CPFMagazine Spring 2019

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A national network of volunteers, parents and stakeholders who value French as an integral part of Canada. CPF Magazine is dedicated to the promotion and creation of French-second-language learning opportunities for young Canadians.

SPRING 2019

Magazine

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CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

ADVENTURE

BOOKS FOR

YOUNG READERS

VOLUNTEERING

WITH CPF!

FRENCH

IMMERSION:

IS IT RIGHT

FOR MY CHILD?

BE DARING:

SPEAK IN

YOUR SECOND

LANGUAGE


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Magazine

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

SPRING 2019

www.cpf.ca

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE

Michael Tryon, Nicole Thibault,

Towela Okwudire, Denise Massie,

Lee-Anne Lavell

CONTRIBUTORS

Nancy McKeraghan and other

authors and organizations,

as noted in their articles.

EDITORIAL MANAGER

Lee-Anne Lavell

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Stripe Graphics Ltd.

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CPF Magazine is published three times per

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French. Our readership includes parents

of students learning French as a second

language, French language teachers,

school board or district staff, and provincial,

territorial and federal government staff

responsible for official languages education.

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SPRING 2019

Table of Contents

FEATURES

3 How Do I Know if French Immersion is Right

for My Child?

6 Be Daring: Speak in Your Second Language

8 Make It Fun: CPF Volunteer Henry Annan Talks

About Learning French Inside and Outside

the Classroom

10 Books for Young Readers

12 Saskatchewan Nursing Program Launches

Long-awaited Bilingual Option

REGULAR ARTICLES

2 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

14 CPF NETWORK Why Volunteer with CPF?

15 CPF RESOURCE Me, Moi + Canada Contest

16 CPF RESOURCE REEL Canada: Bring French (Canadian!)

Film into Your School

18 CPF RESOURCE EXPLORE Program

19 KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

20 CPF RESOURCE La Tournée Bonjour My Friend! Tour

20 OUR ADVERTISERS

This issue of CPF Magazine is printed

on 70lb Endurance Silk, using vegetable

based inks. The paper is FSC certified by the

Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), meaning

it comes from well-managed forests and

known sources, ensuring local communities

benefit and sensitive areas are protected.

Canadian Parents for French is a nationwide, research-informed, volunteer organization

that promotes and creates opportunities to learn and use French for all those who

call Canada home.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

A

s parents and educators, one question we are often asked by our children

and our students is, “why do I need to learn French?” For students it can

sometimes be difficult to understand how learning French will apply to life

outside of the classroom. It is not always clear why it is important, or what type of

benefits learning a second language can bring.

Now more than ever, we live in an interconnected world. Knowing a second

language is an asset in today’s globalized job market, whether you’re working

in Canada or abroad. Learning has also never been easier, online or in-person:

Language learning apps and online resources are just a click away, and there

are lots of opportunities to take advantage of Canada’s many experiential

learning programs.

In this issue of CPF Magazine, we explore the answer to this question. There is

no one “right way” to learn French; it happens in more ways than one, both inside

and outside of the classroom. We’ll hear from French Second Language speakers

whose lives and career trajectories have been positively impacted by learning

French. We’ll also look at resources available across Canada to support French

language learning at home, at school and in the community.

As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act and the

importance of French and English for the future of our country, this issue of CPF

Magazine explores opportunities for Canadians to engage in the two languages.

Your local CPF Chapter and/or Branch also has resources to offer and stories

to share about the process of learning French, the associated challenges and

successes, and the lifelong impact of French second language learning. This issue

offers tools and information for you and your family to start thinking about the

ways that learning French can benefit you and yours. Enjoy! n

Université d’Ottawa | University of Ottawa

FRENCH IMMERSION

at uOttawa

Nancy McKeraghan

CPF National President

A unique opportunity

with unparalleled support!

• French immersion available in 86 undergraduate programs

• Open to core, extended and French immersion students

• Special courses to make the transition to bilingual

university studies

• An extra $1,000 per year for studying bilingually

• An authentic bilingual environment in Canada’s capital

immersion@uOttawa.ca

www.immersion.uOttawa.ca

2 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


HOW DO I KNOW IF

FRENCH IMMERSION IS RIGHT

FOR MY CHILD?

BY ANTONIA CETIN, M.ED.

LEARNING A LANGUAGE IS SERIOUS BUSINESS. LEARNING

A LANGUAGE DEVELOPS CRITICAL THINKING. LEARNING A

LANGUAGE CAN HELP YOU GET A FOOT IN THE DOOR. LEARNING

A LANGUAGE CAN INCREASE OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE TO YOU.

BUT IS IT FOR EVERYONE AND IS IT FOR YOUR CHILD?

CONTINUED...

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 3


Antonia Cetin has been a teacher for

27 years. As a French Second Language

instructional coach, she works with

teachers on pedagogical practices and

strategies. Antonia runs training sessions

and leads learning groups locally,

national and internationally.

In other countries all around the world,

learning a second language or even

a third or fourth is no big deal. It’s

part of the culture, it’s part of going to

school and people who speak several

languages are the norm. So, does their

geographical location of birth make these

people smarter than us? Do they have

more linguistic ability than Canadians?

Do people who move to Canada and then

learn English and French have some extra

gene that allows them to learn a language

that we don’t? Hardly. If we learned one

language, does that not mean that we

are capable of learning languages? What

these people have is exposure to the

language, motivation to practice, and a

growing confidence in their abilities.

Likewise, for the children who go

into French immersion, they need to

have exposure to French, motivation to

practice their French, and they need to

feel they are making progress.

What if my child doesn’t

know what to do?

In an immersion program where the

teacher speaks only in French, students

get necessary exposure to the language.

Don’t worry that your child won’t know

what’s going on or what to do all of the

time. It’s expected that second language

learners will need to figure things out.

The teacher will use gestures, speak with

lots of expression, and slow the speed of

speech for students who need it. Also,

kids will look around to see what’s going

on and will be able to figure things out

by watching their peers and following

what those peers are doing. For most

kids, their French teacher is the only

person they hear speaking in French, so

it’s important for the teacher to speak in

French consistently in order for students

to develop vocabulary and language

structures.

What if it’s too hard for

my child?

As long as we believe in their abilities and

encourage them to hang in when they

face the challenge, children will be able

to learn French. Will they get frustrated?

Sometimes. (Don’t you get frustrated

when you’re telling a story and you

can’t think of the right word?) Will they

be tired? You bet. Learning a language

takes a lot of concentration. Won’t they

struggle and make mistakes? Without

struggle and mistakes learning doesn’t

happen. Allowing your child to struggle

in a controlled environment helps them

learn and develop coping strategies and

resilience.

But I don’t speak any French.

How will I help my child?

You don’t have to speak French to

encourage your child to speak in French.

You don’t have to play chess in order to

encourage them to play chess; or, to be

an artist to encourage them to draw. You

do need to show them you value learning

languages and you need to motivate

them. Then, you can celebrate in their

accomplishments, thereby giving them

more confidence to take risks.

If you feel like you want to be more

involved in their language learning, you can

watch an age-appropriate video in French

with them. When they have learned to

read, you can have them read you a story

in French. You may not understand it all,

but you can ask them to explain it which

will develop their listening and reading

comprehension skills. You can ask them

how to say certain things in French. If you

know they are learning about money, you

can ask them at the store how they would

read the prices in French. And, you can

marvel with them about how they are

capable of saying things that you can’t -

how cool is that?!

What if we already speak

another language at home?

Won’t that confuse my child?

The brain is a mysterious and marvellous

thing which is able to compartmentalise

and regionalize languages. Once you start

learning an additional language, you can

tell which words go with which language

and how those words work in each

language. In some families, children talk

to one parent in one language and to the

4 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


other parent in another language, and the brain accepts that’s

how it works. Furthermore, when you learn a second language,

you learn coping strategies that will help you learn other

languages: using visual clues, watching for people’s reactions,

paying attention to gestures, picking out familiar sounds and

noticing inflection. This means that the more languages you

learn, the easier it is to learn other languages.

What if my child can’t read

in English yet?

Learning to read requires the same skills in any language:

picking up clues from pictures and from context, phonological

awareness, decoding, and making predictions. For students who

are experiencing difficulty reading in either language, they may

need a little more time to practice (they didn’t all learn to talk

at the same time either) or they may need extra support. As a

parent, you may have to practice with them at home and you

may have to be their advocate at school to make sure they get

the support they need. Support in either language, however,

will help them to learn to read in both languages.

Where does the motivation to speak

in French come from?

If the expectation in the classroom is that only French is spoken,

the motivation is to speak with others. Initially, there may be

a silent period where students are trying to figure out how to

say things and are just listening. Eventually, because we are

all social and learn through social interaction, a need will arise

for the student to use French. Maybe the student will need a

pencil, some help or an opinion. The motivation will come to the

student naturally in order to have that need met.

How will their

confidence grow?

When learning to play hockey, to play the piano, or to speak

French, the more you practice, the more you improve, the more

confidence you gain, the more you take risks and the more you

enjoy it. Just as practice makes perfect for any skill, so does

realizing that practice is paying off. When students realize they

are making progress, they will feel encouraged and will be more

likely to take risks. We need to help them see the progress they

are making and celebrate their risk-taking.

Because of the exposure to French that a child has in French

immersion, the motivation to participate in classroom activities,

and the practice and awareness of their progress, French

immersion provides an excellent environment for learning

French and for developing resiliency, critical thinking and literacy

skills that will help children succeed in their French immersion

program, in school, and in life. n

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CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 5


BE DARING:

SPEAK IN YOUR

SECOND LANGUAGE

BY CAROLINE BOWDEN

Caroline Bowden has been an English as a Second Language teacher for 17 years. She works with public servants in the National Capital Region to help them achieve their language goals.

This article was first published on February 11, 2019, as part of the Language Portal of Canada’s Our Languages blog. A Translation Bureau initiative, the Language Portal provides Canadians with a wide range

of resources to help them communicate more effectively in English and French, and publishes weekly articles by language lovers on the Our Languages blog:

www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca/en/blogue-blog-enrichir-vocabulaire-enrich-vacabulary-eng.

6 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


“ I have four very simple rules of language learning

for my students: try your best; be brave; be able to

laugh at yourself; repeat all of the above often.”

My name is Caroline, and I’m a

linguistic hypocrite. Perhaps I’d

better give that confession

some context.

I’ve been an English as a Second

Language teacher for over 17 years. Every

day, I work with public servants in the

National Capital Region to help them

achieve their linguistic goals and that

much sought after language profile.

I have four very simple rules of

language learning for my students: try

your best; be brave; be able to laugh at

yourself; repeat all of the above often.

Sounds relatively easy to do, right? That

is, until it came to my own efforts to

speak my second language, French.

I’m also an actor, and I’ve worked at

various times over the past two decades

as a tour guide and broadcast journalist.

So, to say that I know my way around a

good turn of (English) phrase is pretty

much a given. English phrases, yes. But

French? Now that was a very different

matter, indeed.

My current acting gigs are with

an Ottawa-based, site-specific theatre

company. “Site-specific” means that we

perform in historic houses, museums

and other sites, and take on the roles of

various real characters from the history of

those sites. Our plays always incorporate

some sort of mystery that can only be

solved with the help of the audience,

which moves with the actors throughout

the site. We have a script, but we also rely

a lot on improvised dialogue with each

other and our audience members.

I find this type of theatre exhilarating,

at least in English. The idea of trying to

do this in French had me running scared.

Bunny-in-the-headlights terrified. What

if I forgot my lines and couldn’t come

up with something else to say? What

if an audience member said something

to me and I blanked utterly or didn’t

understand? What if? What if? The

thoughts swirled around my brain on a

crazy hamster wheel.

Rationally, I knew that this is what

every single second language learner

experiences. Goodness knows I had

experienced it often enough while living

in Montreal. Having a good friend tell

me that I was the only person she knew

whose French had actually gotten worse

the longer I lived in La Belle Province

hadn’t exactly helped with my confidence,

either.

I set about my task like a General

planning a battle. I learned my French

lines studiously, even going so far as

having a recording of them playing on

a repeat loop as I slept (no, seriously…

it helps!). I asked a bilingual friend to

converse with me in French and suggest

suitable “improvised” lines my character

(an elderly, cantankerous psychic

medium) could say.

The word came down the day

before we opened: “Twelve tickets have

been sold for the four o’clock show on

Thursday.” It was game on.

The cast met in the early afternoon of

the show for one last rehearsal in French.

I’d already asked the two veteran actors if

they could please keep the improvisation

with me to a minimum and stick to the

script, just so I didn’t get lost.

Things went well in the rehearsal. The

senior actor gave us all the pep talk, and

then it was time to get into costume.

Standing in the “wings” before my

entrance, I eavesdropped as my scene

partner interacted with the audience,

finding out where they were from.

Montreal, Quebec City, France.

Deep breath. And go.

And I promptly forgot everything I

had to say after the first line. My eyes

must have been as huge as saucers as I

looked pleadingly at my scene partner for

help. Bless her heart, she picked up the

next line, fed me what I needed to say,

and we were off, with no looking back.

The audience members were ready

to be entertained and, more importantly,

willing to be part of the story. They played

along, were forgiving of any mistakes I

may have made, and were enthusiastic

and giving.

How can I describe that feeling of

relief and accomplishment as we took

our final bows? It was the first of three

shows that day, and the adrenaline rush

sustained me through the rest of the

afternoon and evening.

The confidence I felt after that

show continued as, weeks later, I found

myself in Edinburgh, Scotland, chatting

with a laid-back family of four from Lyon

at the train station. Admittedly, some of

what passed between us was Franglais,

but we had such a good time talking

about the places we’d seen and things

we’d done on our individual holidays

that it didn’t matter.

So, what have I been trying to say

here? Well, to quote Shakespeare from

the infamous “Scottish play” (you know

which one, and actorly superstition

prevents me even from writing the title),

when it comes to using your second

language out and about in public, you

have to “screw your courage to the

sticking place.” Or as Nike would put

it: just do it. Yes, you’re going to make

mistakes, but you’ll be so glad that at

least you tried. n

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 7


CPF VOLUNTEER HENRY ANNAN TALKS ABOUT LEARNING

FRENCH INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

is a first-year paediatrics resident at the IWK Health Centre and a graduate of

Dalhousie Medical School in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He has been an advocate

for bilingualism from an early age. In high school, Henry was a youth

ambassador for the organization Français pour l’avenir. He has been

involved with Canadian Parents for French for many years, first as a

participant at the Concours d’art oratoire and subsequently as a volunteer

judge. Recently he co-founded the Dalhousie French in Medicine Interest

Group. During his time in medical school, he was involved in the Francodoc

program, a nationwide program under the Association of Faculties of

Medicine of Canada, which aims to enhance French-speaking medical human

resources in Canada. He is a past-president of the Canadian Federation of

Medical Students and sits on the Board of the Canadian Medical Association.

What was your first connection

to the French language and

learning French?

When I was 12 years old my family

moved to Canada from Ghana, which

is an associate member country of

La Francophonie. I was taking French

classes in Ghana, and when we moved

to Canada I really wanted to continue

studying French. French is very important

to me and a part of my Canadian identity.

I took core French classes from

Grades 1 - 12. Some people think you

can’t learn French if you’re in core

French. I participated in the CPF Concours

d’art ortatoire in my community and

eventually competed at the National

Concours, representing Nova Scotia in

the core French category. Afterwards,

I got involved with CPF as a judge at the

provincial Concours. So yes, you can

definitely learn from your core

French classes!

I also had lots of experiences learning

French outside of the classroom. In junior

high, I told my dad I wanted an immersive

French experience and he arranged for

me to spend a week in Chéticamp, which

is an Acadian community in Cape Breton,

Nova Scotia. In high school I volunteered

with Francais pour l’avenir as a bilingual

ambassador: For Official Languages Week,

I visited French-speaking communities

in New Brunswick and helped spread

the message about why bilingualism is

important, both in Canada and around

the world.

8 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


WHEN WE TALK ABOUT LEARNING FRENCH WE TEND TO SAY,

“I SPEAK FRENCH SO I CAN GET A JOB.” BUT YOU NEVER

KNOW WHEN IT’S GOING TO HELP YOU, OR WHERE IT’S

GOING TO TAKE YOU.

How has French helped your

personal and professional

development?

Learning French has had a major

impact on my professional life. I’m a

resident at the only pediatric hospital

in the Maritimes. We see patients from

many different provinces, and from

diverse communities within the region.

Every now and then we’ll get Frenchspeaking

patients.

For example, when I was a third

year medical student at the hospital, I

worked with a patient from an Acadian

community who had undergone major

surgery. The doctors were trying to speak

to him the day after the surgery, and he

wasn’t responding. At first they were

wondering if there was a medical concern,

if something had happened during the

surgery. Then someone thought about

the fact that the patient was Francophone

and asked if anyone spoke French. I was

able to speak with the patient in French

and he was answering questions quite

clearly. Being bilingual helps me maintain

a patient-centered approach to care. It

opens your mind to different possibilities

and helps you consider how different

factors can affect other people. As a

medical resident, it helps me think about

the person and their perspective, and

how it’s affecting their situation in

that moment.

You are studying to be a doctor

(a paediatrician). Where do you

see French intersecting with

your career in the future?

As a medical student, I want to

keep improving my French-speaking

competencies in medical settings, and

also support other medical students to

do the same. To work as a doctor in a

medical setting you need to learn how

to elicit specific pieces of information in

English, but to do this in French is another

skill altogether.

One way for Anglophone medical

students to develop their French is to

complete rotations in French-speaking

communities. I’m one of the founding

MAKE IT FUN!

VERY FEW PEOPLE

WANT TO GO INTO

A CLASSROOM AND

WRITE TESTS.

members of the French in Medicine

Interest Group, which encourages

medical students to develop their ability

to speak French in a hospital setting

by helping to arrange placements for

Anglophone medical students in

French-speaking communities.

What has most surprised you

about the way that learning

French has been an advantage

in your life?

When we talk about learning French

we tend to say, “I speak French so I can

get a job.” But you never know when it’s

going to help you, or where it’s going to

take you.

It’s one thing to learn French in a

formal classroom setting, but it’s also

important to be appreciative of French

culture. I read at least one French novel

every summer to get an appreciation of

the language.

I always have French artists on

my iPod. I listen to a lot of African

Francophone music. My favorite French

musician is the Belgian artist Stromae.

Stromae transcends borders with his

music; his songs are popular all over

the world.

I love books and music; some people

may love watching movies. To learn

French, you need to find an avenue to

get into it by following your interests.

What advice would you have

for youth thinking about

learning French?

Make it fun! Very few people want to go

into a classroom and write tests. So much

learning can be done while singing along

to your favorite songs. For example, if

your child is interested in sports: Is there

a French soccer star they can follow in

French, by listening to their interviews

in French or following them on social

media? Learning French doesn’t have to

be a chore, it can be fun. n

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 9


Take a look at these French-language book titles from Renaud Bray, for young readers from

beginner to advanced reading levels. For more information, or to order, visit their website

at www.renaud-bray.com.

AGE 6 AND UP

Louca and Nathan reach

out to their old teammates,

only to learn they’ve taken

up new sports. To win his

teammates back, Louca

vows to compete against

each one of them in their

chosen sport.

AGE 3 AND UP

A duck is out for a walk.

He looks at the clouds. He

watches a butterfly. He

finds a piece of paper. Yuck

– it’s not very tasty! But,

there’s something special

written on the paper…

what is it?

AGE 7 AND UP

After a terrible house fire

separates Guilby from his

parents, there is nothing

that can stop him from

looking for them: not the

creatures in the sewer or

the shadow monster that’s

tracking him. With his

friends at his side, Guilby goes on an adventure

to find his parents once again.

AGE 8 AND UP

What’s making that noise

in the attic? Maddox faces

his fears and visits the attic

with Aurore. Will they find

a terrible creature – or an

adorable companion?

AGE 6 AND UP

Sarah-Lou knows

something is wrong when

she sees police officers at

her school one morning.

The school lab has been

ransacked and the teachers

are nervous. She will stop

at nothing to learn the

secret lurking behind the

school walls. Criminals, watch out – Sarah-Lou

is on the case!

AGE 5 AND UP

Erin lives in a fishing port.

Her mother does not

want her to travel by sea

because of a dangerous

black rock on the coastline

that terrorizes sailors

and destroys their boats.

One day, she hides in a boat and sets sail,

determined to see this mysterious black rock

for herself.

10 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


AGE 5 AND UP

Little Bee searches for

her queen – but where is

she? Travel with Little Bee

to help her find the

Queen Bee!

AGE 6 AND UP

There’s a ghost in my

neighbourhood. He lives

just down the street from

me. My friends and I are

going to spy on him. It’s

a dangerous mission, but

we’re brave…

AGE 7 AND UP

Antoine has no luck.

While taking care of his

friend’s cat Hortense,

Hortense disappears,

leading Antoine on a

search to find her.

But where is Hortense

hiding?

AGE 9 AND UP

Humans have disappeared

from the planet, pigeons

have taken over and rats

live in a subterranean

society. Sammy is a rat

who lost half his tail in

an accident. His life takes

a turn when his fiancée

disappears. He goes in

search of her on a dangerous adventure that

takes him to the end of the world…

AGE 8 AND UP

Halloween is the favorite

holiday of these three friends.

These trick-or-treaters have a

plan to get the most candy in

the neighbourhood! But when

they see Jacob being bullied

by Mailloux and his gang, they

change their plans to help

their friend, for a Halloween

they won’t soon forget!

AGE 13 AND UP

13-year-old Astrid finds

herself alone after a

cataclysmic event that

separates her from her

family and friends. She hides

out in the one place that

feels safe to her: the local

library. To survive, she raids

the local corner store and finds that others have

been doing the same. And as food grows more

scarce, danger increases.

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 11


Saskatchewan

Nursing Program

Launches

Long-awaited

Bilingual

Option

BY IRYN TUSHABE, WRITER AND INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST

Seven first-year nursing students are completing their first

year of the Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Science

in Nursing (SCBScN) classes in both French and English,

thanks to the recently-launched bilingual option.

“I got accepted in both programs, but I chose the bilingual

option,” says student nurse Sabrina Michaud, who moved to

Saskatchewan from Montreal six years ago. “I strongly believe

that we need to have healthcare professionals who can serve the

French community in French.”

Her colleague Joëlle Lapierre agrees. “For me, it’s an opportunity

to maintain my French culture throughout my education,”

she adds.

The Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Science in

Nursing (SCBScN) program, a collaboration between the Faculty

of Nursing at the University of Regina and the School of Nursing at

Saskatchewan Polytechnic, is partnering with La Cité Universitaire

Francophone to offer the bilingual option. Fifty percent of the

program’s classes are taught in French and fifty percent are

taught in English.

"In an ideal world we would have established a Frenchlanguage

only option like the one that exists, for example, at

Université de Saint-Boniface in Winnipeg,” says David Gregory,

Dean, Faculty of Nursing at the University of Regina. “But, like the

University of Alberta, we decided to look at the bilingual option as

a first step forward.”

As a former professor at the University of Manitoba, where

French-language programs are abundant, Gregory says he was

surprised by the lack of similar opportunities at the University of

Regina. “I approached the Provost and he thought it was a good

idea,” he explains. “And that’s when we started to work with

La Cité to develop the bilingual option for the nursing program.”

That work, which began in 2015, culminated in the enrolment

of seven students in the program’s bilingual option for the 2018-19

school year. A program must have at least seven registered

students in order to assign clinical placements in hospitals.

Program Liaison Francine Proulx-Kenzle says that one aim

of the program’s bilingual option is to improve the quality of

French-language healthcare services provision for Saskatchewan’s

Francophone community. “So far, so good,” Proulx-Kenzle says,

adding that the first semester, bilingual or not, is tough on new

students. “But we’re here to support them and to provide them

with the resources that they need.”

12 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


“We’re like the little guinea pigs of the

program,” Lapierre says. Even though she

appreciates the advantages of a close-knit

group, such as the help that they offer each

other, Lapierre says she has sometimes missed

interacting with the larger nursing student

community. According to Mr. Gregory, the

students in the bilingual option are on their own

while taking the French classes, but will have

more opportunities to take classes with the larger

Bachelor of Nursing cohort as they advance

through the four-year program. Talks are also

underway with representatives from the three

French-language nursing programs in Western

Canada to share resources and knowledge.

The program continues to grow: The 2019-

2020 school year will see seven more students

enrolled in the bilingual option, increasing the

program’s capacity to fourteen students. “It will

continue to accumulate,” explains Proulx-Kenzle.

“The neighbouring universities have about 30

[new students in their bilingual programs] each

year, so why couldn’t we?” n

The 2018-19 student cohort for the Saskatchewan Collaborative

Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, bilingual option.

To all

parents:

Thank you

for giving the

lasting gift

of language

learning

to your

child(ren).

We salute you!

Continue to

promote

French

over the

summer

with

books,

movies,

camp,

travel,

games,

& play dates.

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 13


CPF NETWORK

WHY VOLUNTEER

WITH CPF?

Volunteering is at the heart of Canadian Parents for French.

CPF was founded in 1977 by a dedicated group of parents

who wanted to ensure that children would have the

opportunity to become bilingual in the Canadian school system.

This original small group of parents who met in Ottawa over

40 years ago has evolved into a proactive national network

with 10 branches and offices and 150 chapters in communities

coast to coast to coast.

At CPF, volunteers play an integral role. In communities

across Canada, they connect youth and families with

opportunities to access French language education.

Advantages of volunteering with CPF include:

n Networking opportunities with parents and

community members

n Personal and professional development opportunities

n Learning first-hand about French language learning

resources in your community

We asked volunteers to share their favourite CPF memories and

their reasons for getting involved. Here is what they told us:

My favourite memory with CPF is:

n Meeting like-minded advocates for French and bilingualism

and sharing stories. Connecting with parents, teachers, and FSL

supporters from across the country at National conferences

n Meeting motivated people from across the country who

encourage French language learning

n All the people, the learning and the sharing that happens

across the network! n

CPF Saanich Chapter volunteers promoting CPF’s work.

I VOLUNTEER WITH CPF BECAUSE

Being bilingual has afforded me great

opportunities in life, and I want my

students and my children to experience

the same opportunities.

I want my children to be proficient

in Canada’s official languages.

I want to inject fun into French learning

for the students in my community.

My daughter is in French immersion and

loves learning French.

All children, families and communities

deserve the opportunity and exposure

to French language and culture.

I believe in giving as many opportunities as possible to

children to learn French. My own 4 children all graduated in

French immersion. Time to give back!

Contact your local Branch office or

Chapter for more information, or contact

volunteers@cpf.ca to learn more!

14 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


Me, Moi + Canada Contest

The Me, Moi + Canada Contest ask Canadians ages six and

up to share what the experience of living in a country

with two official languages means to them.

Create a video telling us why Canada’s two official

languages are important to you for the chance to win

exciting prizes!

In 1969, French and English were given equal status

under Canadian law through a policy of official bilingualism.

To celebrate 50 years of bilingualism in Canada, the

Me, Moi + Canada Contest wants you to share your

experiences with Canada’s two official languages.

Me, Moi + Canada Contest asks you to engage with the

history of Francophone-Anglophone relations in Canada

and reflect on your relationship with Canada’s two official

languages. What role does bilingualism play in your everyday

life, and how does your knowledge of the two official languages

impact your identity and relationship with Canada? n

For more information, visit the contest website:

https://historicacanada.wishpondpages.com/memoicanada/en

Historica Canada is the largest independent organization devoted to enhancing awareness of

Canadian history and citizenship. Its programs are offered bilingually and reach more than

eight million Canadians annually.

CPF RESOURCE

COME LEARN FRENCH

IN QUEBEC

at The Centre linguistique du Collège de Jonquière

PROGRAMS FOR EVERYONE

Youth

Adult

Customized

Online

2, 3 or 5 weeks French immersion

Including workshops & socio-cultural activities

Home-stay (3 meals day)

NEW for 2019! Jr. ESL program

13 to 15 yrs old

Experience Quebec

Culture in a

100 %

French

environment

langues-jonquiere.ca

1-800-622-0352

immersion@cegepjonquiere.ca

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 15


CPF RESOURCE

Bring French (Canadian!) Film into Your School

This article reprinted with permission from the Language Portal of Canada, Translation Bureau, Public Services and Procurement Canada, www.canada.ca/our-languages.

At REEL CANADA, we believe great films are a fantastic tool for

helping students learn a new language. We also know that

watching Canadian films opens a conversation about nation,

identity, and what it means to be a part of this (bilingual) country.

That’s why we’re inviting all teachers to screen a French-language

Canadian film, completely FREE OF CHARGE.

Whether you want to borrow a DVD to show to your class or would

like to plan a film festival that brings your whole school population

together for a day of movies, we can help. CPF school members can

borrow from REEL CANADA’s library of more than 20 French-language

feature films, along with documentaries and short films that cover many

themes and topics. We also provide lesson plans for French classes (and

lots of other subject areas) to easily tie in with your curriculum.

These screenings can take place at any time during the school

year, and we’ll provide programming support to help you find a film

that’s age-appropriate, and interesting for your students.

For more information about our programme, please visit

reelcanada.ca/schoolfestivals/, and for film listings, please check out

reelcanada.ca/french.

To get started, you can reach us at contactus@reelcanada.ca,

by phone at 416-642-5796, ext. 203, or toll free at 1-855-733-5709,

ext. 203. Please put “RC/CPF – your school name – your city” in the

email subject line and make sure to tell us what grade levels you teach. n

Students at St. Joseph's High School in Windsor, Ontario, after a screening of

The Rocket. The whole school wore red and white, and organized a week

of Canadian activities to tie in with the festival.

Recognized for its quality of teaching

Réputée pour sa qualité d’enseignement

Superior academic results

Résultats scolaires supérieurs

Highest graduation rates

Le plus haut taux de diplomation en Ontario

The choice of 7 out of 10 francophone parents

Le choix de sept parents sur dix

#MeilleureEducation

EcolesCatholiquesOntario.ca

16 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019



By just knowing the proper letter-sound blends

YOU CAN

in better comprehension skills just by knowing how to decode the language.

Watermelonworks French Sounds

decodes the language one sound at a time!


CPF RESOURCE

Funded Programs Allow You To

Explore Canada and Learn French

p r o g r a m

The Explore Programs are intensive language immersion programs

offered in the spring and summer which allow your child to

discover another region of Canada while learning French.

There is currently a five-week program for students 16 years

old or older. There are no grades or language-skill

requirements for funding; however, participants

must meet all of the criteria below.

With over 20 institutions across Canada that

offer Explore, you’re sure to find one that’s

right for your child, or you! Your child could

attend a local music festival, join a whalewatching

excursion, wander through a

museum, canoe on a great lake, explore

a national park or travel back in time by

visiting a historic attraction, all while

learning French, connecting with the

local residents and learning more about

our rich and diverse Canadian culture.

FUNDING

The Explore program for 16+ year olds provides $2,800

in funding which covers major expenses for participating in

the program: tuition, instructional materials, workshops, food,

accommodation, and most activities. Aside from personal

spending money, your child will need to cover registration

fees and travel expenses.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

In order to qualify for the Explore (ages 16+) funding, you must:

– be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident;

– be 16 years old by the time your Explore course begins; and

– have been a full-time student for at least one term during the current

school year. n

DID YOU KNOW? A new Explore for youth between

the ages of 13 to 15 was launched this year. The

program is in high demand and is currently full.

Check back again in the fall of 2019 to apply.

For full details please visit www.myexplore.ca

18 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

National office

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

T: 613.235.1481

cpf@cpf.ca cpf.ca

Quebec office & Nunavut support

qc.cpf.ca

British Columbia & Yukon

227-1555 W 7th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1S1

T: 778.329.9115 TF: 1.800.665.1222 (in BC & Yukon only)

info@cpf.bc.ca bc-yk.cpf.ca

Alberta

211-15120 104 Ave. NW, Edmonton, AB T5P 0R5

T: 780.433.7311

cpfab@ab.cpf.ca

ab.cpf.ca

Northwest Territories

PO Box 1538, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P2

cpf-nwt@northwestel.net nwt.cpf.ca

Saskatchewan

303-115 2nd Ave. N., Saskatoon, SK S7K 2B1

T: 306.244.6151 TF: 1.800.561.6151 (in Saskatchewan only)

cpfsask@sasktel.net sk.cpf.ca

Manitoba

101-475 Provencher Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R2J 4A7

T: 204.222.6537 TF: 1.877.737.7036 (in Manitoba only)

cpfmb@cpfmb.com mb.cpf.ca

Ontario

103-2055 Dundas St. E., Mississauga, ON L4X 1M2

T: 905.366.1012 TF: 1.800.667.0594 (in Ontario only)

info@on.cpf.ca on.cpf.ca

New Brunswick

PO Box 4462, Sussex, NB E4E 5L6

T: 506.434.8052 TF: 1.877.273.2800 (in New Brunswick only)

cpfnb@cpfnb.net nb.cpf.ca

Nova Scotia

8 Flamingo Dr., Halifax, NS B3M 4N8

T: 902.453.2048 TF: 1.877.273.5233 (in Nova Scotia only)

cpf@ns.sympatico.ca ns.cpf.ca

Prince Edward Island

PO Box 2785, Charlottetown, PE CIA 8C4

T: 902.368.3703 glecky@cpfpei.pe.ca pei.cpf.ca

Newfoundland & Labrador

PO Box 8601, Stn A, St. John’s, NL A1B 3P2

T: 709.579.1776 ed@cpfnl.ca nl.cpf.ca

TF: 1.877.576.1776 (in Newfoundland & Labrador only)

LIVE French Classes

Online With French

Professors

Live Virtual classroom of 8 students

Proprietary curriculum aligned with DELF

Experienced OCT Native Speaker Professors

All levels: A1 to B2

10 sessions of 90 minutes

Next semester begins in September

frenchacademy@campt.ca

We also offer one-on-one French tutoring

tutors@gftutors.ca

$20 OFF

for the first 5 parents

who register!

Discount code:

CPF-ACDM

Registration is Open!

Web : campt.ca • Phone : 866-395-8868

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019 19


CPF RESOURCE

La Tournée Bonjour My Friend! Tour

is hitting the road to ask Canadians

what linguistic duality means to them.

Tour ambassadors Laura Lussier

and Shaunpal Jandu (former

CPF National staffer) are travelling

across the country, interviewing

Canadians on what it means

to live in a country with two

official languages.

Each destination will include

an event and discussion where

community members are asked

to share their views on linguistic

duality and its importance to our country. Canadian Parents for

French is a partner of la Tournée Bonjour My Friend! Tour and

encourages our CPF members and their families to participate

in the tour’s activities as it travels across Canada. Check the full

tour schedule visit www.bonjourmyfriend.ca to find out when

la Tournée Bonjour My Friend! Tour will be stopping in your

community! We want to hear from English-speaking Canadians

on the reasons why they support linguistic duality and what they

want Canada to look like in the next 50 years. Let’s get out and

speak up for a bilingual Canada!

La Tournée Bonjour My Friend! Tour is an initiative of the

Canadian Foundation for Cross-Cultural Dialogue, in collaboration

with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages and the

Language Portal of Canada. n

OUR ADVERTISERS

Camp Mère Clarac

T: 819.424.2761 (21) F: 819.424.5771

E: info@campclarac.ca W: www.campclarac.ca

Camp Tournesol

T: 905.891.1889 E: martine@campt.ca

W: www.campt.ca

Canadian Parents for French – Saskatchewan

T: 306.244.6151 F: 306.244.8872

E: cpf.sk.ed@sasktel.net W: www.sk.cpf.ca

Centre linguistique du Collège de Jonquière

T: 418.542.0352 TF: 1.800.622.0352 F: 418.542.3536

E: immersion@cegepjonquiere.ca

W: www.langues-jonquiere.ca

CSDC des Aurores boréales

T: 807.343.4089

E: cavanrassel@csdcab.on.ca

W: www.ecolescatholiquesontario.ca

Oxford Learning

T: 519.473.1207 E: info@oxfordlearning.com

W: www.oxfordlearning.com

Portail Linguistique du Canada

TF: 1.855.997.3300

E: noslangues.ourlanguages@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

W: www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca

University of Ottawa

T: 613.562.5800 (1346) E: nlauzon@uOttawa.ca

W: www.uottawa.ca

Watermelon-Works

T: 519.539.1902 E: jgray@watermelon-works.com

W: www.watermelon-works.com

20 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2019


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