20893 ACE Language (Yr 5) Possessives pronouns and determiners

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YEAR 5

ENGLISH

LANGUAGE:

TEXT STRUCTURE AND ORGANISATION

Grammar and punctuation: possessives, apostrophes,

possessive pronouns, possessive determiners

Understand how the grammatical category of

possessives is signalled through apostrophes

and how to use apostrophes with common

and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

Australian Primary Publisher

of the Year 2015 and 2016


Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

Foreword

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) is one in a series of seven teacher

resource books that support teaching and learning activities in Australian Curriculum English. The books focus on

the sub-strand of Text structure and organisation within the Language strand of the national English curriculum.

The resource books include theoretical background information, activities to develop the content descriptions, blackline

masters, resource sheets and assessment checklists, along with interrelated links to other English strands and sub-strands.

Titles in this series are:

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Foundation)

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 1)

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 2)

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 3)

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 4)

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

• Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 6)

Contents

Format of this book .................................. iv – v

Language: Text structure and

organisation .............................................. 2–81

Understand how texts vary in purpose, structure and

topic as well as the degree of formality (ACELA1504)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

–Teacher information ................................................. 2

–Activities to develop the content description ...... 3–11

–Blackline masters ............................................. 12–25

–Assessment checklist ............................................. 26

–Interrelated English links ........................................ 27

– Modes, capabilities and priorities covered by the

activities in this content description ........................27

Understand that the starting point of a sentence gives

prominence to the message in the text and allows for

prediction of how the text will unfold (ACELA1505)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

–Teacher information ............................................... 28

–Activities to develop the content description .......... 29

– Blackline masters and

resource sheets ................................................ 30–37

–Assessment checklist ............................................. 38

–Interrelated English links ........................................ 39

– Modes, capabilities and priorities covered by the

activities in this content description ....................... 39

Understand how the grammatical category of

possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how

to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns

(ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

–Teacher information ............................................... 40

–Activities to develop the content description .......... 41

– Blackline masters

and resource sheets ......................................... 42–56

–Assessment checklist .............................................. 57

–Interrelated English links ......................................... 58

– Modes, capabilities and priorities covered by the

activities in this content description......................... 58

–Teachers notes ........................................................ 59

Investigate how the organisation of texts into

chapters, headings, subheadings (home pages and

sub pages for online texts) and according to

chronology or topic, can be used to predict content

and assist navigation (ACELA1797)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

–Teacher information ................................................ 60

–Activities to develop the content description .......... 61

– Blackline masters

and resource sheets ......................................... 62–79

–Assessment checklist .............................................. 80

–Interrelated English links ......................................... 81

– Modes, capabilities and priorities covered by the

activities in this content description ........................ 81

Answers .....................................................82–84

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

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Format of the book

This teacher resource book includes supporting materials for teaching and learning in the sub-strand of Text structure

and organisation within the strand of Language in Australian Curriculum English. All content descriptions in the substrand

have been included, as well as teaching points based on the Curriculum’s elaborations.

While the book focuses on the sub-strand of Text structure and organisation, activities and interrelated links to other

strands and sub-strands have been incorporated.

Each section supports a specific content description and follows a consistent format, containing the following

information over several pages:

• activities to develop the content descriptions • student blackline masters • resource sheets

• interrelated English links

• assessment checklist

Answers relating to student blackline masters have been included at the back of the book.

The length of each content description section varies.

Teacher information includes background information relating to the content description, as well as

related terms and desirable student vocabulary and other useful details which may assist the teacher.

Related terms includes vocabulary

associated with the content description.

Many of these relate to the glossary

in the back of the official Australian

Curriculum English document;

additional related terms may also have

been added.

Student vocabulary includes words

which the teacher would use—

and expect the students to learn,

understand and use—during English

lessons.

Further resources by R.I.C.

Publications ® or other publishers

or authors are included where

appropriate.

Text structure

and organisation

Understand how texts vary in purpose,

Activities to

structure and topic as well as the degree of

formality (ACELA1504)

develop the

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012 content description

E1. Analyses and identifies the most appropriate choice of text type for a given purpose and topic.

? What this means

provides a general

explanation of the content

description.

Teaching points

provides a list of

the main teaching points

relating to the content

description.

Elaborations are a

list of elaborations

based on those in the

content description.

Activities to develop the content

description includes descriptions or

instructions for activities or games

relating to the content descriptions

or elaborations. Some activities are

supported by blackline masters or

resource sheets. Where applicable,

these will be stated for easy reference.

Analysing text structures and language features of various text types (pages 12 to 25)

Pages 5 to 11 provide teacher information, student activities and examples of seven imaginative, informative and persuasive text types written in

the forms of a narrative, a procedure, a report, an explanation, an exposition, a discussion and a recount. These pages support the blackline masters

provided on pages 12 to 25.

Each text type in pages 5 to 11 includes:

– information for the teacher about the various language and structural features, and the purpose of the specifi c text type

– a detailed analysis of the structural and language features of the text presented in the sample texts provided on pages 12 to 25

– suggested activities for helping students analyse structural and language features, and the purpose of the specifi c text type

– answers for the student analysis worksheets, presented at the back of the book.

Analysing texts

In preparation for their own writing, provide students with a variety of appropriate text types across a range of topics. Analyse them by discussing the

structure and language features, and the purpose, formality and intended audience. As the structures and language features are identifi ed, they can

be presented in charts so that similarities and differences between different text types can be seen. The more students analyse the different text types

written by others, the more able they will be in planning and writing their own.

Using technology to present text types

To help students identify the language features of text types, scan and enlarge the sample texts on pages 12 to 24 for use with an interactive

whiteboard text program. Colour code the different language features and compare and contrast their use in different text types.

Analysing the purpose of texts (page 4)

Provide students with a variety of appropriate text types across a range of topics. Use the table on page 4 to help them analyse each text and answer

the questions: Is it a factual or literary text type? Was it written to inform, to entertain or to persuade?

Language and text structure revision/introduction activities

As students need to identify language features such as verb tense, use of adverbs and adjectives to enhance and /or clarify meaning, identify pronouns

and use of text connectives such as conjunctions, they will need revision/teaching to become familiar with these. The Primary grammar and word

study series by R.I.C. Publications provides background information for the teacher, teaching suggestions and student worksheets on these aspects. The

content description on pages 28 to 39 of this book also treats pronoun reference and text connectives in detail.

Interrelated English links: See page 27.

E2. Determines the degree of formality of text type appropriate for a given audience.

Identifying the degree of formality in text types

Provide students with a variety of appropriate text types across a range of topics. Suggest the possible intended audience giving reasons for suggestions.

Informal text is written much as the spoken word. Formal text is written correctly but not as we would necessarily speak. Some examples of formal/

informal features are:

Features of formal text

Features of informal text

actions actions


n


casual style

Altering the degree of formality in text types

Having classifi ed texts as either formal or informal, convert them from one type to the other. To help with the degree of formality, suggest examples of

people the students know or know of, to be the audience. This will help them to choose appropriate language and styles.

R.I.C. Publications® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

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Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

iv


Format of the bookum.

Blackline masters

and resource sheets

are provided to support

teaching and learning

activities for each content

description. These include

worksheets for class use,

games, charts or other

materials which the teacher

might find useful to use or

display in the classroom.

For each blackline master or

resource sheet, the content

description to which it

relates is given.

Each section has a checklist

which teachers may find useful as

a place to keep a record of their

observations of the activities to

develop the content descriptions.

Interrelated English links

lists other links covered within

the Language strand, Literature

strand and Literacy strand of

English that are incorporated in

the activities provided with the

content description. While the

book’s approach focuses on the

Text structure and organisation

sub-strand, the links show the

integration across the three

strands.

A table showing the Language

modes, General capabilities

and Cross-curriculum priorities

covered by the activities in each

content description is provided.

Answers for student worksheets

are provided at the back of the

book.

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

v


Text structure

and organisation

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through

apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Related terms

Punctuation/Punctuation marks

The system of inserting marks in text to clarify

meaning. Punctuation marks include the

apostrophe, full stop, comma, colon, semicolon

and quotation marks.

Possessive apostrophe

Punctuation marks used to show possession.

Depending on the status and spelling of

the noun (owner) the apostrophe may be

accompanied by the letter ‘s’.

Regular plural nouns

Those that end in the letter ‘s’, following a

specifi c rule for their formation; e.g. add an

‘s’, or ‘es’, change the ‘y’ to ‘i’ and add ‘es’ or

change the ‘f’ to ‘v’ and add ‘es’.

Irregular plural nouns

Those that have a different word to signify

the plural form. These are treated in the same

way as singular nouns; e.g. men’s, women’s,

children’s.

Possessive pronouns

Those that represent the owner and his, her or

their possessive apostrophe.

Possessive determiner

That which signifi es who a thing belongs to;

e.g. my car, your apple, his book, her train, its

tail, our class, your teacher, their lesson.

?

T

E

What this means

Teacher information

• The apostrophe is used to signal possession. There are rules related to the use of the

apostrophe and the letter ’s’, dependent on the number of owners and the last letter

of the owner.

Teaching points

• If the name of a single owner does not end in the letter ‘s’, there is only one way to

show possession; e.g. Ben’s dog.

• If the name of a single owner ends in the letter ‘s’, there are two choices for

showing possession; e.g. either an octopus’ head or an octopus’s head.

• There is only one way to show possession of a regular plural noun; e.g. the cats’

milk.

• For irregular plural nouns that do not end in the letter ‘s’, there is only one way to

show possession; e.g. the women’s fashion.

• Pronouns can help identify where to place the possessive apostrophe or determine if

it has been correctly placed.

• When named owners who share the same thing(s) are listed, only the last owner has

the possessive apostrophe.

• When named owners who own individual things are listed, they all have a

possessive apostrophe.

• There are times when the possessive apostrophe is misused; e.g. with plurals, with

possessive pronouns and with the possessive determiner, ‘its’.

Elaborations

E1. Understands that one or many owners determines the position of the possessive

apostrophe.

E2. Understands that possessive pronouns and determiners do not require a possessive

apostrophe.

Further resources

• Primary grammar and word study (Books A–G) R.I.C. Publications

• Posters: Introducing punctuation R.I.C. Publications

• Interactive software: Introducing punctuation R.I.C. Publications

• http://www.teachingheart.net/readerstheater.htm

Student vocabulary

punctuation

punctuation

marks

possessive

apostrophe

singular nouns

plural nouns

regular plural

nouns

irregular plural

nouns

possessive

pronoun

possessive

determiner

R.I.C. Publications ® follows the guidelines for punctuation and grammar as recommended by the

Style manual for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn., 2002.

Note, however, that teachers should use their own guide if there is a confl ict.

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

40


Text structure

and organisation

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is

signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with

common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Activities to

develop the

content description

E1. Understands that one or many owners determines the position of the possessive apostrophe.

• To show the position of the possessive apostrophe

Enlarge, laminate and display the resource sheets pages 42, 43, 45 and 47. Discuss their content and brainstorm additional examples. Use the pictures

on pages 43 and 45 to stimulate ideas for examples of different possessive phrases. On the record sheets, pages 44 and 47, record examples of phrases

using the possessive apostrophe for one and more than one owner. Turn each phrase around and use the word ‘of’ to show possession. Write a sentence

including the possessive apostrophe for each example.

Make one collection of pictures of people and animals and one of inanimate objects. Take turns to select one picture from each collection. Make up a

possessive phrase using the apostrophe. Put the phrase into a sentence. Record on page 44 for single owners and 47 for more than one owner.

Enlarge, laminate and display the ‘Named owners’ resource sheet on page 50. Use the collections of pictures from the above activity to write sentences

individually naming multiple owners who share the same thing and those who each own their own thing.

Students write sentences containing deliberate errors and give to a partner to correct.

Students take on the role of teacher and take turns explaining the rules associated with the possessive apostrophe.

• To show that plural nouns do not require the possessive apostrophe

Enlarge, laminate and display the resource sheet page 45. Discuss its content and brainstorm additional examples. Write sentences that include plural

nouns used correctly.

Encourage students to look out for community signs that have used the possessive apostrophe in error. Record these errors and use as examples

to explain how and why they are incorrect. If possible, photograph the signs and use in a display highlighting the incorrect use of the possessive

apostrophe.

Students write sentences containing deliberate errors and give to a partner to correct.

Interrelated English links: See page 58.

E2. Understands that possessive pronouns and determiners do not require a possessive apostrophe.

• To show that possessive pronouns and the possessive determiner ’its’ do not require the possessive apostrophe

Enlarge, laminate and display the resource sheets, pages 52 and 53. Discuss their content and brainstorm additional examples. Write sentences that

include possessive pronouns and the possessive determiner ‘its’ used correctly.

Students write sentences containing deliberate errors and give to a partner to correct.

Encourage students to look out for community signs that have used the possessive apostrophe in error. Record these errors and use as examples

to explain how and why they are incorrect. If possible, photograph the signs and use in a display highlighting the incorrect use of the possessive

apostrophe.

Interrelated English links: See page 58.

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

41


To show possession by one owner – 1

Resource sheet

The apostrophe is used to show possession by someone or something.

If the name of the owner does not end in the letter ‘s’,

there is only one way to show possession.

Add an apostrophe and the letter ‘s’ to the owner.

My Diary

Anna’s diary

a dog’s collar

a car’s engine

a ladder’s rungs

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

42

the diary of Anna

the collar of a dog

the engine of a car

the rungs of a ladder

If the name of the owner ends in the letter ‘s’, there are two choices to show possession.

Add the apostrophe to

the end of the owner.

Add the apostrophe to the end of

the owner and add the letter ‘s’.

a platypus’ bill a platypus’s bill the bill of a platypus

a hippopotamus’ teeth

a hippopotamus’s teeth

the teeth of a

hippopotamus

a walrus’ tusks a walrus’s tusks the tusks of a walrus

a rhinoceros’ horns

a rhinoceros’s horns

the horns of a

rhinoceros

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012


To show possession by one

owner – 2

Resource sheet

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

leopard

wombat

possum

horse

giraffe

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

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mantis

octopus

ibis

albatross

chamois


To show possession by one owner – 3

With the word ‘of’

With possessive

apostrophe

Singular noun Possession(s)

e.g. horse mane the horse’s mane the mane of the horse

The horse’s mane was ruffled by the wind.

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

44

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012


To show possession by more than

one owner – 1

Resource sheet

The apostrophe is used to show possession by someone or something.

The plural of most nouns ends in the letter ‘s’.

There is only one way to show possession by more than one owner.

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Add an apostrophe after the letter ‘s’ at the end of the plural form.

the cats’ whiskers

the whiskers of the cats

the churches’ steeples

the steeples of the churches

the fairies’ wings

the wings of the fairies

the elves’ beards

the beards of the elves

The plural of some nouns is a different word.

There is only one way to show possession of such owners.

Add an apostrophe and the letter ‘s’ to the plural noun.

the people’s princess

the princess of the people

the mice’s food

the food of the mice

the children’s grandmother

the grandmother of the children

the men’s moustaches

the moustaches of the men

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

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To show possession by more than

one owner – 2

Resource sheet

leopards

geese

wombats

children

possums

women

horses

lice

giraffes

teeth

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

46

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012


Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

To show possession by more than one owner – 3

With the word ‘of’

With possessive

apostrophe

Plural noun Possession(s)

e.g. princes crowns the princes’ crowns the crowns of the princes

The princes’ crowns were made of solid gold.

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The possessive apostrophe

The apostrophe is used to show possession by someone or something.

Rewrite each sentence using the possessive apostrophe.

1. (a) The dog of the farmer rounded up the sheep.

(b) The eggs of the hen were eaten by the fox.

(c) The wallet of the pensioner was handed in at the police station.

2. (a) The tail and neck of Brachiosaurus were very long.

(b) The head of Brachiosaurus was very small.

(c) The front legs of Brachiosaurus were longer than its hind legs.

3. (a) The supporters of the politicians were ready to vote.

(b) The cries of the babies were heard across the park.

(c) The antics of the animals made the children laugh.

4. (a) The hissing of the geese was very loud.

(b) The vote of the people were very important.

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

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Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012


Pronoun clues

Resource sheet

The position of the possessive apostrophe indicates if there is one or many owners.

Pronoun clues in the sentence can also indicate the number of owners.

The teacher was happy with the students’ progress and rewarded them well.

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

The teacher was happy with the progress of more than

one student and rewarded them very well.


The teacher was happy with the student’s progress and rewarded him well.

The teacher was happy with the progress of one student and rewarded him very well.

The farmer cleaned the horse’s stable and gave it fresh hay to eat.

The farmer cleaned the stable of one horse and gave it fresh hay to eat.


The farmer cleaned the horses’ stable and gave them fresh hay to eat.

The farmer cleaned the stable of more than one horse and gave them fresh hay to eat.

The swimmers’ coach was delighted when they won the relay race.

The coach of more than one swimmer was delighted when they won the relay race.


The swimmer’s coach was delighted when she won the relay race.

The coach of one swimmer was delighted when she won the relay race.

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Pronoun clues

The apostrophe is used to show possession by someone or something.

1. Use the pronoun in bold type in each sentence to decide where to place the possessive

apostrophe in the noun in bold type.

(a) The cats owner was upset when they did not return

home one night.

(b) The builders ladder was stolen while she was

replacing tiles on the roof.

(c) At the end of the party, the boys mother took

them home.

(d) Mum washed my brothers socks with my red dress.

He now has pink socks.

(e) The trees branches came down when it was hit by

lightning.

(f) The bear cubs mother caught fish for them.

2. Write the missing pronoun in each sentence.

(a) The parents were happy with their sons’ behaviour

so they took

for a special treat.

(b) Lauren enjoyed her brothers’ company, especially

when

let her play football.

(c) Grandma looked forward to her nephew’s visits

and always baked a special cake for .

(d) Anjil often walked her neighbours’ dogs. She knew

didn’t have much free time.

(e) Salwa and Sujatha studied the female student’s reports.

They were sad to see that

no progress.

(f) The garden’s lawn suffered because

not been watered.

had made

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

had

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

50


Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Named owners

When named owners who share the same thing(s) are listed, only the last owner has the possessive apostrophe.

the parents of both Achim and Nari

Achim and Nari share the same parents.

Achim and Nari’s parents

the friends of both Nagisa and Anja

Nagisa and Anja share the same friends.

Nagisa and Anja’s friends

the pets of both Ciara and Logan

Ciara and Logan share the same pets.

Ciara and Logan’s pets

Resource sheet

the games of both Mira and Eyal

Mira and Eyal share the same games.

Mira and Eyal’s games

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

51

When named owners who own individual things are listed, they all have a possessive apostrophe.

the parents of Achim and the parents of Nari

Achim and Nari have different parents.

Achim’s and Nari’s parents

the friends of Nagisa and the friends of Anja

Nagisa and Anja have different friends.

Nagisa’s and Anja’s friends

the pets of Ciara and the pets of Logan

Ciara and Logan have different pets.

Ciara’s and Logan’s pets

the games of Mira and the games of Eyal

Mira and Eyal have different games.

Mira’s and Eyal’s games


Named owners

The apostrophe is used to show possession by someone or something.

1. Write the phrase with the possessive apostrophe to represent each sentence.

(a) Sam and Mitchell share the same sisters.

(b) Ryan and Luke have different computer games.

(c) Lisa and Joanne share the same teachers.

(d) Mum and Dad share the same hobbies.

(e) Rover and Toby have different kennels.

2. Write a sentence to explain each phrase.

(a) Jack’s and Jill’s buckets

(b) Bill’s and Ben’s flowerpots

(c) Lassie and Rover’s owners

(d) Mum’s and Dad’s cars

(e) Harry and Hannah’s goats

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

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Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012


The plural/possessive trap

Resource sheet

The apostrophe of possession is often misplaced.

On many community signs, it can be seen in a word ending

with the letter ‘s’ that is simply a plural word.

How can you avoid falling into the ‘plural/possessive’ trap?

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Read the phrase or sentence. Does it make sense?

Sign

Shoe’s

for SALE

Traffic light’s

ahead

Keep dog’s

on a lead

Place bike’s

in the rack

Leave

trolley’s here

What it is saying

the ‘for sale’

of the shoe

the ‘ahead’

of the traffi c

lights

Keep the ‘on

a lead’ of the

dog.

Place the ‘in

the rack’ of

the bike.

Leave the

‘here’ of the

trolley.

Does it make

sense?

No

No

No

No

No

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

53

Correct sign

Shoes

for SALE

Traffic lights

ahead

Keep dogs

on a lead

Place bikes

in the rack

Leave

trolleys here

What it means

There are shoes

for sale.

There are traffi c

lights ahead.

Dogs should be

kept on their

leads.

Bikes should be

placed in the

rack.

Trolleys should

be left here.

(in a trolley

park)


Possessive pronouns

Resource sheet

The possessive apostrophe is used only when the owner is represented by a noun.

If the owner is represented by a possessive pronoun, no apostrophe is required.

Possessive

pronoun

Examples

Meaning

mine

yours

(singular)

his

hers

ours

yours

(plural)

theirs

‘You have your favourite foods and I

have mine.’

‘This is Mum’s magazine. Where is

mine?’

‘Emil, the books on the table are yours.’

‘These scissors are mine. Where are

yours?’

After Joel won the tennis match, the

trophy was his.

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

54

The favourite foods belonging to me.

Where is my magazine?

The books belong to Emil.

Where are your scissors?

The trophy belongs to Joel.

‘I ate my apple but Sam left his.’ Sam did not eat his apple.

Ashley knew the responsibility was hers.

Mai found her clue but Sasha couldn’t

fi nd hers.

The twins looked at the lunchboxes on

the table. ‘Are they ours?’ they asked.

‘Your car wasn’t damaged in the storm

but you should see ours!’

The twins’ mother answered, ‘Yes, they

are yours’.

‘Our car was parked on the street. Where

was yours parked?’

‘Look at the twins! I knew that puppy

was theirs!’

The family hoped the winning raffl e

ticket would be theirs.

The responsibility belongs to Ashley.

Sasha couldn’t fi nd her clue.

Do the lunchboxes belong to the twins?

Our car was damaged in the storm.

Yes, the lunchboxes do belong to the

twins.

Where was your car parked?

The puppy belongs to the twins.

The family hoped their raffl e ticket was

the winner.

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012


Resource sheet

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

The possessive determiner ‘its’

Why does the possessive determiner ‘its’ not require an apostrophe?

‘It’s’ is the contraction for ‘it is’.

If ‘it’s’ is written as the possessive determiner, there is no sense to the meaning of the sentence.

Incorrect example Nonsense meaning Correct example Meaning

The buttons of

the coat were

lost and the

lining of the

coat was ripped.

The coat was so

old, its buttons

were lost and its

lining was ripped.

The coat was so

old, it is buttons

were lost and

it is lining was

ripped.

The coat was so

old, it’s buttons

were lost and it’s

lining was ripped.

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

55

The ranger watched

over the cubs of the

lion as it slept.

As the lion

slept, the ranger

watched over its

cubs.

As the lion

slept, the ranger

watched over it

is cubs.

As the lion

slept, the ranger

watched over it’s

cubs.

The magic of the

rain helped the

crops to grow.

The rain cast its magic

over the crops and they

began to grow.

The rain cast it is

magic over the crops

and they began to

grow.

The rain cast it’s magic

over the crops and they

began to grow.

The juice of the

peach dribbled

down Jem’s face

when he bit

into it.

As Jem bit into the

peach, its juice

dribbled down

his face.

As Jem bit into the

peach, it is juice

dribbled down

his face.

As Jem bit into the

peach, it’s juice

dribbled down

his face.


Pronouns and determiners

A possessive pronoun represents the owner and the apostrophe.

1. Choose the correct possessive pronoun for each sentence.

mine yours his hers ours theirs

(a) The couple wondered where the building plans had gone. The builder had

several on his desk but none of them were .

(b) At the bus station, the man saw many buses but didn’t know which was

.

(c) ‘Look at all the cars in the car park now, Dad. Which one is

?’

(d) ‘She’ll do her duties, Nadim. You just concentrate on ’,

said the school teacher.

(e) ‘That’s

!’ shrieked the young child as he snatched his toy.

(f) ‘You all have a record of your test scores. Ethan and Jed, can you tell me

.’

A possessive determiner identifies the owner of something.

2. Choose the correct possessive pronoun for each sentence.

my your his her its our their

(a) The girl looked at

(b) It was the family’s choice to move from

(c) ‘I have lost

(d) ‘You’ve spent all of

(e) Andrew felt lonely when

(f) A deciduous tree loses

(g) ‘We picked the flowers from

Thomas proudly.

watch, hoping the lesson would end.

tie’, said the careless schoolgirl.

home.

money!’ shrieked Mum.

friends returned home.

leaves in autumn.

garden’, said

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

56


Text structure

and organisation

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is

signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with

common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Assessment

checklist

Student Name

Understands the

rules for applying the

apostrophe to single

owners

Understands the

rules for applying

the apostrophe to

multiple owners

Understands that

pronouns in a

sentence can identify

the owners

Understands the

rules for adding the

apostrophe when

named owners share

the same thing

Understands the

rules for adding the

apostrophe when

named owners each

own individual things

Understands that the

apostrophe is not

required for plural

nouns, possessive

pronouns and the

determiner ‘its’

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

57


Text structure

and organisation

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is

signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with

common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Interrelated

English

links

Below is a list of links within the Language strand, Literature strand and Literacy strand of English that are covered within the activities provided with the

content description above:

E1. Understands that one or many owners determines the position of the possessive apostrophe.

• Recognise uncommon plurals, for example ‘foci’ (ACELA1514)

• Identify and explain characteristic text structures and language features used in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts to meet the purpose of the

text (ACELY1701)

• Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive print and multimodal texts, choosing text structures, language features, images and

sound appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1704)

• Reread and edit student’s own and others’ work using agreed criteria for text structures and language features (ACELY1705)

• Develop a handwriting style that is becoming legible, fl uent and automatic (ACELY1706)

• Use a range of software including word processing programs with fl uency to construct, edit and publish written text, and select, edit and place visual,

print and audio elements (ACELY1707)

E2. Understands that possessive pronouns and determiners do not require a possessive apostrophe.

• Reread and edit student’s own and others’ work using agreed criteria for text structures and language features (ACELY1705)

• Develop a handwriting style that is becoming legible, fl uent and automatic (ACELY1706)

• Use a range of software including word processing programs with fl uency to construct, edit and publish written text, and select, edit and place visual,

print and audio elements (ACELY1707)

The above links are reproduced with permission from ACARA.

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Modes, capabilities and priorities covered by the

activities in this content description

Language modes General capabilities

Listening Literacy ✔

Speaking

Reading ✔

Viewing

Numeracy

Information and communication

technology (ICT) capability

Critical and creative thinking

Writing ✔ Personal and social capability

Ethical behaviour

Intercultural understanding

Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

Asia and Australia’s engagement in Asia

Sustainability

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

58


Text structure

and organisation

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is

signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with

common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Teachers notes

Date

Comments

Further resources

R.I.C. Publications ® www.ricpublications.com.au Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5)

59


Text structure

and organisation

Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is

signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with

common and proper nouns (ACELA1506)

© Australian Curriculum: Assessment and Reporting Authority 2012

Answers

The possessive apostrophe .............................page 48

1. (a) The farmer’s dog rounded up the sheep.

(b) The hen’s eggs were eaten by the fox.

(c) The pensioner’s wallet was handed in at the police station.

2. (a) Brachiosaurus’ tail and neck were very long or Brachiosaurus’s tail

and neck were very long.

(b) Brachiosaurus’ head was very small or Brachiosaurus’s head was

very small.

(c) Brachiosaurus’ front legs were longer than its hind legs or

Brachiosaurus’s front legs were longer than its hind legs.

3 (a) The politicians’ supporters were ready to vote.

(b) The babies’ cries were heard across the park.

(c) The animals’ antics made the children laugh.

4. (a) The geese’s hissing was very loud.

(b) The people’s votes were very important.

Pronoun clues ...................................................page 50

1. (a) cats’ (b) builder’s (c) boys’

(d) brother’s (e) tree’s (f) cubs’

2. (a) them (b) they (c) him

(d) they (e) she (f) it

Named owners .................................................page 52

1. (a) Sam and Mitchell’s sisters.

(b) Ryan’s and Luke’s computer games.

(c) Lisa and Joanne’s teacher.

(d) Mum and Dad’s hobbies.

(e) Rover’s and Toby’s kennels.

2. (a) Jack and Jill each have their own buckets.

(b) Bill and Ben each have their own fl owerpots.

(c) Lassie and Rover share the same owners.

(d) Mum and Dad each have their own cars.

(e) Harry and Hannah share the same goats.

Pronouns and determiners ..............................page 56

1. (a) theirs (b) his (c) ours

(d) yours (e) mine (f) yours

2. (a) her (b) their

(c) my (d) your

(e) his (f) its

(g) our

Australian Curriculum English – Language: Text structure and organisation (Year 5) www.ricpublications.com.au R.I.C. Publications ®

84

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