy fire engine, scarf, tomato, tomato sauce, capsicum,

strawberry, shoes, jumper, red cordial or jelly, postbox, red

car.

Welcome to Little Red Riding Hood’s classroom

• Make the entrance to the classroom look like the start of

the woods. Hang brown and green crepe paper from the

doorway and the ceiling. Create a path to follow from

carpet squares. Display a wolf painted by one of the

children peeking out from behind a ‘tree’. The tree could be

an available indoor plant from elsewhere in the building or

a branch stuck in a pot plant filled with sand. Grandma’s

house can be an area separated by desks with blankets

over them. Inside the area, place a beanbag to represent

Grandma’s bed. The children can use puppets or get

dressed up in clothes from the drama centre to act out the

fairytale.

‘Big bad wolf’ paw prints

• Cut out large grey wolf-like paw prints from thick card.

Write numbers, letters or words the children are learning on

them. The children have to correctly name each number,

letter or word before stepping on the paw print or they will

be eaten by the wolf.

red

yellow

green

purple

blue

orange

apple bus scarf

jumper

tomato

Sauce

W

jelly

98 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®


To Grandma’s house I go

Literature resources – 1

(Children skip around the room pretending to hold a basket of

food for the first verse. Then they do actions to match each of

the other verses. Sung to the tune of: ‘The farmer in the dell’.)

Stories

Websites to view and listen to the fairytale include:




A selection of traditional and modern versions include:

• Little Red Riding Hood by Candice Ransom

• Little Red Riding Hood by Trina Schart Hyman

• Red Riding Hood by James Marshall

• Little Red Riding Hood by Harriet Ziefert

• Little Red Riding Hood by Jerry Pinkney

• The true story of Little Red Riding Hood by Agnese Baruzzi and Sandro Natalini

• Little Red Riding Hood: A classic collectible pop-up by Marjorie Priceman

• Little Red Riding Hood (Flip-up fairytales) by Jess Stockman

Songs, action rhymes, fingerplays and poems

Hey-ho, to Grandma’s house I go

To Grandma’s house I go

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

To Grandma’s house I go

Met a wolf along the way

Met a wolf along the way

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

Met a wolf along the way

Stopped to pick some flowers

Stopped to pick some flowers

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

Stopped to pick some flowers

Knocked on Grandma’s door

Knocked on Grandma’s door

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

Knocked on Grandma’s door

She looked very strange

She looked very strange

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

She looked very strange

The wolf was in disguise

The wolf was in disguise

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

The wolf was in disguise

He tried to eat me up

He tried to eat me up

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

He tried to eat me up

I yelled and screamed for help

I yelled and screamed for help

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

I yelled and screamed for help

The woodcutter used his axe

The woodcutter used his axe

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

The woodcutter used his axe

The big bad wolf is dead

The big bad wolf is dead

Hey-ho, the derry-o!

The big bad wolf is dead

R.I.C. Publications ® – www.ricpublications.com.au Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood 99


Literature resources – 2

Songs, action rhymes, fingerplays and poems

Here are Grandma’s glasses

Here are Grandma’s glasses. (Make circles with hands over eyes.)

Here is her nightcap. (Make semi-circle with hands over head.)

This is the way she makes her bed (Pull up quilt with hands.)

Before she has a nap. (Shut eyes and lay one cheek on folded hands.)

Five apple muffins

Five apple muffins, Red Riding Hood made

Put on a tray and there they lay.

Along came a big bad wolf that day,

Stole a muffin and took it away!

(Repeat with four, three and two.)

Last verse:

One apple muffin, Red Riding Hood made

Put on a tray and there it lay.

Along came a big bad wolf that day,

Stole the last muffin and took it away!

Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?

(Children stamp around the room swinging arms. In final line, shake head vigorously.)

Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?

The big bad wolf

The big bad wolf

Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?

No! No! No! NOT I!

Notes

100 Early years themes—Fairytales—Little Red Riding Hood www.ricpublications.com.au – R.I.C. Publications ®

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