BeatRoute Magazine BC Edition May 2019

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a monthly arts and entertainment paper with a predominant focus on music – local, independent or otherwise. The paper started in June 2004 and continues to provide a healthy dose of perversity while exercising rock ‘n’ roll ethics.

Currently BeatRoute’s AB edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton (by S*A*R*G*E), Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

MAY 2019

FREE

KALI

UCHIS:

THE

NEXT R&B

DIVA HAS

ARRIVED

+ JORJA

SMITH:

ON THE

BRINK OF

SUPER

STARDOM

PLUS! ORVILLE PECK • JENNY LEWIS • SNOTTY NOSE REZ KIDS • DESTINATION NXNE • YVES JARVIS & MORE


KNOW

YOU’RE

WEIRD!

JOHNFLUEVOGSHOESGRANVILLEST··WATERST··FLUEVOGCOM


Contents

Up Front

4

7

8

9

10

The Guide

The Chromatics

Dream Pop masterminds

retrace their steps back to

familiar territory

The Agenda

VanCity Places

West End Nigerian restaurant

Arike hits home with

heart and soul

That’s Dope

Big canna loophole: Celebs

partner with companies, not

endorse them

VanCity People

Retired filmmaker turned

restaurateur, Uwe Boll

stands up to the haters

Music

17

31

35

Concert Previews

Yves Jarvis, Orville Peck,

Lemonheads, Jenny Lewis,

SonReal, Snotty Nose Rez

Kids

Album Reviews

Mac Demarco, Lizzo,

Vampire Weekend, L7,

Schoolboy Q, Tacocat, The

National and more!

Live Reviews

Alice In Chains, Earl Sweatshirt,

Maggie Rogers

MAY 2019

KALI

UCHIS:

THE

NEXT R&B

DIVA HAS

ARRIVED

+ JORJA

SMITH:

ON THE

BRINK OF

SUPER

STARDOM

PLUS! ORVILLE PECK • JENNY LEWIS • SNOTTY NOSE REZ KIDS • DESTINATION NXNE • YVES JARVIS & MORE

Cover Story

24

Kali Uchis &

Jorja Smith

Catching up with two of the

hottest names in r&b on the

forefront of innovation

FREE

Movies|TV

37

38

Travel

44

Film review

JT LeRoy poses questions on

truth, identity, fact and fiction

This Month In Film and

The Binge List

Destination:

NXNE Toronto

Celebrating its 25th year, Toronto’s

North by Northeast creates a

street level festival experience

38

July Talk, April 18 at the Pacific

Coliseum. Read our review of this

show and more online at beatroute.ca

The Arts

40

40

41

43

Horoscope

46

Hunch Festival

Solo Performances offer a new

kind of festival experience

The Yes Men Combating fake

news and divisive rhetoric in An

Evening of Corporate Drag

Last Podcast On The Left

Podcast troublemakers turn true

crime on its severed head

This Month In Theatre

No matter your sign, there’s

always a song for you here

LINDSEY BLANE

11

Fashion

Donald Glover partners

with adidas to let your

feet tell the story

11

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 3


The Guide

MAY

Chromatics:

A soundtrack

for spring

Thursday, June 6 • Vogue Theatre

Portland-born dream pop band Chromatics are

undeniable masters of fusing electronic and pop to

create a unique, hazy sound fit for the silver screen.

Under the watchful eye of producer and multi-instrumentalist

Johnny Jewel, their songs have been

used in a handful of film soundtracks including

neo-noir cult classic Drive, where their sound

feels so unbelievably organic to the setting.

Their most recent cinematic venture was

their appearance on the latest season of Twin

Peaks when the full band, fronted by lead

vocalist Ruth Radelet, played out the credits

live inside the titular town’s otherworldly

Road House bar.

Beyond their contributions to film,

Chromatics have been operating under

the radar with modest, quiet releases

over the past few years. Last year the

band released two EPs of remixes and

instrumentals for their songs “Shadows”

and “Looking for Love,” as well

as their Camera EP. This year they’ve

released another EP consisting of

three variations of their track “Time

Rider,” which acts as a welcome

return to form.

Going back to their dreamy

and lo-fi sound, Chromatics have

retraced their steps back into

familiar positions, which will undoubtedly

bring on a new slew

of fans who didn’t get a chance

to experience them the first

time around.

By Joey Lopez

Editor/Publisher

Michael Hollett

Senior Editor/Western Canada

Glenn Alderson

Creative Director

Troy Beyer

Editorial Coordinator

Jordan Yeager

Contributing

Writers/ Coordinators

Noemie Attia • Ben Boddez

Leyland Bradley • Sebastian Buzzalino

Lauren Edwards • Kenn Enns

Karina Espinosa • Rachel Fox

Kathryn Helmore • Willow Herzog

Safiya Hopfe • Kim Jev

Robann Kerr • Brendan Lee

Christine Leonard • Joey Lopez

Dayna Mahannah • Maggie McPhee

Jennie Orton • Johnny Papan

Jamila Pomeroy • Dan Potter

Paul Rodgers • Judah Schulte

Yasmine Shemesh • Leah Siegel

Brad Simm • Clarence Sponagle

Graeme Wiggins • Jordan Yeager

Contributing Photographers

& Illustrators

Lindsey Blane • Mihaela Bodlovic

Sebastian Buzzalino • Kira Clavell

Maya Fuhr • Jesse Gillett

Joshua Grafstein • Michael Grondin

Ben Houdijk • Zee Khan

Spencer Marsh • David Monteith-Hodge

Darrole Palmer • Michel van Collenburg

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Distribution

BeatRoute is distributed in Vancouver,

Victoria, Calgary and Edmonton

Contact us

2405 East Hastings St.

Vancouver, BC

V5K 1Y8

e-mail: editor@beatroute.ca

beatroute.ca


@beatrouteBC


@beatroutemedia


beatrouteBC

4 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


UPCOMING SHOWS

REAL ESTATE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 25

THE GREAT GET DOWN

WISH FUNDRAISER

MAY 4

KT TUNSTALL

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

MAY 6

LÉON

W/ MORGAN SAINT

MAY 7

THE PHILOSOPHER KINGS

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

BRUNO MAJOR

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

KEVIN MORBY

W/ SAM COHEN

APRIL MAY 8 11 APRIL MAY 1011 MAY APRIL 1511

AMERICAN FOOTBALL

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

SIN CITY 18 YEAR

ANNIVERSARY FETISH BALL

APRIL MAY 1611 MAY APRIL 1811 MAY APRIL 3111

THE PLANET SMASHERS

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT IMPERIALVANCOUVER.COM


UPCOMING SHOWS

ALLAN DAN RAYMAN MANGAN

SPECIAL GUESTS

FEB MAY 25 6

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

EPIK HIGH

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

may FEBRUARY 2 & 3 7

RIVAL SONS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

may 4

LA DISPUTE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

may 6

ALYSSA EDWARDS

DANCING QUEEN LIVE

may FEBRUARY 9 7

A NIGHT OF WORLD CLASS

PROFESSIONAL BOXING

may 11

YANN TIERSEN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

may 14

WALL EXCHANGE

WITH CARL HART

FEBRUARY 7

may 23

SHANE KOYCZAN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

may 24

RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE

SEASON 11

may 31

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT VOGUETHEATRE.COM


MAY

The AgendaBy YASMINE SHEMESH

4

DERADOORIAN

Saturday, May 4 at Western Front

Best known as a former vocalist and bassist

for the indie rock band Dirty Projectors,

Angel Deradoorian works within hushed,

minimalist and ambient textures. The young

songwriter will be in-residence for five days

at the Vancouver artist-run-centre, Western

Front, with a special, culminating public

performance on May 4.

5

GLITTER BALL

Saturday, May 4 to Sunday, May 5 at the Pace

The first of its kind in Vancouver, this music

festival features bands exclusively fronted

by women and those who identify with other

marginalized genders. The first day showcases

hip-hop artists, including Bbymutha, while the

second will feature rock acts including Sylvia

Wrath. Partial proceeds from Glitter Ball will go

to WISH Centre Drop-In Society.

10

CROSS CULTURAL

STRATHCONA WALKING

TOUR

Sunday, May 5 to Sunday, May 26

at various locations in Strathcona

This guided walking tour explores

the richly diverse histories of the

Strathcona neighbourhood, from

early immigrant communities to

present day. In celebration of

Asian Heritage Month and Jewish

Heritage Month, both occurring in

May, the tour will highlight important

landmarks like the Vancouver

12

Japanese Language School and

Lord Strathcona Elementary,

Vancouver’s oldest primary school.

Tours take place every Sunday

this month.

18

Comics.

Lil Clitty

Friday, May 10 at Little Mountain Gallery

Comedy veteran Ese Atawo created Lil

Clitty, a character for her act to parody the

current state of female hip-hop. She aims to

push the boundaries with her show, Sweet

Release: A Hip-Hop Comedy Concert. The

event celebrates her album release.

Check out our expanded feature online at

beatroute.ca.

VANCOUVER COMIC ARTS FESTIVAL

Saturday, May 18 to Sunday, May 19 at Roundhouse

Community Arts & Recreation Centre

This two-day celebration of comics and graphic

novels is back with another exciting lineup

of exhibitions, panels and events. Featured

creators this year include Canadian author

and artist Vivek Shraya and Ian Boothby, who

draws comics for The New Yorker,

MAD Magazine, and Simpsons

26

SHUCK IT FORWARD

Sunday, May 26 at Chewies Steam

& Oyster Bar Coal Harbour

Shuck it Forward is back for the

fifth year in a row to raise funds

and awareness for those affected

by Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Along with an oyster-shucking

competition that features 24

of North America’s best shuckers,

there will also be a pop-up

barbershop, live music and a silent

auction. The event has raised more

than $110,000 since 2015.

30

TACOFINO HASTINGS X

STRATHCONA BEER COMPANY

COLLABORATIVE DINNER

Thursday, May 30 at

Tacofino Hastings

Tacofino and Strathcona Beer

Company join forces for a fivecourse

meal of west coast-meets-

Baja cuisine. Held at Tacofino’s

Hastings location, the dinner will

have Regional Executive Chef Stefan

Hartmann and Hastings Head

Chef Daniel Echeverría collaborating

on a vibrant, multi-course menu

with unique beer pairings.

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 7


VanCity Places

Food

HEART AND SOUL

West End Nigerian restaurant Arike hits the mark locally and globally

By DAYNA MAHANNAH

N

ostalgia runs deep through

the intrepid flavours of Arike,

the new Nigerian eatery in

Vancouver’s West End.

“It stems from memories

and the tastiest food you

ate when you were a kid,”

co-owner Sam Olayinka says, reminiscing

on how his Nigerian roots became

the essence of his new restaurant. “I

haven’t tasted, still to this day, anything

as good as my dad’s bronco stew.”

Nestled just below street level on

Davie Street, Arike serves up a delicious

blend of traditional Nigerian and

Canadian West Coast food, with a dash

of classical French cuisine.

Born in Ottawa, Olayinka lived all

over Canada before meeting his business

partner, Mike Hayman, at Vancouver’s

Art Institute. They refined their

cuisine chops in French

ARIKE

fine dining and corporate

sous programs.

But Olayinka claims the

Michelin-star chefs he’s

trained with have nothing

on his dad’s traditional Nigerian

stew.

1725 DAVIE STREET

Salad, cassava fries, goat, chicken

wings, flatbreads, and dessert — all

with that unique Nigerian-Canadian

essence — populate Arike’s menu. It’s

the famed jollof rice, however, that

reigns.

Arguably the most good-natured

battle in existence, the jollof rice war

between West African countries is a

one-upmanship of who-does-it-better.

The rice is traditionally made with

seasoned tomato stew, using the same

palm oil for every batch (like a “mother

oil”), creating a depth and complexity

otherwise impossible.

Olayinka presents it with a grilled

suya — a spicy beef striploin skewer.

Stakes are high; this food critic has

experienced Ghana’s jollof. Olayinka’s

Sunday - Thursday - 5:30

pm to 10:30 pm

Friday, Saturday - 5:30 pm

to 12 am

version? Complex spice rolls over

the tongue, leaving a halcyon tingling

foundation for the suya — thin and

boldly flavourful — to melt in the

mouth. The dewy rice teems with

boisterous spirit; a new contender

in the global jollof rice battle steps

forward.

Arike’s flatbread — a mainstay —

uses a traditional agege bread recipe

for the base. The oxtail and pork belly

option is rich, juxtaposed with a mild,

house-made goat cheese

and roasted tomatoes.

Agege goes where no

pizza dough dares, to the

crispy, bubbled side of

delicious.

An espresso martini is

an oddly appropriate pairing, setting

a precedent for dessert. Unfortunately

for the martini, Milo ice cream is

up to plate. Milo, a chocolate malt

product from Nestle popular outside

of North America, is transformed.

“I’m not gonna tell you the exact recipe,”

Olayinka says with a half-smile.

Milo, vanilla, tonka bean, whipping

cream: an exotic scoop of heaven.

Different and undeniably delicious,

the menu will change with the

seasons. After all, Arike was sparked

by an unrelinquished taste for Olayinka

dad’s stew. “And I’m still trying

to chase that.” ,

300 words.

ARIKE — which means

“to pamper” in the

Yoruba language — is

named after Olayinka’s

grandmother.

Vegetarians have

options too — corn

fritters, onion rings,

flatbreads, and desserts

— with more to come as

the menu changes.

Ghanaian-Romanian

pop artist Sister

Deborah sings about

jollof wars in her song,

“Ghana Jollof.”

8 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


That's Dope

THIS

BIG NAME

BACKERS

BEHIND

LEGAL WEED

Big cannabis has paid

celebrities to partner with

their companies, not endorse

them By DAYNA MAHANNAH

C

anadian cannabis laws

may have been loosened

but cannabis marketing

restrictions are super tight.

As the billion dollar

industry explodes across this

country, immense creativity is

being expended to get bud brand

name recognition from companies

desperate to market new products

when any form of advertising and

promotion is basically not allowed.

While celebrity-endorsed cannabis

is illegal in Canada, companies

are finding legal loopholes to work

with big names in other ways.

These entertainers – among others

– have partnered with big canna in

ways not technically involving high

profile endorsement. Whether it’s

through buying shares or holding

executive positions, they’re finding

ways to extend their personal

empires into the green stuff.

The Tragically Hip

“We are happy to announce that

we have become partners with

one of Canada’s newest, soon to

be public, licensed producers of

medicinal marijuana,” said The

Tragically Hip when they announced

their partnership with

Newstrike in 2017. Up Cannabis

Inc. is the product of that partnership,

focusing on uniting quality

adult-use cannabis products with

the power of music. The Tragically

Hip have been longtime supporters

of legalization and hope for this to

extend their advocacy of safe use

through investments and creative

collaboration. Up Cannabis Inc.

strains are grown in Ontario, like

the band, making use of what is

expected to be Canada’s premier

growing region.

Snoop Dogg

It won’t come as a surprise as,

second to Bob Marley, Snoop Dogg

has been the most weed-identified

cannabis advocate of the celebrity

world. The 45-year-old rapper and

entrepreneur brings his line, Leafs By

Snoop, into Canada in partnership

with Tweed. The company offers

three strains in their newfound Canadian

market: Sunset, Ocean View,

and Palm Tree CBD. Expanding into

the tech side of the industry, he has

recently invested a reported $2-million

USD into Trellis, a Toronto-based

software company that provides

management tools for businesses in

the cannabis industry.

MONTH

IN CANNABIS NEWS

AND VIEWS

Martha Stewart

America’s favourite lifestyle

authority and convicted felon,

Martha Stewart, announced her

partnership with Canopy Growth

in February. It may not surprise

those familiar with her close

relationship with canna-preneur

Snoop Dogg but it’s a big leap

from her gingham and good times

image. Her collaboration with

Canopy includes the Sequential

Brand Group, a cannabis themed

fashion and lifestyle brand. We

can expect to see developments

this summer, like expansion into

hemp-derived CBD products

for animals as well as cannabis

research.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: BEATROUTE

Whoopi Goldberg

Whoopi Goldberg and

award-winning edibles maker

Maya Elisabeth launched

Whoopi & Maya in 2016. As one

of the fastest growing cannabis

companies in California, the dynamic

duo have expanded from

their initial offering of medical

cannabis products, formulated to

provide relief for women experiencing

menstrual cramps, into a

dynamic line including tinctures,

bath soaks, body balms and

edibles.

Seth Rogen

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg’s

new Cannabis line, Houseplant,

launched in March 2019. The

recreational cannabis company

made its debut alongside

Canopy Growth. Rogen and

Goldbergs’s company partners

include the California-based

United Talent Agency. The

company has somehow found

a way to get around Canada’s

strict packaging laws, with its

fiesta orange packaging, which

fits perfectly with the company’s

retro branding.

Gene Simmons

It may not contain pyrotechnics,

facepaint, or platform boots, but

Invictus does have the rock and

roll power of Gene Simmons.

Known for living a sober life, Simmons

is taking a less hands-onproduct

role as “chief evangelist,”

leaving the cannabis logistics

to other members of his team.

The company, which operates

cannabis businesses in Canada,

has Simmons responsible for

“providing marketing counsel,

serving as a spokesperson in the

media, public appearances and

participation in the company’s

annual general meeting and

investor meetings.”

Ghostface Killah

Dennis Coles (aka Ghostface

Killah) of the Wu-Tang Clan

and founder of the record label

Starks Enterprises, launched

Wu-Goo alongside Killa Priest.

The brand features a 70 per cent

THC hash oil and was released in

alliance with vape pen company

Dynamite Stix. Other products

include vape cartridges, disposable

pens, pre-rolled joints and

edibles. ,

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 9


VanCity People

UWE

BOLL

Retired filmmaker

turned restaurateur

Uwe Boll stands up to

the haters By RACHEL FOX

wCity

Briefs

ZEE KHAN

What drew you to live and

work in Vancouver?

Uwe Boll: My first movie

Sanctimony in the year 2000

brought me to Vancouver and I

felt that here is the same shitty

weather like in Germany. So I

came back for more movies.

What do you love about the

restaurant life?

UB: I love good food and wine,

and Bauhaus delivers that.

What I didn’t know was that it

is a never-ending job I signed

on to. A film is done after it

is delivered – a restaurant is

a daily drama. It is fun, but

it wouldn’t work without my

active involvement in the

business.

Is running a restaurant like

running a film company?

UB: I loved making movies and

didn’t stop because I wanted

to. It is just that now, if Netflix

or Amazon doesn’t finance

your movie, then you cannot

refinance it. All independent

buyers worldwide are dead,

because the DVD business is

dead. The restaurant business

side is juggling numbers. You

never know how many guests

you will have two weeks from

now, or how much they will

spend. And that is like a movie:

You don’t know how many

people will buy a film ticket or

a DVD.

Independent filmmakers want

to know how you managed to

be so prolific, despite having

a number of “bombs.” How

did you keep getting funding?

UB: My first movie was German

Fried Movie, a comedy based

on Kentucky Fried Movie, and

we made it for $60k with private

money. We recouped that

money over two years. After

four German movies, I was

able to raise private capital in

Germany, and doing this for

five years in a row, on a bigger

scale, made all those other

movies possible. Sometimes

a bomb is not a bomb. If you

make a movie for a good price

and it doesn’t work theatrically,

you can do well with DVD

sales.

Now retired from filmmaking, Vancouver-based

and German-born

Uwe Boll is a notorious figure,

known as much for his challenging

disposition as he is for being

behind a staggering number of

B-level action movies, many of

which were commercial flops.

Reviled by critics who seemed

to relish in pummeling his unique

oeuvre, he famously took them

to task in the boxing ring for

charity. Now the subject of a new

documentary called Fuck You All:

The Uwe Boll Story, the one-time

“most hated man in Hollywood”

currently owns and operates the

trendy Vancouver gastronomical

hot spot Bauhaus.

Over the years you’ve had a

lot of negativity directed at

you. Does it ever get to you?

How do you handle that?

UB: Of course it affected me,

and also my ability to hire

big movie stars. That is the

reason I boxed the critics and

beat them up. But overall, you

cannot think too much about

reviews – you have to make it

work and keep going.

In a Vanity Fair article in 2017

you revealed that you courted

George Clooney for a role.

What role and what film?

UB: Darfur. He was very active

helping in the Darfur crisis and

I wanted him to play one of the

journalists, but he and Matt

Damon didn’t even answer me,

and that was because I was

not in “the club.” They work

only with people they know.

Who was the most difficult

actor you’ve worked with,

and why?

UB: I normally always had very

good relationships with all the

actors I worked with. Ray Liotta

was not easy on the set of In

the Name of the King, because

he hated that kind of movie.

But he was great in Suddenly.

Michele Rodriguez tried to

change her role in Bloodrayne

all the time, and the dialogue of

the other actors. That was crazy.

But she is a lovely person.

Tell us a bit about this new

documentary. Is this the final

word from Uwe Boll?

UB: This is the second doc

made about me. I think it

shows more about my real

personality and about my movies.

It is entertaining, and that

is the main message of all my

movies: never be boring. Boring

movies are the worst. Terrence

Malick proves that with all the

movies he has made in the last

10 years.

Uwe Boll will be in attendance for a

screening of Fuck You All followed

by a Q&A at the Rio Theatre on

May 5.

The Dude abides!

The Vancouver Art House Society

is raising funds to bring the cedar

sculpture that inspired the nickname

of Mount Pleasant’s “Dude

Chilling Park” back to its rightful

home. The sculpture was moved

from the park — real name Guelph

— to Denman Island for repairs and

bronzing in 2017 after extensive

deterioration. Now, a campaign

has begun to secure the long-term

installation of the Dude at its

namesake grassy knoll via

indiegogo.com.

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun

to Receive Honorary Doc

Emily Carr University will present

Canadian artist of Coast Salish

and Okanagan descent Lawrence

Paul Yuxweluptun with an Honorary

Doctor of Letters for his contribution

to contemporary art. His works

confront issues of colonization, politics

and the environment. “They’re

recognizing me for standing up, for

talking to the world,” Yuxweluptun

says. “Politicians come and go.

Artists are for life.”

BC Proposes

Anti-Ticket Bot Law

The British Columbia government

has introduced legislation to ban

software and bots from purchasing

large amounts of tickets to live

events. In an effort to make buying

tickets more fair. Lisa Beare, the

Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture,

said in a statement, “People

will be able to enjoy the diverse

performances and entertainment

BC has to offer without being

unfairly gouged at the box office.”

If passed, the act will require

clear price disclosure, guaranteed

refunds from secondary sellers,

and mechanisms for buyers to

sue if they’ve suffered losses from

breach of the law. ,

10 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


Fashion

CHILDISH

KICKS

By KIM JEV

L

eave it to an unstoppable

force like Donald

Glover to use Coachella

2019 for the grand

unveiling of his partnership

with adidas Originals.

A small number of lucky

music fans at the desert

valley music festival were

surprised when an AirDrop

request appeared on their

smartphones, asking to

accept a photo from an

account claiming to be

Glover. Those brave enough

to accept the random offer

were awarded a free pair of

shoes.

Donald Glover Presents

is the creative partnership

between the multi-talented

artist and the iconic sportswear

brand. Since its unveiling,

word has spread about

this collection as a symbol

of life’s experiences, where

product and vision collide.

“Rich is a concept,” says

Glover. “With this project, I

wanted to encourage people

to think about how their

stories can be told on their

feet.”

Donald Glover Presents

reimagines three classic

adidas styles — the Nizza,

the Continental 80 and the

Lacombe — in subtle, toneon-tone

white canvas.

Check adidas.com for availability

The Nizza DG

Debuting in the 70s, the

hardwood-inspired styles of

the Nizza are designed for

everyday wear. Considered

to be the retro B-ballers

choice, they are perfect for

knocking about and working

things out in.

The Continental 80 DG

With accents straight from

the archives, the Continental

80 pays straight

homage to the early 80s

court designs, showing

off a swooping stripe and

retro-style logo window

next to the laces. These

throwbacks re-up the split

rubber cup sole and are

even lined with French Terry

to seal the classic deal.

The Lacombe DG

Designed for the streets

with tailored court style, the

Lacombe DGs are inspired

by the vintage Newcombe

shoes. Classic tennis style,

these kicks take back the

court and throw preppy out

the window.

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 11


12 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


VanCity Places

TUNE-UP

TIME:

ASK THE

EXPERTS

The best cycle shops, bike

parts, and tune-up tips for

summer

By DAYNA MAHANNAH

Spring has sprung in Vancouver

and those clouds could clear at any

time so bikers should be road-ready.

BeatRoute checked in with experts

at five Vancouver bike shops to talk

about the most important things to

look for in bike upkeep. Here’s the

lowdown on how to prep for a solid

summer of smooth cycling.

Adam Douglas believes

in the power of grease

Ride On Bike Shop

2180 Main Street

Daily: 11 am-630 pm,

Holidays: noon-5 pm

The Main Street location’s

top technician, Adam

Douglas, describes the

owner as a “pure legend”

and cycling advocate who

keeps the shop simple

and approachable to all

levels of bike-enthusiasts.

A standout? Their bike

baskets, which come

in sizes ‘six-pack’ to

‘weekend grocery-load’.

The stays make them

secure as heck (read:

hard to steal) and go for

$45. Douglas emphasizes

the importance of chain

upkeep; “Less is more

with oil.” Once a month

and after a long, rainy

rides, run a thin oil over

the chain and wipe excess

off with an old rag.

KRISTI CALDERON

Super Champion

Specialty Bike Shop

245 Main Street

Mon—Sat: 11 am-6 pm, Sun: noon-5 pm

BLAKE STARTUP

Kirsty Stevens is ready to build

or fix anything thrown her way

Landyachtz Factory Store

1146 Union Street

Mon-Fri: 8am-7pm,

Weekends: 10am-6pm

“We can handle anything a bike

needs,” says store manager

Blake Startup. “Because we

build them from the ground up.”

Hundreds of tires ($50-$150

each) hang from the shop walls

and ceiling. The “world of gravel

tires” references a new form

of biking, off-road exploration.

Top brands including Shwalbe,

Panaracer and the new Teravail

are available. Landyachtz sees

tons of commuters from the

Adanac bike route and Startup

knows a squeaky brake can be

dangerous. “Listening to your

brakes is one of the most important

safety things you can do.”

Nick Hart

has a

handle on

handlebars

Sidesaddle Bike Shop

2496 Victoria Drive

Mon-Sat: 11 am-6 pm, Sun: 11 am-5 pm

Vancouver’s first women-focused bike shop boasts

a saddle library of 60 to 100 styles between $30-

300. Want to try before you buy? Test drive as

many as you like for a $50 fee and get $25 credit

towards your saddle of choice once you’ve found

the perfect fit. Staff mechanic Johanna Bleecker

says saddles are a huge factor in a rider’s comfort

and, subsequently, how much they ride. “Don’t wait

until things are super bad,” is her tune-up advice.

Changing gears, for example, should not feel difficult.

“That usually means your cables are corroded

or rusted.” Replacing them will make it smoother,

easier. Don’t we all want that?

Johanna Bleecker

wants you to take

a seat

DARROLE PALMER

Full of punk and bike curios, Super

Champ still has a practical yet

extensive handlebar collection

of road and track styles. Proper

handlebars can improve comfort

and diminish wrist pain. They range

from $5 to $150 in-house, but

co-owner Nick Hart says they can

order anything. On the road, Hart

advises, “Try to avoid cross-chaining.”

That is, for bikes with gears,

you never want to be on your

biggest ring and your biggest cog

at the back, which puts the chain at

an extreme angle and causes it to

strain, skip and wear out.

DARROLE PALMER

Resident mechanic

Joshua Manimtim is

at one with two wheels

Our Community Bikes

2429 Main Street

Daily: 11 am-6 pm

Our Community Bikes is uberstocked

with cool parts, but

co-manager Emiliano Sepulveda

is stoked about their stash of

interesting hubs (the centre part of

the wheel the spokes are threaded

into), which can be rebuilt into new

wheels if you change a bike. Used

hubs start at $6 and vintage ones

go for $40-50. Aside from oft-neglected

advice of putting air in your

tires every two weeks, Sepulveda

suggests raising your seat post. If

it’s too low, you don’t have full leg

extension which can create knee

problems. “Even 10 millimetres,” he

says. “That makes a big change.” ,

COURTESY OUR COMMUNITY BIKES

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 13


SoCIAL Lite

Based in Ontario

with distribution

across the country,

SoCIAL Lite is the

easy-breezy of

vodka sodas with

its sugar-free 4 per

cent alcohol content

that’s only 80

calories per can.

Another distinction

is they like mixing

their flavours,

creating colourful

combos that

include grapefruit

pomelo, pineapple

mango, lime ginger

and lemon cucumber

mint.

Drink

BATTLE

OF THE VODKA SODAS

Vodka is in a class of its own — clear, clean, refreshing and

refined. It’s at the centre of plenty of amazing, sometimes

complex, cocktails. Its popularity reigns with cool sophistication

from cocktail lounges to dance clubs. While

mixologists know how to make marvelous mixes, less can

be more and the simplicity of distinction slightly tempered

with flavour works very well in a can. And sometimes

you want a lite, convenient drink you can toss in your

knapsack, easy as a beer. Meet four Canadian

low-cal, low effort vodka soda cocktailsin-a-can

battling for supremacy.

By BRAD SIMM

Nude

Just like its name,

Nude is a strippeddown,

sugar-free

vodka soda

that’s designed

to eliminate the

sickly-sweet hangovers

that come

with too many cosmic

concoctions.

Made in BC with

triple-distilled vodka,

sparkling water

and all natural fruit

extracts (peach,

lime, mint, kiwi), it’s

crisp and light at

only 100 calories

per can, but still

has a nice bite.

Last Mountain

If you’re looking

for a little more

punch and a touch

of sweetness, Last

Mountain Distillery

offers its Sweet

Tea Vodka Lemonade

and Mojito

Vodka Soda, each

with less than 20g

of sugar weighing

in with 7 per cent

alcohol content.

They also have

their lemon and

lime sugar-free

flavours dialed in

with the same high

alcohol level and

all natural ingredients.

Nütrl

Nutrl Vodka Soda

is an offshoot of

Nutrl Vodka, a

craft product that

uses a 76 step

distilling process

to achieve its pure,

uncorrupted taste

experience. Nutrl

boasts of having

a super-simple

formula with “no

carbs, no sugar,

no sweetener” and

offers a variety of

flavours to choose

from (lime, lemon,

blackberry, black

cherry, cranberry

and pineapple).

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 15


JESSIE REYEZ • BAHAMAS • SERENA RYDER

HALF MOON RUN • A TRIBE CALLED RED • WINTERSLEEP

DEAR ROUGE • PEACH PIT • SHAD • JOCELYN ALICE • FOXWARREN

COSMO SHELDRAKE • FAST ROMANTICS • SCENIC ROUTE TO ALASKA

FRED PENNER • THE JERRY CANS • ART D’ECCO • THE BOOM BOOMS

SARAH MACDOUGALL • LUCA FOGALE • daysormay

PARKER BOSSLEY• JESSICKA • THE SUNSET KIDS

HUNTING • BEGONIA • THE MODELOS

SAM LYNCH • TAYLOR JAMES

THE OOT N’ OOTS • THE KWERKS

CAT MADDEN

At all Long & McQuade locations, including:

lineup subject to change

368 Terminal Avenue ∙ (604) 734-4886

vancouver@long-mcquade.com

1363 Main Street ∙ (604) 986-0911

northvan@long-mcquade.com

MEDIA SPONSORS

AVAILABLE NOW

16 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


MUSiC

I listen to

absolutely everything.

I won’t even say I have

taste. Of course I’m

offended by music

sometimes, but

I try to take in

everything.

By JUDAH SCHULTE

I

n the six years Jean-Sebastien Audet

has been releasing music, his

YVES

persona has constantly evolved.

Performing now as Yves

Jarvis, the 22-year-old Calgary-born,

Montreal-based

songwriter writes ethereal

JARVIS

compositions that occupy a

space between folk and R&B,

only because there’s no

other place for them to go.

Defying conventions of both

structure and genre, his

songs wander and explore;

sometimes sounding like

THE DIY

a mad-man D’Angelo, at

other times, a twisted,

space-age Harry

Nilsson. Yves Jarvis

is always Jean-Sebastien

Audet, and

both refuse to sit

KING

still.

Often saturated

with

grain and

samples

of rain or street noise, Audet’s music

feels like something expressed in

confidence, a conversation with a

friend you didn’t know you had.

Endless, seamless vocal layerings

and swelling organs make his

expressions feel as huge and

significant as gospel while

his whispered vocals and

candid lyrics offer a level

of intimacy comparable

to singer-songwriters

like Judee Sill and Nick

Drake.

The disjointed

post-punk of Tenet,

Audet’s first fulllength

album

released as Un

Blonde, reflects

the young

songwriter

as he was

CONTINUED

ON PG. 20 k

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 17

MAYA FUHR


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

RUN FOR

COVER

Orville Peck breaks the rules of the

Wild West with his debut, Pony

By MAGGIE McPHEE

“Who was that masked man?”

was a classic query in old time westerns. The answer used to be “the

Lone Ranger” but now it’s Orville Peck, a risk-taking and mysterious

Canadian musician determined tor reinvent the country sound.

“North America feels the most like the

Wild West than it has in a long time,” says

Peck over the phone in a steady voice, worlds

away from his baritone that belts out ballads

of heartbreak and loneliness on his glimmering

debut, Pony.

“The rules don’t really matter that much

anymore, largely on a negative scale,” he says.

But to him these tumultuous times also inspire

subversive artists that reject the status

ORVILLE PECK

Vancouver:

Friday, May 19

The Wise Hall

Calgary:

Thursday, May 23

Commonwealth

Edmonton:

Saturday, May 25

The Starlite Room

Tix: $12

18 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


quo and make their own rules,

“like outlaws.”

Peck embraces the contradictions

of being a country musician;

a rebel and performer, clad in

rugged jeans and bedazzled satin

shirts, craving normalcy and seeking

freedom, embracing machismo

and homoeroticism. The phallic

imagery evoked by his 10-gallon

hat and fringed leather mask

is probably no accident. Within

these fluid binaries, he moulds

masculine western tropes into

something personal for him as a

queer musician.

At the core of this alchemy lies

a sense of respect for himself and

for country music listeners.

“A mainstream country radio

station would look at what I do

and think it’s too inappropriate for

their listeners,” Peck says. “But I

receive messages every day from

middle aged white men who live in

Alabama telling me they’re driving

their kids to school every day with

their wife and they’re all listening

to ‘Dead of Night’ in the car.”

Country music audiences are

dying for diversity and Peck feels

part of pushing for the genre’s

comeuppance. He harkens back

to his punk roots, laughing that

being a “weird country star” feels

like being a punk rocker because

he’s rallying against this “facade of

what people are still trying to push

as country music.”

His fans tell Peck they crave

fresh perspectives and idiosyncratic

stories. They want to outgrow

country music’s “stigma of

being a conservative, bland pedestrian

genre.”

Pony stands in bold opposition

to these stereotypes. Peck assembles

sprawling and sparkling landscapes

within which his cast of

outsiders love, lose, and long. On

opener “Dead of Night,” drawn

out chords craft a never-ending

desert for he and his man to drive

through.

Peck’s lingering, rumbling vocals

on “Big Sky” carve a skyscape

expansive enough to hold a lineage

of ex-lovers. And on “Buffalo Run,”

thrashing guitar and rhythmic

drums transmute into stampeding

buffalo.

Setting plays a major role in

Peck’s storytelling. “When I started

putting together these songs,

the places I’ve visited and the people

I’ve met, those are the things

that have really stuck with me.”

Having been on the move his

whole life, from the Pacific Northwest

to London, England, to Toronto,

Peck developed a strong

memory connection to environment.

“It’s definitely important to the

cowboy and western aesthetic because

it’s so much about travelling

and being this nomadic soul,” he

explains. “You leave a little piece

of yourself everywhere and you

take a little piece with you as well.”

These pieces sneak into Pony

in subtle ways. Peck draws inspiration

from his experiences on

the road as well as his personal

obsessions with theatre, cinema

and a slew of musical genres. He

cites new wave, gospel, girl groups,

punk and 80s rock as things he enjoys

that “just had to kind of creep

in for the record.” The end result

is a sound “rooted in outlaw country”

that can travel into rougher

territory and sometimes soars into

glittery falsetto.

“I think if you’re doing anything

with sincerity it will always have a

uniqueness to it,” he says.

Peck has just started his first full

North American tour. “I’m not really

a fan of apathy,” he says of performing.

“You can expect a lot of

drama and cool outfits and stories

wrapped up with sincerity, hopefully

to come and hang out in Orville

Peck’s world for a while.” ,

MASKED FOR MUSIC

Some artists love basking in the warm glow of the

bright stage lights they’re performing under. Others

would rather hide in anonymity and let the music

speak for itself. Here are some of our favourite

artists hiding in plain sight.

By BEN BODDEZ

Daft Punk

All hail the dance-party

powering robots. These iconic

helmets have evolved, now

coming equipped with colourful

LED displays. It’s rumoured that

these impressive and complex

extensions of the famous duo

cost $65,000 each to produce.

Nobunny

Wearing an unkempt bunny

mask and often not much

else, the identity of the sweaty

garage rock anti-hero isn’t as

hidden as most. At the same

time, it’s a strangely perfect,

albeit creepy, accompaniment

to his chaotic live shows.

Pussy Riot

Donning colourful balaclavas,

the Russian punk rock activists

remain masked for different

reasons than most as they’re

known to stage public protests.

“Anybody can be Pussy Riot, you

just need to put on a mask and

stage an active protest of something,”

says band member Nadia.

Leikeli47

More than a fashion statement,

Brooklyn rapper Leikeli47 says

her trademark bandannas and

balaclavas help her cope with

shyness. She takes her dedication

to the mask a step further, staying

concealed in interviews and other

public appearances as well.

Marshmello

The latest EDM star to cross

over to the pop world with

some big-name collaborations,

this sweet-tooth foam enclosure

was inspired by the artist’s

fascination with fellow masked

party starter Deadmau5. .

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 19


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

MAYA FUHR

YVES JARVIS

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

at 16, too avant-garde to be fully appreciated

by the population of the

Calgary streets he was busking on.

Its follow-up, Water the Next Day,

is a sonic chronicle of his relocation

to Montreal in his late teens. It picks

up that same experimental spirit

and drops it into mellow, contemplative

territory. Breaking away from

Un Blonde and adopting the name

Yves Jarvis with his latest release,

The Same but by Different Means, Audet

YVES JARVIS

doesn’t seek to reinvent his sound so much as

to richen it. Here and there, a lyric or melody

will break through the blanket of seemingly

infinite piano, organ, vocal harmonies, and

textural sounds. In such swirling, transitory

soundscapes, it’s the slight moments of

rupture and subtle ascensions that hold the

music together.

“It’s very ungrounded, unhinged, and impulsive,”

says Audet. “I guess at the centre, it’s

like fire or electricity. Something brilliant. The

only thing I think I could liken it to is chipping

away at wood. I’m working with one core, and

that’s what I’m trying to get at.”

Vancouver:

Saturday, May 4

KW Studios

Tix: $10, eventbrite.ca

Calgary:

Wednesday, May 8

King Eddy

Edmonton:

Friday, May 10

Sewing Machine Factory

Tix: $10

When Audet speaks, it’s equal parts

thought and vocalization. Speaking of his

own music, his voice contains a palpable

consideration and hesitation, as if not entirely

sure what to make of it yet. When talking

about the work of others, Joni

Mitchell in particular, his speech

quickens, his voice softens and the

conversation takes a tone of warm

familiarity. But regardless of who

made it, Jarvis speaks about music

poetically, using colours, textures

and experiences to paint a picture.

His appetite for listening to music

is just as insatiable as his drive

to make it, Audet draws inspiration

from sources old and new.

“I listen to absolutely everything,” says Audet.

“I won’t even say I have taste. Of course

I’m offended by music sometimes, but I try to

take in everything.”

The enigma of his ever-changing yet

unmistakable musical identity is something

Audet has been earning for years. He’s been

growing alongside it and documenting it

all the while, as if writing his music like one

would note their height on the doorframe of

the world.

Whichever direction he takes and whichever

colour he explores, one thing is certain:

each entry to come will be written a little

higher up than the last. ,

20 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


Tickets on sale now!

SQUEEZE PLAY

Hip-hop duo Snotty

SQUEEZE

PLAY

Nose Rez Kidz think

ahead and look towards

Dando the future and the with

Evan

Lemonheads responsibility break a

10-year hiatus with

By SAFIYA HOPFE

a second anthology

of covers

By GRAEME WIGGINS

MICHEL VAN COLLENBURG

THE LEMONHEADS

Thursday, May 18

Rickshaw Theatre

Tix: $25

E

nding a 10-year hiatus

with an album of covers

is one way to shrug off

any expectations. It’s

certainly in keeping

with The Lemonheads’

Evan Dando’s way of doing things.

The Lemonheads seemed poised for

greatness in the mid-90s; the combination

of Dando’s model looks, musical hooks and

slacker charm seemed destined to take

the world by storm. But a combination of

constant touring, drugs and off-stage antics

made for a slim discography. They took

a nine year hiatus starting in 1997, then

released two albums between 2006 and

2009, the latter all covers. Ten years later,

they’re back with a sequel: Varshons II.

“I’m competing for the most slacker of all

time because I haven’t finished my own record

yet,” says Dando. “I like other people’s

songs. It’s kind of a cool thing to do.”

It was also a nice way to get his feet wet

back in the studio after a long break.

“Been writing a bunch, but don’t really

have enough for a new album so I went in to

record a bunch of covers as something to

tour on until I get my album done. I like going

into the studio and letting it inspire me. It

was fun.”

The first Varshons album came about

from trading mixtapes with album producer

(and Butthole Surfers frontman) Gibby

Haines. It was an eclectic assortment of

songs that avoided clichéd choices. The

new one is also diverse with a brilliant Lucinda

Williams cover (“Abandoned”)

alongside punks The Eyes and

Nick Cave.

“A lot of them I’ve been doing

for years. Wouldn’t do something

like ‘Pale Blue Eyes’ or something

classic of all time, just songs that I really like.”

There were some sacred songs that

couldn’t be touched, to keep the album

fresh. “No Velvet, no Stooges, no Modern

Lovers. No Hendrix.” But there is an Eagles

song (“Take It Easy”) on there, and “Round

Here” by country superstars Florida Georgia

Line, which seems delightfully out of character.

“I like that song. It’s a hard one to like. It’s

a little overblown, a little over-produced. But

it’s a great song.”

After this tour, Dando hints at the possibility

of a new record.

“Going to start recording a new album.

I have a bunch of songs, and we’ll hit the

studio soon. Like a back to school thing. Get

a new record out.”

As much as he might be construed as a

slacker king, his perfectionist streak is really

the only hold up: “It’s not easy. I don’t want

to do it until it’s really good and I haven’t

got there yet. I’m trying. I’ve done a lot of

records I’m really proud of so I don’t want to

do one until I’ll be really proud of it. I should

be ready soon.”

Until then we have some great covers and

a tour of the hits. Hopefully the recent hiatus

will be the last and The Lemonheads will be

back in full. ,

Media partner

May 30 . 7:30 PM

Queen Elizabeth Theatre

Ticketmaster.ca

HAHAHA.COM

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 21


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

JENNY

LEWIS:

TO HELL

AND

BACK

Jenny Lewis takes ownership

of her narrative

with latest solo release

By KARINA ESPINOSA

T

he most striking thing about

speaking with Jenny Lewis

is the way she manages to

make our conversation seem

fluid and relaxed. As she

answers questions with tiny,

thoughtful details, she radiates

the charm of California

cool girl, but never comes

across as aloof.

“There’s a little bird making a nest

outside my bedroom window,” she

says. “It’s very cute, but it makes this

repetitive squeak that woke me up at

6:45 in the morning.”

According to Lewis, her neighbourhood

in Studio City, Los Angeles, is basically

a bird sanctuary. “My neighbours

are bird fanatics and they throw like, raw

meat to the ravens. There are so many

different kinds of birds, so yesterday I

just decided to do a little bird watching.”

But ravens feeding on raw meat? “Yeah,

I didn’t know that either until I stepped

onto a raw piece of ribeye,” Lewis says

without missing a beat.

There’s something to be said about

a person who can enliven the most

mundane small talk with vivid imagery.

Since her days as the front woman

of cult indie-rock band, Rilo Kiley,

Lewis has been a master storyteller,

drawing from everyday hardships and

heartaches of life. But for someone

who once wrote, “You say I choose

sadness, that it never once has chosen

me,” Lewis is surprisingly warm

and upbeat. “I’ve learned that positivity

is a choice for survival. I wouldn’t characterize

myself as happy or sad, but I

5 CHILD

STARS

TURNED

MUSICIANS

Jenny Lewis isn’t the only one

who established herself early on

as someone to watch in more

than one medium. Here are five

young movie and streaming stars

who transitioned their fame into a

music career. By BEN BODDEZ

AUTUMN DE WILDE

22 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


do try to see the glass as half-full—on

most days,” she says.

Lewis began her career as a child actor,

landing roles in TV shows like Growing

Pains and Troop Beverly Hills. But

it’s not a period she remembers fondly:

forced to mature early, she became the

sole breadwinner to support her mother

and sister. As to whether she’d ever return

to the profession, Lewis says she’s

open to anything “that feels right in the

moment,” especially if the dynamic is

healthy and the relationship is healing.

“But that kind of performance gives

me anxiety, and I don’t think I like playing

other people. Or maybe I do. I don’t

know. It was just such a big part of my

life, and I pivoted from acting so that I

could take control of the narrative creatively.

The idea of going back doesn’t

feel as exciting to me because it’s not

my story to tell.”

In writing music, she’s able to do

just that. Two years ago, Lewis began

recording On the Line, her fourth

solo effort, at Capitol Records in Los

Angeles. There, she had legendary

equipment—including the piano that

Carole King played on Tapestry and a

microphone used by Frank Sinatra—at

her disposal.

“There’s Frank Sinatra DNA in the

capsule of this microphone at Capitol

Records. And now my spit is with

Frank’s spit forever on this Neumann

mic. It’s pretty fucking cool,” she says

gushing. What’s more, Lewis assembled

a backing band of renowned musicians,

including Beck bassist and legendary

hitmaker, Don Was, and Ringo Starr.

It’s a far cry from early Rilo

Kiley when she and her

bandmates recorded music

on four-track tapes in her

living room. But Lewis says

that she still felt at home

playing with those big names on her

album.

“To end up in a studio with really seasoned

musicians was kind of a logical

step for me. I’m not making records in

my home anymore. I’m free to explore

different sounds and methods.” Recording

as a solo artist comes with its

insecurities, however, and Lewis admits

to feeling mixed emotions when she

tackles new work on her own.

“Freedom, fear, responsibility. You’re

alone, but you’re autonomous. You have

creative freedom and choice, but there

isn’t that one person you can turn to

and say, ‘Is this okay? Am I doing the

right thing?’ And to be single on top of

that, when in the past, my partner and I

would bounce off each other.”

But that experience, she concedes,

was ultimately rewarding. “You get to

make your own, pure vision. It’s still

collaborative, but at the end of the day

I’m the one making the decisions.”

On the Line is a sweeping symphony

of loss and rebirth. Written over multiple

years shortly after her breakup with

longtime partner, Jonathan Rice, it began

as an album of self-exploration. But when

Lewis’ estranged mother passed away

right before recording, the album took on

new meaning, and it became a way for

the songwriter to process her grief.

The barren piano ballad “Dogwood”

YVES JARVIS

Monday, May 20

Commodore Ballroom

Tix: $39.50, ticketmaster.ca

acts as the “core and soul”

of the record and reflects

the overall theme of losing a

loved one—romantic or familial.

It’s Lewis’ own favourite

track from the album, and

one she finds difficult to perform live.

“For me, it’s very moving. And I guess

some nights I don’t want to feel that

way. Or I don’t want to remember feeling

that way,” she confesses.

As anyone familiar with Lewis’ music

knows, her fraught relationship with

her mother has hung heavy over her

songwriting for years. But it’s always

appeared in oblique references, blurring

the line between memoir and fiction. It

isn’t immediately obvious, with its slick

groove and almost mythic lyrics, but

“Little White Dove” was written about

Lewis’ time with her mother at the hospital.

But in this instance, she and her

mother have reconciled.

“My mother is a great source of inspiration.

She’s a very mysterious figure

in my life and a complex person. I’ve

always tried not to be too judgemental

of her. My relationship with her is very

personal and formative and something

I’m trying to figure out in all areas of my

life. It’s just been a constant, and now

that she’s gone, I’m not sure that there’s

anything more I can write, honestly.”

She hesitates before adding, “It might

be time to start writing about something

else.”

It’s the beginning of a new chapter.

Now the “heroine” of her own story,

Lewis is in control and won’t let her past

pain dictate her future. ,

Juliette Lewis

Nominated for an

Academy Award at 18

for her role in Cape

Fear, Juliette Lewis –

no relation to Jenny

– has since released

seven albums, both

with indie rock band

Juliette and the Licks

and through her own

solo material. The

band is currently

working on their first

studio album since

2006.

Macaulay Culkin

The quintessential

child actor, Culkin

made a short-lived

venture into music

with parody rock

band the Pizza

Underground, which

replaced Velvet Underground

lyrics with

material surrounding

the doughy delicacy.

The band broke up

in 2016.

Finn Wolfhard

The Vancouverite

star of Stranger

Things and It didn’t

wait until adulthood

to pursue a music career.

The 16-year-old

frontman released

his debut EP with his

alternative rock outfit

Calpurnia in June

of last year and it’s

not as scary as you

might think based on

his acting resume.

Drake

The one of the

world’s most

streamed musician

made his debut

on the Canadian

high school drama

Degrassi at age 15,

leaving the show six

years later to pursue

a music career that

got him signed to Lil

Wayne’s Young Money

Entertainment.

Miley Cyrus

Miley Cyrus got her

start at age 11 in the

Tim Burton classic

Big Fish. And while

her dad, Billy Ray

Cyrus, might be

experiencing a small

career renaissance

on the back of country-trap

banger, “Old

Town Road,” Miley

continues in a long

line of teen Disney

stars turned *ahem*

adult musicians.


MUSiC COVER STORY

KALI

UCHIS

LIVES A RETRO

DAYDREAM

By Jamila Pomeroy

Kali Uchis, the stage-persona of

Karly-Marina Loaiza, is the Latina

Rosie the Riveter, here to serenade

you with her old school funky flavours

of R&B.

The Colombian-American singer/

songwriter is living a retro daydream

where only the aesthetic remains;

equal rights are praised and

celebrated; and women are at the

forefront of innovation.

Outside of music, Kali says she

spends her time “Investing in

property and going for long walks

on the beach.” Kali states through

her presence that strength can

be found in duality; embracing

old-school feminine visuals, with

modern feminist values.

Knowing her true purpose, often

skipped classes in high school

to spend time in the photo lab

making experimental short films,

explaining why her music videos

carry a highly cinematic quality.

This interest in photography led

her to creating mix-tape cover art,

and eventually music to pair with

these works. As a multidisciplinary

artist, Kali has been able to bridge

her personal aesthetic, persona,

and now empire, outward through

a multiplicity of expressions: all

remaining within the realm of

vintage, pin-up, and visuals of old

KALI & J

24 BEATROUTE MAY 2019

CONTINUED ON PG. 26 k


JORJA

SMITH

STAYS LOST

IN THE STARS

By Jordan Yeager

ORJA

Jorja Smith emanates self-assured

grace and confidence,

an embodiment of the duality

of being both soft-spoken and

completely badass. The young

singer is contemplative, poised,

and to the point, carefully handpicking

words to convey the

thoughts spinning around the

heights of her Gemini mind.

Though her ascent to stardom

might seem sudden, Smith has

been hard at work for years. She

started writing songs and playing

keyboard as a child; some

tracks off her debut album Lost

& Found were written when she

was 16. She’s 21 now.

“My parents always encourage

me to do what I love and

follow my dreams,” says Smith.

CONTINUED ON PG. 26 k

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 25


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

BEN HOUDIJK / SHUTTERSTOCK

DARROL EPALMER

KALI

UCHIS

and really just any type

of artist that seemed like

they were doing their own

thing.”

PNE Forum

For Kali, being a female

pop star in 2019 Tix: $49.50

means using her platform

for philanthropic deeds,

speaking at the podium

of women’s empowerment

and approaching

life with a kind heart. She has been

JORJA SMITH AND

KALI UCHIS

Vancouver:

Wednesday, May 22

Toronto:

Thursday, May 30

RBC Echo Beach

Tix: $49.50 - $175.00

hometown in Colombia

with her charity, Visión

Valores Y Vida.

“I have my own charity

with my family in

Colombia and all the

proceeds go to Visión

Valores Y Vida.” The

foundation, which is primarily

geared towards

providing clothing and

toys to children was announced last

JORJA

SMITH

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

playing music since she was seven year.

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

school Latina culture.

While all things retro may be today’s

craze , for Kali, these vintage

vibes were born out of necessity and

generating a persona within limitations.

and says she was “one of those little

kids making drum beats off of pots

“I think growing up, my goal has

always been to be successful enough

to be an independent person who

doesn’t need help from anyone and

can do whatever I want to do and

also a provider, not just for my family

“I’ve always loved all things retro. I just loved being but to other people in less fortunate

As a teenager, I developed my personal

style shopping for secondhand

For Kali, the topic hits close to

situations.”

able to take

clothes and creating new clothes out something old and home. Her father grew up on the

of them. I would reinvent myself make it new, fresh, streets of Colombia as a kid, and her

through those expressions of fashion

and play around with vintage

tershocks of Colombia’s decades of

family was deeply affected by the af-

modern and make it

styles whether that was the 90s, 80s, my own.”

political turmoil.

70s or 60s I just loved being able to

Through her many artistic platforms,

take something old and make it new, and pans.” Encircled by music in her

philanthropic expressions,

fresh, modern and make it my own,”

she says.

Influenced by music of the 60s,

early soul, R&B, doo-wop, and jazz,

Kali bridges visuals of the past with

rhythms reminiscent of early 00s’

soulful pop and R&B: “I love artists

that are free and do what they want

to. I’ve always loved Erykah Badu,

Amy Winehouse and Selena. Growing

up I was really into all types of

experimental music: Jimi Hendrix

community and encouragement by

her family, Kali grew up playing piano

and saxophone, while participating in

a jazz band. She spent those years in a

bicultural upbringing in Virginia and

Colombia.

“I think being bicultural made me

very open minded to the world.”

With a global and empathetic eye,

Kali participates in many philanthropic

efforts helping children and

families in need, in and around her

and as she continues to build her empire,

Kali believes the route of true

success comes from a place of kindness

and a place of softness.

“If all of us had empathy and were

reminded of people who are in less

fortunate circumstances then we

could turn a lot of lives around and

have the opportunity to do something

greater. It’s something that I’ve

always personally tried to keep in

mind and stay passionate about.” ,

“They boosted my confidence

early. I used to sing all the time in

the house and play them songs

I’d written. My mom got me into

playing the keyboard when I was

eight.”

Some of us would be mortified

to read songs we’d written in our

Don’t compare

yourself to other

artists as we all

have our own path.

Love and believe in

what you do.”

vulnerable, awkward teenage

years, let alone perform them in

front of global audiences. But

Smith transcends that embarrassment

– she knew herself

then, just as she does now.

“It’s mad to think things I go

through now I can relate to

through my music from years

ago,” she says. “They can give me

the same feeling.”

Growing up in the small town

of Walsall, England, Smith was a

fish too big for her tank. She got

restless, and by 16, she knew she

wanted to move to London to

pursue music.

“I didn’t know any different than

Walsall when I grew up,” she says.

“When I started going to London

I realized that’s where I wanted to

be. I’m a busy body and love to be

constantly doing things.”

Smith has collaborated with

artists like Stormzy, Drake, and

most recently Kali Uchis, who is

accompanying her on this North

American tour. But she’ll never

work with someone just for the

clout. In fact, she almost said no

to working with Drake.

“I write my own songs, and ‘Get

It Together’ was a cover for me

to sing,” she says. “At first I didn’t

relate to the words, but over time

things changed in my life and I

listened back. I was like, ‘Oh, now

I get what she is saying.’”

The singer-songwriter has always

known what she wants, and

to witness her thoughtful process

is to know that she is right in her

certainty that she’ll succeed. Her

advice to anyone chasing similar

goals is poignant.

“Don’t compare yourself to

other artists as we all have our

own path. Love and believe in

what you do, explore your craft

and push yourself even further

than you think you can go. Don’t

be afraid of criticism either – it

can help. But trust yourself.” ,

26 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


THE

REAL

DEAL

Canadian rapper

SonReal finally taps

into his true self

on The Aaron LP

By LEYLAND BRADLEY

SONREAL

Victoria:

Sunday, May 26

Capital Ballroom

Vancouver:

Thursday, July 11

Commodore Ballroom

Calgary:

Wednesday, May 22

Commonwealth

Edmonton:

Thursday, May 23

The Starlite Room

Tix: $15, Ticketweb.ca

“I just got back

from Coachella,”

says Aaron Hoffman, aka BC-rapper

SonReal, in a voice filled with the

sort of excitement you’d expect from

someone fresh from a few days in a

desert musical oasis. “Honestly, for me,

Coachella is more of a grind. It’s gogo-go,

and by the end of it you’re just

annihilated.”

Was it worth it?

“Yes.”

His favourite performance? “Weezer.

Hands down.”

SonReal is one of the most creative

and hardest working rappers in

Canada. Fresh from another JUNO

nomination, this time for Video of the

Year—his fourth JUNO nom since

2013—SonReal recently announced

his first world tour to accompany his

upcoming introspective full-length, The

Aaron LP, out May 10.

Seven countries in three months is a

lot for any artist, but for SonReal, touring

is all about connecting

with his fans around the

world.

“When an artist is really

cult and they’re bubbling

and boiling, and the fans are

loving it, things can happen

really quickly. It’s out of

everyone’s hands at that

point,” he says.

“When I played Europe

last time, I could see people

singing my songs, watching

me and just singing along.

I mean, I’m not the biggest artist in the

world, so seeing that made me want to

make more music, better music.”

After the release 2017’s One Long

Dream, SonReal commemorated the

passing of his father with the song and

video “My Friend.” The need to tell his

story and rethink what sharing his private

life versus public life meant to him

paved the way for a new approach.

“The Aaron LP is what my mom, my

sister or my dad would think sounds

the most like me. After my dad passed,

I was like, ‘I’ve got to say whatever the

hell I’ve got to say,’ so this is really the

first time I’ve been this vulnerable and

this open on an album. It also sounds

really cohesive. I literally recorded the

entire thing in one room, by myself. It

was just me.”

Passionate would be an understatement

for SonReal. Now 33 years old,

SonReal still puts in the work, and he’s

confident in what the future holds.

“Honestly, I’ve been doing this for so

long. There’s no telling how big this is

going to get,” he says. “I’m so hyped.

I’m excited. I’m just beaming.” ,

RIO

THEATRE

1660 EAST BROADWAY

MAY

3

MAY

4

MAY

5

MAY

6

MAY

7

MAY

8

MAY

10

MAY

12

MAY

13

MAY

15

MAY

17

MAY

18

MAY

24

MAY

27

MAY

May the Fourth be With You!

The Geekenders present

A NUDE HOPE:

A SCI-FI BURLESQUE ADVENTURE

Also May 4 & 5

TALKING HEADS: STOP MAKING SENSE

Friday Late Night Movie

Oscar-winner

GREEN BOOK

Additional dates www.riotheatre.ca

Japanimation Classic!

PERFECT BLUE

20th Anniversary Remaster

FREE SOLO

Final Screening

UWE Boll Live for Q & A!!

F**K YOU ALL: THE UWE BOLL STORY

Ethan Hawke & Noomi Rapace

STOCKHOLM

#CDNFilm

Filmmakers in Attendance!

ONCE UPON A SUPERHERO

STORY STORY LIE

Fight Club

The Gentlemen Hecklers Present

TOP GUN

La Maison Lust Presents

WET Also May 11

John Waters’

SERIAL MOM

Friday Late Night Movie

Happy Mother’s Day!

CatVideoFest 2019

MAMMA MIA!

The Yes Men’s

MIKE BONNANO

Live!

COCO MONTOYA

Live!

The Fictionals Comedy Co. Presents

IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY

#IAHatRio

Double Feature!

Keanu Reeves

JOHN WICK 1 & 2

David Cronenberg’s

A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE

Friday Late Night Movie

The Geekenders Present

DUNGEONS & DRAGLESQUE

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW

Sing-a-long!

GREASE

Also June 22

AMERICAN HISTORY X

Friday Late Night Movie

THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW

A #DNDLive Improv Comedy Adventure

JUNE

Paul Anthony’s

TALENT TIME

6 First Thursday of Every Month!

*www.riotheatre.ca for additional times

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA

S

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 27


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

MARC DE VINCI

ORAL MORALS

Hip-hop duo Snotty

Nose Rez Kids think

ahead and look back

to the future with

responsibility

By SAFIYA HOPFE

Fast-rising West Coast rappers

Darren “Young D” Metz and Quinton

“Yung Trybez” Nyce remember when

their relatives in Kitimat would call

them “snotty nosed kids from the

rez” with endearment– carefree kids

who wouldn’t let a few boogers get

in their way. Now, they go by “Snotty

Nose Rez Kids” to honour being a little

rough around the edges, and that

this is what makes them beautiful.

The journey of the last couple of

years has been wild, and in many

ways unexpected– but they say it’s a

dream come true.

Since their 2017 debut, they’ve

been nominated for the

Polaris, a Juno, and best

hip-hop album at the Indigenous

Music Awards.

But Nyce says, they’re not

in it for that. “At the end of

the day, it’s just to have a

positive impact on people.”

The project started as

a vision when the two

were in school preparing

to work nine-to-five jobs.

Since then, each album

SNOTTY NOSE

REZ KIDS

has had what Metz calls a “snowball

effect.” “With each project” says

Metz, “trying to get up there, trying

to define ourselves and our style, we

healed in ways that we thought we

couldn’t heal. And not just that, but

helping others heal.”

In late 2017, The Average Savage

marked Nyce and Metz’s emergence

from their shells. This sparked a

healing journey as they explored

their roots and their power through

verse. New record Traplines, signifies

that they now have their confidence.

It was this confidence in their collective

voice that brought it into being.

Last summer, the two wanted to

make a mixtape, Rez Bangers & Koolapops,

but realized a project of that

scale wouldn’t be true to them. They

wanted to make a full-length record–

and they wanted it to have a message.

And the time really couldn’t be

riper. After all, as Nyce points out,

our planet is dying, slowly but surely.

Describing the album, he says, “It’s a

reminder to people that the land we

come from comes with responsibility.

Our ancestors upheld those re-

Vancouver:

Thursday, May 30

Fortune Sound Club

Victoria:

Friday, June 7

Capital

Calgary:

Tuesday, May 21

Commonwealth

Edmonton:

Wednesday, May 22

99ten

Tix: $15, Ticketweb.ca

sponsibilities and passed

those responsibilities

down to us.”

He adds, “People need

inspiration from an outside

source, not necessarily

holding them up

on the frontlines. We give

them a different energy.

We make anthems for

that sort of thing.”

Although forward-thinking

action is

definitely a focus of theirs, Snotty

Nose Rez Kids are far from forgetting

where they came from. Having been

raised in a culture and an environment

where oral storytelling is pivotal,

their work is in many ways shaped

by what their grandparents, parents,

aunties and uncles shared with them

in hours spent at the dinner table. “A

lot of the stuff on Trapline, is a lot of

just that,” says Nyce.. “My mum’s on

the opening skit, she’s telling us exactly

what our traplines are and what

they mean, letting us know that we

don’t own these traplines we don’t

own this land, but we have a responsibility

to preserve it, protect it, and

pass it onto the next generation for

us to survive. So we give and we take,

when it comes to storytelling.”

They aim to speak not only for

themselves but for all of those who

came before them. Nyce describes

this as a relationship of responsibility.

“Without us, there’s a missing link.

The generation before us can’t have

that information passed on to the

generation after us without our link.”

,

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 29


MAY

WED 1

NICK WATERHOUSE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FM-84

THU 9 WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

TUE 21

IQ 2000 TRIVIA:

SEINFELD

THU 2

LADY LAMB

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FRI 10

NO REQUEST FRIDAYS

WITH ALAN

SUN 19

MOGLI

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FRI 3

NO REQUEST FRIDAYS

SUN 12

W/ ALAN & BAZZ

IQ 2000: RU PAUL’S DRAG RACE

TRIVIA NIGHT

MON 20

NEXT FOOLISH MUSIC FAR FROM BACK TOKYO

VOL BIG 14. SHOES. BIG HAIR. BIG ATTITUDES.

FRI 3

DIZZY

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT 11 SAT 25

OMAR APOLLO

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

NITE FOOLISH MOVESFAR BACK

DANCE BIG PARTY SHOES. JAMS BIG HAIR. FOR BIG THE ATTITUDES. YOUNG, RESTLESS, & BORED!

SAT 4

TELEKINESIS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT TUE 17 14

LAUREN STEVENSON

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT

FRI

17

24

JESSE ROPER

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT SAT 17 4

BYE FELICIA

MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU

THU 16

LIZ COOPER & THE STAMPEDE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FRI 24

NO REQUEST FRIDAYS

WITH ALAN & BAZZ

SUN 5

JON BRYANT

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

CAMP COPE

FRI 17 VANCITY ROYALTY DRAG PARTY!

SUN 26

THE AMERICAN WET DREAM 2:

WETTER & DREAMIER

TUE 7

WAND

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT 17 FOXING & NOW, NOW

SAT 18

SAT

FRI

17

31

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

THE SKINTS & JESSE ROYAL

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FRI 10

JESSE RUTHERFORD

BYE FELICIA

SAT 18 WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

ANYTHING GOES!

THU 30

THE OUTtv OFFICIAL RUPAUL’S

DRAG RACE SEASON 11 FINALE PARTY


SPENCER MARSH

Reviews

MUSiC

Mac

rides

the indie

range

Album Review

MAC DeMARCO

Here Comes the Cowboy

MAC’S RECORD LABEL/

ROYAL MOUNTAIN RECORDS

2018 saw the rise of the “yeehaw

agenda,” a movement revolving

around the reclamation of cowboy

culture. It started slowly and gained

traction through memes, songs like

Beyoncé’s “Daddy Lessons,” and

even TikTok, which helped skyrocket

“Old Town Road” by Lil Nas X to

stratospheric heights.

This year, we have prince of indie

rock Mac DeMarco jumping on the

yeehaw train with his fourth album,

Here Comes the Cowboy. It’s the

first album to be released on his

new label, Mac’s

Record Label.

In “Hey Cowgirl,”

DeMarco invites a

cowgirl to “try the

big city lights for a

while,” and “All of

Our Yesterdays” is a

bittersweet number

about the passage

of time, featuring

country-inspired lead

licks and an absolutely beautiful

sun-drenched chorus.

DeMarco’s previous album, This

Old Dog, his most personal release

to date, contained lyrics relating

to his relationship (or lack thereof)

with his alcoholic father. On Here

Comes the Cowboy, DeMarco still

has some serious feelings to unburden

through his usual brand of

laid back indie rock. One example

is the slow and solemn lead single

“Nobody,” where he expresses his

disillusionment with being in the

public eye and how he can’t go

back to being a nobody.

We also get to see his classic

goofball persona shine through for

the first time since his debut album,

2. On “Choo Choo,” he sings about

riding a train over funky instrumentals,

and at the end of “Baby Bye

Bye,” there’s a two-minute-long jam

outro with DeMarco falsetto singing

“yeehaw,” with plenty of screaming,

and maniacal cackling.

Here Comes the Cowboy isn’t exactly

country, but it shows DeMarco

is willing to take risks. Musically,

it’s minimalistic, but there’s beauty

in its simplicity. He wears his heart

on his sleeve through his lyrics and

proves again that he’s a compelling

songwriter and a driving force in

indie rock.

Robann Kerr


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

ALEX LAHEY

The Best of Luck Club

Dead Oceans

The Best of Luck Club is the second

album from Melbourne, Australia’s

indie sweetheart Alex Lahey. A

great choice for fans of Liz Phair’s

Exile in Guyville and Lahey’s fellow

Aussie icon, Courtney Barnett.

The Best of Luck Club is a simple

but enjoyable pop album. After

her debut, Love You Like a Brother,

where fans might have hoped for

more emotional depth, they’re met

with just as catchy, slightly more

hollow pop songs.

The first single from the album,

“Don’t Be So Hard on Yourself,”

stands out with a cheesy but

charismatic saxophone solo from

Lahey as the focal point. The high

energy teen anthem, “Am I Doing It

Right?” pulls from more pop-punk

influences and certainly wouldn’t

sound out of place playing at your

local Hot Topic, especially when

she shouts “Don’t say I’ve got nothing

to prove” in the chorus.

“Unspoken History” and “I Want

to Live With You” stand out as the

emotional core of the album, both

introspective ballads dealing with

relationships.

Towards the end of the album

the songs begin to blend into each

other, fitting into a similar stylistic

pattern. Though it feels like a step

back from where the artist could’ve

gone after her debut, The Best

of Luck Club still manages to be

an entertaining sophomore effort.

Kenn Enns

AMYL AND THE

SNIFFERS

Amyl and the Sniffers

ATO/Rough Trade/Flightless

Records

Australia’s Amyl and the Sniffers

have made a name for themselves

in the past year due to their wild,

hedonistic live performances,

which often feature frontwoman

Amy Taylor completely disintegrating

the barrier between band and

audience.

Amyl and the Sniffers’ self-titled

debut harnesses this explosive

energy into a 29-minute, 11-track,

breathless sprint of an album

that is as fun as their live shows

promise.

Amyl and the Sniffers is, at its

core, an update to the breakneck

glory days of the 70s, when rock

and roll was fuelled primarily by

endless cheap booze and amphetamines.

Dirtbag anthems, such as lead

single “Got You,” are drenched

in nihilism and pandemonium as

the band swirls and rips around

Taylor, feeling like they could come

undone at any moment. And like

the best luminaries of rock and roll,

Taylor manages to hold everything

together through sheer force of

will, a testament to her strength

and power as one of the most

engaging performers today.

After the hype they garnered

at this year’s SXSW, Amyl and the

Sniffers are rocket-bound for the

highest echelons of rock royalty, an

immediate and unstoppable tour de

force that leaves you gasping for

more. Sebastian Buzzalino

BLACK MOUNTAIN

Destroyer

Dine Alone

If you’ve been missing the clean

refreshing taste of Canada’s psychrock

darlings Black Mountain, the

time is now to rejoice. Destroyer

has arrived just in time to quench

your summertime blues and transport

you to their silver mothership

in the sky.

Far from an abandonment of

their 70s space rock roots, Destroyer

pulls its sinister title from

the 1985 Dodge speed demon of

the same name.

Peeling away from the post with

the Sabbathy overture “Future

Shade,” the expanded ensemble

lays a fuzz-covered offering on the

cybernetic altar of “Horns Arising.”

Video game monitors tumble

down the hillside like granite boulders

and levitate in a field of static

electricity on “Closer to the Edge”

and the lackadaisical Beatles meltdown,

“Pretty Little Lazies.”

Hip-thrust hustle and string

bending swagger rule the galaxy

on the mercurial “High Rise”

and “License to Drive,” while the

leather-wrapped “Boogie Lover”

oozes with nocturnal heaviness.

Reboot and unwind with “FD 72”,

Black Mountain’s zero G tribute to

the man who fell to Earth, and then

return to launch sequence and

start all over again.

Christine Leonard

L7

Scatter the Rats

Blackheart Records

It’s been 20 years since L7, the

cultish Los Angeles collective, released

their last album, Slap-Happy,

but vocalist/guitarist Donita

Sparks and friends haven’t struck

the revolution off their to-do lists.

Scatter the Rats is a streetsmart

11 floor elevator ride

complete with leather fringe, mirror

balls and a giant bag of cocaine.

Ballsy Sunset Strip sizzlers like

the surfy “Burn Baby” and “Fighting

the Crave” showcase marquee

grooves and flash bomb riffs, while

roadhouse ramblers “Prototype”

and “Murky Water Cafe” betray a

brittle frailty.

Shades of a newly made over

identity emerge on the sweetly

suburban “Holding Pattern,” but

domesticity is short-lived as they

dive back into the gutter with “Cool

About Easy” and revel in the grimy

catcall of a title track.

Revving into high gear for “Ouija

Board Lies” and “Garbage Truck”

the jaded foursome summons a

western-tinged punk rock momentum

that will ultimately leave

you passed out on your front lawn

come morning.

If this anarcho-femme punk band

goes down in history for one thing

it will undoubtedly be their 1992

smash hit “Shit List,” but coincidentally

Scatter The Rats continues

with the perfect anthem for the

modern #MeToo era.

Christine Leonard

LIZZO

Cuz I Love You

Atlantic Records

Fresh off a breakthrough Coachella

performance, the genreless

singer, rapper and flautist has been

having a meteoric rise this year,

appearing as a guest judge on

RuPaul’s Drag Race and promoting

her empowering self-love anthems

across the late-night TV circuit.

Cuz I Love You is a project

infused with Lizzo’s infectious

personality, dropping quotable and

fun rap lyrics while also translating

her loud, unapologetic nature into

passionate and impressively soulful

R&B material. Thirty seconds into

the opening title track, Lizzo has already

sung a full-voiced a cappella

soul belt, and giggled as she raps.

Structured more like a series of

high-octane dancefloor fillers than

a cohesive album, it still works because

Lizzo’s all-out celebration of

all aspects of her identity is genuinely

inspiring. She celebrates body

positivity on “Tempo,” interracial

love on “Better in Color” and enjoys

the single life on “Soulmate.”

Songs written for the primary

purpose of being a feel-good anthem

can often elicit eye-rolls, but

Lizzo is both authentically herself

and inclusive enough that it’ll make

anyone want to join her party.

Ben Boddez

32 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


SCHOOLBOY Q

CrasH Talk

Interscope Records

TACOCAT

This Mess Is A Place

Sub Pop

TARIQ

Telegrams

Tonic Records

THE NATIONAL

I Am Easy To Find

4AD

VAMPIRE WEEKEND

Father of the Bride

Columbia Records

After delaying his fifth studio

album following the death of

his close friend Mac Miller, TDE

rapper ScHoolboy Q’s CrasH Talk

is finally here. Taking a break from

the quirky high-concept material of

his past, every song on this project

gets straight to the point.

ScHoolboy Q has never been

the most technically gifted rapper,

but he certainly has one of the

most commanding voices in the

rap game. Often rhyming over

what sounds like a horror movie

soundtrack with a trap beat, Q’s

menacing, grimy delivery slices

through and draws attention even

when he’s not saying all that much.

There’s a lot of empty space in his

flow, choosing each of his words

carefully.

CrasH Talk is one of Q’s most

cohesive projects yet in terms of its

sound. Skittering hi-hats keep the

energy up throughout, but the album

offers a few surprises as well

when Q adapts his sound to fit his

guests. “Lies” sees him playing off

the soulful Ty Dolla $ign, while he

dives into the paranoid psychedelia

of Kid Cudi on “Dangerous”. The

best guest of all proves to be 21

Savage on “Floating,” spitting the

closest thing to Q’s brand of understated

yet threatening confidence.

Ben Boddez

After 10 years surfing the soundwaves

of fun bubblegum punk,

Seattle-based quartet Tacocat shift

to a softer, more polished brand

of pop.

Featuring punchy, kick drum-driven

rhythms, Beach Boys-esque choruses

and lyrics free of pretension,

This Mess Is A Place is an energetic

jaunt through bouncy melodies.

Singer Emily Nokes takes the

lead with her all-or-nothing singing

style that is garnished with winding

inflections that nod to the late Dolores

O’Riordan of The Cranberries.

Many tracks aren’t as straightforward

as you might expect from a

punk band. Tacocat make frequent

detours from their main chord

progressions to explore more

hook-laden melodies.

WIth This Mess Is A Place,

Tacocat wear the pop punk title

well, putting together dynamic

tracks that feel decidedly upbeat

while expressing thoughts that are

decidedly not, like on their summertime

anthem, “Crystal Ball,” when

Nokes proclaims, “What a time to

be barely alive,” like a victory cry.

Judah Schulte

For his fifth full length, Vancouver’s

Tariq offers 10 immaculately

produced folk songs with the

thoughtfulness of an artist who

has been doing so for more than

20 years. Perhaps his lushest and

most cinematic release to date, the

record has the a big-band level of

grandeur with almost every track

featuring brass and string arrangements.

Though the instrumentation

is consistently grand and sunny,

Tariq’s lyrics are unsparingly candid

while drawing deeper meaning

from everyday life in the Pacific

Northwest.

“Coquihalla” kicks things off

with plucky piano and a rhythm

that bounces. Almost nodding to

the title of the opening song, the

tracklist plays out like a road trip on

a sunny day. With instrumentation

that is almost always playful and

soaring and the lyrics meaningful

but never morose, one can imagine

listening to Telegrams around a fire

on a summer night.

The record glitters most for “Radio

Song,” a folk pop gem, while the

finishing track, “Light of the Moon,”

returns to a more traditional roots

music with an acoustic guitar and

cascading layers of vocals.

Tariq continues the folk tradition

of making extraordinary stories of

ordinary occurrences and people,

but with a modern polish and lustre.

Telegrams is an uplifting addition to

Canadiana folk music.

Judah Schulte

The National are known for their

obsession with sex, love, death and

relationships through their musical

expressions. Whether it’s dainty

piano notes or quickened drum

beats, lead singer Matt Berninger’s

iconic voice, often comparable to

Leonard Cohen and Nick Cave,

strings the pensively sad lyrics into

indie-rock instrumentals.

Their eighth album, I Am Easy To

Find, strikes with a force, bringing

new attributes to the table. Not

only is it the longest recorded

album so far, but nearly every track

also features female vocalists.

I Am Easy To Find includes Lisa

Hannigan, Sharon Van Etten, Mina

Tindle, Kate Stables, and Gail

Ann Dorsey, David Bowie’s former

bandmate, heard on “Oblivions,”

“Roman Holiday” and “Hey Rosey.”

Another female contribution is

Berninger’s wife, Carin Besser,

who also wrote several songs. Her

optimistic, romantic lyrics bring the

band into a new fold, differing from

the well-known difficult lyrics highlighting

self-loathing and shattered

relationships.

Berninger’s deep, sunken

baritone lifts and soars through his

wife’s lyrics, inviting listeners into

music more hopeful than before.

In their 2013 album Trouble Will

Find Me, the album finished with

the melancholic track “Hard to

Find,” and since then, it seems

they’ve changed their minds.

Lauren Edwards

The six-year wait between Vampire

Weekend albums may have felt like

an eternity, but fear not, Father of

the Bride is here and you’ll want to

be the one catching the bouquet.

Frontman Ezra Koenig teased

early in the game via Instagram

that the band’s new album would

be “a lil more springtime” than

2013’s Modern Vampires of the

City.

Father of the Bride boasts a

whopping 18 songs, a total Koenig

reports was even tough to pair

down from the potential 23. With

its lush arrangements and bouncy

lyrics, Koenig has delivered on his

spring-like vision and brought some

friends along for the ride.

Appearances from Steve Lacy

of The Internet, Jenny Lewis of Rilo

Kiley, and David Longstreth of Dirty

Projectors add a freshness to the

band’s sound.

One previously released single

is the blissed-out “Sunflower,”

blossoming with its dream-pop

demeanor paired with plucky vocals

and a kaleidoscopic-like video

directed by Jonah Hill.

Pop aside, there are also gentle

country influences throughout,

with the help of vocals by Danielle

Haim of HAIM in “Married in a Gold

Rush” offering a back-and-forth

duet of two lovers promising a

brighter future together.

Leyland Bradley

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 33


LOCAL ALBUMS

THE PIETASTERS Leroy Sibbles

DUB PISTOLS (DJ SET) ONE DROP

THE LEG UP PROGRAM MAT THE ALIEN

ENTANGADOS MAMA PULPA Chainska BRASSIKA

VIEJA SKINA SWEETLEAF LOWDOWN BRASS BAND

THE BANDULUS SCOtCH BONNETS SALSAHALL COLLECTIVE

DEf 3 THE BRROKS THE CAPITAL COLLECTIVE ERICA DEE LIVE

TANK GYAL BOOGAT MT. DOYLE STEPHEN LEWIS MERYEM SACI

BLACKWOOD KINGS GREENLAW DANNY REBEL & THE KGB PHONOSONICS

GANJO BASSMAN APEX BREAKS DJ ANGER HANDSOME TIGER REBEL SELECTOR

THE FUNKEE WADD BOOMSHACK BREHDREN TECSTYLEZ SEXWEATHER DJ ABEL

JULES UNO DUNDIDIT

ALEX LITTLE & THE

SUSPICIOUS MINDS

No Control EP

Light Organ

Alex Little and her band of musical misfits

ironically reel it in and take the reins on

their debut EP, No Control. The five tracks

mix confident rock and roll with pop

sensibilities and psychedelic undertones.

Little offsets heavy subject matter like

substance abuse and heartbreak with her

made-for-college-radio vocals that break

through with a whiskey and cigarette

coated clarity. Rounded out by Andy

Bishop (White Ash Falls), drummer Cody

Hiles (The Zolas) and bassist Mike Rosen,

the band recall all the right elements of

the Cure and the Pretenders while making

a modern sound all their own.

Lauren Edwards

JOVANA GOLUBOVIC

Act: Natural

Independent

There’s something deliciously retro

about Jovana Golubovic’s latest. It’s a

soundtrack befitting Hepburn-esque cigarette

holders, floor length silk nightgowns

and black and white stills of rainy nights

illuminated by gas lamp posts.

The 10-track album, set for release

June 2, features cooing vocals from the

Serbian born Golubovic, where she talks

lost, complicated and broken love. The

vocals stand apart, complemented by the

antique ‘ohh’ and ‘aww’ of background

singers, piano melodies and, of course,

the timelessly seductive saxophone. The

album is unapologetically nostalgic, a

sexy and elegant homage to times gone

by.

Kathryn Helmore

APOSTROPHIC

These Old Tapes

Tastefaker Records

Vancouver electronic producer Apostrophic

begins this bone-crushing EP with

a seven-minute track that conjures the

image of a single passenger on a sinking

ship as the horns blare. The hull is torn to

shreds and the passenger sinks into the

murky deep.

These Old Tapes is a grand, Hans Zimmer-esque

operatic record that comes on

as destructive until it eventually simmers

into a serene calmness as notes are

drawn out, backed by hypnotic, echoing

percussion.

Exciting and satisfying, These Old

Tapes is confident and is a strong

contender for one of the best Vancouver

electronic EPs this year.

Joey Lopez

KIMMORTAL

X Marks The Swirl

Coax Records

Vancouver rapper Kimmortal’s latest project

X Marks the Swirl demonstrates her

abilities as a storyteller with a series of

tracks that examine aspects of her queer

Filipino identity and spirituality.

Mostly backed by ethereal, contemplative

synths and strings, it allows the

listener to pay even more attention to the

importance of what she’s saying. Her vocals

are always the most interesting part,

especially when she showcases some

impressive speedy flows to accompany

her lyricism.

Also in her arsenal is a fluttery, quieter

singing voice that provides a great contrast

to her up-front confidence in speaking

about her experiences. Ben Boddez

34 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


Live

MUSiC

ALICE IN

CHAINS

April 10, 2019

Queen Elizabeth Theatre

Switching up the classic Alice

in Chains live experience by

demoting the monster stacks

of guitar and bass amps in the

background for huge lighting

rigs instead was a

defining choice of the

evening.

Mirroring their recent

venture into the

sci-fi realm, their

light show made it

seem like the band were

performing in an alien

spacecraft.

Bathing in orange

radiating from the massive

floodlights, the audience

would witness an Alice in

Chains still in a state of

growth. The fire within to

perform was on full display as

Mike Inez made an example

out of his bass, pummeling it

just inches away from faces in

the front row. William Duvall,

who never stayed in the same

place twice, strode the stage

reaching skyward as if to rip

inspiration from the heavens

to use in his wailing vocal

performance.

From the opening dissonance

of “The One You

Know,” the emotional heaviness

of AIC’s vast catalogue

came alive. The atmosphere

would only get heavier as the

glaring light boxes flipped

around mid-set to reveal massive

video screens. As oblique

images swept across the

stage, an emotionally riveting

tribute to deceased former

bandmates Layne Staley and

Mike Starr played out during

“Nutshell” as Jerry Cantrell

cooked up some heartfelt

guitar solos.

Nearing the end of a

lengthy encore, the venue

was transformed into a giant

intergalactic beer hall. As

everyone screamed, “If I

would, could you?” it was

conclusive; the gravitational

pull of Alice in Chains is

still undeniably heavy.

Dan Potter

KIRA CLAVELL

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 35


DARROLE PALMER

MUSiC LIVE REVIEWS

MAGGIE ROGERS

April 17, 2019

The Commodore Ballroom

ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” blared through

the speakers as Maggie Rogers came

bounding from stage right, skipping and

clapping, embodying the energy of a young

Fiona Apple. She opened her set with “Give

A Little” as she released her hair from a

top bun, allowing it to dance as freely as

she was.

Rogers has the ability to take you on an

undeniable, unforgettable lyrical journey, as

if every song was not just a part of her life,

but part of yours.

“In different cities I find the space to

work through things by dancing,” Rogers

said, softly addressing the audience.

Integrating nature and calm tones into

her set had the audience sitting at her feet,

looking up asking for more. From “Falling

Water” to “Back In My Body” and “Light

On,” she never stopped dancing, sharing

and reminding fans why she’s infamously

known for once bringing Pharrell Williams

to tears.

After the audience stopped chanting

her name, pleading for more, Rogers stood

centre stage, mic in hand, saying, “I’m just

going to sing,” and offered a beautiful a

capella send off.

Clarence Sponagle

EARL

SWEATSHIRT

April 15, 2019

The Commodore Ballroom

Rap shows aren’t known for their punctuality,

so when Earl Sweatshirt took the stage 20

minutes early it was a little bewildering. This vibe

continued into the performance.

One doesn’t name an album I Don’t Like Shit, I

Don’t Go Outside without being somewhat of an

introvert, but there was a calculated distance in

the performance that was definitely atypical of

a rap show.

Even on more high energy tracks like “December

24 (bad acid)” Sweatshirt rarely moved

quicker than a lackadaisical stroll. It wasn’t quite

low energy, but neither was it notably intense.

The crowd ate it up however, screaming words

alongside his nonchalant delivery.

He moved through songs quickly, playing fragments

of about 20 or so, with a slight focus on

newer material. The pace blurred it all together.

The short songs from Some Rap Songs

juxtaposed with the claustrophobic, bass heavy

production of his earlier work was disorienting

in a good way that captured the essence of his

albums.

The show ended with about 10 minutes of his

DJ playing rap classics and there was no encore;

a mystifying finish to a half-baked evening.

Graeme Wiggins

JOSHUA GRAFSTEIN

36 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


MOViES|T.V.

HOAXING AROUND

Standing in the shadows

of an imaginary

persona in JT LeRoy

By NOÉMIE ATTIA

J

T LeRoy was a jaded, vulnerable

boy with an endearing

Southern accent and two

best-selling books in the early

2000s.

He was always hiding behind sunglasses

and blond wigs – because JT

LeRoy was never a real person. He

was actually a persona born in writer

Laura Albert’s brain and embodied by

artist Savannah Knoop for nearly six

years.

Director Justin Kelly adapted

Knoop’s memoir, Girl Boy Girl: How

I Became JT LeRoy, into a film called

JT LeRoy about the six-year hoax.

The film portrays the true story

through the eyes of Savannah (Kristen

Stewart). We see them discovering

their creative legitimacy as a

young artist leaving their hometown

for San Francisco. Laura (Laura

Dern), the experienced writer, fosters

that confidence through encouraging

Savannah to play the part of LeRoy.

“When you’re young, you’ve just

gotten out of high school, and you

meet someone who’s an

amazing artist – I read both

books and I loved them,”

Knoop tells BeatRoute

about Albert. “When she

eventually asked me to

perform this character,

it was sort of like accessing

a creative path. It was

getting the feeling of what

it could be like to be an artist after

you’d already made the work, which

is a strange process.”

The film portrays the genius of

Knoop’s impersonation of LeRoy.

More importantly, Knoop’s agency

glows through Leroy’s dark shades.

JT LEROY

Friday, May 17

(5:30 pm) • Sunday,

May 19 (7:30 pm)

• Monday, May

20 (6:00 pm) •

Wednesday, May 22

(6:10 pm)

Vancity Theatre

Tix: $13, viff.org

“I think it was just

good casting. I was a

good person to play that

character, because I already

had some of those

interests.” Becoming Le-

Roy also coincided with

Knoop’s exploration of

their queer identity: it

was an outlet for them

to learn more about themself.

However, one thing is clear for

Knoop: “I’m pretty sure I would

be where I am now, regardless of

playing JT LeRoy. But of course

it affected me as a young person,

deeply.” Knoop, who co-wrote the

film’s screenplay, didn’t become a

writer because of LeRoy.

“Me playing JT was sort of quixotic,”

says Knoop. “It brings up that

question of when you play something,

you become it. What are the

boundaries around that?”

Stewart’s interpretation of

Knoop’s character is particularly convincing.

Knoop was a consultant on

set for any emotional and logistical

questions. They donated their favourite

DIY clothes from that period to

Stewart’s wardrobe, which makes the

character even more authentic.

“It’s very meta,” Knoop says, when

asked how it felt to have someone

play them playing another character.

“There would be moments when

I would see Kristen do something I

had done as JT. There’s this specific

way of clapping at readings. I feel like

I didn’t know I was doing it when I

was playing JT. I really did get to see

how JT LeRoy was a very separate

person from me, that I was playing a

role to the best of my ability, and that

that character was not me.

I don’t know why, but I didn’t

totally understand that, probably

because I didn’t really have any footage

of me playing JT and it was very

blurry in my memory. So to see the

differences was illuminating.”

JT LeRoy poses questions on identity

and truth when a story is constructed

by many perspectives, even

fictional ones.

“Can you only write on the page,

or can you write out in the world?”

asks Knoop. “What happens when

you write out in the world? What is

different than when you write on the

page?”

Above all, this story seems to be

about Knoop’s ability to become what

they already had inside them, no matter

what physical form it took. ,

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 37


MOViES|T.V.

THIS MONTH IN FILM

38 BEATROUTE MAY 2019

GODZILLA: KING

OF THE MONSTERS

May 31

In what sounds like every kid’s

dream come to life no matter

their generation, Godzilla

returns in all his CGI glory

and must battle his long-time

nemeses Rodan, Mothra, and

the three-headed dragon, King

Ghidorah Into The Dark. It’s

wish-fulfillment with an interesting

cast including Kyle Chandler,

Millie Bobbie Brown and Sally

Hawkins.

ROCKET MAN

May 31

Taron Egerton has gone all in

with the Elton John ‘biopic’ he

has described as not so much

a biopic but an R-rated fantasy

musical. Committing to the role

by singing - not miming - every

song, and doing his best at

mastering the piano, Egerton

plays Elton as the film takes

our hand through various

moments in the life that saw

a child prodigy emerge as a

musical legend. Will we see

more music biopic Bohemian

Rhapsody magic here?

1985

April 25

Stories from the past often

resonate with even more

vibrancy when told through the

lens of reflection. Directed by

Yen Tan, 1985 is the story of

Adrian, played by Cory Michael

Smith, a young man who returns

home to Texas to tell his family

and friends of his contraction of

AIDS during the 80s epidemic.

ÁGA

May 9

A film almost as much about

the cold, harsh environment of

the Russian far-North as the

indigenous Yakut people who

live there. We follow Nanook

and Sedna, two elderly Yakuts

who do their best to cling to the

old ways, while everyone - and

everything - slowly slips away.

Directed by Milko Lazarov, Ága

closed out the 2018 Berlin Film

Festival.

By Brendan Lee

BiNGEWORTHY

GOOD OMENS

NETWORK:

AMAZON PRIME

AIR DATE: May 29

It was 1990 when beloved

authors Neil Gaiman and the late

Terry Pratchett published the

epic, eccentric, and wholly unique

Good Omens novel. Now, after

years in development, and after a

posthumous letter from Pratchett

to Gaiman that urged him to

continue with the series after his

death, Crowley the demon and

Arizaphale the angel are now

ready for prime time.

The story follows the two

representatives of Heaven and Hell

on Earth (played by Michael Sheen

and David Tennant), as each must

work in unison as the world prepares

for the coming of the antichrist.

With the six part miniseries

penned and showrun by Gaiman

himself, the series promises to

be proficiently ‘out there.’

WHEN THEY SEE US

NETWORK:

NETFLIX

AIR DATE: May 29

In 1989, five juvenile

males were falsely

convicted of

brutally raping a

jogger, and the

media had them

vilified. Despite

flimsy evidence

and false

confessions,

the teenagers

spent between

six and 13 years behind bars —

then private citizen Trump wanted

them executed. This is their story.

Created, written, and directed by

Avu DuVernay (Wrinkle in Time),

the limited series boasts a strong

ensemble cast and emerges in a

current climate where truth and

accuracy in the news and the justice

system has never been more

important.

INTO THE DARK: ALL THAT

WE DESTROY (EPISODE 8)

NETWORK:

HULU

AIR DATE: May 3

Hulu is trying something a little different

and it seems to be working.

In October, they released the first

episode in a year long

horror anthology series

that began a 12-episode

jigsaw that sees

episode eight, ‘All That

We Destroy,’ releasing

this May. Each episode

is based around

a holiday in the month

that it’s released,

Mother’s

Day is

the

chosen

theme

this

time

Jharrel Jerome as

Korey Wise in Netflix’s

When They See Us.

David Tennant (left) and

Michael Sheen in Good Omens.

around (oh no...).

The episode follows a geneticist

who fears her son may be on the

verge of becoming a serial killer,

so she does what any sane mother

would do. This lovely woman creates

a few clones which she uses

to stage the scene of the son’s

first murder, to hopefully cure him

of ever doing it again.

THE RAIN: SEASON 2

NETWORK:

NETFLIX

AIR DATE: May 17

A Danish post-apocalyptic Netflix

series about killer rain set to

storm into its damp and raucous

second season. The first eight

episodes told the story of a horrible

Scandinavian viral epidemic,

transmitted via rainfall, that nearly

wiped out civilization.

Six years later, a Danish

brother and sister find the nerve

to ascend from their bunker and

set out in search of their scientist

father, who left them alone and

never came back.

The children meet other

survivors in their quest throughout

season one, with the finale

foreshadowing some very dark

implications surrounding the

origin of the virus, and the terrible

possibilities of what’s to come.

It can become tiresome

watching the same old American

shows, so if you’re looking to see

a somewhat familiar story told

in an unfamiliar setting, look no

further - but don’t forget to bring

an umbrella. By Brendan Lee


DAN’S HOMEBREWING SUPPLIES

Huge selection

of beer and

wine-making

equipment &

ingredients

NEW ALBUM AVAILABLE NOW

INCLUDES CRYIN’ AND DANGEROUS HEART

www. joeylandreth.com

835 East Hastings ST. Vancouver, BC • 604-251-3411 beermaking.ca

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 39


ARTs

SAY YES

Mike Bonanno uses satire to find truth within a

system of fake news and divisive rhetoric in An

Evening of Corporate Drag ByJENNIE ORTON

MIHAELA BODLOVIC

FLYING SOLO

HUNCH: A Festival of Solo Performances offers a new kind of festival experience

By KATHRYN HELMORE

H

UNCH is a brand-new

theatre festival in

Vancouver dedicated to

solo performance work,

pushing boundaries with

a three-day celebration

of dance, immersive theatre and

comedy.

“Solo performance work is

incredibly important,” says HUNCH

co-founder and former general

manager of the Montreal Fringe

Festival, Al Lafrance. “It’s intimate

unlike any other type of theatre. It’s

amazing because of how a single

person can hold an entire crowd.”

HUNCH HEADLINE HIGHLIGHTS

Butt Kapinski

Friday, May 10 at 8:00pm

Created and performed by Deanna

Fleysher, this show rethinks solo

performance. Private eye Butt Kapinski

invites the audience to co-star

in a choose-your-own-adventure

murder mystery infused with sex,

sin, shadows and subterfuge.

“Butt Kapinski is the juggernaut

of touring solo performances,” Lafrance

says. “Acclaimed by reviews

of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival,

it is a noir detective piece that is

impossible to escape from.”

Three headlining

shows will display the

variety that can be

found in solo performance.

Across three

nights, the festival will

move between a riveting

murder mystery, an exploration

of state sovereignty and youthful

rebellion, and a never-before-seen

tap dance and spoken word fusion.

“I hope the festival knocks down

doors in people’s minds,” says

Lafrance. “Many people picture

solo performance as one person

complaining about their life. The

HUNCH FESTIVAL

Thursday, May 9 to

Saturday, May 11

Red Gate Revue Stage

Tix: $25,

brownpapertickets.com

Magic Unicorn Island

Thursday, May 9 at 8:00pm

Set in a new state created by

disenfranchised yet ambitiously

optimistic children, Magic Unicorn

Island by Jason McDonald is a

politically poignant piece of work

which ponders the questions of

utopia, childhood, state sovereignty

and warfare.

“This is a life altering show,”

says Lafrance. “While incredibly

emotional, it is also very accessible

and perfect for newcomers. You’ve

just got to be ready for it.”

point of the festival is

to show that you can

do so much more, and

offer performances with

great depth, with just one

person.”

The closing night cabaret,

an ambitious 11 act showcase,

mixes a number of genres including

traditional Chinese dance, improv

solo work, and clowning.

“Our performers are masters of

their craft,” says Lafrance. “This

is a stellar line up. I don’t see how

anyone could be disappointed in

this show.”

Tap Tap

Saturday, May 11 at 7:30pm

In the world premiere of Tap Tap,

dancer Travis Knights explores

themes of meaning, connection

and community in a technologically

advanced society using tap dance

as the staging ground for the

expedition.

“The play is about the human

interaction and the difficulty of connecting

in the modern age,” says

Lafrance. “A 65-minute show fusing

tap dance and spoken word, it is an

ambitious undertaking by a world

renowned dancer.” ,

M

ike Bonanno, of the activist

AN EVENING OF

duo The Yes Men, has taken

CORPORATE

advantage of the current atmosphere

of click bait and person-

Sunday, May 12

DRAG

ality politics to take the piss out of some The Rio Theatre

of the most egregious culprits of corporate

and global politics.

“We have a global culture of capitalism that is more deranged

than any in history,” Bonanno says. “We cook up complex excuses

to continue elevating our weird business gurus and excusing

a ravenous system that we invisibly worship, even as it destroys

the places we live. With a system so fucked up, there are plenty

of hypocrisies and idiosyncrasies that are ripe for satire. And

sometimes a tactically deployed satire can influence policy or

culture.”

The Yes Men have a proven track record of infiltrating the

most tightly guarded institutions. From posing as a rep from

Dow Chemicals on BBC World to crashing fossil fuel energy conferences,

to operating a fake website as the World Trade Organization

itself, the group continues to grab the attention of the

power brokers on their own turf and expose their inherent blind

priorities.

“If we infiltrate a business event and are featured on stage

as some kind of VIP, the satire becomes invisible to that audience,

or at least most of them,” Bonanno says. “But then when

we show what happened to the outside world, the ridiculousness

is brought forward. It’s not that the audience is funny, it’s that

we’re all absurd to believe what we do about our culture and to

believe all these things people in power say and do to excuse the

indirect violence of their actions.”

An Evening of Corporate Drag aims to dismantle the double-talk

of current corporate speak, complete with audience participation,

satire and absurdist role play for those frustrated by

the system of fake news and divisive rhetoric.

“Fake news is always, to my knowledge, not meant to be revealed

as fake,” Bonanno says. “It is meant to live on tricking

people with misinformation. Whereas we may employ lies while

making a satirical story or intervention, but then we immediately

reveal the truth, usually within hours. We are meticulous about

fact checking with the truthful stage of our actions — and the

goals always include promoting factual information and contribute

to a more informed public.” ,

40 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


LAUGHING

ALL THE

WAY TO THE

MORGUE

Last Podcast On The

Left turns true crime on its

severed head

By PAUL RODGERS

F

ascination

with true crime

and the paranormal is nothing

new, though some believe

such subjects should

not to be taken lightly.

Marcus Parks, Ben Kissel

and Henry Zebrowski of

Last Podcast on the Left,

have been able to turn

their own brand of black

comedy and a long-held

interest in the darker

sides of life into one of

the most successful podcasts going.

They have a globetrotting live show

and fiercely-dedicated fanbase.

“True crime and an interest in the

paranormal has always been a thing,

it’s just now becoming revealed,”

says Zebrowski, who in addition to

the show is an accomplished actor in

films such as The Wolf of Wall Street

and the Adult Swim series Your Pretty

Face is Going to Hell.

“The media is catching up to what

millions of people were already into.”

The show, and its live iteration,

specialize in what the trio call

LAST PODCAST

ON THE LEFT

Thursday, May 30

Queen Elizabeth Theatre

Tix: $30-$45,

Ticketmaster.ca

“edu-tainment.” They do

deep dives on heavy-hitter

serial killers, the paranormal,

conspiracy theories,

cryptids and more. Parks

tackles the bulk of the research

with the aid of assistants,

and is responsible for driving

the narrative. Zebrowski’s acting

background allows him to get into

the heads of the characters involved,

while Kissel, a political pundit who

appears on CNN and Fox, ensures

the content is accessible. Together,

their tangible long-lasting friendship,

comedic nature and razor sharp intellects

create a podcast that is disturbing,

informative and hilarious.

“It’s funny when describing the

show to people, cause I’ll be like,

‘yeah it’s true crime but then it’s also

funny,’” Kissel explains. “And they’re

like, ‘well how can it be funny?’ And

I’m like it’s difficult to describe because

it’s about making fun of these

idiots, it’s about making fun of these

serial killers.”

Take Dennis Rader, the BTK killer,

one of the show’s earlier deep-dive

subjects, who Kissel refers to as the

“archetype of a douchebag.”

“He’s just such a frickin’ fat, useless

nerd who liked horrible poetry. That’s

how we try to mine the comedy and

it’s always in the weird little details.

That’s the trick of it, to never make

fun of the victims, always make fun of

the so-called monsters and just make

the world see these people as the

dumpy losers that they are.”

While the trio have a knack for

presenting the material for laughs as

they “de-fang” killers often sensationalized

in the media, the content

of the show, and the research required,

can be emotionally taxing

on its hosts. Putting the worst

parts of humankind, like Ed Gein,

John Wayne Gacy, the Columbine

shooting, 9/11 — or in a more recent

episode, Nazi scientist Josef

Mengele — under the microscope

every week is a heavy task.

“Obviously when talking about

serial killers, it does make you

think about how depraved human

beings can be,” says Kissel.

“But on the flip-side, when we

have our audience and get to interact

with people it gives you a

validation of humanity,you realize

people are good. We’re talking

about outliers here, we’re not

talking about mainstream people.

Most people do not bury other

people in potted plants, most people

are just trying to do the best

they can to survive and they focus

on family and friendship.”

In their live shows, fans are

treated to all the edu-tainment

and high-octane banter they know

and love from the podcast. The

body of the show features individual

segments from each of the

three hosts, and opens with repartee

tailored to the specific crowd.

Vancouver fans can likely expect

Robert “Willie” Pickton to come

up in the dialogue.

The three are also in the process

of releasing a book. After

absorbing a horribly grim library’s

worth of material for research

purposes, Zebrowski says it feels

they’ve “come full circle” by adding

one of their own to the world.

With a back catalogue of more

than 360 episodes plus many

more “Side Stories” episodes, if

you’re new to the show you have

a wealth of material to get caught

up. ,

ON TOUR

May 4 Vancouver KW Studios

May 8 Calgary The King Eddy

May 10 Edmonton The Sewing Machine Factory

May 12 Winnipeg Forth

“as comforting as it is uncompromising”

PITCHFORK (8/10)

FLEMISHEYE.COM

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 41


NORTH BY NORTHEAST 2019

MUSIC & GAMING FESTIVAL

TAKING OVER TORONTO

FESTIVAL

VILLAGE

A WEEKEND OF LIVE MUSIC,

COMEDY AND IMMERSIVE

EXPERIENCES.

JUNE

GAME

LAND

THREE DAYS OF HIGH-STAKES

ESPORTS AND FULL-ON GAMEPLAY.

AT STACKT

JUNE

YONGE & DUNDAS

SQUARE

NXNE

TALKS

BRINGING TOGETHER CULTURAL AND

COMMUNITY LEADERS TO DISCUSS

IDEAS ESSENTIAL TO CANADA’S MUSIC

AND GAMING INDUSTRIES.

JUNE

LAND

JUNE

$29 WRISTBANDS

AT NXNE.COM

CLUB

SO MANY BANDS, SO LITTLE TIME.

1 WRISTBAND, 30+ CURATED SHOWS,

20+ OF TORONTO’S BEST MUSIC VENUES.

NXNE.COM


ARTs

DAVID MONTEITH-HODGE

THIS MONTH IN THEATRE

Here are out top stage picks for the month of May.

The Sea

Tuesday, April 30 to Sunday, May 19 at

Jericho Arts Centre

It’s 1907 in a small English seaside village

and when a tempest capsizes a villager’s

boat, one man makes it back to shore.

The local conspiracy theorist decides

that the town is being invaded… by Martian

militants.

VAMP: A Supernatural Musical

Burlesque

Friday, May 3 to Saturday, May 18 at

Performance Works

Sometimes titles just sell themselves.

VAMP is a new, body-positive and

hilarious burlesque musical inspired by

classic horror movies and everything

Nassim

that goes hump in the night. Combining

circus, burlesque and musical theatre to

tell the story of a young woman’s sexual

awakening in a ghoulish world, this play

is for adults only.

Nassim

Tuesday, May 7 to Sunday, May 19 at

Historic Theatre

It’s hard to go into what this play is

about, in part because it’s kept a secret

from everyone — including the one performer

in this solo-ish show. Every night,

a different Vancouver actor will read the

lines for the first time in this semi-autobiographical

piece by Nassim Soleimanpour.

Get ready to learn Farsi.

By Leah Siegel

JULY 19 TO 21 2 1 0

9

JERICHO BEACH PARK

BASIA BULAT | THE HAMILTONES

DAVID HIDALGO | LARKIN POE | CORB LUND

REBIRTH BRASS BAND | SAM ROBERTS BAND

CHARLOTTE DAY WILSON

THE AERIALISTS | BLACK STRING | DANNY BOUDREAU BAND | MATTHEW BYRNE

CELEIGH CARDINAL | ANDREW COLLINS TRIO | COPPERHEAD | THE DARDANELLES

DESIREE DAWSON TRIO | STEVE DAWSON | BROTHER TITO DELER

DWAYNE DOPSIE & THE ZYDECO HELLRAISERS | BOBBY DOVE

RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT | MIKE FARRIS & THE FORTUNATE FEW | LUCA FOGALE

FRONT COUNTRY | AMOS GARRETT & JULIAN KERR | RAINE HAMILTON STRING TRIO

ZAKI IBRAHIM | ILLITERATTY | KIRCHEN, COX & MCRAE | KITTY AND THE ROOSTER

JOEY LANDRETH | LA MEXCALINA | GEORGE LEACH BAND | LE VENT DU NORD

LOCARNO | LONESOME ACE STRINGBAND | LOS PACHAMAMA Y FLOR AMARGO

DON MCGLASHAN | PABLO MENENDEZ & MEZCLA | MIDNIGHT SHINE

IRISH MYTHEN | NAMGAR | TAL NATIONAL | OKTOPUS | MARIN PATENAUDE

THE RAD TRADS | JOHN REISCHMAN AND THE JAYBIRDS | RIIT

PHARIS & JASON ROMERO | LUCY ROSE | ROSIE & THE RIVETERS

SARAH SHOOK & THE DISARMERS | VIVEK SHRAYA/TOO ATTACHED | RUBY & SMITH

SON OF JAMES | NANO STERN TRIO | EMILY TRIGGS

TSATSU STALQAYU (COASTAL WOLF PACK)

| SUNNY WAR

WWW.THEFESTIVAL.BC.CA

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 43


Travel

NXNE 2019:

SUMMER

SOUNDS TAKE

OVER TORONTO

STREETS

DREW YORKE ANTON MAK

Celebrating its 25th year,

Toronto’s North by Northeast

creates a festival experience

that’s street-level

Destination: Downtown Toronto

When: June 7-16, 2019

Why: North By Northeast Music Festival

T

he once crowded Toronto

and area music festival

scene has thinned out

recently as festivals have

“gone on hiatus” or simply

shut their doors. Toronto’s 25 year

old street party, North by Northeast

(NXNE) music and eSports

continues to go strong , taking over

many of the city’s top venues for 10

days from June 7 – 16. Northby is a

multi-media festival that peaks with

Tinashe

NXNE

FESTIVAL

VILLAGE

Yonge &

Dundas

(JUNE 14 -16)

44 BEATROUTE MAY 2019

massive free shows in the centre of

Toronto.

NXNE’s Yonge Street shows have

included: Flaming Lips, Iggy and

the Stooges, Run the Jewels and

last year, Chvrches, Lights and Jazz

Cartier.

NXNE features emerging-acts

club shows best seen with by club

hopping wristband that gets priority

access to over 30 shows. Most

shows are programed by Canada’s

top musicians presenting their four

favorite up-and-coming acts.

Confirmed Curators include: Jim

Cuddy, Brendan Canning (Broken

Social Scene), The Elwins, Charlotte

Navigating The Village

GETTING THERE

NXNE Yonge Street Festival Village

– Subway directly to heart of

the Festival at Dundas (mainstage)

or Queen stations.

Cornfield, Ian Blurton, Menno

Versteeg (Hollerado) and Royal

Mountain records, The Jerry Cans,

Six Shooter records and more.

Amercian Football, Cupcakke,

Haviah Mighty, Persons, Owen,

Just John x Dom Dias, Nick

Schofeld, Most People, Syngja and

Dishpit are among acts already

booked.

The festival also hosts a free

eSports tourament opening

weekend at Stackt, a cool new

shipping container marketplace

featuring competitive game play

on La Forza, Super Smash bros

and NBA 2K.

FOOD

3Eaton Centre Urban Eatery

(Food Court) --Decent food court

worth the escalator rides down. All

major chains plus less mass market.

Healthy options include: Urban

Herbivore and Fast Food Fresh.

3Fantastic, affordable Thai legend,

Salad King (340 Yonge) steps

north of Dundas stage.

3Raptors-slayer LeBron James

owns a slice of Blaze Pizza (10

Dundas E), north of the Square.

Build your own pies are a tasty deal.

3The Senator (249 Victoria) classic

diner, around corner from NXNE

been serving awesome comfort

food since the early 20th century.

ANTON MAK

Jazz Cartier

3Toronto’s original Chinatown has

great choices, west on Dundas

past Bay for cheap dim sum, noodles

and crazy popular Japanese

Cheescake. High end dim sum at

Lai Wah Heen, Hilton Double Tree

(101 Chesnut).

3Jump up Jamaican at Ritz Caribbean

(211 Yonge) festival site, steps

from the Comedy Tent.

3There’s also a grocery store in

Atrium mall basement, northwest

corner of Yonge and Dundas.

Lights gets up

close and personal

3Budget buster – Modern South

American food at Lena (176 Yonge)

festival site at Queen; modern

American at Richmond Station (1

Richmond W), old school steakhouse

at Barberians (7 Elm) or;

high-end madness at one of Toronto’s

best, George (111 Queen E).

DRINKS

NXNE has a beer and spirits garden

in Yonge Dundas Square and even

some free sampling. Happy with


Yungblud

IF YOU GO:

Details/line-up: nxne.com

Cost: Clubland all-access wristbands -

$29. Festival Village shows - free

Where: Downtown Toronto

NXNE CLUBLAND

The best way to discover new acts at

NXNE is to club hop with a priority access $29 wristband that gets

you into over 30 shows. Go to the gig curated by your favourite artist

but then, hit up a neighboring venue and see acts you’ve never heard

of. There are over 20 downtown NXNE venues, seasoned club hoppers

pick a neighbourhood with a few adjoining venues. Here are two

of our hop happy hoods.

Die Mannequin

6

MORE IN THE 6

SIX MORE SUREFIRE

TORONTO JUNE JOINTS

Toronto Pride

All of June

Said to be world’s largest Pride

event, activities all month but

massive parade is June 23.

warm, knapsack beers? Head into

the Atrium mall basement to the

LCBO provincial liquor store.

3Ironic dive bar or, just kind

of grimy, the Imperial Pub (54

Dundas E) has been serving cheap

beer for decades. Their free

popcorn is probably older than

you but low cost lager and decent

top floor patio make this a solid,

nearby option.

3The Brewers (275 Yonge) is a

glitzy pub with lots of craft beers

and decent food.

3Jack Astors, (10 Dundas E) is

worth the effort if you can grab

a seat on their fifth floor balcony

for an amazing view overlooking

the festival site.

CANNABIS

One of the newest – and fanciest

– legal pot shops, Tokyo Smoke

(333 Yonge), just north of the

Festival Village in former HMV

store, east side of Yonge.

Original Queen West

Queen West, near Spadina has

been a longtime musical epicenter

of Toronto.

Top rooms include: The

Horseshoe (379 Queen W)

was an old school country bar,

embraced new music in 80s,

rootsy vibe, Blue Rodeo, The Hip

and The Police all played early

shows here; The Rivoli (334

Queen W) intimate, classy music

back room – they even have air

conditioning – was early home to

Kids in the Hall and has decent

Thai food; The Cameron House

(408 Queen W) big in the 80s

and still relevant. Kids of original,

artsy-owners operate it currently,

play there as Ferraro. Jim Cuddy

got his start here, now son Devin

is a regular act; The Bovine Sex

Club (542 Queen W) gloriously

grimy with kick-you-in-thecrotch-kitsch,

reliable for late

nights and loudness at this punk

friendly place, check out upstairs

rooftop Tiki Bar; and, The Drake

Underground (1150 Queen W)

art bar vibe in the basement

of the elegantly restored, one

time dive, now diva Drake Hotel.

Check out the outdoor Sky Bar

upstairs.

Westside, Dundas and

Ossington

Near one of Toronto’s hottest

restaurant strips are more, reliable

music rooms.

Unpretentious rooms, The

Garrison (1197 Dundas W) and,

not surprisingly, smaller, The

Baby G (1608 Dundas W) share

the same owner and, commitment

to emerging indie rock;

The Dakota (249 Ossington)

hosts some of Toronto’s best

roots gigs; the Night Owl (647

College) features mixed genres

and a good kitchen and; nomadic

Toronto programming legend

Dan Burke brings his astute ear

and eye for breaking bands in the

indie and art rock world to the

Monarch (12 Clinton).

ACCOMODATION

Air BnB has tons of rooms in Toronto.

There are plenty of hotels close

to Festival Village. Biggest bargain

is Bond Place Hotel (65 Dundas

E). Decent rooms start at $139, you

can see and hear festival from the

front door.

3The Marriot in the Eaton Centre,

Pantages (200 Victoria) and the

Hilton Double Tree (101 Chesnut)

have swell rooms starting at around

$200. The Marriott and Pantages

are steps from festival,

Chesnut, two blocks away.

3Budget Buster – Swank, secret

hotel with only four rooms

($400-$500), Ivy at Verity

(111 Queen E). Rooms upstairs

above posh Verity women’s

health club. Female guests get

unlimited access to the Verity

club and spa, sorry dudes, no

fly zone for you. ,

ANTON MAK

Dundas West Fest

June 7–9

Owner/programmers of two

great west end live venues,

The Garrison and The Baby G

raise the band bar at this cool

neighbourhood’s fest with acts

like: Dilly Dally, Suuns and Teen

Anger.

Luminato

June 7-23

Lots of high brow hijinks as

Toronto “high arts” lovers take

in experimental art, dance,

opera and more.

Stackt, June 14 -16

Toronto’s awesome new shipping

container marketplace has

it’s “official” opening weekend

with tons of free stuff and live

bands. (Home of NXNE’s eSports

tourney the week before).

Toronto Jazz Fest

June 21- 30

Toronto’s long running jazz fest

takes place across down- and

midtown with a mix of free

shows, club acts and ticketed

concerts. Headliners include:

Norah Jones and Diana Ross.

Wolf Pack rugby

June9, 15, 22 and 30

Hungry for the Wolf(Pac)?

Toronto has a professional

men’s rugby team that plays

in the British Rugby Football

League, the only North

American squad. The games

are relatively cheap, lots of

action at a full on party played

at creaky and fun outdoor

Lamport Stadium. The stadium

sits in trendy Liberty Village

near the Ossington restaurant

district. Three games in June

including June 15, 1 pm versus

the Dewsbury Rams.

MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 45


Horoscopes

Messages from the Stars: A look into the cycles and cosmic

details of an unfolding forevermore, paired with a song

suggestion curated for your sign by Willow Herzog

Aries (March 21 - April 20)

Unexpected and challenging

conditions have been surrounding

upwards momentum. You have

accomplished much since this time

last year in the realm of dream and

goal actualization. Be willing to let

go of ego to deepen into potent

heart messages. This cycle is about

the heart and deep listening.

Song suggestion for the month: “Eon”

-Meredith Monk

Taurus (April 21 - May 21)

Much is being excavated from your

internal waters and it’s time to

release. Release old wounds, old

hurt, old sorrows. Channeling your

chaos into creativity will bring about

ingenuity. Tap into the power of

your feelings and how feeling them

can allow you to heal. You are going

through an energetic growth spurt,

one that requires rest and attention

to recalibrate.

Song suggestion for the month: “I Go To

Sleep” - Anika

Gemini (May 22 - June 21)

Healing psychic secrets and letting

creativity bloom go hand in hand

this cycle. There is pain in unreleased

communications and a surge

of healing that comes from sharing

words. Let the sound of your own

vibration heal you. This is a strong

month for writing, singing, painting

and creativity of all kinds.

Song suggestion for the month: “Out of

Sight” -Jack Name

Cancer (June 22 - July 23)

Realization of endless change and

reaffirmation of love towards self.

You are a forever growing thing and

you’re now learning to outgrow limiting

patterns. Be soft with yourself

and accept discomfort as part of

growth, as growing pains. Trust in

your innovations and new ways of

doing things - even if you may feel

temporarily misunderstood and

possibly exhausted.

Song suggestion for the month: “Magellan”

- Felt

Leo (July 24 - Aug. 23)

You are an innovative force to be

reckoned with and ideas are coming

through you from a higher place

of mind. It has been a potent time

of connections, reimagining your

processes and seeing the past two

years of work brought to a greater

place. You have a uniqueness that

gives you a highlighted spot as a

leader and innovator within your industry.

This is a month for starting

large projects and making creative

breakthroughs.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Everybody Wants to Love You” - Japanese

Breakfast

Virgo (Aug. 24 - Sept. 23)

It’s time to get down to business

and reconstruct some parts of your

plan if you want it to take you into

this next cycle smoothly. This past

month, you have learned formative

pieces of information about what

does and doesn’t work for you. It

is time to step outside of what is

comfortable, of what is your current

experience, and shake up the container

of your reality.

Song suggestion for the month: “Orlando”

- Exploded View

Libra (Sept. 24 - Oct. 23)

This could be a charmed month

ahead for you if you are willing to

experiment, reinvent, and heal parts

of your old personality. This is a cycle

to investigate your roots and pull

them up with the dirt still clinging to

them. This means bringing forward

the parts of your foundation that are

so uniquely you, while infusing them

with an analytical self-purging of the

outdated. Be willing to dive deep into

your inner world and do away with

daily distractions

Song suggestion for the month: “Sunrise

of the Planetary Dream Collector” -Terry

Riley, Ragazze Quartet

Scorpio (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22)

Relationships will be the priority, and

the unfolding potential of where you

are placing your time and energy will

be magnified. There has been momentum

in your mission and pieces

are starting to fall into place, though

often not in the way you most

expected. If something is feeling

too good to be true, be grateful.

Reclaim a capacity for joy

by purging unnecessary relationships

and life pieces

this month. Onwards and

upwards, sweet dreamer.

Song suggestion for the

month: “Celestial Power”

-Henry Flynt

Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec. 21)

There is a strong urge to change

the tapestry of your life and the

industries you exist within. Check

in with where to place your energy

and who to trust your heart with.

Be open to conversation and new

collaboration within realms of

business and creativity. Don’t underestimate

your power; feel empowered

in your ability to choose

your path. Gently analyze what has

chosen to reveal itself.

Song suggestion for the month:

“Trance #2” - Angus MacLise, Tony

Conrad, John Cale

Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 20)

You have been on a powerful

trajectory of pouring your energy

towards actualizing dreams and

healing old wounds. Make sure

you take time to pause and sip

in the potency of stillness. Much

can happen in the quiet spaces,

sitting with self. Messages about

how to use your creative ingenuity

wait in these ethereal pockets for

you to listen and tap in. Trust

in the experiences life has

been presenting and know

how capable, resilient and

beautiful you are.

Song suggestion for the

month: “Towergate” -Tower

Recordings

Aquarius (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19)

Energies may be conflicting this

month as you are asked to relive

parts of your past in order to create

a future that sees you in a place

of healthy boundaries and healed

trauma. You have been asserting

yourself in ways that illustrate your

worth, and this is causing energetic

support or push back depending

on the situation. Keep going with

cultivating the life that allows your

creative energy its greatest actualization.

Keep knowing your worth

and standing up for yourself in truly

realizing what is healthy. Know you

are so loved.

Song suggestion for the month: “The

Dream” - Thee Oh Sees

Pisces (Feb. 20 - Mar. 20)

Finally, seeds are coming to fruition

and you are tasting the fruit. You

have put in much hard work to

cultivate key areas of your life,

especially in the realm of work

innovations, career building and

solidifying of mission. It is as if you

are inside an unfinished painting

watching it take form around you.

Perceive with wonder while taking

on some of the key brushwork, to

paint a new vision into being.

Song suggestion for the month: “Rich

Witch” - Vibracathedral Orchestra

ANIKA MEREDITH MONK JAPANESE BREAKFAST THE OH SEES

46 BEATROUTE MAY 2019


MAY 2019 BEATROUTE 47


CANADA’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT CONCERT PROMOTER

UPCOMING SHOWS

YANN TIERSEN

May 14 - The Vogue Theatre

DIZZY

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 3 - The Biltmore Cabaret

IONNALEE

WITH ALLIE X

May 4 - Venue

LA DISPUTE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 6 - The Vogue Theatre

WAND

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 7 - The Biltmore Cabaret

FM-84

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 9 - The Biltmore Cabaret

FILTHY FRIENDS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 10 - Rickshaw Theatre

LAURA STEVENSON

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 14 - The Biltmore Cabaret

CAMP COPE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 17 - The Biltmore Cabaret

ALLAN RAYMAN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

May 25 - The Vogue Theatre

48 BEATROUTE MAY 2019

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT MRGCONCERTS.COM

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