2018 Annual Report

redoaktxfire

2018

Red Oak Fire Rescue

Annual Report

1


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Message from the Chief 3

Vision 4

Major Accomplishments & Highlights 5

Organizational Chart 8

Fire Administration 9

Community Risk Reduction 10

Emergency Operations 12

E.D.U.C.T. Department Comparisons 13

Statistics & Data 14

Department Funding 22

Training 24

Department Fleet 25

Stations 26

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I am honored to deliver the Red Oak Fire Rescue annual report. This

comprehensive report defines our services, programs, and accomplishments over

the course of 2018. In addition to defining what we do, it is our aim to be

transparent on the performance of our service delivery.

The fire department continues to be a dynamic, evolving, essential resource for

our community. As professionals in our chosen field, we strive to bring excellence

to the workplace every day. The community is steadily changing, and we must be

progressive with planning efforts and keep a proactive posture with the

deployment of our service delivery and programs.

To preserve the perception of our value we will remain a community-oriented

department. We will continue to advocate for the betterment of the community

and remain engaged through community involvement in education, public

programs, and ensure effective communication with stakeholders.

Statistics, by themselves, do not characterize the dedication our department members put forward in carrying out

our mission, vision, and values. Our member-driven strategic planning process continues to provide direction for

our department in process, procedure, and budget. I am extremely proud of our professional staff and the

tremendous effort they display each day to our community and surrounding communities.

Our department appreciates the continuous support displayed by the community towards the organization. We

welcome feedback on the quality of our service, speed, professionalism, and compassion in which it is provided.

We focus on excellence and strive each day to improve in every facet of our services with continuous improvement

measures.

It is our belief that the quality of life within the community depends on a partnership between the citizens,

business community, elected officials, city employees, and our school district. Thank you for the honor and

privilege of serving you.

Eric Thompson, Fire Chief

City of Red Oak, Texas

3


Vision of Excellence

The members of Red Oak Fire Rescue have a shared vision of creating an organization that is recognized

for exceeding the needs of the community and setting the standard of excellence in emergency

services.

Core Values

Red Oak Fire Rescue is dedicated to providing excellent service to our customers. To achieve our

Mission and reach our Vision of Excellence - a healthy, positive and productive work environment

is essential. The members of Red Oak Fire Rescue have identified a set of core values that every

member shall uphold to ensure our ideal work environment. Each and every action and decision

will reflect these core values.

Professionalism

Acting with honesty, integrity and respect.

Leadership

Showing the way with a positive attitude and open communication.

Employee Well-Being

The department will strive to provide employee wellness, employee education, professional

development and encourage and support employee family life.

Accountability

Taking pride in our work and being responsible for our actions.

Teamwork

All members working together to achieve a common goal.

4


MAJOR

ACCOMPLISHMENTS &

HIGHLIGHTS

5


January

March

Fire Chief takes

dual role as Interim

Assistant City

Manager/Fire Chief

The year started with a Promotional Ceremony for 9 promotions.

March (Continued)

April

Installed perimeter fence

around FD & PD

TIFMAS Deployment to Amarillo

Active Shooter Class

April (Continued) May July

Active Shooter & Mass

Casualty Drill

1st Annual Health & Safety Fair

with ROISD

Rides to School in the Fire Truck

Hazmat Training & Skills

August

September

110 acre grass fire that required assistance from 9 surrounding

mutual aid partners and the Texas Forestry Service.

September 22 nd flooding 5 separate rescues and 25

citizens rescued from flood waters.

6


October

City Council

allowed the Fire

Department to

eliminate part

time positions

and hire 3 full

time positions.

3 attended Swift Water Training

29 Public education events reaching 4,380 citizens, children & visitors

December

The 12/26 flood

event had a complex

rescue that took

place in Waxahachie.

Hired 3 Firefighters

to start in January

Tanner Burch

Andrew Rieger

Anthony Snider

Promotional Ceremony

David Petricca to Battalion Chief

Loss Horn to Captain

Kirk Markgraf to Driver/Engineer

Red Oak Firefighters Association, Red

Oak Wal-Mart, Red Oak Chick-fil-A, Red

Oak Brookshire’s and Red Oak ISD came

together donated their own money and

came up with over $7,000.00 to ensure

needy families in the Red Oak area had

a Christmas.

7


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Fire Chief

Executive

Assistant

Chaplain

Volunteer

Chief Executive Officer

Deputy Fire Chief

Fire Marshal

Community Risk Reduction

Division

A Shift B Shift C Shift

Battalion Chief

Regulatory Compliance

Battalion Chief

Operations/Training/

Health & Safety

Battalion Chief

Support Services

Station

Captain Captain Captain

181

Engineer

Engineer

Engineer

Firefighter

Firefighter

Firefighter

Firefighter

Firefighter

Firefighter

Captain

Captain

Captain

Station

Engineer

Engineer

Engineer

182

Firefighter

Firefighter

Firefighter

Firefighter Firefighter Firefighter

8


FIRE ADMINISTRATION

Fire Administration is comprised of a staff of three which includes the Fire

Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator/Assistant City Manager, Deputy Chief/

Fire Marshal and an Executive Assistant. Our administration responds to change,

solves problems and collaborates on issues, assesses community needs and resources

required to meet those needs, and formulates plans to provide comprehensive

and cost-effective services to our customers — the citizens of Red

Oak. These personnel are also responsible for strategic and budgetary planning,

quality assurance, the setting of policies and overall management of all depart-

9


The Community Risk Reduction Division of Red Oak

Fire Rescue, commonly referred to as the Fire Marshal‘s

Office, is under the direction of Deputy Chief Ben Blanton.

Community Risk Reduction conducts annual fire inspections

of existing occupancies - for example: schools, churches,

restaurants, apartment buildings, and businesses. All

Certificate of Occupancies for new businesses require a fire

inspection as well. The Division assures proactive measures

are taken that actually prevent a fire before it begins and to

prevent the spread of fire if a fire does occur.

Community Risk Reduction is responsible for fire

prevention, fire inspections, investigations, construction

plan review, fire alarm and fire sprinkler system plans and

testing, public education, construction consultation and

advisement. Red Oak Fire Rescue Investigators determine

cause and origin of fires; investigators are certified as Peace

Officers and hold certificates from the Texas Fire

Commission as fire and arson investigators.

The CRRD brought in $11,000 in revenue in 2018.

This revenue was through inspections, plan reviews,

Certificate of Occupancies, Sprinkler/Alarm Test, Foster

Homes and Burn Permits.

10


Public fire education is also another task of the

division along with assistance from the fire suppression

personnel. In 2018 Red Oak Fire Rescue had 30 Public

Education Events ranging from day cares, elementary

schools, area businesses, our senior community, to special

events. We estimate Red Oak Fire Rescue reached

approximately 4,380 children, citizens and visitors.

CRRD also reached the community with 12 public safety

announcements which included using local newspapers,

social media and the Red Oak Fire Rescue website.

Community Risk Reduction Breakdown 2018

Inspections 337

Plan Reviews 69

Certificates of Occupancies Inspections 56

Foster/Group Home Inspections 14

Fire Safety Classes/Public Education 30

High Hazard Fire Inspections 89

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Emergency operations is the most visible and active component of the department. Fire-Rescue

resources are deployed from two stations which are staffed by career firefighters 24 hours a day, 7 days a

week, 365 days a year. There are 27 personnel assigned to operations. The makeup of these personnel

include: 3 Battalion Chiefs, 6 Captains, 6 Engineers, and 12 Firefighters. These personnel are divided up equally

and are deployed into a 3 shift rotation. Personnel assigned to shifts work 24 hours and then are off for 48

hours. Personnel assigned to operations respond to all types of fires, emergency medical services, motor

vehicle accidents, rescue calls, and hazardous materials incidents.

American Medical Response is the city’s contracted ambulance provider. Red Oak is a part of a county

EMS system that has 7 staffed ambulances, 2 ambulances are stationed in our city. Central Fire Station has a

cohabitation arrangement with Fire and EMS, and a third station only houses EMS resources.

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Battalion

City Population Incidents Services ISO Stations Engines Ladder Medic

Chief

Cedar Hill 48,710 6,302 F/M/R 2 4 3/3P 1/3P 3 1

DeSoto 49,047 9,062 F/M 1 3 2/3P 1/3P 3 1

Duncanville 39,707 6,683 F/M 2 2 1/3P 1/3P 2 1

Ennis 18,513 N/A F/M 2 2 2/4P 1/4P FRO 0

Ferris *5,780 1,119 F/M 3 2 1/3P 0 FRO 0

Glenn Heights 13,084 1,364 F/M 5 1 1/3P 0 1 0

Hutchins 6,300 1,621 F/M 4 2 2/3P 0 2 0

Lancaster 39,386 6,539 F/M/R 2 3 3/3P 0 3 1

Midlothian *46,340 3,927 F/M/R 2 3 3/3P 1/3P 3 1

Ovilla 4,114 871 F/M 2 1 2/3P 0 FRO 0

Red Oak *23,500 2,772 F/M/R 2 2 2/3P 1/0P FRO 1

Waxahachie 37,500 4,508 F/M/R 2 3 3/3P 1/2P FRO 1

*Population is a combination of City Population + Emergency Service District Population

E.D.U.C.T.—Ellis Dallas Unified Cooperative Team

Definitions:

INCIDENTS - Based on total responses for 2018.

SERVICES - Identified the types of emergencies in which the

agency responds and handles

APPARATUS/STAFFING - Minimum staffing per unit is indicated

under apparatus type. For example, the code (3/3P)

under the Engine Category indicates the department has 3

engine companies staffed with at least 3 personnel at any

given time.

F — FIRE

M — EMERGENCY MEDICAL

H — HAZMAT

R — TECHNICAL RESCUE

ISO RATING - Established by the Insurance Service Organization

for Fire Departments; rating is on a scale of 1-10,

with 1 being the best possible score.

FRO - First Responders Only: These cities do not have ambulances.

CHIEF - Identifies the number of Battalion Chiefs assigned

to a 24-hour per period.

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STATISTICS &

DATA

14


3,444

Apparatus

Responses

AVERAGE

RESPONSE

TIME WAS

5:58

Average of 7.6

calls per day

2.5 Fire Calls

5.1 EMS Calls

Ratio of EMS

incidents to Fire

incidents is 67% &

33% respectively

768 Overlapping

District Incidents

(27.7% of calls)

609 Hours

on EMS calls

15

4.4% Increase

in calls from

2017


Fire City ESD#4 Other District Combined

100 Fire, Other 2 3 5

111 Building Fire 2 10 12

112 Fire in structures other than in a building 1 1

113 Cooking Fire, Confined to Container 7 7

118 Trash or rubbish fire, contained 3 5 8

122 Fire in motor home, camper, recreational vehicle 1 1

130 Mobile property (vehicle) fire, other 1 1

131 Passenger Vehicle Fire 4 1 1 6

132 Road freight or transport vehicle fire 2 2

138 Off-road vehicle or heavy equipment fire 1 1

140 Natural vegetation fire, other 2 2

143 Grass fire 12 23 3 38

150 Outside rubbish fire, other 1 7 8

151 Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire 1 1 1 3

154 Dumpster or Other Outside Trash Receptacle 1 1

160 Special outside fire, other 1 1

161 Outside storage fire 1 1

162 Outside equipment fire 1 1

TOTALS 41 53 5 99

Overpressure Rupture, Explosion, Overheat (No Fire) City ESD#4 Other District Combined

251 Excessive Heat, Scorch Burns With No Ignition 3 1 4

TOTALS 3 1 4

Rescue & Emergency Medical Service Incident City ESD#4 Other District Combined

311 Medical assist, assist EMS crew 3 2 1 6

320 Emergency Medical Service, other 2 1 3

321 EMS Call, Excluding Vehicle Accident With Injuries 1,088 542 40 1,670

322 Motor Vehicle Accident With Injuries 103 16 12 131

323 Motor Vehicle/Pedestrian Accident (MV Ped) 3 3

324 Motor Vehicle Accident with No Injuries 48 2 50

363 Swift water rescue 5 5

381 Rescue or EMS standby 1 1

TOTALS 1,248 563 58 1,869

Hazardous Condition (No Fire) City ESD#4 Other District Combined

400 Hazardous condition, other 1 1

410 Combustible/flammable gas/liquid condition, other 2 1 3

411 Gasoline or Other Flammable Liquid Spill 4 4

412 Gas Leak (Natural Gas or LPG) 3 1 4

413 Oil or other combustible liquid spill 1 1

421 Chemical hazard (no spill or leak) 1 1

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(continued) City ESD#4 Other District Combined

422 Chemical spill or leak 1 1

424 Carbon monoxide incident 1 1 2

440 Electrical wiring/equipment problem, other 4 2 6

442 Overheated motor 2 2 4

444 Power line down 8 12 20

445 Arcing, shortened electrical equipment 2 2 4

480 Attempted burning, illegal action, other 1 1

28 23 1 52

Service Call City ESD#4 Other District Combined

500 Service call, other 1 1 0 2

510 Person in distress, other 3 2 5

511 Lock-Out 51 6 57

512 Ring or jewelry removal 1 1

520 Water Problem, Other 1 1

531 Smoke or Odor Removal 19 9 28

550 Public Service Assistance 2 1 3

551 Assist Police or Other Governmental Agency 1 1

553 Public Service 131 51 4 186

554 Assist Invalid 4 10 14

561 Unauthorized Burning 4 14 18

571 Cover Assignment, Standby, Move-Up 66 66

TOTALS 216 96 70 382

Good Intent Call City ESD#4 Other District Combined

600 Good Intent Call 3 1 4

611 Dispatched & Cancelled En Route 80 33 67 180

621 Wrong Location 2 2

622 No Incident Found On Arrival at Dispatch 14 4 1 20

631 Authorized Controlled Burning 6 14 1 21

632 Prescribed fire 1 2 3

651 Smoke Scare, Odor of Smoke 4 2 6

TOTALS 108 58 69 236

False Alarm & False Call City ESD#4 Other District Combined

700 False Alarm or False Call 72 11 1 84

730 System Malfunction 5 5

731 Sprinkler Activation Due to Malfunction 1 1

733 Smoke Detector Activation Due To 4 4

735 Alarm System Sounded Due to Malfunction 10 1 11

736 CO Detector Activation Due to Malfunction 1 1

740 Unintentional transmission of alarm, other 7 1 8

741 Sprinkler activation, no fire—unintentional 1 1

743 Smoke Detector Activation, No Fire 2 1 3

744 Detector Activation, No Fire - Unintentional 1 1 2

745 Alarm System Activation, No Fire 8 8

TOTALS 112 15 1 128

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Severe Weather & Natural Disaster City ESD#4 Other District Combined

800 Sever weather or natural disaster, other 1 1

814 Lightening Strike (no fire) 1 1

815 Severe Weather or Natural Disaster Standby 1 1

TOTALS 3 3

Grand Totals 1,759 809 204 2,772

Total Incidents 2009 - 2019

3000

2605

2696 2658

2772

2500

2263

2336

2265 2226 2182

2298

2000

1500

1000

500

0

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

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Time of Day Breakdown

200

180

160

140

125 125 127 152 154 147 149 160

180

144

154 151

160

121 116

80

120

105

100

80

74 72

85

60

48 45

52

46

40

20

0

12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am 11am12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm 11pm

Day of Week Breakdown

430

420

419

419

410

400

398

405

390

380

377

385

370

369

360

350

340

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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.5

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2018 TARGET

Percent of Property Saved vs. Loss—Total Saved: $ 3,258,588 82% 80%

NFPA 1710 COMPLIANCE MEASURES 2018 TARGET

A Shift B Shift C Shift

Average Reaction Time - Station 1 1:31 1:04 1:10

1:14

≤ 80 Seconds

Average Reaction Time - Station 2 1:39 1:10 1:21 1:23 ≤ 80 Seconds

Average Response Time - Station 1 5:35 5:14 5:23 5:24 ≤ 5:20 Minutes

Average Response Time - Station 2 6:47 6:34 7:05 6:48 ≤ 5:20 Minutes

Travel Time (1st Arriving Engine at a Fire Suppression Incident) 6:40 ≤4 Minutes

Average Full Alarm Assignment Response Time (Staffing 15) 8:13 ≤ 9:20 Minutes

Fractile Time at 90% of Fire Responses 9:10 ≤ 5:20 Minutes

Fractile Time at 90% of Structure Fire Responses 9:03 ≤ 9:20 Minutes

The current roadway infrastructure and geographic location of Station 2 will continuously present challenges in

achieving response time goals for E-182.

Truck 181 is cross-staffed with Engine 181. Challenges in achieving response time goals will be on-going for

Station 1 until the truck is staffed independently or until we transfer back to a Quint concept.

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Mutual Aid Given & Received

204 83

Given

Received

21


2018 Amended General Fund Budget

$3,105,940



89.7% of Total Budget

68.2% Salary and Overtime Expenses


10.3% of Total Budget


21.5% Insurance, Taxes and Benefits

Expenses


26% of the General Fund Budget is


Debt Funded Capital

allocated to the Fire Department

$159,500


ESD #4 Revenue—$509,168

22


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Training is Crucial to our Career Development. Red Oak Fire

Rescue is committed to providing the citizens of the City of Red Oak with

a highly trained fire and rescue department. Members are sent for

specialized training on a regular basis throughout the region. On a

regular basis, our firefighters train with area fire departments to

maintain familiarity with each other and increase on-scene performance

and safety. As the Rescue Department for the Ellis Dallas Unified

Cooperative Team (EDUCT), each member of the department must be

trained at the technician level on all rescue disciplines. This includes:

High Angle, Trench, Confined Space, Heavy Extrication, Structural

Collapse and Swift Water Rescue. Total training hours for 2018 were

8,819.

Firefighters participate in company level and multi-company

training evolutions and exercises. This emphasizes teamwork and

coordination during emergency incidents requiring multi unit responses.

Rotation is used to maintain an even coverage of available

apparatus across the city while crews are training. This is to ensure that

there is a unit covering all stations and districts at all times.

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Truck Year Model Total Mileage Fuel Expense Total Hours

FY18

Maintenance

Expense

Responses

T-181 2013 16,812 $5,309.03 1,810 $17,620.32 416

Engine Year Model Total Mileage Fuel Expense Total Hours

FY18

Maintenance

Expense

Responses

E-181 2012 53,094 $6,726.55 5,541 $8,456.90 1,303

E-182 2017 18,189 $8,896.65 1,500 $5,414.92 1,119

E-183 2007 120,774 $1,731.95 9,722 $4,997.28 N/A

Brush Year Model Total Mileage Fuel Expense Total Hours

FY18

Maintenance

Expense

Responses

B-181 2009 24,574 $1,006.76 N/A $3,196.40 68

B-182 2004 48,437 $1,198.82 7,086 $3,361.01 78

Rescue Year Model Total Mileage Fuel Expense Total Hours

FY18

Maintenance

Expense

Responses

R-182 2006 12,787 $391.24 1,146 $21.50 11

Support

Vehicles Year Model Total Mileage Fuel Expense Total Hours

FY18

Maintenance

Expense

Responses

C-181 2017 N/A $1,393.43 N/A $6,137.47 23

C-182 2011 150,277 $3,763.99 N/A $331.63 36

BC-181 2016 23,515 $3,185.87 N/A $2,916.55 389

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Central Fire Station opened in 2003. Central Fire Station is the home for one Ladder Truck, one Engine, one Reserve

Engine, one Brush Truck, one Battalion Chief, and one AMR ambulance. Station One’s primary response district is all

City and ESD areas west of Hwy. 342 to the boundaries of Ovilla and Glenn Heights. Station One also houses the

city’s Emergency Operations Center. Staffing at Station One consists of one Battalion Chief, one Captain, one Driver/

Engineer, and two firefighters. In addition, Fire Administration offices out of this station.

Station 1 had 2,236

Fire apparatus responses.

AMR had 1,335 responses including

903 hospital transports.

Station 2 had 1,208

Fire apparatus responses.

Station Two, which opened in January of 2008, services all addresses

east of Hwy 342. The station is located in the 1200 block of Pierce

Road. Strategically located to receive the highest ISO points for

addresses within the city, the station is within five road miles of the

eastern-most residences of the City of Red Oak. Station Two houses

one engine, one Heavy Rescue, one brush truck, and the mobile

incident command bus. Staffing at Station Two consists of one

Captain, one Driver/Engineer, and two Firefighters.

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