NZPhotographer Issue 19, May 2019

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun and informative e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners. You can always read the latest issue for free or subscribe to the magazine and get unlimited access to all back issues. Find out more: www.nzphotographer.nz

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ISSUE 19, May 2019

BEST ENTRIES FROM

THE CUBA DUPA

PHOTO CHALLENGE

INTERVIEW WITH

MIKE BOUCHIER

RULES AND TIPS FOR

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

BY JAMES GILBERD

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

IN JAPAN

BY STEPHEN DUFFIN

MIND GAMES:

BREAKING THE RULES

HOW TO CAPTURE:

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

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WELCOME TO ISSUE 19 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

Did you notice the new logo

on the cover or were your eyes

simply taken in by the photo as

you skimmed the titles to see

what you can expect to view

and read in this issue?!

Our main theme this issue

focuses on street photography

with Stephen from Nifty Few

taking us around the streets of

Japan and our Behind The Shot

feature showing us Singapore's

skyline, both sure to instil some

wanderlust! Back on home

territory, we showcase some of

the best shots you've submitted

from Cuba Dupa in a special

readers' submissions feature.

James Gilberd shares some tips

for street photography whilst also covering the main rules but don't worry if

you've never been one to follow rules, neither has Ana whose article asks

us to put our perfect 'Instagram Worthy' shots to one side and purposefully

break the rules.

There's more, of course! We've interviewed Mike Bouchier and we hear

about Women in Photography from founder Lesley Whyte. Richard giving

tips on how to take bird photos and Brendon takes us kayaking across to

Quail Island to see the view from the water.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 19

May 2019

Cover Photo

Mike Bouchier

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

ana@excio.io

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone 04 889 29 25

or Email hello@excio.io

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REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He is an avid tramper

who treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio, Ana's

photography journey

started many years ago

with one of the first Kodak

film cameras. She loves

exploring the unseen

macro world and capturing

genuine people's emotions.

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer who

teaches photography

workshops and runs

photography tours. He

is the founder of New

Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2019 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

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CONTENTS

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10

28

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34

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50

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INTERVIEW WITH MIKE BOUCHIER

RULES & TIPS FOR STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

by James Gilberd

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY IN JAPAN

with Stephen Duffin

WOMEN IN PHOTOGRAPHY

with Lesley Whyte

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Arun Ravindran

CAPTURING QUAIL ISLAND BY KAYAK

by Brendon Gilchrist

HOW TO CAPTURE: BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

with Richard Young

INTERVIEW WITH MIKE BOUCHIER

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

MIND GAMES: BREAKING THE RULES

By Ana Lyubich

RULES AND TIPS FOR STREET

PHOTOGRAPHY

CAPTURING QUAIL ISLAND

BY KAYAK

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54 BEST ENTRIES FROM CUBA DUPA 34

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Arun Ravindran


Rules and Tips for Street

Photography

When I began photographing, street

photography books by Andre Kertesz,

Gary Winogrand, Diane Arbus, Henri

Cartier Bresson, and Wellington photographer

Peter Black opened my eyes to viewing

familiar environs in a whole new light. Like the

first music you really like, it kinda stays with

you.

THE RULES OF STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

Supposedly there are rules to street

photography, such as never shoot with

anything longer than a standard lens, or never

crop your images. I suspect these were made

up by lesser photographers from observations

of the greats. So, while there’s some sense

behind them, they are there to be broken. But

there is one golden rule that you should not

break: Treat others as one would like others to

treat oneself.

That is to say; if you’re going to do street

photography you will need to develop a set

of personal ethics around it. Experience and

changing social influence may cause your

ethical stance to shift over time, demanding

frequent reflection and discussion with

peers. This is part-and-parcel of being a

photographer, but if you worry about it too

much you’ll seize up and stop taking photos

altogether. Finding a personal balance is key.

Although there was street photography

before Henri Cartier Bresson, the French artistphotographer

really defined the genre in the

1930s. His concept known as The Decisive

Moment still stands as one of the cornerstones

of photography.

“To me, photography is the simultaneous

recognition, in a fraction of a second, of

the significance of an event as well as of

a precise organisation of forms which give

that event its proper expression.” – Henri

Cartier-Bresson.

Reading further about the meanings and

interpretations of the Decisive Moment can

by James Gilberd

make your head spin. It’s far better to spend

the time looking at HCB’s photos and shooting

your own but put simply The Decisive Moment

means the point in time when all elements in

the scene combine in the best way.

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS

Have your camera prepared so that you can

quickly put it to your eye and shoot without

mucking about. With manual exposure, you

should pre-set your aperture and shutter

speed for the light conditions by metering

off the road or another mid-tone. Keep this

setting until the light changes. Somewhere

around 1/250s at f8 is generally useful. Some

photographers pre-focus their lens manually

for extra speed. Your overexposure warning

display should be switched on.

Don’t be afraid to set the ISO high enough to

get a fast shutter speed. Noise doesn’t matter

here; getting the photo does. Keep your

camera switched on and the lens cap off.

Use single shot mode as shooting bursts is like

trout fishing with a stick of dynamite rather

than a rod and fly! If you’re a chronic overshooter,

try using a 35mm film camera. It’s

cool, challenging but fun, and will help you

train your eye and shoot more sparingly. If you

spy a potential photo, wait around a bit for

something to happen.

Viewpoint Is Vital. When you spot a potential

photograph, decide where you need to be

for the best view and get there with your

camera ready to shoot (provided it’s safe and

isn’t going to upset anyone).

Don’t encumber yourself with unnecessary

camera gear and other baggage. You’ll

attract attention and struggle to move

around. One smallish camera and a prime

lens or wide-standard zoom are all you need.

Always use a lens hood for flare reduction

and lens protection. A UV filter is also a good

idea.

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GROUND ZERO,

MANHATTAN, 2004

WHERE’S MY HALF,

May MANHATTAN, 2019 2004 7


My ‘weapon of choice’ used to be a fully

manual Olympus OM‐1 with a 35mm f2

lens, (used for the black & white photos

shown here). These days, a smaller DSLR or

any mirrorless camera is excellent for street

work. I prefer a semi-wide prime lens, but if

you like extreme wide-angle, take care to

compose using the whole frame, including

foreground elements and avoiding tracts

of empty space. If you’re shooting with a

longer focal length, it’s all too easy to stand

off and get photos that look uninvolved,

like a passer-by’s view. Remember what

war photographer Robert Capa said If your

pictures aren’t good enough, [it’s because]

you’re not close enough.

If you’re new to street photography, try

covering a public event such as a festival

or food market where the presence of other

photographers means you won’t stand out.

Look for interactions, the peak of the action,

the decisive moment to take your photo.

Go back and review my article Planning

and Capturing a Photo Story in issue 18 so

that you capture a story rather than random

shots.

Of course, there are as many approaches

to street photography as there are

photographers. Wellington, for example,

has Gabrielle McKone, Julian Ward, Peter

Black, Camus Wyatt, et al, all of whom have

entirely different approaches.

It can be hard to muster the confidence

to take your first shot of the day but with

persistence and practice, you will find

reward. Like opp-shopping, you have to go

out often, knowing that some days you’ll

come home with nothing, other days with

bounty.

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OFF TORY ST, WELLINGTON, 2016


FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

We’re inviting photographers to highlight all the wonderful things that make the Wellington

Botanic Garden much more than a garden, while encouraging photographers to focus on

the garden season by season.

For prizes and full Terms & Conditions see: www.excio.io/freshshoots

The competition is split into quarterly competitions based on each of the seasons:

Summer Autumn Winter

15 December -

22 March 2019

23 March -

21 June 2019

22 June -

20 September 2019

CATEGORIES

NATURE

PEOPLE &

EVENTS

CREATIVE

PARTNERS

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STREET

PHOTOGRAPHY

IN JAPAN

with Stephen Duffin

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HI STEPHEN, CAN YOU INTRODUCE

YOURSELF?

I have a huge appreciation for all things

creative, in particular photography & music.

I’m an Aucklander through and through, but

don’t hold that against me ;) I’m originally

from West Auckland, but am now living on

Auckland’s Northshore.

I have a background in business and I run

a photography company that specialises

in travel, accommodation & social media

imagery. I also run Nifty Few – a New Zealand

Photography brand/community. We hold

regular meet-ups for like minded individuals to

link up and inspire one another.

WHAT’S YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

BACKGROUND?

I started taking an interest in photography

at a young age. I remember early on using

disposable cameras and being fascinated

by the process. There was always a ton of

excitement and anticipation with how the

photos were going to turn out. I phased

through a few cheap digital cameras in my

teens but I found that I really got hooked into

photography when I invested in a Fujifim x100.

Ever since then it’s grown into a huge passion

of mine and I’m forever longing to get that

perfect shot and camera setup!

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU HAVE?

Camera: Olympus OMD EM1ii

Zoom Lenses: 7–14mm 2.8 Olympus, 12–35mm

2.8 Panasonic

Prime Lenses: 25mm 1.2 Olympus, 45mm 1.8

Olympus, 75mm 1.8 Olympus

Gimbal: Zhiyun Crane Gimbal

Drone: DJI Phantom 4 Pro

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY STYLE AND HOW HAS

THAT EVOLVED OVER TIME?

I enjoy travelling and aligning my photography

to capture the moment and experience –

whether this be the accommodation, the

surroundings or the attractions. I always aim

to convey a story through my photography,

for the viewer to get an appreciation for the

experience and a perspective the viewer

hadn’t previously seen.

I like to play with natural light in my images but

I don’t shy away from different techniques,

such as putting a slight spin on a photo

through editing software like Lightroom. I find

it’s very much a photo by photo process for

me and I try not to have any hard set rules to

achieve my best shot possible.

YOU’VE RECENTLY RETURNED FROM A

TRIP TO JAPAN, TELL US ABOUT THAT…

Japan was an amazing experience and it

had been on mine and my wife’s ‘to do list’

for some time. It’s one of those places where

you’ll find it hard to put your camera down as

there are photo opportunities around every

corner, from street alleyways to towering

architecture, ancient temples, and natural

landscape – it has it all.

We started our trip off in Tokyo – Japan’s

largest city. I loved the hustle and bustle of the

city, it really is a street photographer’s dream.

Whilst being such a hectic place, the people are

incredibly courteous and polite. The train network

is amazing and is an experience in its self. On

our visit, we often travelled through Shinjuku train

station which is the worlds busiest station. With

an average of 3.64 million passengers per day

passing through the station, it’s fair to say that we

got lost a lot! It was all part of the fun though and

provided ample photo opportunities.

We visited some of the iconic photography

spots like Shibuya Crossing which is another

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incredibly hectic place, rumoured

to be the busiest intersection in the

world. At peak times upwards of 3,000

people cross at a time, coming from

all directions at once.

We also visited the Tokyo Sky Tree

(previous page) which is an amazing

piece of architecture and is one of the

tallest structures in the world standing

at 634 meters. For reference, the

Auckland Skytower stands at a mere

328 meters.

There are a number of day trips

you can do from Tokyo to get out

of the hustle & bustle and one that

we did was a train trip to Chuerieto

Pagoda, a five storied pagoda on the

mountainside overlooking Mt Fuji. It

was breathtaking seeing Mt Fuji in the

flesh.

On the second half of our trip, we

travelled to Kyoto which is known

as ‘old Japan’ and is renowned for

its traditional temples, shinto shrines,

sublime gardens and geisha’s. It

was amazing witnessing such old

architecture and customs which still

thrive there today.

Again there were photography

opportunities galore but the stand out

photography spots for us in Kyoto were

the Kinkaku-ji Temple of the golden

pavilion (the temples top two floors

are completely covered in gold leaf!)

and Arashiyama Bamboo Grove, with

its soaring stalks of bamboo, it’s like

being in another world here!

The trip as a whole was extremely

inspirational and I found that it

gave me a revitalised energy to my

photography. I couldn’t recommend

Japan enough if you’re looking for a

getaway with photography in mind!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU

ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/steve_duffin

www.instagram.com/eskrow_nz

www.instagram.com/niftyfew

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Women in

Photography

with Lesley Whyte

HI LESLEY, WHEN DID YOUR LOVE OF

PHOTOGRAPHY START AND WHERE HAS THAT

LEAD YOU?

My love of photography started in my teens when my

uncle gave me his Rolleiflex 2 1/4 square camera. My

parent’s bathroom soon turned into my dark room, my

newly developed pictures hanging from the shower rail.

Although very faded, I treasure my first photo; a photo

of my Fox Terrier dog Sally peering out from the long tall

grasses on the bank of the pond on the family farm.

Many years passed, my photography passion didn’t

wane – photos filled our house, memories on display.

Over those years other aspects of my life took priority

though, family, moving countries twice, and a career

outside of photography. It wasn’t until around 2013 when

I seriously picked up a camera again that I realised what

I’d been missing – I wanted to create that same feeling

I felt with my first photo, I wanted another Sally moment.

In 2017 I was fortunate to be mentored by Tom Ang as

part of the Connections programme, which resulted

in two of my photographs being exhibited on Queens

Wharf. I don’t think of myself a photographer though,

I think of myself as a “women with a camera” who has a

passion for photography.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY STYLE AND

WHAT YOU’RE MOST PASSIONATE ABOUT…

Over the years my photography had been quite

general – never any specific style, probably because

I hadn’t found “my style”. It was only in 2013 that I found

my niche, that being street photography.

I prefer to not go through too much post production

editing, rather attempting to take the photo the way

I want it to look as a finished product. For me, my style is

in the upfront research which is when the taking of the

photo starts; checking out tide times, sunset / sunrise,

weather forecast all of which will dictate what settings

I should be using before I get on location. Whilst street

photography is for me, “my passion”, it is the creative

process, the connecting with people and my building

a sense of community in my photos. My photography

style isn’t about being a good technical photographer,

it is about enjoying my photography. It is not about

becoming a famous photographer or getting lots of

likes and comments on my photos, it’s about sharing my

journey and my passion.

It is street photography that has provided me with

the most growth challenge; being comfortable

photographing people in public surroundings, being

comfortable in approaching people in public. Using

that confidence and my mentoring by Tom Ang, my

knowledge has grown; but what is more important to

me is that to grow as a photographer is to not lose the

passion.

My challenge and growth at the moment lay with my

newly acquired Canon EOS R; while a new camera

doesn’t necessarily improve my finished photo, it

contributes through pushing me to explore and use a

greater range of manual settings. My technical growth is

now coming through and reflected in my photos.

WHICH PHOTOGRAPHERS DO YOU MOST

ADMIRE?

Vivian Maier is my all-time favourite street photographer,

I so admire her work. However, war photographer Gerda

Taro is who I admire the most; her coverage of the

Spanish Civil War is truly amazing but unfortunately, she

was the first female photojournalist to be killed on the

front line.

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TELL US ABOUT YOUR WOMEN IN PHOTOGRAPHY

EVENTS AND ADVENTURES – HOW WAS THE IDEA

BORN AND WHY WOMEN ONLY?

When I re-entered the “world of photography” –

I couldn’t find any photography workshops or networking

forums for women. Chatting with a few ladies, like

me, they were also looking for social activities and

photography adventures – hence Lesley Whyte

Photography was borne; New Zealand’s only

organisation which provides adventures, tours,

workshops, and networking events, run by a woman,

solely for women.

Women network and have different learning styles to

men – an article in Forbes magazine points out that

whether through online social networking or face-to-face

contact, women are meeting, sharing and connecting

in ways that men often shy away from. The Forbes

article continued to highlight that women generally see

things from a lot of different angles and in an effort to

personalise networking, women normally try to create

connections or friendships and ask, ‘what can I do for

her in order to get what I need.’ For me, this is what

#womeninphotography is about – working together

so we can all grow; grow our passion in photography

together whether a professional or hobbyist.

It’s been a heartfelt journey bringing

#womeninphotography to fruition and since the launch

on 3rd April 2019 it’s been a whirlwind few weeks; my

inbox has been inundated with messages from around

New Zealand and overseas wanting to know more

about #womeninphotography networking events,

photography adventures, tours and workshops for ladies.

For me, when I receive feedback such as “you are onto

a winner, I love the concept and the execution” only

serves to reinforce what I felt was missing.

TELL US MORE ABOUT THE LAUNCH EVENT…

In collaboration with Progear in Newmarket, the

launch in Auckland was attended by 35 amazing

ladies who heard Marina de Wit talk about her journey

as a fine nature photographer and her work, which

has recently been shortlisted from entries across the

world at the prestigious Royal Horticultural Society

Botanical Art & Photography Show in London. Of

course, the evening concluded with some amazing

networking and chats.

SO HOW CAN OUR FEMALE READERS JOIN YOU?

Getting hold of me is really easy, all the contact

details and dates for networking events, workshops,

tours and adventures are on my website www.

lesleywhytephotography.co.nz. I’m also easy to find

on social media; Facebook and Instagram – Just

search Lesley Whyte Photography.

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FISHEYE’D SKYLINE

by Arun Ravindran

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Behind The Shot

with Arun Ravindran

HI ARUN, CAN YOU INTRODUCE YOURSELF TO

US AND SHARE HOW AND WHEN YOU GOT

STARTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY?

I work in Wellington as an IT Consultant having

relocated to NZ from Singapore in December 2018.

I am originally from Kerala, a beautiful place in India

famously knows as “God's own country”.

I relocated to Singapore because of my job and

it was there that I started developing an interest in

photography with the purchase of a Nikon D7000 with

a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens before upgrading to a Nikon

D750.

Just before coming to New Zealand I brought a Sony

A7R3 with a 16–35 f/4 for landscapes though I am

yet to explore and capture the real untapped New

Zealand – I look forward to doing so in the near future

though.

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED SINCE YOU

BOUGHT YOUR FIRST CAMERA?

At first, I was under the impression that investing in

gear gets better results and better photos. I failed

terribly. So, I started investing in learning, doing

photo courses and photo tours and I slowly started

improving.

In the past, with film cameras, each click was so

precious because the films were limited to 36 shots.

We really used to think and click each shot and this is

a missing craft since the introduction of memory cards

on digital cameras.

One major change I did when I started learning was

that I started to take no more than 35–36 shots a day,

to mimic the film cameras, and to really think before

composing each shot.

Another thing I learned was to specialize in one genre,

to focus on one style of photography and to master it

rather than be mediocre across all styles.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR SHOT ENTITLED ‘FISHEYE’D

SKYLINE’

This shot was taken from the famous Marina Bay

Skydeck in Singapore. It shows ‘The Shoppes’ at

Marina Bay Sands Hotel in front, the ArtScience

museum towards the right side (the Lotus like structure)

and last but not least we can see a fish-eye view of

the famous Singapore Skyline.

The panoramic view was absolutely amazing from the

57 th floor and I decided to try a different perspective

with a Fish Eye lens since most of the locations

in Singapore are already explored and heavily

photographed.

I arrived at the location early so that I could secure

a spot with my tripod because the place gets really

crowded during the night.

This photo was actually taken during my second

attempt at entering the Marina Bay Sands hotel

because they didn’t allow me into the Skydeck with

such a heavy tripod the first time. I had to come

again, hiding my tripod, and got lucky to get inside

with it to achieve this shot!

IF YOU COULD RE-TAKE THIS SHOT, WHAT

WOULD YOU DO DIFFERENTLY?

The observation deck is absolutely amazing for

capturing the view at sunset. However, when I visited

it was raining heavily so if I could go back and re-take

the shot I would try shooting this on a day with a nice

sunset rather than just shooting it at blue hour.

HOW DO YOU PROMOTE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHS?

This might be where I need to improve as I am not

so good at promoting my work. I post my pictures on

Instagram using hashtags to reach a wider audience

than my own followers.

I also joined Excio after stumbling onto the site via

a Google search one day. After going through the

website I came to know how Excio promotes amateur

photographers and was amazed at the content – I’m

honoured to be taking part in NZP because of clicking

the Excio link that day and signing up!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/arunrnair65

www.facebook.com/arunravindran65

albums.excio.io/profile/Arun%20Ravindran

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F7.1, 1/400s, ISO100

Capturing Quail Island by Kayak

Lyttelton Harbour aka Christchurch’s Nature

Playground is a place where people come to

boat, fish, swim and, of course, take photos. It’s

just a small place but many people don’t realise

the extent of hidden opportunities available. Over

the next few minutes, I will be your tour guide and

harbour master as we circumnavigate Quail Island

by sea kayak.

First let me say, to be in a position to explore

waterways by sea kayak is a huge eye-opener and

to have access to places that many other people

do not, due to other boats simply being too large,

is a priviledge which allows me the freedom to find

and photograph new locations.

Meeting my friend at 7am, the paddle over was

smooth sailing, there was a point where the wind

picked up in the middle but it was as expected

as it is very exposed. We made a bee-line for the

shipwrecks graveyard with our starting point in

Cass Bay which is the easiest entry point in Lyttelton

Harbour mainly because of the sandy beach and

shallow water for easy entry.

by Brendon Gilchrist

I find paddling quite relaxing, it’s just you and the

water, the birds and your thoughts. It was amazing

to see so much wildlife as we paddled over; Shags,

Sea Gulls, the odd fish and sometimes a noise that

makd you think something (someone?!) hit the

bottom of your boat.

You might remember I wrote about Quail Island

in issue 14 when I visited the ships graveyard

amongst other places. Having already captured the

perspective from land, it was amazing to see the

view from the water and compare how different the

2 are.

The scene you can get by boat is a lot harder to

capture but you have far more options than on

land. The hard part is lining up the composition and

lining the boat up so that the waves push you across

till you have that photo you want… It took me 3

attempts to get the one image I wanted!

We must have spent about 15 minutes here,

kayaking around the boats and enjoying the shelter

we now had from the wind. Being so close to the

surface of the water gives you a different view

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F7.1, 1/250s, ISO100

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F4.5, 1/160s, ISO1600

and not being able to exit the boat is also a bonus

as it lets your creativity go on a journey of finding

something possible to shoot and making it work,

lining the kayak up and floating through, redoing it

over and over until you have the photo you like.

As we continued our first circumnavigation of Quail

Island we arrived at the calmest part and shallowest

part, the only part where you can walk to the island

at low tide. Yes, that is right, you can walk to the

island at low tide! It’s not very often you read that

nugget of wisdom but it’s true. You will find the

shallowest part near King Billy Island which is located

on a peninsula near Charteris Bay.

We sat here taking photos and looking at the

southerly that was sitting over Banks Peninsula

thinking it looked a little nasty. The rain was off and

on and we didn’t notice until we started paddling

again that we had drifted back about 200 meters

with the changing tide. It always amazes me with

each paddle, whether in choppy conditions or

calm conditions, that you know which way the

tide is going. Even when it’s calm the current is

really strong, it is like an unseen river of water that is

forever flowing.

The rain seemed to have set in by this time but it was

somewhat soothing although the wind was picking

up. I was thinking it might be tough going back to

the mainland but no one ever said that I would

gain confidence by staying in my comfort zone so

it felt good to know that something coming up was

going to test my skills yet give me experience and

ultimately make me better at sea kayaking.

The same goes with photography, if you want to

learn more you need to take more photos. Go to

places and put yourself in situations where you will

learn more about light or how to capture something

that you might not ordinarily think to capture

as it will help you learn and grow and might be

something that can be applied to your main focus/

niche in photography in the future.

Still raining slightly, we decided to check out the sea

caves. The caves water colours were so fascinating

it was as if the colour of the water changed when

you went inside. The caves were not huge but

big enough to go inside and turn a 5-meter boat

around. Sitting inside the biggest cave you could

hear the water crashing and you would get sucked

in and out with each set of waves, a very cool

feeling.

Once we had finished at the caves the wind was

blowing quite hard and the waves were getting

bigger with some white caps on the top. We

headed in a parallel direction on our journey back

so the waves were not hitting us side on, we were

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asically going from the shipwrecks to Governors

Bay, then once we got back to calmer waters

we turned back the other direction and headed

towards Cass Bay. Some waves would punch

through the nose of the boat and splash up around

us, it was a pretty awesome feeling and with the

camera in a dry bag in front of me, nothing to worry

about!

Once back in calmer waters a Shag came near us

which we just sat and watched. It dove down to go

fishing and we wondered when it was going to pop

back up… a few moments later it resurfaced right

in front of my boat – It’s in these moments that I wish

I had a Go Pro!

The sea kayaking world I have entered will open up

new opportunites that will allow me to see the world

in a whole new perspective. The locations I can now

reach are only limited to my fitness and experience.

3 TIPS FOR KAYAKING PHOTOGRAPHY

• Remember that you’re limited – You only have 1

angle of perspective. Put your creativity to work but

do play with ‘point of view’ shots – A view of the tip of

the boat looking out to show the viewer what you saw

in that moment of time.

• Before you leave the shore, set your camera to a

native setting so that it is all ready to go. You want to

be be able to pull the camera out and be ready for

your shot rather than messing around with camera

settings on the water! You may want a faster shutter

speed if you suddenly see dolphins jumping out of the

water but generally for landscape scenes, be ready.

• Don’t forget where you are! One big wave could

knock you out of the kayak or make you almost fall

out… Be careful and aware of your gear. Make sure

you’re confident in staying afloat if the weather is a

bit rough before taking the camera out. Insurance is

good but you really don’t want to have to use it!

F7.1, 1/400s, ISO100

May 2019

37


HOW TO CAPTURE: BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

Bird Photography Tips with Richard Young

NZ White Capped Albatross, Kaikoura F11, 1/250s, ISO 200

Capturing The Moment:

When photographing birds it is important that they

are sharp and in focus. To achieve this it’s best to use

a tracking focus function with a fast shutter speed. To

gain a fast shutter speed in the forest you may need

a large aperture. It is also important to make sure the

focus points are on the bird, ideally over its eyes.

Being Aware Of The Subject:

Be careful not to scare the bird away. If you walk up

to a bird it will normally fly off, so keep your distance

when observing birds. Generally, if you stay still near

small forest birds like Robins and Fantails they will

come close to you. You could also try to find the birds

food source and wait for them to come and feed.

Lighting For Forest Birds:

If you are photographing birds in the forest, try to find

some nice light breaking through the canopy. This will

allow you to use a faster shutter speed to help freeze

the bird in motion, as small birds move about a lot.

It will also help show the detail of the bird’s feathers

which can be hard to capture in poor lighting.

Previsualise Your Composition:

A messy background can distract from the subject.

Try to position yourself so you can line up the bird with

a pleasing background, this may be something that

offers a contrast in colour or lighting to help define the

bird. You can also use a large aperture to make the

bird stand out against an out of focus background.

IMPROVE YOUR WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY WITH A 4-DAY WILDLIFE MASTERCLASS WORKSHOP ON THE OTAGO

PENINSULA: 1ST - 4TH NOVEMBER WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


IMAGINE

AUCKLAND

PHOTO COMPETITION

1 May 2019 - 10 July 2019

May 2019

39


Interview with

Mike Bouchier

which was adequate and a step in the right direction

but I wanted more. Then came the Canon EOS6D

and a Samyang 14mm manual lens. I bought my

first Fujifilm mirrorless back in 2016 which was an X-E2.

I bought this for a trip to Melbourne as I didn’t want to

carry the Canon 6D. I loved the form of the X-E2 which

has a classic Rangefinder Style.

HI MIKE, CAN YOU TELL US WHO YOU ARE AND

WHAT YOU DO?

I live in Whitby, Porirua North of Wellington with my

wife and son. We moved to Wellington nearly 10 years

ago from Bristol in the UK.

I work for Transpower in the National Coordination

Centre as part of the team securing the nation’s

power supplies! I have worked in the electricity supply

industry all my life. I started as an overhead linesman

then power station operator, trader and power system

operations.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO PHOTOGRAPHY?

I have always had a camera, an old film point and

shoot for holiday snaps and family shots originally.

I bought my first digital camera in 2001, a Sony DSC

P50 2.1 megapixel which was so slow! I never thought

digital photography was going to take off after this!

I then had a Casio Exilim 6 megapixel and then a

Panasonic Lumix TZ10 14.5 megapixel.

Around 2012 I came across Mark Gee’s images and

that seemed to spark something in me. I wanted to

emulate an image like Marks. So I researched what

equipment I needed to achieve this so I bought a

second-hand Nikon D70 with an 18–55mm F3.5 lens

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH NOW?

I now have the Fujifilm X100F which lives up to the

hype! I love the compactness of this 24 megapixel

camera. It’s easy to carry around and is nearly always

with me. It has a fixed lens of 23mm which is 35mm full

frame equivalent, great for street photography.

It also has a built in ND filter which is great in really

harsh light or if you want a long exposure. But

what I really like about the fujifilm X Series is the film

simulations you can select in camera. Most of my

black and white images are taken with the Acros

Simulation which gives great tones.

In terms of lenses, I have the Fujinon XF18–55mm f2.8–

4, XF27mm f2.8, XF35mm f2, XF 50–140 f2.8 and the

Samyang 12mm f2. The 18–55 is so much more than

a kit lens and is often found on my X-E2 or X-T20. The

Samyang 12mm is fantastic in low light and great for

astro.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY STYLE?

I didn’t think I had a style but when you look at my

instagram feed, there’s definitely a trend going on

there! I’m a bit of an opportunist and tend not to plan

too much. That is probably why my feed is becoming

more and more street focused.

Landscape photography is still a passion though. Now

winter is almost with us, I look more at my shift roster

followed by the weather and moon phases just in

case an astro opportunity could be had.

HOW WOULD YOU SAY YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

HAS IMPROVED OVER TIME AND WHAT HAS

BEEN YOUR BIGGEST LEARNING CURVE?

From the outset, because I wanted to make astro

images, I had to learn very quickly how to drive my

camera in manual and focus in the dark! Not an easy

task when you’re impatient and want those images!

Having to understand the relationships between ISO,

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aperture and shutter speed seemed so daunting and

frustrating but I soon got the hang of it.

It sounds funny but after mastering the camera

functions, I really struggled with composition.

I would make images that would be too busy or

distracting or have no clear focal point. Then came

editing the images. I use Adobe Lightroom for my

editing and finding the best workflow was tricky but

I soon found a solution.

One common mistake I made in the beginning was

to over process my images, making the colours really

pop but to have ghosting around objects where I had

used a selective brush. I look back and cringe when

I see some of my old images! I now try just to keep

things simple and try as much as possible to try and

get things as good as possible in camera.

First I make sure the image is level and correct the

verticals or distortion and then judge whether to

crop to improve the composition. Then I check the

histogram to see how the image is exposed. I usually

tend to expose for the highlights when taking a shot

so I may need to recover detail in the shadows. But

saying that sometimes shadows draw your eye to the

focal point. Then it is just checking where I can extract

any more detail but being careful not to push too far.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR PHOTO ON THE COVER…

I’ll never forget the morning I took this shot. I was

visiting family in the UK last December and staying at

a friends house in Stinsford, Dorset. I knew there was

going to be a good chance of some fog that morning

so woke up early.

The walkway runs behind the village church (where

poet and novelist Thomas Hardy’s heart is buried) and

out into the countryside. The sun was just rising over

the horizon and cast this beautiful diffused orange

glow through the fog.

A man came walking through and we had a brief

chat before he carried on his way. As he was getting

further away I noticed the overhanging trees framed

his silhouette perfectly so I quickly took a few shots

before he disappeared. As soon as I looked at the

image on the back of the camera I knew it was a

good shot, the framing of the man and the leading

lines of the path drawing your eye to him.

May 2019

41


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May 2019

43


STREET PHOTOGRAPHY OR SUNSETS, WHICH

DO YOU PREFER?

At the moment it has to be street photography.

I’m not one of those “in your face” street

photographers, yes I like candid shots but I’m not that

bold to blatantly go up to someone and take their

photo. If I see a good shot I will ask the person if it is

OK. If they say no, fair enough and I’ll move on.

Living close to the ocean I do like a nice seascape

and living on the west side of NZ we do get some

good sunsets. The Pauatahanui Inlet and Plimmerton

are my go to spots for these.

HOW DO YOU NURTURE YOUR PASSION FOR

PHOTOGRAPHY? ARE THERE TIMES WHEN YOU

DON’T PICK UP YOUR CAMERA, IF SO HOW DO

YOU RE-INSPIRE YOURSELF TO GO OUT AND

TAKE PHOTOS?

There are quite often times where I don’t pick up a

camera, although lately I always have my X100F with

me.

To get the creative juices flowing I tend to watch a lot

of YouTube and listen to many podcasts.

I’ve recently discovered Sean Tucker, who has an

amazing YouTube channel. He’s not your usual selfpromoting

youtuber but has a very philosophical

approach to many photography genres.

Another photographer I follow is Kevin Mullins. He’s

predominantly a wedding photographer with a

candid / street style. He’s also a street photographer

and Fujifilm user and does a podcast with Neale

James called Fujicast.

Neale James has a podcast called Breathe Pictures

where he interviews many popular photographers

that I listen to too.

WHAT TIPS CAN YOU GIVE OUR READERS?

Just get out there and shoot. Don’t be scared of trying

something new.

Find a meetup or go on photowalks to meet like

minded people. Most of my favourite images have

been taken while out with other photographers.

It doesn’t matter what camera you have it’s what

your eye sees that makes the image.

I read recently about someone commenting on an image

and saying “oh you must have a good camera?” and

their response was “would you ask a chef if he has a good

oven if he made you a nice meal?” Food for thought!

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May 2019

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May 2019

47


DO YOU HAVE AN OVERALL FAVOURITE

IMAGE?

I went back to the UK at Christmas to visit family. On

the way back I managed to spend a few days in

Kyoto, Japan. The Gion district is synonymous for

Geisha and while we were wandering the streets,

three well dressed women were coming out of a

residence. Although they were not in traditional

Kimono with full hair and makeup, there was

something about the way they were dressed and

their how their hair was done that suggested to me

that they were in fact Geisha or Maiko. It was raining

a little and while one was holding her hand out to see

how much it was raining another was looking up to

sky. I had my Fujifilm X100F with me that day and just

took the shot. I edited this on my return home and

converted to black and white with a square crop.

HOW DO YOU PROMOTE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

My main platform at the moment is Instagram. I have a

Facebook site but don’t get much engagement with it.

I’m not one who goes out for likes and comments. If you

like me images, great. If you don’t, that’s great too!

Only last week, through Instagram, I was invited to

join a group for Wellington Street Photographers. We

have already discussed many topics, shared images

and given constructive comments on our images. I’m

sure this will progress into meetups and collaborations

which can only help our interests.

HOW DID YOU DISCOVER NZP AND EXCIO?

I have a friend that works at Wellington Botanic Gardens

and she put me onto the Fresh Shoots Competition.

From there I downloaded a copy of the magazine.

I was struck by reading stories and recognising names

of people whose images I had seen online. Rather than

being aimed at professional photographers, I liked how

it is aimed at photographers of all abilities.

I only recently downloaded the Excio app. I love the

ability to show images of people I follow on my phone

wallpaper.

WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR THE FUTURE?

I was lucky enough to travel quite a bit over the last year

so I shall be turning to areas of New Zealand that I have

yet to explore now. My son is a budding film editor so we

are going to film some video for him to create a short

film. I have never done this before so should be fun!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/mikebouchier_nightshift

www.facebook.com/Bouchierphoto

albums.excio.io/profile/Mike20Bouchier

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May 2019

49


Improving Your Photography

Photo Review Session

by Excio

F/8, 1/350s, ISO 400, 19mm

REVIEW BY:

Matej Tandara

INITIAL THOUGHTS

The idea for this photo is good showing the high

skyscrapers in the big city from street level. The focus

is spot on, the skyscrapers are very sharp and the

colours are very good being vibrant yet still natural.

An overall solid image with a few technical errors but

otherwise great potential.

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DYNAMIC RANGE

Evening in Qatar by Alexander Heggie

The skyscrapers in the image are perfectly exposed

but the bottom of the image, especially the right

corner, is too dark creating a “closed” feeling. I would

advise going into Photoshop or any other image

editing software and selecting the darker parts, lifting

the shadows and then masking them into the image

so that they don’t stand out. This would give the

image an overall better feel and most importantly,

make it appear more open. The added brightness

would also make the skyscrapers look better and

maybe even give them the sense of being taller.


COMPOSITION/FRAMING

One major drawback in this photo,

and something that could’ve easily

avoided, is the traffic lights blocking

the view. All photographers have

to learn to zoom with their feet

although I understand that you

took this shot on a tour bus so

didn’t have that luxury! However,

if you had taken another few steps

(or waited another second) you

could’ve captured an even better

image without those two traffic

lights getting into the way.

A lot of times you can mask these

types of problems out in Photoshop

but in this image, it would be

extremely difficult to get it right and

very time consuming so it’s always

best to take a moment and look

around you before taking the shot

to see if there’s a better place to

stand without the distractions.

Composition wise, I think this photo

would’ve looked better if you had

captured more towards the left

of the frame than the right - The

skyscrapers are really close to each

other but then suddenly you have

a gap between them and another

building on the far right that’s cut

off. Looking carefully, the corner

of skyscraper on the far left of the

frame seems higher than those on

the right so it would’ve potentially

improved this shot dramatically

to have included more of that

building to show a mix of tall/short

skyscrapers.

In this edit, I made some of the

buildings a little bit taller and others

a bit shorter to create an invisible

descending line which makes the

image a lot stronger. I also did

some colour correcting, making

the blues more teal to give this

image an overall warmer look.

Would you like to get your photos reviewed? Become an Excio member and get public or private

feedback so that you can learn what you’re doing right and where you can make improvements.

May 2019

51


Mind Games: Breaking the Rules

““Life is fluid and sometimes the pictures disappear

and there is nothing you can do. You can’t tell the

person, ‘Oh, please smile again. Do that gesture

again.’ Life is once, forever.”

Henri Cartier-Bresson

By Ana Lyubich

This month's article was

inspired by my recent talk

at Johnsonville Camera

Club. While preparing for it I was

doing some research and came

across the term “Instagramworthy”.

I tried to find out what

people mean by this phrase and

discovered an apparently simple

meaning – An image that is

“pretty and popular”.

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My belief is that an image being

‘Instagram-worthy’ takes away the

pure enjoyment of photography as

people follow popular and modern

trends in order to get likes rather

than taking photos to capture

moments, record history, and

express their views.

It is great to be inspired by other

photographers or artists work that

we admire and try to achieve

the same level in our own work,

but there is something wrong with

replicating someone’s work or style

just for the sake of it getting lots of

attention on social media.

Since I’m a huge fan of breaking

the rules (from a creative point

of view obviously!) I always try

to consciously do something

“wrong” when taking a photo

whilst still making it look good.

Subconsciously it is quite hard to

do since (no matter whether you

are a self-taught photographer or

have a degree in photography)

your mind knows you have

some general rules to follow in

photography e.g. the rule of thirds.

Even our team of photo reviewers

at Excio recommend following the

rules in most cases as you can read

on our blog but I decided to look

at suggestions of when and how

it’s ok to break the rules, being the

creative rebel that I am!

THE RULE OF THIRDS

We’re told to have 1/3 sky and

2/3 land or 2/3 sky and 1/3 land

and to position the subject on

the intersection of “invisible lines”

horizontally and vertically not

in the centre. Breaking the rule

means capturing the moment,

capturing emotions, experimenting

with composition, and putting the

subject in the centre of the frame

when it feels right.

THE HISTOGRAM

We’re told to check the histogram

so as to check the light and

exposure before taking the photo.

We’re told to bracket so as to

get all the lights and all the darks

perfectly captured. Breaking the

rule means trying purposefully

to overexpose/underexpose to

create a fine art piece. Experiment

with the light, shoot against the

light, challenge yourself to shoot

at the brightest time of day with

direct sunlight and see how you

can break the rules whilst creating

an image that works.

THE HORIZON LINE

This is the first thing we get told to

fix on an image when our horizon

is tilting to one side but it is possible

to break the rule and create your

own horizons on purpose. I recently

learned about the ‘Dutch Angle’

thanks to our photo reviews on

the blog and is something I’m now

trying to experiment with.

USE A TRIPOD – AVOID

CAMERA SHAKE

Sure, most of the time we want

sharp images, but what about

breaking the rule and jumping up

and down or spinning around with

the shutter open to purposefully

create blurred, out of focus

photos? This is how we create art!

As long as they captured what you

wanted to tell and they tell your

story as you see it, go for it!

FILL THE FRAME – FOCUS ON

THE CENTRE OF INTEREST

Here comes a great piece of

advice from Abraham Maslow on

how to break this rule... “Enlarge

the object. Or, squint at it so you

see only general outlines. Or, gaze

at it from unexpected angles,

such as upside down. Look at the

object reflected in a mirror. Put

it in unexpected backgrounds…

or through unusual colour filters.

Gaze at it for a very long time.

Gaze while free-associating or

daydreaming.” His main theory is

that by framing the object, you

cut it away from its surroundings

and, thereby, from common

“perceptions, expectations and

theories of how it should look.”

So, next time you go out with your

camera with the main goal of

taking that perfect shot to post

on social media for everyone’s

approval, stop!

You put a lot of stress on yourself

by wanting the ‘perfect’ shot and

if (when) something doesn’t go

as planned or as good as you’d

hoped you can quickly lose your

motivation for taking photos.

If you just go out for a walk without

planning or expecting anything,

but have your camera ready to

capture whatever is awaiting

you in the big world, you will see

that the magic starts to happen!

Let your passion and creativity

shine through without following

the crowd of ‘Instagram-worthy’

photographers.

May 2019

53


BEST ENTRIES

FROM THE

PHOTO

CHALLENGE


SUCKER

F1.2, 1/1250s, ISO100

MANNERS STREET, WELLINGTON

I love the context of this shot of a woman

at the bus stop... her dress, shoes, flowers

in her hair, and the timeliness of the pursed

lips, sucking of her drink. The added bonus

was when she appeared to see me taking

the photo and looked over the top of her

glasses in an assertive manner.

Alan Blundell

May 2019

55


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SMILING LADY

Featuring a modern take on

opera with a caffeinated theme!

Adam Bedford

May 2019

57


“XENA”

F1.8, 1/500s, ISO100

Amanda Main

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JUGGLING

F2, 1/500s, ISO1600

Mr Wizowski juggling as part of his

show titled Joust of the Unicorn.

Brendon Doran

May 2019

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COFFEE OPERA

F2.8, 1/6400s, ISO1600

The New Zealand Opera performed an

offbeat piece of theatre centred around

the love of coffee, how very Wellington!

Brendon Doran

May 2019

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DANCING WITH THE RHYTHM

F2.8, 1/250s, ISO400, 70mm

A busker playing his violin on Cuba street.

Clint Thambi

May 2019

63


ENTRANCED

F1.4, 1/6000s, ISO200, 85mm

Complete involvement in the bands

evening performance.

Greg Arnold

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May 2019

65


LOVERS

F2.8, 1/1600s, ISO400, 85mm

Hard to mistake the chemistry

of these two in the crowd!

Greg Arnold

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May 2019

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A DAZZLING

AFTERNOON

The people dancing were dazzling,

the light of the sun too.

Hiroko Fujiwara

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May 2019

69


WOULD YOU LIKE

A COFFEE?

Coffee time with a taste of

excitement and fun.

Hiroko Fujiwara

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May 2019

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MOMENT OF JOY

F1.2, 1/1250s, ISO100

A woman dancing with red butterfly

wings and an unstoppable smile

takes the heart of the audience.

Lin Htet Aung

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May 2019

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INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE IS MUSIC

They may look different but they have

one thing in common, music. Feel it to understand it.

Lin Htet Aung

May 2019

75


CHA WA

F5.8, 1/250s, IS0800

Enjoying the last performance of Cuba Dupa 2019 on the Glover

stage; the vibrant, fiery and energetic, Cha Wa.

Mick Brady

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May 2019

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TIME OUT FROM

TIME OUT.

Mid-afternoon, Glover Park at the 2019

Cuba Dupa Festival.

Nathan Fox

May 2019

79


LE DANCE

Colourful and enthusiastic dancers

entertaining an appreciative crowd.

Paul Taylor

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May 2019

81


SHUT UP & DANCE

Shut Up & Dance doing just what it says

on the package.

Paul Taylor

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May 2019

83


IMPROMPTU SONG

F8, 1/160s, ISO400, 35mm

This group burst into an impromptu song

while looking for any offers of work.

Rob Weir

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May 2019

85


PERFECT COUPLE

F4, 1/320s, 70mm

This couple have a very spectacular

and unique costume. They are shining

in the crowd and attracting everyone's

attentions - The best couple of the day.

Tipdarath Phal

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BLENDING (BENDING) WITH

THE RHYTHM

F2.8, 1/100s, ISO 200, 200mm

Clint Thambi

May 2019

87


PERFECT DRESS WITH

BEAUTIFUL SMILE

F4, 1/320s, 105mm

She had a very unique style with an amazing

outfit. Her expression shows how much she is

enjoying the event.

Tipdarath Phal

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May 2019

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GOOD VIBES

Ras Judah & The Culture Embassy

preforming at Cuba Dupa.

Victor Crafts

May 2019

91


DANCE GOINGS ON

Wellingtonians are determined to

celebrate at this annual event.

Yao Liu

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May 2019

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"TO TAKE A PHOTOGRAPH IS TO ALIGN

THE HEAD, THE EYE AND THE HEART.

IT'S A WAY OF LIFE"

HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON

94 NZPhotographer

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