Volume 24 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2019

thewholenote

In this issue: The Toronto Brazilian bateria beat goes on; TD Jazz in Yorkville is three years young; Murray Schafer's earliest Wilderness forays revisited; cellist/composer Cris Derksen's Maada'ookkii Songlines to close Luminato (and it's free!); our 15th annual Green Pages summer music guide; all this and more in our combined June/July/August issue now available in flipthrough format here and on stands starting Thursday May 30.

PRICELESS

Vol 24 No 9

JUNE | JULY | AUGUST 2019

CONCERT LISTINGS

FEATURES | REVIEWS

SUMMER 2019

The Beat Goes On!

15th Annual Green Pages

Summer Music Guide

Escola De Samba De Toronto


UNITED IN SONG.

CONNECTED BY DANCE.

JULY 4 TO 7, 2019

TORONTO, CANADA

1,000 CHORAL SINGERS!

1,000 FOLK DANCERS!

OVER 20 CONCERTS, EVENTS & EXHIBITS!

A CELEBRATION OF LATVIAN CULTURE!

Photography Credit: Rihards Lonskis

WWW.LATVIANSONGFEST.COM


TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE

SUMMER FESTIVAL

Elisa Citterio, Music Director

FREE CONCERTS with baritone Peter AROUND Harvey TORONTO

OPENING NIGHT

Mon June 3

Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre

Directed by Elisa Citterio and Ivars Taurins

The festival opens with a concert featuring

Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir,

with guest artist baritone Peter Harvey.

TICKETS REQUIRED

JOIN US FOR A SERIES OF FREE CONCERTS, PRESENTED IN

CONJUNCTION WITH THE TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE 2018/19 SUMMER Season INSTITUTE.

Delightfully Baroque

Tue May 30 at 8pm

Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre

The Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra & Chamber

Choir, directed by Jeanne Lamon and Ivars Taurins,

Sun June 4 at 12:30pm

Walter Hall, Faculty of Music,

University of Toronto

A casual noon-hour concert of baroque chamber

music by members of the TBSI Faculty

Sat June 8

Many Strings Attached

BAROQUE PORTRAITS

MANY STRINGS ATTACHED

Mon June 5 at 8:30pm

Walter Hall, Faculty of Music,

Sun June 9

University of Toronto

Thomas Georgi leads the participants of the

Viola d'Amore Workshop in a recital of solo and

chamber works.

TBSI ORCHESTRAS AND CHOIRS

Wed June 12

Directed by Jeanne Lamon, Elisa Citterio,

FREE ADMISSION TO and ALL Ivars CONCERTS Taurins

THE GRAND FINALE

Sat June 15

Directed by Jeanne Lamon and Ivars Taurins

TICKETS REQUIRED

Lynn and

James Haight

TBSI Orchestras and Choirs

Thurs June 8 at 1pm

Walter Hall, Faculty of Music,

University of Toronto

Directed by Jeanne Lamon and Ivars Taurins

The Grand Finale

Summer Festival presented in conjunction Musical Interlude with the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute

Sun June 11 at 7:30pm

Grace Church on-the-Hill

(300 Lonsdale Road, Toronto)

Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute generously supported by

Directed by Jeanne Lamon and Ivars Taurins

The combined forces of the TBSI Orchestra and

Choir, along with Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and

Chamber Choir, all in one baroque extravaganza!

Tickets are required for the June 11 Grand Finale, and are available at the Tafelmusik Box Office

as of June 6. No tickets are required for the May 30, June 4, 5, & 8 concerts.

For details call (416) 964-6337 or visit tafelmusik.org

TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE SUMMER INSTITUTE GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY

Thank you to

The

McLean

Foundation

FACULTY OF MUSIC

tafelmusik.org/TBSF

PHOTOS: CYLLA VON TIEDEMANN

2019/20 Season

Subscribe and save up to 20%

Book now to guarantee the best seats at the best price.

Single tickets go on sale August 13, 2019.

tafelmusik.org


A new Festival for Choral Singers

Welcoming Choristers of the World to Celebrate

and Explore the Wonder of Choral Music

June 25-27, 2020

The Living Arts Centre ■ Mississauga, Ontario, Canada

choralmosaic.com

Primadonna Choralis ■ Kim André Arnesen ■ Rajaton

Mass Choir World Première Gala

Performance Opportunities for All Choristers ■ Master Classes & Workshops

All choristers welcome, no audition necessary!


2409_JuneCover.indd 2

PRICELESS

Vol 24 No 9

2019-05-27 8:08 AM

Volume 24 No 9 | Summer 2019

ON OUR COVER

Escola De Samba De Toronto

JUNE | JULY | AUGUST 2019

CONCERT LISTINGS

FEATURES | REVIEWS

SUMMER 2019

The Beat Goes On!

15th Annual Green Pages

Summer Music Guide

PHOTO: RANDALL COOK /

TD Toronto Jazz Festival

FEATURES

7 OPENER | Once On a Time |

DAVID PERLMAN

8 FEATURE | Voices in the

Wilderness – Murray

Schafer | DAVID JAEGER

12 PLANTING NOT PAVING |

The Beat Goes On! –

Brazilian Drum Groups

in TO | CATHY RICHES

15 PROFILE | Cris Derksen –

Luminato | DAVID PERLMAN

17 MUSIC AND DANCE |

Susanna Hood – Impossibly

Happy | STUART BROOMER

18 FEATURE | TD Toronto Jazz

Festival – Revisioning

Continues | COLIN STORY

20 James Campbell | Festival

of the Sound | DAVID PERLMAN

22 Janet Lopinski | Canadian

Chopin | PAUL ENNIS

24 Gemma New | Das Lied

at HPO | LYDIA PEROVIĆ

Escola de Samba de Toronto, on Cumberland Street

(2018 TD Toronto Jazz Festival)

You’ve seen them. Actually, you probably heard them long

before you saw them … those big Brazilian-style drum groups

that pop up whenever there’s a festival in the summer. Loud,

exuberant and infectious, baterias have become mainstays in

multicultural Toronto. … Cathy Riches, pg 12

If you like Brazilian music don’t miss “Festa Brasileira

– Um Grande Encontro!” at the TD Toronto Jazz Festival,

starting at 3pm Saturday, June 22, at Bloor and Avenue Road.

Produced in partnership with Escola de Samba’s honorary

Brazilian, Alan Hetherington, it’ll be one great big Brazilian

summer party – and it’s free!

25 Charles Richard Hamelin |

On Mentoring | PAUL ENNIS

84 WE ARE ALL MUSIC’S

CHILDEN | MJ BUELL

102 REARVIEW MIRROR |

We Are All Ronan Mattin …

(Or Should Be) |

ROBERT HARRIS

15

LE MONDE DE

SAINTE-COLOMBE

ACD2 3021

Sampler

Les Voix humaines

Susie Napper

viola da gamba

Margaret Little

viola da gamba

Available from

June 21,2019!

G R I G O R I A N . C O M


an Ontario government agency

The WholeNote

VOLUME 24 NO 9 | SUMMER 2019

Centre for Social Innovation

720 Bathurst St., Suite 503, Toronto ON M5S 2R4

PHONE 416-323-2232 | FAX 416-603-4791

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EDITORIAL

Managing Editor | Paul Ennis

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Recordings Editor | David Olds

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Digital Media Editor | Sara Constant

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THANKS TO THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

Beat Columnists

Wendalyn Bartley, Brian Chang, Paul Ennis,

Christopher Hoile, Jack MacQuarrie, Jennifer Parr,

Lydia Perović, Colin Story, Andrew Timar,

Steve Wallace, Matthew Whitfield

Features

Stuart Broomer, Paul Ennis, Robert Harris,

David Jaeger, David Perlman, Lydia Perović,

Cathy Riches, Colin Story

CD Reviewers

Alex Baran, Stuart Broomer, Max Christie,

Raul da Gama, Janos Gardonyi, Tiina Kiik,

Roger Knox, Pamela Margles,

Lesley Mitchell-Clarke, David Olds, Ted Parkinson,

Ivana Popovic, Cathy Riches, Terry Robbins,

Michael Schulman, Andrew Scott,

Sharna Searle, Bruce Surtees,

Andrew Timar, Ken Waxman

Proofreading

Sara Constant, Paul Ennis, Danial Jazaeri,

John Sharpe

Listings Team

Ruth Atwood, Tilly Kooyman, John Sharpe,

Gary Heard, Colin Story, Katie White

Design Team

Kevin King, Susan Sinclair

Circulation Team

Lori Sandra Aginian, Wende Bartley, Beth Bartley /

Mark Clifford, Jack Buell, Sharon Clark, Manuel

Couto, Paul Ennis, Robert Faulkner, Terry Gaeeni,

James Harris, Micah Herzog, Jeff Hogben, Bob

Jerome, Chris Malcolm, Luna Walker-Malcolm,

Sheila McCoy, Lorna Nevison, Garry Page, Andrew

Schaefer, Tom Sepp, Julia Tait, Dave Taylor

un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario

an Ontario government agency

un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario

BEAT BY BEAT

26 Classical & Beyond |

PAUL ENNIS

28 World View | ANDREW TIMAR

31 Music Theatre |

JENNIFER PARR

32 In with the New |

WENDALYN BARTLEY

34 Art of Song | LYDIA PEROVIĆ

36 On Opera | CHRISTOPHER HOILE

38 Choral Scene | BRIAN CHANG

40 Early Music |

MATTHEW WHITFIELD

42 Jazz Notes | STEVE WALLACE

43 Bandstand | JACK MACQUARRIE

78 Mainly Clubs, Mostly Jazz |

COLIN STORY

LISTINGS

54 Summer Festival Listings

60 A | Concerts in the GTA

70 B | Concerts Beyond the GTA

76 C | Music Theatre

77 D | In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz)

80 E | The ETCeteras

45 -53

SPECIAL SECTION

THE GREEN PAGES

SUMMER MUSIC GUIDE

DISCOVERIES:

RECORDINGS REVIEWED

67 Editor’s Corner | DAVID OLDS

69 Strings Attached |

TERRY ROBBINS

70 Keyed In | ALEX BARAN

72 Vocal

73 Classical and Beyond

77 Modern and Contemporary

78 Jazz and Improvised Music

80 Pot Pourri

82 Something in the Air |

KEN WAXMAN

83 Old Wine, New Bottles |

BRUCE SURTEES

MORE

6 Contact Information

7 Upcoming dates and

deadlines

83 Classified Ads

2019

GREEN PAGES

15th Annual Summer Music Guide

6 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


FOR OPENERS | DAVID PERLMAN

Once On A Time, Wikipedia tells us, is the title of a fairy

tale created by A. A. Milne, written in 1917. I remember being baffled

by it as a child, feeling as though it wasn’t really for me. But the title

stuck, and I was searching for one for this opener, so I thought what

the heck, and the table of contents already having gone to the printer,

now I am stuck with it.

Milne’s own introduction to the book begins with the words “‘This

is an odd book” by the way, and I suppose the same thing could be

said of this, and indeed every, summer issue of The WholeNote,

covering, as it does a full three months rather than our more usual

monthly cycle.

Once on a time we used to do a June issue like the others and then

follow it with a combined July/August only. But as global warping

has steadily played havoc with when the regular season ends and the

lazy, hazy days of summer start, it has become increasingly difficult to

neatly define where one stops and the other starts. Add to all this the

explosion of summer events, large and small, and the task of laying

it all out in orderly fashion for you, the reader becomes well-nigh

impossible; and giving editorial credit where it is due, to the explosion

of creative and communal summer music becomes a depressingly

arbitrary exercise.

All is not lost though: our annual green pages guide to summer

music (page 45 and following) offers tantalizing glimpses into dozens

of musical events, province-wide and beyond, and ways to access

detailed information for those that strike your fancy.

As for our editorial coverage, think of our writers as slightly tipsy

Virgils to you, the reader’s Dante: more than happy to be your guide,

but more likely to guide you down their chosen path than yours. In

other words, enjoy their passion (and occasionally even humour),

but take their recommendations with a healthy grain of salt, a slice of

lemon and a shot of your favourite tequila.

And please, stay tuned over the coming months via our electronic

media. We’ll be posting regularly to our website, updating listings as

the summer goes, and publishing our between-print-cycle e-letter,

HalfTones, usually only once a month, on an accelerated basis. So if

you haven’t already, do consider signing on.

Back to A.A. Milne for a moment, though: I may have opened a bit

of a Pandora’s box by so glibly snitching its title, because as I write

this I find myself once again with the queasy feeling the book gave me

as a child. The Wiki entry perhaps offers some clues: “Milne created

the story to contain believable, three-dimensional characters, rather

than the stereotypes which will satisfy children” it opines. “Hence it

introduces us to a princess who is far from helpless; a prince who,

whilst handsome, is also pompous and vain; an enchantment which is

almost entirely humorous; a villain who is not entirely villainous and

receives no real comeuppance; a good king who is not always good; an

evil king who is not always evil, and so on.”

I thought it was supposed to be fantasy. Reads more, from this

description, like the daily news.

Oh well. Take your musical comfort where you can. And we’ll see

you on the other side.

publisher@thewholenote.com

Upcoming Dates & Deadlines for our SEPTEMBER 2019 edition

Free Event Listings Deadline

Midnight, Thursday August 8

Display Ad Reservations Deadline

6pm Thursday August 15

Advertising Materials Due

6pm Monday August 19

Classifieds Deadline

6pm Saturday August 24

Publication Date

Tuesday August 27 (online)

Thursday August 29 (print edition)

Volume 25 No 1 “SEPTEMBER”

will list events

September 1 to October 7, 2019

WholeNote Media Inc. accepts

no responsibility or liability for

claims made for any product or

service reported on or advertised

in this issue

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thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019| 7


FEATURE

VOICES IN THE

WILDERNESS

Thinking about

Murray Schafer

in 2019

DAVID JAEGER

The Horned Enemy from The Princess of the Stars, (Wildcat

Lake, 1997) designed by Jerrard and Diana Smith.

SEAN HAGERMAN

On a particularly sunny and warm May day in

Belfast – one might even have called it summery –

my thoughts turned to the coming season, and

to the phenomenon of music performed in the great

outdoors, or even deep in the wilderness, if the friends

and followers of Murray Schafer are to be emulated. My

reverie gradually took me back to a much earlier time

when such thinking was a fresh idea.

I recalled that in the summer of 1979 my CBC Radio colleague, John

Reeves, approached me with an unusual proposal for a broadcast. He

asked if I would consider funding an episode he wanted to produce for

my recently established contemporary music series, Two New Hours

(1978–2007) on what was then known as the CBC FM Network. The

notable aspect of his proposal was that it would feature a composition

by Murray Schafer, to be recorded on a wilderness lake. The title of

the episode was simply, Music for Wilderness Lake. The performance

of the work would be by an ensemble of 12 trombonists, ringing the

lake, and the recording would be made from the perspective of microphones

positioned in a canoe in the middle of the lake.

I thought about Reeves’ proposal, reflecting on other Schafer

compositions I had already broadcast on the series, such as his now

iconic Third String Quartet, which I had commissioned. The quartet

had been a highly unconventional piece, one which begins with only

the cellist on stage and in which the other three string players gradually

join after slowly progressing, one by one, from the back of

the hall to centre stage. In the middle movement, the string players

perform all manner of un-string-like sounds. They shout, growl,

stomp their feet, and generally carry on in an unhinged and bellicose

manner. Needless to say, this kind of innovative writing worked

beautifully both on stage and on the radio! The idea, therefore, of a

new Schafer composition to be recorded from a canoe in the centre

of a wilderness lake was only momentarily surprising. I responded by

authorizing the necessary budget to Reeves to produce the segment.

I subsequently discovered that the audio recording was only part of

the project. A film crew would accompany Reeves and his recording

engineer into the wilderness. The filmmakers eventually contracted

for the rights to synchronize and mix our CBC recording as a part of

the soundtrack of their film were Barbara Willis Sweete, Niv Fichman

and Larry Weinstein; it was released as the first ever film by their

new company, Fichman-Sweete Productions, which later evolved into

Rhombus Media.

Schafer mentioned in his 2012 autobiography, My Life on Earth

& Elsewhere, that Music for Wilderness Lake was his first environmental

piece. “I had been canoeing around one of the many unpeopled

lakes in the Madawaska area and had noticed how the sounds changed

throughout the day and evening. I decided to write a work for the lake

and take advantage of those changes,” he wrote. “Just at this time I

was approached by a group of 12 trombone players who wanted me to

write a piece for them. I suggested my idea and they liked it.” The book,

published by The Porcupine’s Quill in Erin, Ontario, is not the focus of

this article, but bears mentioning; it is a remarkable read, divided into

two parts. Part one is subtitled Student, Sailor, Wanderer and part two

is The Music of the Environment. It’s furthermore am increasingly valuable

document, since Schafer has become afflicted with Alzheimer’s

disease, and unable to further share his remarkable story.

Brooke Dufton, a soprano and scholar who has devoted much of

her career to studying and performing the works of Schafer told me:

8 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


GREAT CHAMBER

MUSIC DOWNTOWN

STRINGS

Oct. 17

Nov. 7

Dec. 5

Jan. 9

Jan. 30

Feb. 27

Mar. 19

Apr. 16

Quartetto di Cremona

Vision Quartet

Gryphon Trio

Miró Quartet

St. Lawrence Quartet with pianist

Stephen Prutsman

Schumann Quartett

Pavel Haas Quartet

Quatuor Ébène

St. Lawrence Quartet

PIANO

Oct. 22

Dec. 17

Feb. 18

Mar. 10

Mar. 31

Piano 6 Gala

Jonathan Plowright

Francesco Piemontesi

André Laplante

Benjamin Grosvenor

Benjamin Grosvenor

FULL SEASON OF 13 CONCERTS $500, $459.

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“I had been canoeing around

one of the many unpeopled

lakes in the Madawaska area

and had noticed how the

sounds changed throughout

the day and evening.

I decided to write a work for

the lake and take advantage

of those changes”

“Given the many obstacles to presenting this

music publicly – gathering a dozen adventurous

trombonists at once, to play at dawn, and getting

performers and audience to that location, and

at those times – it is remarkable how frequently

Music for Wilderness Lake is professionally

performed. In the last three years alone, almost

40 years after its creation, it has been featured in

at least seven events. These are ones I know about:

Stratford Summer Music, Stratford ON; Make

Music New York, New York Central Park Lake;

Nuit Blanche, Huntsville ON; The contemporary

Austin Sound Series, Austin, Texas; Kalvfestivalen,

Gothenburg, Sweden; and Living with Lakes, in

Sudbury ON.” Dufton herself is often included in

such performances, positioned in the front of a

distant canoe, singing Ariadne’s Aria by Schafer.

Music for Wilderness Lake proved to be pivotal

for Schafer’s subsequent works for performance

in the natural environment. Schafer wrote:

“Following the success of Music for Wilderness

Lake, I began to think of a larger, more theatrical

work in which the action would take place

on a lake with the musicians situated around the

shores.” The resulting piece, Princess of the Stars,

composed in 1981 is an environmental opera,

which also serves as the prologue for the 12-part

Patria Cycle, which revolves around the journeys

of three central characters: the Princess of the

Stars, the Wolf and the Minotaur.

In 1997 our Two New Hours production team

was able to record and broadcast a production

of Princess of the Stars, staged on and

around Wildcat Lake in the Haliburton Forest

and Wildlife Reserve by Patria Music/Theatre

Projects. This was a large- scale undertaking,

requiring advance research of the lake itself in

order to determine ideal locations for microphone

placement. Once the locations were

set, our team constructed simple floats, which

were anchored at those precise locations with

microphone mounts. For each performance, we

paddled out to these positions with the mics

themselves, installed them, together with the

portable recording devices, and then ditched

our canoes behind large boulders on the nearest

shore, becoming invisible. This was all accomplished

before the pre-dawn glow and the

arrival of the audience. After the performances,

we collected the recording gear and headed to

the mixing station. Listeners to Two New Hours

Scanned scores courtesy Neil Dallhoff.

across the nation were thus transported to the

lake to experience the opera.

Prior to that, in 1995, as a sort of warm-up to

the Princess of the Stars opera broadcast, Schafer

prepared several pieces from the final movement

of Patria, the Epilogue, titled, And Wolf Shall

Inherit the Moon. Several musicians travelled

with us to Wildcat Lake, where recordings were

made using those same methods that we would

subsequently employ for the later production of

Princess of the Stars. The resulting broadcast,

titled Wolf Music, was heard on Two New Hours

in 1996 and subsequently leased to Centrediscs,

the record label of the Canadian Music Centre.

This recording is still available through the CMC

and Centrediscs. Wolf Music was also entered

by CBC Radio as a submission to the 1996 Prix

Italia, an international competition for public

broadcasters, where it earned a special mention

from the jury.

Two New Hours was also involved in the

commissioning, recording and broadcasts of two

more parts of the Patria Cycle: Patria 5 – The

Crown of Ariadne and Patria 8 – The Palace of

the Cinabar Phoenix.

And Wolf Shall Inherit the Moon lives on,

continues each summer in the Haliburton

forest as a cohort of up to 64 participants who

spend a week and a day in the forest, organized

in packs, to live in the wild creating music

and performing together. Poet and essayist Rae

Crossman describes it as, “an annual pageant

involving musicians, actors, dancers, artists and

storytellers who create musical drama in the

Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve, on the

edge of Ontario’s Algonquin Park.” Crossman

explains: “This is music theatre like no other:

the stage is a moose meadow, a rock-strewn

gorge patterned with moss, a raft assembled

from rugged cedar driftwood, or a quiet forest

pool, fringed with cardinal flowers. The lighting:

dawn through filigree of pine, intense noonday

sun on a burnished lake, flickering campfire

flames, or a million stars. Flute music accompanies

birdsong. A trombone echoes across the

bay. Is that wind in the tamarack or an ethereal

voice singing sibilant notes of sorrow? “

Double bassist Neal Evans says: “One of my

chief impressions from participating in several

Murray Schafer works is that everything he

does creates community.” Evans, together with

his wife Peg and their two sons, have been

long-term participants in The Wolf Project,

as it’s also known. They told me that over the

space of eight days it “creates a community

of people who feel a close bond, much closer

that would be achieved by a regular weeklong

camping experience.” The reason, they

explain, is because participants’ days together

are purposeful. “There is the immediate need to

create short ‘pieces’ (Encounters) to perform for

the rest of the group, and the overarching need

to create the large-scale composed piece (Great

Wheel Day) for the final day. What makes this

experience so different, is that at the end of our

‘creative’ work periods, we continue working

together to prepare meals, set up a campfire,

dig a latrine, hang a tarp or paddle in some

supplies. There is no audience, only members of

the group, which means that our guards do not/

10 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


cannot effectively go up on the final day. There is a heightened sense

of ‘performance,’ of course, tempered by the awareness and understanding

of our shared humanity.”

Given the current fragile state of his health, Schafer no longer

participates in this ongoing Epilogue to the Patria Cycle. But his story

continues to be told. There are two large-scale projects in process that

aim to put his life and career into perspective. One of these is a documentary

by filmmaker Neil Dallhoff with the working title, R. Murray

Schafer: Into the Mouth of the Wolf. Dallhoff told me he has spent

countless hours with Schafer and his wife, mezzo-soprano and doctor

of divinity, Eleanor James, talking, planning and filming at their rural

home in Indian River. Dallhoff says: “The film is going to strongly

represent Murray’s outdoor works, mostly through archival drawings,

participant accounts and Murray’s writings. As we continue filming,

the theme of the Patria Cycle is emerging in parallel with the story of

his life and work.”

And filmmaker Barbara Willis Sweete, our cinematic partner

in crime for the CBC Wilderness Lake recording, 40 years ago, is

creating Schafer’s Labyrinth for the 2020 edition of Luminato. It will

be a multimedia work in which, according to the project proposal,

the Molinari String Quartet will perform live on stage in front of

a giant movie screen showing motion picture images that include

choreographed dance, shots of nature, archival and present-day

images from Schafer’s life, visual effects, graphics and animation.

“More than 50 years ago,” the proposal goes on to point out, “Schafer

envisioned a Theatre of Confluence that would combine elements

of opera, theatre, dance, music and projected images – and which

would immerse its audience in a totally unified multi-sensory and

multi-disciplinary experience.”

Schafer’s Labyrinth will include all 13 of Schafer’s string quartets,

performed over two consecutive days in four distinct programs, each

lasting between 60 and 85 minutes. “Schafer’s quartets embody his

entire philosophy and symbology and are filled with visual allusions

Murray Schafer

and extra-musical references,” the proposal continues. “Images

invoked in his quartets include the behaviour of water (Quartet No.2),

the sounds of birds and the howling of wolves (Quartet No.10) and

the movements of Tai Chi (Quartet No.6). The quartets also reflect

Murray’s preoccupation with mythology. Traces of the Greek myth

of Theseus, Ariadne and the Minotaur are threaded through all his

quartets, taking the form of musical leitmotifs that interact with each

other in fascinating ways. The archetypes within this myth form the

primary thematic underpinning of Schafer’s Labyrinth.”

As I open my autographed copy of his book, My Life on Earth

and Elsewhere, which I acquired on the occasion of Schafer’s 80th

birthday, I see his inscription: “For David: New sounds every day of

your life! Listen!”

David Jaeger is a composer, producer and broadcaster

based in Toronto.

COURTESY OF NEIL DALLHOFF

The Azrieli

Music Prizes

2020 Edition

Chamber Music

Celebrating

Excellence in

New Composition

Call for Submissions closes September 1st

The winning work will receive :

• $50,000 cash prize

• Live performance at the

2020 AMP Gala Concert

• International performances

• A recording on the multi-award-winning

Analekta label

www.azrielifoundation.org/music

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019| 11


PLANTING NOT PAVING

THE BEAT GOES ON!

Brazilian Drum Groups in TO

CATHY RICHES

Maracatu Mar Aberto

MARCELA BOECHAT

You’ve seen them. Actually, you probably heard

them long before you saw them, when the sound

of funky, rhythmic pounding drifted past your

ears as you made your way to a street festival in Toronto.

I’m talking about those big Brazilian-style drum groups

that pop up whenever there’s a festival in the summer.

Loud, exuberant and infectious, baterias have become

mainstays in multicultural Toronto. Sometimes there will

be dancers – usually women – all decked out in feathers

and sequins, shimmying along in high heels, deftly

navigating the streetcar tracks. (How do they do that?!)

Mostly though, it’s simply a group of drummers and percussionists

emulating the massive Brazilian samba clubs, albeit on a much

smaller scale. With their matching T-shirts, jaunty hats and big smiles,

they bring a little taste of Carnaval, the huge celebration that happens

every year before Lent in Rio de Janeiro, to the streets of Toronto.

Samba as a way of life

Samba is a cultural icon of Brazil, with its roots in Africa, and an integral

part of life for the majority of Brazilians. Throughout the country,

samba is played, danced and sung in various styles and settings.

Samba de roda (samba circle) and samba de raiz (roots samba) involve

smaller groups with guitar, cavaquinho (a small ukulele-type instrument)

and percussionists getting together at parties and taverns to

sing and dance. Ballroom samba dance (samba de gafieira), similar to

Argentine tango, became popular in the 1940s and is still danced today.

Toronto musician, music professor and ethnomusicologist, Gordon

Sheard sees samba as a central part of life in Brazil. “Starting in

the early 20th century, it played a key role in the formation of the

Brazilian national identity,” explained Sheard. “It’s both a unifying

element and an instrument of diversity, as its outgrowths evolve to

serve the needs of specific communities – from the bossa nova of Rio’s

middle classes to the samba reggae of the Afro-Brazilians of Bahia.”

The massive drum groups (known as samba schools, although they

aren’t schools in the traditional structured sense) formed to take part

in the pre-Lenten Carnaval. Samba schools became fixtures in the

community throughout the country and especially in Rio de Janeiro in

the poorer neighbourhoods (favelas). They provide a social life as well

as musical training and are a part of life for many in Rio.

“We need to have a beach; We need to have futbol; We need to have

samba. It’s all linked and part of the culture. We grow up knowing

that,” says Maninho Costa, a Rio de Janeiro native.

For the samba schools, Carnival parading has become a major

competition, with different levels of schools – similar to professional

sports leagues – competing against each other every year over

a four-day period. The biggest Carnival is, of course, in Rio de Janeiro,

where some legendary schools, like Mangueira, have been playing

and competing since the 1930s. Samba squads often have hundreds

of members and each of the main schools spends many months each

year designing their theme, holding a competition for their song,

building the floats and rehearsing. Each school’s parade may consist

of 3,000 participants, including celebrities, dancers, singers, veteran

performers and elaborate floats.

The preparations, especially producing the many different costumes,

provide work for thousands of the poorest in Brazilian society. The

resulting competition is a major tourist draw and media event, with

tens of thousands attending in the Sambadrome and the event televised

to millions across South America.

Baterias in Toronto

The Brazilian percussion groups here are about more than drumming

and often become like little communities or families for the

participants. And samba can get under your skin, whether you’re

Brazilian or not.

Torontonian Gloria Blizzard started playing with a drum group 15

years ago until a hand injury forced her to back off the practising. So

she switched to dance so she could continue to “stay deeply connected

to the music in a different way. Samba is something that you catch.

Once you’re in, that’s it.”

12 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


The first samba school to appear on the scene in Toronto in 1994

was Escola de Samba de Toronto, led by Alan Hetherington. Although

born and raised in Canada, Hetherington is an expert in Brazilian

music through his frequent travels to Brazil, playing with some of the

famous samba schools in Rio and Sāo Paulo and studying with several

of the master sambistas of Brazil. Finding suitable rehearsal space was

a challenge for drum groups then and Escola de Samba started out in

Christie Pits park, until noise complaints chased them out. When Lula

Lounge opened it was a fitting home for the group for many years,

being a hub of Latino culture in Toronto’s west end.

In 2003, Hetherington moved the Escola de Samba Toronto to the

Royal Conservatory of Music on Bloor Street. Today he teaches beginner

and intermediate classes there every Sunday from September to May

with opportunities for students to perform at the school and local street

festivals. Hetherington also draws from the class to populate his professional

samba groups, A Fantástica Bateria and Batucatronica, the latter

of which is a mashup of samba drums and electronic dance music.

Samba Squad was the second bateria-style band to form in Toronto

and is led by percussionist Rick Shadrach Lazar, who founded the

group in 1999. Samba Squad has played virtually every festival in the

Toronto area and beyond over the years and is one of the most recognizable

groups. Lazar describes the style of music as inspired by the

Escolas de Samba of Rio, the Afro Blocos of Salvador, Bahia and the

Maracatu nations of Recife, Pernambuco. “I see it as following the

path of the drum along the African Diaspora,” said Lazar. “Our repertoire

also includes gahu from Ghana, sabar and donba from Senegal,

comparsa and salsa/mambo from Cuba, soca from Trinidad, funk

from the USA and baladi from Egypt.”

In 2005, Lazar continued the tradition from Rio of support for the

community, especially at-risk youth, by holding workshops, along with

partners Janet McClelland and Gili Zemer, at Rose Avenue Public School

where McClelland taught. That grew into a full-fledged Samba Kidz

program with workshops for at-risk youth. Kids who came through the

Rose Avenue and Jane-Finch programs grew up in Samba Squad and

went onto post-secondary programs at Ryerson and York Universities.

“The program developed student leaders and the student leaders, in

turn, became the teachers of our summer camps and workshops,” said

Lazar. “We’re proud of the program and the progress the kids made.”

Two natives of Brazil have become prominent band leaders and

teachers in Toronto – Maninho Costa and Aline Morales. Costa’s

group, Batucada Carioca is in the traditional style of the bands from

his native Rio de Janeiro. Costa brings his experience playing in elite

“We need to have a beach; We need to have

futbol; We need to have samba. It’s all linked and

part of the culture. We grow up knowing that.”

— Maninho Costa, Rio de Janeiro native

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thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019| 13


L to R: Alan Hetherington; Maracatu Mar Aberto; Aline Morales

groups in Rio from a young age – including the renowned Uniao da

Ilha do Gobernador run by his uncle – to the tight, swinging shows

of Batucada Carioca. Costa regularly holds Women’s Samba Bateria

workshops for women wanting to learn the basics of Brazilian drumming

with a chance to try out all the instruments.

Morales hails from Belo Horizonte and her group, Baque de Bamba

focuses on a style of folk music from the northeast region of Brazil

called maracatu de baque virado. The group is largely made up of

women but all genders are welcome. Their performances include some

dancing and singing of traditional maracatu songs and the joy is infectious.

“Some people say that you don’t choose maracatu, that maracatu

chooses you. And I’m starting to believe that,” said Morales. “I

wasn’t born in Recife where this tradition came from, but since the day

I started to play, I couldn’t respect more what maracatu represents.”

Morales holds evening workshops that have often been taught by

veteran members of the group such as Mari Palhares, who has gone

on to form her own groups, and Ana Maria Higuera, who started

playing with Baque de Bamba when she was just 12 years old. Morales

explains that “Big groups like ours need this kind of support from the

members. It’s vital for the growth of the community.”

Maracatu Mar Aberto, led by Alex Bordokas, also performs maracatu

de baque virado and plays regularly at festivals around town, such

as Pedestrian Sundays in Kensington Market. “We have a collective

approach where the sound and impact of the group is greater than the

sum of our parts,” said Borodakas. “Our focus is on the creativity of

Mar Aberto and not any one artist in the group.”

Among the newer bands on the scene is Tdot Batu. Led by Patricio

Martinez, the group focuses on the samba reggae rhythms from

Martinez’s home of Salvador, Bahia, in Brazil’s northeastern region.

Performances are high energy and the infectious rhythms get their

audiences partying and dancing.

Started just three years ago by Adam Kafal, a member of Batucada

Carioca, Blokoloko is the latest group to emerge on the scene. Their

rhythmic style is inspired by the samba carioca of Rio and they are

also mainstays of Kensington’s Pedestrian Sundays and a few other

festivals. But performing isn’t everything for them. “I think the

process of creating and sustaining a rhythm is more of a joy than

performing,” said Kafal. “Blokoloko started because I wanted to play

samba with an emphasis on more complex breaks and arrangements.”

At the end of the summer of 2018, a Brazilian supergroup

comprising about 70 members from Batucada Carioca, Blokoloko,

Samba Squad and Escola de Samba – and led by Maninho Costa –

rocked Kensington Market with an afternoon of exuberant percussion.

A similar event is being planned for the summer of 2019.

Joining a bateria

Almost all of the groups in Toronto hold beginner workshops for

people interested in trying their hand at Brazilian percussion. All

that’s needed is a good sense of rhythm. From these workshops

members for the performing group are often chosen.

The groups in Toronto follow the aural teaching tradition of Brazil

for learning songs. The use of written notation is rare. New members

learn through attending workshops and rehearsals and listening, as

well as studying audio clips or videos. “Samba is hard,” explained

Adam Kafal. “It’s not something you can pick up by coming to a single

two-hour rehearsal per week. My goal is to make people care a little

more about the music and show them the way.”

The seasoned players are encouraged to help the novices. Emphasis

is on watching and listening and, often, singing the parts and keeping

time with your feet before an instrument is ever picked up and played.

It can be a long process for people who don’t have a background in

drumming and students need to have patience and openness in order

to gradually learn enough to contribute to the group. It’s a lesson that

can be applied to life as well as music.

“Learning to listen and absorb and digest before jumping in, is a tool

I try to equip my students with,” said Hetherington. “And it can serve

us well in many other aspects of our lives, too.”

Cathy Riches is a self-described Toronto-based recovering singer

and ink slinger.

BRAZILIAN MUSIC 101

Percussion groups are just the tip of the iceberg

that is Brazil’s vast, varied musical culture. Toronto

is lucky to benefit from an influx of Brazilian

immigrants who have brought their skills to our city.

Plus we have plenty of local musicians who are adept

in these musical styles.

Here is just a handful of the other styles of Brazilian

music and bands you can enjoy:

Choro, which means “cry” in Portuguese, is anything

but sad. It’s a happy, upbeat music and is often

compared to ragtime or New Orleans-style music. It’s

primarily instrumental and is covered authentically by

Tio Chorinho. Led by mandolin player, Eric Stein, the

band plays festivals and does the occasional club gig.

Samba de roda (samba circle) is a mix of guitars/

cavaquinho, percussion and singing. Musicians get

together to jam and go through popular samba tunes.

In Toronto, Roda de Samba plays every other Saturday

at Yauca’s, where expat Brazilians and Brazilophiles

gather to dance and sing along. Good times.

Although the source of the name is unclear – it may be

derived from the term “for all” – forro is a lively folk music

from the Northeast region of Brazil. Trio PernamBahia,

led by Carlos Cardozo, plays at Lula and other bars and

Forrobodo is a monthly event, produced by percussionist

Mari Palhares, that delivers a full cultural experience of

traditional food, dance lessons and music.

Of course, bossa nova is one of the most famous

Brazilian musical imports, with Stan Getz bringing it

to North America in the 60s. A crop of young expat

Brazilian performers are keeping classic bossa nova,

MPB and samba alive – Aquarela Brasil, singers Babi

Mendes and Giovanna Correia and guitarist-singer

João Leão, who channels João Gilberto in clubs

around Toronto.

A couple of songwriters producing beautiful

Brazilian-esque music are guitarist André Valério

and multi-instrumentalist Louis Simao. Catch them in

concert if you can (or buy their CDs).

AND A FINAL NOTE!

Don’t miss Festa Brasileira – Um Grande Encontro as

part of the TD Toronto Jazz Festival, Saturday, June 22,

2019, 3pm to 6pm, Bloor Street at Avenue Road

14 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


CONVERSATIONS

Cris Derksen’s

Maada’ookii

Songlines

GIFTS IN TIME

DAVID PERLMAN

Cris Derksen

RED WORKS PHOTOGRAPHY

Let’s do a little bit of time travelling to set the scene:

On June 14, 2017, Tributaries, the show that opened the Luminato

Festival in Toronto, was billed as “paying tribute to the immeasurable

power, passion, beauty, and resilience of Indigenous women … in

a large-scale celebratory experience.” It was divided into four parts,

titled Roots, Resurgence, Reclamation, and Emancipation.

On February 19, 2019, at the Banff Centre, ten musicians met in

Banff for an event titled Call to Witness: The Future of Indigenous

Classical Music. “It was one of the first gatherings of its kind,”

according to the CBC, “and included musicians from Alberta, the

west coast, and northern Ontario. Along with creating music, participants

also drafted a statement to the music industry about the importance

of including Indigenous musicians in any music project involving

Indigenous culture.”

On May 8, 2019, Soundstreams mounted a show titled Fauxstalgia

at the Drake Underground, on Queen St. W. in Toronto. Lawrence

Cherney, Soundstreams’ artistic director elaborated: “Fauxstalgia

speaks eloquently to our priorities, first of all, because it presents

deserving younger Indigenous and queer artists making their debuts

on our stage,” he said. “Equally important, these artists are passionately

engaged in reflecting the past, including ‘classical’ repertoire,

through a 21st century lens.”

On Saturday May 18, 2019, the Toronto-based Eybler Quartet held

a CD-launch concert at The Burdock Music Hall, tucked away in a

trendy brew pub/restaurant on Bloor St. W. The CD in question is the

Eyblers’ second showcasing their groundbreaking take on Beethoven’s

Opus 18 String Quartets. Some of the music played on the evening’s

program was by Beethoven. But the piece that got played twice, once

at the beginning and once at the end, was not.

June 12-16, 2019, Kiinalik, a Buddies in Bad Times/Luminato

co-production comes to the Berkeley St Theatre. In the Inuktitut

language, when a knife is dull, it is said to “have no face,” the

Luminato website explains. The word Kiinalik, in contrast, means that

it does! As we are told, Inuk artist Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory

and queer theatre-maker Evalyn Parry met on an Arctic expedition

from Iqaluit to Greenland. Kiinalik: These Sharp Tools is their concert,

dialogue, and symbolic convergence between North and South,

mapping new territory. “How,” it asks, “do we reckon with these

sharp tools.”

Finally, towards sunset on June 23, 2019, at Harbourfront Centre,

Lakeside, Maada’ookii Songlines, a free performance with a cast

of hundreds including at least eight choirs will ring the proverbial

curtain down on the 2019 edition of Luminato. “Maada’ookii is a

genderless Ojibway word describing what happens when one distributes

or gifts, or shares something with others. And songlines, or

dreaming tracks as they are also called, is a term, drawn from

Australian aboriginal teachings but present across Indigenous traditions,

for songs that help us find the way, both over short but perilous

journeys, and over hundreds or even thousands of miles, traversing

19/20

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Soundstreams.ca

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019| 15


many languages and cultures

along the path.

Look more closely into these

six disparate acts of musical

gifting and sharing, and you

will come across one individual,

Cris Derksen, at the heart of

each of them.

“My name is Cris Derksen, and

I am a half-Cree, half- Mennonite

electronic cellist and composer”

KATHY CAMPBELL

says Derksen, in the introduction

to a five-minute video in

the Banff Centre Spotlight series,

designed to “explore the stories

behind the artists who come to Banff Centre.” (Also appearing in the

Derksen spotlight video is Eybler Quartet violist Patrick Jordan, but

we’ll get back to that.)

“I go back quite a long way in my association with Luminato,”

Derksen tells me. “I moved to Toronto five and and a half years ago

and started doing stuff in Derek Andrews’ world music concerts.

And I played in Iftar that year at the Hearn [a 2016 Luminato show

welcoming Syrian newcomers to the city]. But 2017, the first year

that Josephine Ridge was involved, was when I started to work with

them more intentionally.” “Did she reach out to you?” I ask. “Yes she

saw me in a show I did with A Tribe Called Red and called me in for a

meeting. And that year I did an hour as one part of Tributaries where I

invited a bunch of my Indigenous female friends to each do a song and

I arranged that and got the band together.”

One of those singers in Tributaries was Tanya Tagaq; it’s a friendship

going back in time to Derksen’s graduation (with a Bachelor of Music in

Cello Performance degree) from University of British Columbia. “I was

in Tanya’s band from 2007 to 2011,” Derksen says. “It was a great way to

cut my teeth. I was so fortunate graduating with a gig like Tanya.” It was

the start of a ride, performing and touring, that has taken Derksen across

the globe, as well as coast to coast to coast in Canada, in the company

of an extraordinary range of musicians and other collaborators.

The sesquicentennial year, 2017, saw a significant spike in awareness

of Indigenous performers and performance practice within the

arts community, but, as I expressed it to Derksen, my own fear was

that there would be a drop off when the special sesqui funding dried

up. “But you’re not seeing that, are you?” Derksen responds. “There

are too many strong people doing strong interesting work and there’s

so much work to be done. We’re living in such an interesting timeline

where we seem to be going backwards instead of forwards as far

as racialized issues go, and as far as inequality goes. For me, reconciliation

is between people, not working on the big level.”

The February 19 Banff gathering arose at least in part from the

dynamics of the sesquicentennial year. “Put it this way,” Derksen

says, “Classical music is pretty good at having an Indigenous idea

without the Indigenous performer. So there’s some steps to be made.”

Convening the gathering came directly out of Derksen’s Banff residency,

bringing together ten Indigenous classically trained musicians,

among them composers Andrew Balfour and Ian Cusson, violist

Melody McKiver and her mom, pianist-educator Beverly McKiver,

and Jeremy Dutcher, with Derksen cheerfully but insistently moving

the action along. Perhaps its most enduring outcome will be the joint

manifesto created by the attendees and passed around among the

attendees to be read out to the audience at the gathering. Its bottom

line? Nothing about us without us.

Soundstreams’ Fauxstalgia at the Drake Underground saw Derksen

on familiar turf, performing a solo set for cello and looper, before

laying down the groundwork for an evening-ending improvisation

with the evening’s other performers, pianist, Darren Creech,

performing artist/soprano Teiya Kasahara and contemporary harpist/

improviser, Grace Scheele. Cello and electronic looping as core

performance practice started for Derksen “probably 18 years ago. My

room-mate had a looping station and I borrowed it and then I kept it.

It opened up my eyes to being able to create music on my own without

hiring a band and it was also my first real foray into composing stuff.”

Cris Derksen Trio, with dancer Nimkii Osawamick (left)

and drummerJesse Baird (right)

I observe to Derksen that the

looper work that night seemed

rhythmically effortless, making

the technology almost invisible.

“It’s clear that the thing is your

friend,” I observe. “Yeah we’ve

been hanging out for a while, so I

don’t have to think about that as

much anymore. I can just focus

on the notes. The first loops are

nailed down, I know what they

will be; the melody is in my head

and I can choose how to use it,

to expand it, so it’s loose but

formed. It’s all 100 percent in the

moment though. I don’t have anything saved in the station, so everything

is fully live.”

Cello, sans looper, is also the heartbeat of the Cris Derksen-composed

work, White Man’s Cattle, which opened and closed the Eybler

Quartet’s Burdock Beethoven CD-release concert this past May 19; but

Derksen was sitting in the audience, not playing it. The work premiered

at Banff, where the Eyblers and Derksen put in the heavy lifting on

its creation. It evokes the collision of cultures in Alberta’s history, via

an interpolated, scratchy soundclip of an early 20th-century Alberta

farmer, master of all he surveys, speaking about “his land.” It’s a

layered, driving work, demanding of every ounce of the Eyblers’ astonishing

bowmanship. “The hoofprints of cattle and bison in the dust are

not so different,” Derksen says laconically to the audience when asked

by Patrick Jordan to say a few words before the piece is repeated.

As for Kiinilik in its upcoming June Berkeley Street Luminato

remount, Derksen, who created the music for the piece, with be in

the middle of things again. “I get the lovely musical job of underscoring.

It’s one of the few theatre pieces I actually am happy to be in.

Usually if I get a theatre contract I compose the music and pass it on.

But this is a really beautiful story, and again truthful. We have taken it

many places from its start at Buddies – Montreal, Iqaluit, Vancouver,

Luminato. And we go to the Edinburgh International Festival next!”

Maada’ookii Songlines, June 23, was only vaguely in the works when

Josephine Ridge left Luminato, but the transition under new Luminato

artistic director, Naomi Campbell, has been a smooth one. “It took a

moment for us to find each other and talk and sort out what they wanted

to do and what I could do with what they wanted to do,” Derksen says.

“A bit different than looping so you don’t have to hire a band,” I

remark. “With a cast of hundreds it’s definitely a different style,”

Derksen says. “More notes on the page and throughlines, that kind of

stuff. But we do have some interesting soloists and for the solo parts I

am giving them a lot of free rein; they get the fun part improvising on

top of moments.”

Part of the description of the show on the Luminato website talks

about “a noisy fury blaring out a cacophony of frustrations and

dreams?” So I ask Derksen if it’s an angry work. The response is

unhesitating: “No its not angry at all ... maada’ookii is an Ojibway

word, I’m Cree but I chose to use an Ojibway word because we are on

Anishinaabe territory … When Indigenous people meet there’s a feast,

there’s gifting involved, so this word and this work’s meaning is she/

he shares, gifts. Angry it is not. Truthful it is.”

As mentioned earlier, the gift of songlines is the ability to navigate

hundreds or even thousands of miles, traversing many languages

along the way. The choirs involved seem to epitomize this idea:

Canadian Arabic Choir; Darbazi; Vesnivka; Coro San Marco; YIP’s

Children’s Choir; the Bruised Years Choir (part of Workman Arts);

Faith Chorale; and an Indigenous Hand Drum Choir.

“Will it get crazy?” I ask. “There’s an underscore,” Derksen says. “They

all have their parts but I expect there will be moments of chaotic!”

“And you? Are you going to be sitting inside or outside it?

“Oh I’m going to cello along.” With a laugh.

You can find the entire proceedings of the Feb 19 Banff gathering at

https://vimeo.com/317295761.

David Perlman can be reached at publisher@thewholenote.com

16 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


MUSIC AND DANCE

Near to the

Wild Heart:

Impossibly

Happy

STUART BROOMER

For over a decade, Susanna Hood has been

developing projects that explore and develop her

identity as dancer and singer, choreographer and

composer, often incorporating other arts as well.

There’s the edgy, Dora Award-winning solo dance She’s Gone Away

and Shudder, her visceral interpretation of Francis Bacon paintings.

In 2014 she combined singing and choreography in The Muted Note,

settings of poems by P.K Page with her partner, composer and trombonist

Scott Thomson. Her latest work, Impossibly Happy, is more

ambitious still: she’s debuting as songwriter and bandleader in addition

to roles as singer-dancer-choreographer with her Montreal-based

company of dancers and musicians, Near to the Wild Heart. Setting

poems by the 15th-century Zen master Ikkyū, Impossibly Happy

combines art forms with a singular physical and emotional intensity.

Ikkyū was no ordinary Zen master, but a monk whose poems

explore and celebrate drunkenness and carnal adventures. For Hood,

“Initially, it was the poetry itself that drew me; its simplicity and

openness of form and the possibilities that leant to discovering my

own musicality within. But once I started choosing and working

with poems, it was the raw, unpretentious truths that I found in the

words, unfiltered by conformity for appearances’ sake, that compelled

me. That’s the aspect that made me curious to know more about this

extraordinary person and particularly the paradoxes he seemed to

live without apology. For example, how he/we contain the frictions

between wisdom, grumpiness, sacredness and lust.”

Hood’s conception of Ikkyū takes in dance, song and poetry,

exploring him as spirit presence, paradox and contradiction. The

stage, containing both dancers and musicians, is alive with movement,

sometimes resembling a battle, sometimes a kind of hypnotic

anarchy, with dancers moving rapidly amongst the musicians or

suddenly freezing into muscle-tensed, almost calligraphic forms. It’s

made more precarious by Hood’s simultaneous embrace of choreography,

composition and improvisation: “In all cases, I was looking for

people who could balance working with both set forms and formmaking

through improvisation. Along the way I’ve realized that how

different people approach each of those demands is highly specific

and subjective.”

Hood’s dancers combine interests in improvisation and contemporary

vernaculars: “Sovann Prom-Tep comes initially from breakdancing

culture, and Lucy M. May has been dedicating a good part

of her practice to Krump in the last three years. Both of these dance

forms demand that one is always reinventing and developing one’s

own dance within the form.”

Assembling the musicians to realize her sometimes spiky melodies,

Hood managed to achieve a distinctive sonic palette via the skilled

improvising of drummer D. Alex Meeks with tubist Julie Houle and

violist Jennifer Thiessen. Adding to the special skill set required, every

member of the company is also called on to sing.

Impossibly Happy is risk-taking, interdisciplinary work that seems

to demand all the individual and collective resources that its performers

might bring to it. As Hood remarks: “It was a huge learning curve for all

of us.” As such, it’s a worthy embodiment of Ikkyū’s special vision.

Near to the Wild Heart presents Impossibly Happy, June 20 at 8pm

at Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.

Stuart Broomer writes frequently on music (mostly improvised)

and is the author of Time and Anthony Braxton. His column

“Ezz-thetics” appears regularly at pointofdeparture.org.

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019| 17


FEATURE

THE TD TORONTO

JAZZ FESTIVAL

The Revisioning

Continues

COLIN STORY

Asiko Afrobeat Ensemble

DOMINIC ALI

marks an interesting anniversary for the

2019 TD Toronto Jazz Festival. A mere three years

ago, in 2016, the TJF looked much different than it will

this year, or even than it did in 2017, when it first made

the move from Nathan Phillips Square to Yorkville.

Of the many changes that took place between 2016 and 2017, there

are three that seem most significant. The first: instead of anchoring

the outdoor festivities around large, ticketed tent shows, the TJF’s

outdoor shows would be free, and would, for the most part, feature

local or up-and-coming acts. The second: by moving from Nathan

Phillips Square to Yorkville, the TJF sought to integrate itself within a

pre-existing commercial (and residential) area that is largely pedestrian,

automatically expanding the potential attendance pool of the

free outdoor shows to people who just happen to find themselves in

the area, and making it easy for festival veterans to “make a day of

it.” (One could, of course, wander around Nathan Phillips Square,

but it was hard to find a passable beer, a cup of coffee, or even, say, a

salad on the premises. Even the most ardent jazz fan found it tough

to do a whole day at the festival as it existed at NPS.) And the third:

the TJF would discontinue the longstanding practice of automatically

including all of Toronto’s jazz (and jazz-adjacent) clubs in TJF

materials, with no input as to those clubs’ programming and no real

control over attendee experience, reducing the breadth of the festival’s

offerings in order to focus on depth.

Personally speaking, while I was out of town touring for most of the

TJF’s inaugural Yorkville run in 2017, last year I had the opportunity to

both play in the festival (on an outdoor stage on Cumberland, as well

as indoors at The Pilot) and to attend a variety of shows, including

Dan Weiss’ Starebaby group, a ticketed event at The Rex, Savion Glover

and Marcus Gilmore’s duo show at Koerner Hall, also ticketed, and

a healthy number of free shows that took place at (mostly) outdoor

stages. (For those with an interest in last year’s TJF, please visit The

WholeNote website to check out the pieces I wrote.) As a performer

and as a spectator, I genuinely enjoyed myself; though it lacked the

large open space of NPS, the area’s village-esque qualities ended

up lending themselves well to a multi-stage set-up with staggered

set times. It felt, as I wrote last year, festive, for the first time in my

experience of a jazz festival in Toronto.

In mid-May, I had the opportunity to have a conversation with Josh

Grossman, the Artistic Director of Toronto Downtown Jazz (the organization

that administers and runs the TD Toronto Jazz Festival) to talk

about these relatively recent large-scale changes to the TJF’s format,

the unique aspects of this year’s festival, and the TJF’s future in its

new home.

In order for a festival to feel immersive, a sense of momentum must

be cultivated within the grounds, Grossman says. Audiences should be

able to move naturally from one event to the next, without ever feeling

as though they’re waiting around with nothing to see. When Grossman

looked at other jazz festivals, such as Ottawa or Montreal, or even other

festivals within the city, including those that occur at Harbourfront

Centre, he took note of the way in which there were events “happening

all the time on multiple stages,” which he felt the TJF “couldn’t ever

get at Nathan Phillips Square.” One of the biggest problems? The “relatively

strict sound restrictions in place” at NPS, owing to its proximity to

City Hall and to the courts, which, as Grossman told me, also made the

development of any serious sense of momentum difficult.

Mounting frustrations with the festival’s old location coincided with

the appointment of Howard Kerbel as Downtown Toronto Jazz’s new

CEO in 2016. Kerbel – who was previously a member of the Toronto

International Film Festival’s leadership team, and had, according to

Grossman, “fond memories of how TIFF ran in Yorkville,” before its

move to King Street and the TIFF Bell Lightbox facility – helped to

initiate the move away from NPS at a time when there was a dearth of

multi-day festival activity in Yorkville. Finding the business community

and local leadership amenable to the idea of the TJF in Yorkville, the

timing was right for Toronto Downtown Jazz to make the move.

18 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


MARIE BYERS

One of the best parts of the TJF, in its current iteration, is the proliferation

of free outdoor stages. Beyond helping to fulfil a vision of

a festival with porous borders, the free stages have tended to skew

local and young-ish in their programming. This is, of course, helpful

for musicians at an early or intermediate stage in their own career

development, but it is also helpful for the TJF, which is still focused

on its own long-term growth. A combination of sponsorship and

operational funding from municipal, provincial, and federal levels of

government allow the TJF to pay for its approximately 170 free shows;

making these shows as accessible as possible to the general public.

It also helps with fundraising and development, Grossman says,

“making it easy for potential sponsors and donors to come down, get a

feel for the place, and say ‘this is something we’d like to support’.’”

The drastic reduction in the number of clubs included in TJF

programming has not been without its detractors. In the wake of the

2017 festival, club owners to whom I spoke mentioned that being

excluded from the festival’s promotional materials had resulted in

a definite dip in attendance during the period, as compared to the

previous years. In the research process for this article, I spoke to (and

emailed) a number of musicians who had played at the TJF in the last

two years – i.e. in the festival’s current format – and asked them about

their experiences, both as performers and attendees. The responses

were fairly consistent: while musicians like the idea of integrating a

greater number of clubs into the festival, it doesn’t necessarily follow

that having more clubs participating will automatically make the TJF

experience better; there is something to be said for the communitybuilding

power of geographical proximity, and the possibility that a

festival may cease to feel like a festival if the majority of its offerings

take place at discrete locations at various points throughout a city.

When I asked Grossman about the club situation, he touched on

the same points, as well as what for him was the primary issue: that

Toronto Downtown Jazz wasn’t actually programming the clubs, had

no overview over their operational standards, and had no control

over attendee experience at events that were explicitly being advertised

as TJF events. Moreover, the festival was doing this promotion for

free, and, in some cases, club shows “would be up against events that

the festival had “programmed

directly,” creating odd conflicts

of interest. Another major issue

that Grossman touched on: musician

pay. The TJF works to pay “at

the very minimum, the Toronto

Musician Association’s recommended

rates.” Again, stressing

that all clubs operate differently,

Grossman pointed out that “when

a musician would go in to play” a

venue that had a “pass-the-hat”

payment arrangement, it would

get very tricky to say “this is an

official festival show.”

Josh Grossman

This is not to say, of course,

that there are no clubs involved

in the TJF; there are a handful,

including a number of venues adjacent to the Yorkville festival

grounds, such as Sassafraz, the Gatsby bar at the Windsor Arms Hotel,

and Proof Bar at the Intercontinental Hotel, the latter of which will

host the nightly jam. As it did last year, the Home Smith Bar at The

Old Mill will represent the TJF’s furthest-flung outpost, with four

nights of vocal jazz performances hosted by Heather Bambrick. In the

downtown core, The Rex will again function as a major festival hub,

and will feature major artists such as David Binney, Donny McCaslin

and Chris Potter. Grossman tells me that the TJF and The Rex have a

“co-curatorial relationship;” throughout the booking process they go

back and forth, working through any questions about which artists

will work best in which setting. “What we end up with,” he says, “is

a lineup on our stage that [The Rex] is cool with, and a lineup on The

Rex stage that we’re cool with.” Issues concerning pay, marketing

and promotion are all covered in “a very strict venue agreement,”

resulting in all parties being comfortable and mutually invested in a

positive outcome. And, as Grossman puts it, if it’s possible to develop

similar relationships with other clubs that can provide complementary

programming to the TJF’s other venues, it’s probably “the

way forward.”

Five years from now? Grossman returns to the move from NPS to

Yorkville. “The goal with moving to Yorkville,” he says, “was to refresh

the festival, change things up, a little bit, but also to create an environment

in which people” – attendees, sponsors, artists – “can come and

get excited about what we’re doing, see that we’re trying to build this

thing, and get on board.” Fundamentally, he says, all of the Yorkville

activity will remain more or less the same, because “that’s the vibe”

they’re looking for. When asked about what’s missing, he let on

that he’d been in preliminary talks with the University of Toronto

about space to accommodate a large stage, a marquee venue at which

10,000 or so people could watch major artists perform. I asked if he

maybe had a place like King’s College Circle in mind, but I was wrong.

“Varsity Stadium,” he answered. “But,” he added wryly, “I think that’s

very challenging, for any number of reasons.”

And so, on its third anniversary in Yorkville, the TD Toronto Jazz

Festival seems confident, self-assured, but also duly concerned with the

necessity for future growth. Beyond the improved attendee experience,

it is this potential for growth that seems most exciting about the festival,

and which illustrates one of the less obvious outcomes of its exit from

its old location in Nathan Phillips Square: by narrowing its scope and

reinventing itself as a leaner, more focused festival, the TJF has given

itself the space to better manage its own development. Through this

process, it has quickly (re-)established itself as part of Toronto’s cultural

landscape. As to the future, we’ll have to wait and see.

This year’s TD Toronto Jazz Festival runs from June 21 to 30.

For details visit torontojazz.com.

Colin Story is a jazz guitarist, writer and teacher based in Toronto. He

can be reached at www.colinstory.com, on Instagram and on Twitter.

JULY 19 TH – AUGUST 10 TH , 2019

COME TO THE PARTY!

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thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019| 19


MARK RASH

SUMMER SPOTLIGHT 1

James Campbell,

artistic director

Festival of the

Sound

DAVID PERLMAN

The first-ever concert of the

Festival of the Sound was

held on August 5, 1979

in a Parry Sound school

gymnasium under the direction

of pianist Anton Kuerti.

The summer of 1980 marked the

first full-fledged festival under

the FTOS name, with Kuerti as

artistic director. In 1985, James

Campbell began his tenure as the

Festival’s second artistic director,

a position he still holds today.

I caught up with Campbell

in mid-May, via an exchange

of emails.

WN: To jog your memory, last time we spoke (briefly) was

Feb 4 last year after a New Music Concerts’ Land’s End Ensemble

concert at Gallery 345 in Toronto where you played the Schoenberg

Kammersymphonie Op.9 (Quintet version), with Lands End and

Bob Aitken, flute. I said something about getting in touch with you

about the 2018 Festival of the Sound, and you replied along the lines

of “Great, but why don’t we wait for next year’s 40th anniversary

version.” So here we are!

You said in your previous email that you were at Munich airport

en route to Prague for a week of recording. Can you say more about

that?

JC: We’ve just finished. It’s a recording with the Prague

Philharmonic of Allan Gilliland’s Dreaming of the Masters, a work

commissioned by the Edmonton Symphony for the orchestra and me

in 2005. It has had quite a run; I even performed it twice with the

Boston Pops in Symphony Hall, Boston. It is a cross-over work in the

style of three great jazz clarinetists: Benny Goodman, Acker Bilk and

Buddy de Franco. The CD will be released next April.

I notice you are using your indiana.edu email address, but I don’t

know whether you are still mainly at the Jacobs School. I seem to

have noticed your name cropping up at University of Toronto more

frequently this past year or so (masterclasses, etc) but maybe it’s just

that I have noticed more?

I have just left IU after 31 wonderful years, but please don’t say

“retiring,” because I will still be very active playing, giving masterclasses

worldwide, and being artistic director at Festival of the Sound.

Carol and I are looking forward to spending a lot more time in

Canada. And yes, you have seen my name at U of T more frequently;

I have been a visiting artist there two to four times a year for the last

few years, something I enjoy.

Everything else notwithstanding, I’d say that your 35-year role at

Festival of the Sound is the one that most WholeNote readers associate

you with. How big of a piece of the pie is it?

It is one of the three “jobs” I have had for the last three decades:

professor, performer and artistic director. FOTS takes a lot of energy

and time, but has been a passion of mine.

“Recurring cast of characters” is a phrase that comes to mind when

I look at the artists you’ve attracted to FOTS over the years, albeit

always with interesting “first timers.” There must be something in

the formula that works, for your audiences, and maybe more importantly

for the musicians themselves.

This might be better explained in a conversation, but I’ll see what

I can do here. I believe there is difference between a music festival

and a music series. A series, by definition and necessity, hires preformed

groups or packages. Although some festivals run this way

and it works for them, the FOTS is what I like to think of as a creative

festival. Musicians come together to share the stage with friends and

colleagues they may not interact with during the winter months. I

make up the programs in consultation with the musicians and the

concerts are prepared on site. Musicians get to play works they may

not get to tackle in a busy concert season and the audience hears

programs that can be done only once, at FOTS. Most artists stay in

Parry Sound for three to six days and during this time a sense of

camaraderie develops, adding to the spontaneous music making and

fun that is central (I think) to a summer festival.

The core artists (of which there are now many) are those who love

this kind of interaction and risk-taking, and because many return

on a regular basis (as you have noticed) feel a sense of belonging and

ownership. This adds to the comfortable, relaxed atmosphere FOTS is

proud to foster.

The cross-genre aspect of the festival is one of the things that

stands out. How much of that comes from the fact that you yourself

love crossing those lines as a musician? How much of the curating

at this point comes from artists knowing what pushes your buttons,

and how much is you doing the matchmaking?

I do almost all the matchmaking but do consider every pitch

thrown my way by artists. I also get a lot of ideas sent to me by agents

Cathedral Bluffs

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2019-2020 Season

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Gershwin Cuban Overture

Albinoni Adagio (for full orchestra)

Bizet L’Arlésienne Suite No. 2

2. Saturday November 9 8 pm

Mozart Overture to Don Giovanni

3. Saturday December 14 8 pm

Mozart Overture to The Magic Flute

Beethoven Symphony No. 5 in C minor

4. Saturday February 8 8 pm

Dvořák Symphony No. 5 in F major

5. Saturday March 14 8 pm

Beethoven Overture to Egmont

Schumann Symphony No. 4 in D minor

6. Saturday May 23 8 pm

Mahler Symphony No. 1 in D major

Vivaldi Lute Concerto in D Major RV 93

with guitar soloist Bahar Ossareh

Haydn Symphony No. 104 in D Major

Mozart Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major

with piano soloist Lauren Esch

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68

Finals of the Biennial CBSO

Clifford Poole Vocal Competition

Gershwin Rhapsody in Blue

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Barbara Croall Nimkii N'gamwin

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SEASON FINALE

Saint-Säens Violin Concerto No. 3

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20 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


and organizations worldwide. I enjoy gently pushing some artists

out of their comfort zones, sometimes successfully, sometimes not.

Our audience understands this to be part of what we do and enjoys

hearing musicians trying something new, which makes our stage a

safe place for musicians to stretch a bit. I certainly appreciate it as a

musician. Being allowed to make mistakes has helped me grow in so

many different ways.

This is great, thank you! Last word to you?

If I may wax philosophical for a moment, then: I am sometimes

asked why I have remained with FOTS for so long and have indeed

had other informal “offers.” I could have climbed various administrative

ladders in Canada but there has always been something very

special about the relationship of classical chamber music and Parry

Sound that I have never experienced in all my travels.

I am very grateful to Anton Kuerti for asking me to take over from

him 35 years ago. He, and a wonderfully tenacious group of volunteers,

did most of the heavy lifting. That tenacity remains strong to

this day, making my job simply to keep an artistic focus that is worthy

of the energy and passion of the local community.

When all is said and done, everything we do comes down to

that moment when artist and listener are joined in a moment of

communal focus on a timeless masterpiece and life is made better. As

artistic director, feeling I may have helped that moment happen gives

me a wonderful sense of accomplishment and satisfaction.

It is all about building relationships: artist to artist, artist to board

members, artist to audience members, audience members to each

other, artists and audience members to the local community. These

take time to build, but once established can last a long time. When

I find musicians who connect with all these elements I try to help

build those bonds. We have found that this connection has helped

us through the inevitable ups and downs of our history. We are now

the second largest economic generator in the community – the Island

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thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 21


SUMMER SPOTLIGHT 2

Janet Lopinski

Fifth Canadian

Chopin Piano

Competition and

Festival

PAUL ENNIS

The clock is ticking down to the 18th International Fryderyk

Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw in October 2020, and

the Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano Competition and Festival

August 23 to 29, 2019 at the Royal Conservatory of Music –

offers an interesting stepping stone on one path to the Warsaw event.

Presented by the Canadian Chopin Society, the Festival part of the

event celebrates Chopin’s legacy with a series of concerts, workshops

and performance classes, highlighted by a solo recital by Polish-

Canadian pianist Krzysztof Jablonski, third-place laureate at the 11th

Chopin Piano Competition in 1985.

But the cornerstone of the week is the Competition, divided into

Junior and Senior sections. The top three Senior finishers will travel

to Warsaw in the fall of 2020, guaranteed a spot in the 18th Chopin

Piano Competition. Second-prize winner Tony Yike Yang, in the

Fourth Canadian Competition (2014), became the youngest laureate

(at age 16) in the history of the International Chopin Competition

in 2015, winning the Fifth Prize. (By coincidence, Yang’s teacher,

Vietnamese-Canadian DangThai Son, had finished first in the 1980

International Competition.) Now pursuing a dual degree in economics

and piano performance through the Harvard University-New England

Conservatory of Music Joint-Degree Program, Yang’s recent accolades

include being awarded the Jury Discretionary Award at the 15th Van

Cliburn International Competition in 2017, where (at 18) he was the

youngest competitor.

To learn more about the Chopin Competition and Festival I corresponded

with Janet Lopinski, senior director of academic programs

at The Royal Conservatory, and founder and artistic director of the

Canadian Chopin Society. She was appointed artistic director of the

Canadian Chopin Competition in 2008. By 2010, the 200th anniversary

of Chopin’s birth, a year that saw the presentation of the

Competition Winners Concert in Koerner Hall, it was clear that there

was an appetite for a permanent Chopin Society. With strong support

of the Polish Canadian community, particularly the Maximilian Kolbe

Foundation, the Canadian Chopin Society (CCS) was incorporated

as a not-for-profit entity in 2012. Its mission: “to celebrate the legacy

of Fryderyk Chopin by promoting his music while nurturing the

development of young artists.”

A full-blown Festival and Competition such as this one is presented

every five years, in preparation for the prestigious International

Fryderyk Chopin Competition, Lopinski informed me. In the years

between, the Society presents concerts, workshops, lectures and

masterclasses, and provides performance and scholarship opportunities

for young Canadian pianists. Lopinski herself has performed as

soloist and collaborative pianist, and has presented lectures, workshops

and masterclasses across North America.

The relationship between the CCS and the Fryderyk Chopin Institute

in Poland has evolved over the past decade, Lopinski said. Since 2000,

the cost for the top prize winners’ travel to Poland has been covered.

“We have also made it a point to include Polish pianists on our jury,”

she added. As well, Lopinski was invited to participate in the first

Chopin Competitions Conference, organized by the Fryderyk Chopin

Institute. “The success of Tony Yike Yang certainly brought great visibility

for the CCS,” she said.

At that 2015 conference there were 15 Chopin Competitions

from around the world represented. Lopinski credits the Chopin

Foundation of the USA with being both an inspiration and a model

for the Canadian event. Other competitions whose winners may be

accepted directly to the Warsaw Preliminary Round include those

based in Darmstadt, Moscow, Beijing and Tokyo.

The Chopin Piano Competition is open to talented Canadian pianists

up to age 29 who wish to further their performance skills and in

particular, their playing of the works of Fryderyk Chopin. Application

deadline was May 31, several days after our summer issue went to

press. More information on the event and its participants can be found

at canadianchopinsociety.com. The Senior competitors will participate

in Preliminary, Semi Final, and Final rounds, performing selected

works by Chopin, and will be adjudicated by a panel of respected

Chopin experts. All competition stages are open to the public.

Preliminary rounds will be held in Mazzoleni Hall; the finals will take

place in Koerner Hall with the finalists performing Chopin Concertos

with the Tokai String Quartet.

Krzysztof Jablonski chairs the jury comprised of U of T piano pedagogue

Midori Koga, South African native Anton Nel (a familiar face

at Glenn Gould School masterclasses), Irish pianist John O’Conor

(another GGS faculty member and masterclass participant), and

Juilliard faculty member Golda Vainberg-Tatz.

Mazzoleni Hall will also be the site of three special events: “Insights”

– an evening with Alan Walker, author of the acclaimed biography,

Fryderyk Chopin: Life and Times; “Conversations” – an evening

with the competition jury, providing the opportunity to hear their

thoughts on music-making, competitions, and careers in music; and

“Portraits” – a glimpse into three stages of Chopin’s life through letters

and music.

“Once the applications for the competition have been received, and

the schedule finalized we will also be announcing additional masterclasses

and performance showcases, to provide opportunities for

pianists not entered in the competition to be a part of the Festival,”

Lopinski said. “Please check our website (canadianchopinsociety.com)

after June 10 for these updates,” she added.

I asked what she considered her proudest achievement as artistic

director and she told me that founding the CCS and providing leadership

for its development has “brought the opportunity to combine

several things that are very important to me: my Polish heritage,

my love for music, and my commitment to music education. . .

Certainly witnessing the success of Tony Yike Yang at the International

Competition in 2015, and observing his transition from student to

young artist has been incredibly gratifying and inspiring.”

Paul Ennis is the managing editor of The WholeNote.

22 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Inna Perkis and Boris Zarankin

Founders & Artistic Directors

th

ANNIVERSARY

SEASON

2019 | 2020

October 6, 2019

Schubertiad:

“A day with Schubert”

December 1, 2019

“Runaway Waltz”

April 19, 2020

“ Beethoven after all”

June 14, 2020

“ Intersections”

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 23


SUMMER SPOTLIGHT 3

HPO’s

Gemma New

Das Lied von

der Erde

LYDIA PEROVIĆ

ANTHONY CHANG

One of the best things to come out of this wretched humanity

of ours, Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde is always worth

highlighting when spotted in concert announcements. A very

good edition of Toronto Summer Music Festival is in the offing

this year – check out our website for concert reports during summer

– and will, on August 1, present the chamberized Das Lied at Koerner

Hall in the Schoenberg/Riehn arrangement. Mezzo Rihab Chaieb

and tenor Mario Bahg will sing. Conducting: the young, and already

highly in demand across North America, Gemma New, the Hamilton

Philharmonic Orchestra’s music director.

I took an express bus to Hamilton recently to catch the last HPO

mainstage concert of the season, a program of Vivier’s Orion and

Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. New and HPO’s executive director Diana

Weir took a substantial bit of time to address the audience in the

FirstOntario Concert Hall and talk of all the civic partnerships

developed around that particular concert. There was a small crowd of

students on the balcony thanks to the HPO’s Adopt-a-School program,

and representatives from mental health and the healthcare sector

marking Canadian Mental Health Week. The HPO seemed extremely

proud of its multiple connections to its city and the province, and

eager to deepen and multiply them. What New tells me when I phone

her the week after for an interview confirms this.

“Our audience is almost always full capacity,” she says on the phone

from San Diego, where she was conducting that week. “What we’re

doing in Hamilton seems to bring more and more for our budget

every year, so we are actually growing as an organization. I think

that we found a way to connect with the community and that’s one

of the things that have helped the HPO grow.” Programming is of

course crucial, she says, and also how that programming is delivered.

“Being able to program concerts that can relate to those who know a

ton about music and to those who are coming first time. Making sure

that programs are well paced. Making sure the experience is great for

musicians too and with enough rehearsal time. Planning a season and

having a look at partnerships and community collaborations. Being

able to talk about music! This is a skill that conductors are increasingly

in need of, so we can advocate not only for our orchestra and

musicians but also the program itself. And finally being very involved

in education – especially with the schools not having so much funding

these days for music education. It’s the orchestra’s job to bring young

people to this art form and get them to feel welcome in the concert

hall.”

New is also experimenting with the concert format at the HPO.

Away from the main stage, Intimate & Immersive is a chamber

music concert series with HPO musicians that takes the audience

to less typical concert spaces and seats them next to and around the

orchestra. “There’s always a part of the audience that wants something

a little bit more relaxed and intimate and maybe even more involved

than the traditional concert. They want to be able to move around

and mingle and get to know the music in a more casual environment.

That’s what we’ve been doing with the I & I. We wanted to

create an ambience that’s more like a place you go to for a good drink

and meet new people and a have good night out.” The audience also

has a chance to talk to the musicians before, during and after, in time

segments reserved for that. “Everyone sits very close together. The

orchestra is in the middle, and the seats are all the way around the

orchestra. We encourage everyone to move seats for the second half.”

A visual artist is engaged every time to create the lights or video that

fit the program. “Next to last time we also had smells and things that

you can touch of different substances that evoked for the audience the

idea of paradise,” says New. The last one this season, on May 23 at the

Cotton Factory in Hamilton, was programmed around the beat and

pulse, with an all-contemporary composer lineup.

I ask her about the stamina needed to conduct Mahler symphonies.

“I run quite a lot. I find that helps. If I can run 40 minutes straight,

that usually means I won’t lose my breath during a Mahler

symphony,” she says.” And just rehearsing it as well. The amount of

emotional drama that the piece provides and the excitement of it,

the powerful sound that everyone is giving – it’s all very motivating,

and I feel energized by it.” The Lied von der Erde at TSM will be the

chamber version. Does her approach to conducting differ depending

on whether she is before a chamber orchestra versus a big symphonic

crowd? “Yes, I approach an orchestra in a way that will make most

sense to them. For a small orchestra, like the one I conducted

recently in Santa Fe, New Mexico, we were doing Beethoven’s Second

Symphony and that’s a much smaller environment. You don’t need to

give a big gesture, you can be more subtle. It really depends on what

I’m hearing and what message I want to give. For the Mahler Fifth, it

is a massive orchestra and the sound is so powerful and loud at places,

but also other times it’s incredibly soft and close-knit and subtle. You

have to show that gamut in your physical expression as a conductor.”

Of Das Lied von der Erde itself, which New covered during her

tenure as an assistant conductor of the New Jersey Symphony

Orchestra, she says: “I fell in love with it. It was such a personal work

for Mahler. It’s sad to think that he didn’t hear it in his lifetime.”

Are there any composers that she’d like to advocate for in her

programming? “Claude Vivier,” she says. “He is a favourite. His music

is so intense and clear. It’s really got something that moves many of

us. I’d like to do more of his music in the future.” She’s also enjoyed

playing pieces by Abigail Richardson-Schulte, the HPO’s resident

composer: “Her compositions are positive energy!”

What about the standard rep? I have the impression, I tell her, that

my home symphony, the TSO, never plays enough French music.

“There could be practical reasons for that,” says New. “Ravel often

needs six or eight percussionists. I find, especially with the regional

orchestras when we plan our seasons, that that’s often a challenge.

And the works are shorter. But Ravel is one of my favourite composers

of all time. We’re doing Daphnis et Chloé in September, and just

did Debussy’s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun and Nocturnes in

March. Every time I plan the season I look at what HPO’s done since

2002 – I have that much information going back – and think that

French music is something that we want to do more. Many orchestras

do La mer, that one is probably the most popular, but what about

Alborada del gracioso or La valse? I’d love to do La valse.”

We too would love to hear that, and we’ll be there when she does.

Whether it’s with the TSO or the HPO, just a Presto tap away.

Lydia Perović is an arts journalist in Toronto.

24 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


SUMMER SPOTLIGHT 4

Pianist Charles

Richard-Hamelin

On Mentoring

and More

PAUL ENNIS

WN:

In

Why is mentoring so crucial?

addition to your concert on July 19 at this year’s

Toronto Summer Music Festival, you have the

honour of mentoring Fellows of the TSM Academy.

CR-H: In my student years, I attended many summer programs

which I now realize were as important to my education as my

university studies. Especially the chamber music programs, since

they feel very close to the professional world: you have to very

quickly get along with other players and be ready to give up some

of your preconceived notions and be open to learn from others.

Experience is something that demands to be shared and passed

on, and I’m very lucky to have the opportunity to do that at the

TSM Academy.

What is the most important thing a mentor can do? Please tell us

about a memorable experience you had as a student with a mentor.

Inspiration. A great mentor, over a very brief period of time, can

make you love the music you’re playing to a point where you don’t

want to stop working until you’ve done justice to it. I’ve had many

encounters like this, but most notably was getting working with Máté

Szűcs in Denmark (at the Thy Chamber Music Festival) who was the

Berlin Philharmonic principal viola for many years. He was extremely

inspiring in his musicianship and in how he was able to communicate

that love for the music.

What is the first piece of music you fell in love with? What musicians

inspired you in your student days?

It’s hard to find a single piece, but I remember being obsessed with

Chopin’s Four Ballades as a teenager, especially Krystian Zimerman’s

recording of them. I remember not having a single clue in how he

was able to make the piano sound like this and in how music can

be so emotional and powerful. Later, I became obsessed with Radu

Lupu’s recordings, all of them. To this day, his interpretations are the

golden standard for me: everything he does is considered, impeccably

balanced, yet completely in the moment and free as a bird. I also

heard him live a few times and I always left the hall transformed. A

truly magical artist.

I’m looking forward to hearing the Brahms First Piano Quartet

with you and members of the Dover Quartet. Have you played with

them before?

I have not, but I’ve heard them live a couple years ago with André

Laplante in the Schumann Piano Quintet in Montréal. I was very

moved and impressed by them and I really look forward to working

with them.

How has your approach to Chopin’s Andante spianato et grande

polonaise brillante evolved over the years?

It is actually a relatively new addition to my repertoire! However,

the musical language of the young Chopin, which I’m used to playing

quite a lot (the two Concertos, the Rondo Op.16, etc) is very much

there in this piece too. It is especially inspired music, with very

memorable themes and melodies everywhere, even in all the transitions.

Paul Ennis is the managing editor of The WholeNote.

ELIZABETH DELAGE

InSpirations Ensemble

Jean-Willy Kunz – Organist

Wednesday, June 19, 7:30 p.m.

All Saints Kingsway Church

2850 Bloor St. W, Toronto, ON

ALL

SAINTS

KINGSWAY

ANGLICAN

CHURCH

ORGANIX CONCERTS PRESENTS

19

A Music Series unlike any other

www.organixconcerts.ca

Special

Presentation

Series

Tickets

organixconcerts.ca

416-769-5224

Toll Free:

877-769-5224

Mobile Call/Text:

416-571-3680

Organized Crime Duo

Rachel Mahon and Sarah Svendsen

Tuesday, July 23, 7:30 p.m.

Timothy Eaton Memorial Church

230 St Clair Ave W, Toronto

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 25


CARLIN MA

Beat by Beat | Classical & Beyond

Sumptuous

Servings of

Midsummer Music

PAUL ENNIS

This summer’s many festivals promise music to engage the most

discerning listener across the GTA and the vast country beyond.

What follows is meant to augment our Green Pages supplement,

with special emphasis on the Toronto Summer Music Festival but

touching on other noteworthy festivities elsewhere.

Toronto Summer Music

With more than 200 ethnic groups speaking 140 languages, Toronto

is one of the world’s most diverse cities – slightly more than half the

population is foreign-born – setting the stage for

Toronto Summer Music Festival’s 2019 edition.

“Beyond Borders” will explore and celebrate the

“cross-cultural influences that have pervaded

classical music from the times of Mozart and

Mahler, right up to the composers of today.” With

such a timely theme opening up our ears to listen

afresh to the richness of a packed three weeks of

concerts, TSM’s 14th festival has become the go-to

musical event of the summer.

A look at the content of the opening night

Koerner Hall concert on July 11 gives us an insight

into how these cross-cultural influences work

in practice. Soprano Adrianne Pieczonka’s part

in the evening includes Ravel’s Cinq mélodies

populaires grecques directly inspired by Greek

folk songs. Violinist Kerson Leong contributes

Sarasate’s electrifying Zigeunerweisen, an homage

to Gypsy fiddling prowess. Pianist Jon Kimura

Parker will perform Mozart’s Piano Sonata No.11

in A Major, K331 with its famed “Turkish March”

final movement; as well as Chopin’s Ballade No.4 in F Minor, Op.52,

written in France, far away from his native Poland.

An unusual connection to the Beyond Borders leitmotif is Madeleine

Thien’s pre-concert conversation with Eric Friesen preceding Angela

Hewitt’s Koerner Hall performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations

on July 30. Thien’s novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing is filled with

musical references from Bach to Beethoven and Shostakovich. The

Malaysian-born, Chinese-Canadian began writing the novel in a

Berlin cafe, spending five hours a day listening on headphones to

Glenn Gould’s 1955 recording of the Goldbergs on repeat to block out

the cafe’s noise as she wrote. She told the literary journal Brick that

she was experimenting with musical time in her novel (which won

the 2016 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor-General’s Literary

Award for Fiction) and that the Goldberg Variations “is both a structure

for the novel and a way of trying to make space for the vast

inner lives of the characters.” She said: “Bach always seems to me to

be creating time. He makes space where there seems to be none and

makes something feel eternal in a finite space.”

Other examples of border crossing? On July 12, the world premiere

of Greek-born Canadian composer Christos Hatzis’ String Quartet No.5

“The Transmuting” is part of the New Orford String Quartet’s tenth

anniversary celebration which also includes one of Beethoven’s finest

achievements, his String Quartet No.9 in C Major, Op.59, No.3, the

last of the three string quartets that Count Razumovsky, the Russian

Dover Quartet

ambassador in Vienna commissioned. Then, on July 15, the fruits of

a five-year collaboration between the musicians of Montreal’s Middle

Eastern/early music group, Constantinople, and Ablaye Cissoko, a West

African griot, will be on display in Walter Hall. And the remarkable

Dover Quartet’s concert on July 17 at Koerner Hall features three works

with strong links to the USA: England’s Benjamin Britten composed

his String Quartet No.1 in California in 1941; Hungarian composer Bela

Bartók’s String Quartet No.3 was dedicated to the Musical Society Fund

of Philadelphia; and Antonin Dvořák spent three years in America

away from his Czech homeland – he wrote his immensely popular

“American” Quartet in Spillville, Iowa, a town of 300 Czech immigrants

where he was surrounded by his home culture.

Charles Richard-Hamelin’s July 19 recital in Walter Hall includes

Chopin’s Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante Op.22, a piece

he began composing soon after he left Warsaw for Paris in 1830. Also

on the program (with members of the Dover Quartet) is Brahms’ Piano

Quartet No.1 in G Minor, Op.25, with its Hungarian-rhapsody finale.

A July 26 Walter Hall concert titled “Souvenir of Florence,” headed by

violinists Jonathan Crow and Jennifer Koh, and pianist Philip Chiu,

features Tchaikovsky’s sumptuous Sextet in D Minor, Op.70 (written

while the composer was visiting Florence, Italy), Debussy’s Piano Trio

in G Major (also while living in Italy), and Prokofiev’s Five Melodies for

violin and piano, written in 1920 while touring California.

Crow and Chiu, incidentally, give a recital

on July 29 that reaches beyond TSM’s thematic

borders but one that, based on its recent COC

noon-hour preview, should not be missed: their

performance of César Franck’s Sonata for Violin

and Piano in A Major was truly transformative,

dramatic, delicate and dynamic, from its magical

hushed opening onwards.

World-class performers like Pieczonka,

Parker, Hewitt, countertenor Daniel Taylor, tenor

Anthony Dean Griffey, and the New Orford,

Dover and Rolston String Quartets, are only part

of what TSM offers: 32 emerging professionals are

given the opportunity to be mentored by a faculty

of established musicians. These fellows, as they

are called, from TSM’s Art of Song and Chamber

Music Institute come together to perform at the

Festival’s reGENERATION Saturday concerts,

alongside their mentors. In addition, Chamber

Music fellows also perform in ensembles that

receive coaching from mentors at free noon-hour

concerts in Heliconian Hall.

From July 11 to August 3, TSM provides a sumptuous serving of

midsummer music. I will be there.

Stratford Summer Music

After 18 years as founding artistic director, John Miller has ceded

leadership of Stratford Summer Music to violinist Mark Fewer,

and Fewer’s interest in jazz and improvisation shows in this year’s

program. Stephen Prutsman, Duane Andrews, Phil Dwyer, Jodi

Proznick (with Heather Bambrick), John Novacek and Fewer himself

will participate in a Friday night series at Revival House. There will

be tributes to Nat “King” Cole and Dave Brubeck, and appearances by

John McLeod’s Rex Hotel Orchestra, Laila Biali and The Two Bass Hit

(Joel Quarrington and Dave Young) with Novacek.

That being said, Stratford Summer Music’s longstanding focus

on chamber music as “a vital aspect of music-making … fostering

listening, awareness, flexibility and collaborating with others, while

offering the audience exposure to different styles, genres, and forms

of music” still remains. Highlights include Isabel Bayrakdarian with

pianist Robert Kortgaard and violinist Fewer in recital August 9; “Party

Like It’s 1689” with Suzie LeBlanc, Matthias Maute (recorder) and

Fewer on August 22; cellist (and SSM favourite) Stéphane Tétreault,

Prutsman and Fewer on July 21; the Dann Family in separate chamber

and jazz programs on August 8; clarinetist James Campbell, Stephen

Prutsman and friends on August 22. Pianist Janina Fialkowska

26 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Mark Fewer

presents an intriguing recital of Mozart, Debussy, Ravel, Chopin and

more on August 3.

Of special note, in a nod to the 1960s when Glenn Gould was part

of a triumvirate (with violinist Oscar Shumsky and cellist Leonard

Rose) directing music programs as part of the Stratford Festival, Art of

Time Ensemble is reviving “Hosted by Glenn Gould” where the iconic

pianist introduces performances of chamber music by Shostakovich

and Beethoven via clips from the CBC’s Glenn Gould on Television.

Fewer’s first Stratford Summer Music promises to enhance this music

festival’s reputation as something more than a sidebar to Stratford’s

theatrical main event.

Ottawa Chamberfest

There is a plethora of musical pleasure to be found July 25 to August 8

at this year’s Ottawa Chamberfest – beginning with the collaboration

between the St. Lawrence String Quartet and versatile pianist Stephen

Prutsman in Franck’s masterful Piano Quintet and then, later that

evening, providing the soundtrack for Buster Keaton’s classic comedy,

College. On July 26, Finland’s KallaKvartetti (flute, violin, viola and

cello) harkens back to its Nordic ancestors; on July 27, pianist David

Jalbert performs an ambitious program of Shostakovich, Rzewski and

Wijeratne; and on July 28, Janina Fialkowska offers a strong lineup of

piano works by Mozart, Debussy, Ravel and a considerable selection

of Chopin.

And there’s more. The Netherlands’ all-female saxophone quartet,

Syrène Saxofoonkwartet, returns to the festival on July 29 with

arrangements of Handel’s Water Music, Vivaldi, Barber’s Serenade

for Strings and excerpts from Bernstein’s West Side Story. Honens

laureate, German pianist Hinrich Alpes plays 15 of Beethoven’s

first 20 piano sonatas in two concerts, July 30 and August 1. French

string quartet Quatuor Danel plays Russian repertoire (Prokofiev,

Shostakovich and Weinberg) on July 30. And James Ehnes and

Andrew Armstrong play all of Beethoven’s Sonatas for Violin and

Piano broken into two concerts on July 31 and August 2.

Other highlights: Ottawa’s own Angela Hewitt joins violinist Yosuke

and the Cheng2 Duo for a tribute to Clara Schumann, August 3; then,

August 5, Hewitt plays Bach, focusing on the first three English Suites

and the Rolston String Quartet performs Schafer’s String Quartet No.2

and Beethoven’s “Razumovsky” Quartet No.7, Op.59 No.1. Various

combinations of the Manhattan Chamber Players perform diverse

Mozart and Dvořák on August 6; and the next day they team up with

the celebrated Dover Quartet for Shostakovich’s String Octet.

Two Mini-Tours

National Youth Orchestra Canada’s 59th year has been an auspicious

one so far with the spring release of the NFB documentary That

Higher Level, the result of two months spent with the 100 musicians

between the ages of 16 and 28 who comprised the orchestra

as they prepared for last year’s Canadian tour. A trip to Spain will

follow this summer’s Odyssey Tour to five cities: July 21 during Ottawa

Chamberfest; July 22 at the Maison symphonique de Montréal; July 25

in Parry Sound at the Festival of the Sound; Stratford on July 27 at

SSM; and, finally, Toronto, July 29 at Koerner Hall, as part of TSM.

The summer tour concert program includes Prokofiev’s Romeo

and Juliet, Op.64; Suites Nos.1 and 2 from Manuel de Falla’s The

Three Cornered Hat; Mahler’s Symphony No. 5; and Sinfonia Sacra

(Symphony No.3) by Polish composer Andrzej Panufnik. The tour

will also feature Brahms’ Double Concerto for Violin and Cello

Op.102, with the winners of the Canada Council for the Arts’ Michael

Stéphane

Tétreault

July 21st and 22nd

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 27


Measures Prize as soloists (to be announced in July).

Simone Dinnerstein, the soloist in Philip Glass’ Piano Concerto No.3

when it had its Canadian premiere at last year’s 21C Music Festival

in Koerner Hall, is on something of a mini-tour of her own, with the

Manitoba Chamber Orchestra: this summer she performs the work in

Ottawa (at Music and Beyond July 15, 16), Stratford (July 17), Festival

de Lanaudière (July 19), and Westben Concerts at the Barn (July 20). A

treat to savour.

Two 40th Anniversaries

The Festival of the Sound begins its 40th anniversary year on July 19

with a celebratory Gala Opening Concert comprised of highlights

from past seasons. From Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus to Leonard

Cohen’s Hallelujah; excerpts from Bach’s B-Minor Mass and Orff’s

Carmina Burana; Beethoven’s Ode to Joy and favourite bits from

Gilbert and Sullivan, the specialness of the occasion is underlined.

Other highlights include two concerts by the Rolston String Quartet

playing pillars of the classical repertoire: Beethoven’s String Quartet

Op.59, No.1 “Razumovsky” and Piano Concerto No.5 “Emperor” (with

Janina Fialkowska), July 24; and Mozart’s “Dissonance” String Quartet

and Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden”, July 25. Larry Beckwith’s

production of Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons is enhanced through narration

by Indigenous elder John Rice (who participated with Beckwith

in last year’s FOTS opening event), an art song, the sonnet on which

the concerto is based, and projected images. With Mark Fewer, violin;

John Rice, narrator; Julie Nesrallah, soprano; Robert Kortgaard, piano;

and the Festival Ensemble, July 30.

The first concert of the FOTS was held at 2pm on August 5, 1979 in

the Parry Sound High School Gymnasium under the direction of Anton

Kuerti. That same all-Beethoven program will be replicated at 2pm on

August 5, 2019 at the Stockey Centre, headed by artistic director James

Campbell and the Cheng2 Duo. There will be an all-day celebration of 40

works from 40 years of the festival’s history on August 9, beginning with

a musical morning cruise, followed by several events running concurrently

from noon to 4pm, an afternoon tea and an evening concert.

Not to be outdone, the Elora Festival’s 40th Anniversary Opening

Night brings together many world-class artists for a celebration in song

on July 12 in the Gambrel Barn. Carmina Burana heads a varied program

featuring the Elora Singers, the State Choir LATVIJA, members of the

Grand Philharmonic Children’s & Youth Choirs, singers Jane Archibald,

James Westman and Daniel Taylor, TorQ Percussion, two members of

Piano Six, and conductors Maris Sirmais and Mark Vuorinen.

Some of the festival’s many highlights include the entire lineup of

Piano Six on July 13; André Laplante (piano), Mayumi Seiler (violin)

and Colin Carr (cello) performing Beethoven’s “Archduke” Trio and

Ravel’s Piano Trio on July 14; the Cheng2 Duo on July 20; countertenor

Daniel Taylor and tenor Charles Daniels, on July 21; and Measha

Brueggergosman on July 27.

My Magic Carpet Wish

If I had a magic carpet, I’d ride to the Festival de Lanaudière northeast

of Montreal on July 12 to hear Charles Richard-Hamelin and Les

Violons du Roy perform Mozart’s Piano Concertos Nos.22 and 24.

And I’d return on July 28 for Marc-André Hamelin, Yannick Nézet-

Seguin and Orchestre Métropolitaine for Brahms’ Piano Concertos

Nos.1 and 2.

Safe travels and happy listening.

Circle the Dates

June 28, 29, 7:30pm; June 30, 3pm: Anticipation for these concerts

has been building since last September when Spanish-born

conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, was announced as the TSO’s 11th music

director. Having guest-conducted the orchestra in February 2018,

this will be his second appearance on the Roy Thomson Hall podium.

The appealing program opens with Sibelius’ richly melodic Violin

Concerto, with concertmaster Jonathan Crow as soloist. Prokofiev’s

exuberant Symphony No.1 “Classical” and Stravinsky’s ever-popular

Suite from the Firebird follow. Gimeno’s term as music director begins

with the 2020/21 season.

Paul Ennis is the managing editor of The WholeNote.

Beat by Beat | World View

Transcultural Music

Communities:

Summer Global

Music in Our

Midst

ANDREW TIMAR

“I

decided to noise-cancel life,” begins Olga Khazan in a

provocative recent article What Happens When You Always

Wear Headphones in The Atlantic’s Health section. “The buck

stops at my cochlea. Just like we choose everything else, I choose

exactly what to put in my ears.” she concludes.

Early in May of this year, the Global Musics and Musical

Communities conference at California’s UCLA posed a question:

“How and why [do] specific musical genres travel outside their countries

of origin and lead to the formation of new musical communities?”

Presenters examined genres such as hip-hop, gamelan and

taiko as musics that have “become global in the past century.”

Ethnomusicologist Henry Spiller’s talk sported the cheeky yet

insightful title The Hereness of the There: Making Sense of Gamelan

in the United States.

So what do Khazan’s noise-cancelling earbud manifesto and the

Global Musics and Musical Communities conference have to do with

my summer column?

The UCLA conference reminded me that the examination of musical

nation-hopping performed every day in Canadian locales has been

one of my main subjects here over the years, arguing strenuously that

cross-cultural musical interaction is the norm rather than the exception.

The widespread, speedy transmission of these genres to musical

communities around the world, beginning in the second half of 20th

century, and their adoption and incorporation, is a significant and

remarkable development.

As for living a “noise-cancelling life” – I’m not sure that, even if

attainable, it is a healthy goal. I’m all for choice and for protecting the

health of one’s ears in an increasingly noise-polluted environment,

but for me the joy of music includes the excitement of exploration, the

pleasure of surprise, chance, or even surreptitious discovery.

What does that sound like?

It’s the feeling of walking through the lush shrub- and tree-filled

lakeside Toronto Music Garden on a hot summer afternoon – the

garden that was co-designed by cellist Yo Yo Ma to reflect in landscape

Bach’s Suite No. 1 in G Major for cello. The music of a small

group you’ve only read about slowly emerges out of the city’s din

as you come to the brow of a knoll in the garden. They’re playing at

the bottom of a modest grassy amphitheatre sheltered by a mature

weeping willow.

There’s no front of house, program, no ushers or bar to contend

with. You’re in a T-shirt, shorts and sandals, wearing a protective hat.

If you’ve ridden your bike down, as I have on occasion, you search for

a safe place to park it. Pleasure boats are moored at Marina Quay West

to the left, Billy Bishop Airport’s prop planes within earshot. On the

right, the Lakeshore Blvd. and Gardiner Expressway traffic sings with

an eternal buzz, like the drone of thousands of urban cicadas.

That urban Toronto scene for me is one of the great and unique joys

of music in the summer. It can’t be experienced with earbuds on,

noise-cancelling or otherwise. So, with transcultural music in mind,

28 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


and minds and ears open rather than closed, let’s explore just a few of

the summer global music treats in store in the urban jungle, the GTA

and beyond.

Labyrinth Musical Workshop Ontario:

Have Yourself a Modal Summer

Let’s begin by following up on two of the stories from my column

last month.

Labyrinth Musical Workshop Ontario (LO) recently announced

several concerts in addition to its June modal music workshops (check

its website to register) and its June 8 concert, “Modal Music Summit:

Ross Daly with This Tale of Ours plus Tzvetanka Varimezova,” at

Eastminster United Church. On the July 1 weekend it is programming

three separate performances as part of the Aga Khan Museum’s

Rhythms of Canada program (more on this further on). Then on

consecutive Saturday afternoons – August 3, 10, 17 and 24 – LO offers

afternoon concerts in Flemingdon Park (at Don Mills and Eglinton),

supported by the Toronto Arts Council’s Arts in the Parks program.

The concerts are billed as “family-friendly” and will include a chance

to meet the musicians and instruments. Start time is around 3pm.

Best confirm both the Aga Khan Museum and Flemingdon Park events

in the listings or on the LO website.

Didgori Ensemble: Georgian Polyphony Tours Ontario and Quebec

My other lead story last issue was on the six-member Didgori

Ensemble, the award-winning choir from the Republic of Georgia,

and its June Canadian tour. As I mentioned, such a rare moment for

Canadian Georgian-music lovers only happens once a lifetime.

We pick up the choir’s tour on June 7 when a consortium of Toronto

presenters showcase the Didgori Ensemble at Trinity-St. Paul’s

Centre’s Jeanne Lamon Hall. Audiences can expect brilliant performances

of Georgian polyphony, with ensemble members accompanying

themselves on traditional Georgian instruments. June 8, Didgori gives

a public Georgian choral workshop from 5 to7pm at the St. Vladimir

Institute, 620 Spadina Ave., and the next day they hold a five-hour

Georgian choral workshop at the MusiCamp Studio, 11 Cobourg

Ave., starting at 11am. Check MusiCamp’s website for registration

information.

June 10, Didgori travels east to Kingston Ontario’s St. George’s

Cathedral where they sing liturgical music at 12:15pm, presented by

MusiCamp, the Melos Choir and Period Instruments. They continue

east to Quebec, where on Wednesday June 12, Gabrielle Boutillier

presents “Didgori en concert à Québec” at the Voûtes de la Maison

Chevalier. The next day, they perform and conduct a workshop at the

Auberge La Caravane, in North Hatley, QC. The tour then concludes

on Saturday June 15 at 8pm in Montreal where the Harira Ensemble

and MusiCamp present Didgori: Live in Concert at the Chapelle Notre-

Dame-de-Lourdes. For those eager to experience this extraordinary

music first-hand, Didgori offers an all-ages Workshop for Singers of

All Levels June 15 and 16 at the Centre des Musiciens du Monde, 5043

St Dominique St, Montreal. You can reserve a spot at hariraensemble@

gmail.com.

Small World Music: Free Summer Lunch

Small World Music presents its free Summer Lunch concert series

in partnership with Union Station on the latter’s TD Stage, 65 Front

St. W. on nine consecutive Wednesdays from 12 noon to 1pm. SWM’s

Summer Lunch lineup launches June 5 with Mimi O’Bonsawin who

recently won the Best Pop Album at the 2019 Indigenous Music

Awards. It continues June 12 with Moskitto Bar, the Toronto quartet

musically covering territory from Brittany to Bagdad, through Ukraine

and the Balkans. June 19 the Polky Village Band, an energetic Polish-

Canadian folk music group takes audiences on a musical journey

to Poland, “the melting pot of Eastern and Central Europe with

Carpathian, Jewish, Gypsy, Ukrainian, Slovak and Hungarian influences.”

June 26 the Tich Maredza Band, fronted by Toronto-based

Zimbabwean singer, guitarist, mbira-ist and composer Tichaona

Maredza takes the stage.

Of the five additional acts appearing on the Summer Lunch series,

Fränder, a Swedish and Estonian folk quartet, is the only non-Ontario

Polky Village Band

group, appearing on July 17. Representing the latest generation of

talented musicians to take their rich heritage of indigenous songs to

the world stage; it’s worth taking your soup, sandwich or sushi to

their set.

SWM’s Summer Lunch series, incidentally, is part of Union

Summer: Presented by TD, a sprawling 50 consecutive days of summer

programming on the Front St. TD Stage, promising to “showcase …

Toronto’s talent, culture and spirit right at the gateway to the city.”

Summer Music at the Museum: Aga Khan Museum

Earlier I mentioned Labyrinth Ontario’s three Canada Day weekend

performances at the Aga Khan Museum. The AKM is producing three

festivals this summer celebrating “Canada’s contemporary fabric,

a dynamic mix of world views, cultures, stories, and rhythms. Our

festivities honour the Indigenous people of this land … much of it

planned to happen outdoors.”

Some other selections from its “Rhythms of Canada” festival,

running Sunday June 30 and Monday July 1:

Sunday opens with the 13-member Asiko Afrobeat Ensemble led

by Nigerian-born bandleader Foly Kolade, and includes Torontobased

singer and composer Hussein Janmohamed, plus two-time

world-champion hoop dancer Lisa Odjig from the Odawa/Ojibwe/

United in song.

connected by dance.

July 4 to 7, 2019

A celebration of Latvian culture

AT KOERNER HALL

Concert of Latvian

Orchestral AND

Chamber Music

July 5, 2019 - 4:00 PM

MĀRIS SIRMAIS, CONDUCTOR

LAURA ZARIŅA, VIOLIN

ARTHUR OZOLINS, PIANO

MEMBERS OF THE CANADIAN

OPERA COMPANY ORCHESTRA

The State

Choir LATVIJA

July 5, 2019 - 7:30 PM

Contact Koerner Hall box

office for tickets:

(416) 408-0208

MĀRIS SIRMAIS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

AND CONDUCTOR

Join us for the launch

of a new Centrediscs

recording of music

by Janis Kalnins,

Talivaldis Kenins

and Imant Raminsh.

This concert will

mark the State Choir

LATVIJA’s debut in

Canada , featuring

works by Baltic and

international composers.

Receive $10 off by purchasing tickets to both events.

Full festival program at:

www.Latviansongfest.com

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 29


Pottawatomi Nations from Wikwemikong, Manitoulin Island, Ontario.

Headlining the event is the Cris Derksen Trio, led by rising star musician

and composer Derksen, who describes herself as a “half-Cree,

half- Mennonite classically trained cellist.” Also on the bill is the

Waleed Kush Ensemble offering percussion-driven African jazz, led by

Sudanese multi-instrumentalist Waleed Abdulhamid. The next day on

July 1 Toronto’s Maracatu Mar Aberto perform the rhythms, songs and

dances derived from the traditions of Northeastern Brazil, while other

world music and dance events fill out the Canadian Day afternoon.

The AKM’s “Moon Landing Festival” (July 20 and July 21) plus its

“First Five Fest” celebrating five years of programming (August 31

and September 1) both have plenty for global music explorers. Please

check the listings and the Museum website for details.

Harbourfront Centre: Summer Music in the Garden

My introduction to this month’s column makes it pretty clear how I

feel about Harbourfront Centre’s delightful annual series of al fresco

concerts. Summer Music in the Garden ranks among our city’s essential

music-in-the-park experiences. Now entering its third decade,

artistic director Tamara Bernstein always makes room for top-rank

global music in her astutely curated series. The concerts are scheduled

for Thursdays at 7pm and Sundays at 4pm, so it pays to check the listings.

Pro tip: unless it’s sunny, best call the info desk at 416-973-4000

for the up-to-the-minute rain call.

Sunfest: “Canada’s Premier Celebration of World Cultures”

Every summer for a quarter of a century the southwestern Ontario

city of London has hosted what has become “one of the best overseas

[world] music festivals,” according to the UK’s prestigious Songlines

Magazine, transforming London’s central Victoria Park into “a culturally

diverse jewel, where 40 top world music and jazz groups from all

corners of the planet entertain.”

This year from July 4 to 7

the admission-free festival jams

the park chock-a-block with

five stages and more than 225

exhibitors, including vendors

of global cuisine, crafts and

visual art.

I spoke directly with

co-artistic director Mercedes

Caxaj. “This is the 25th edition

of Sunfest,” Caxaj explained,

“which my father Alfredo

Caxaj founded.” Mercedes has

literally grown up with the

festival. “You could consider

it a family operation since my

mother and brother are also

involved in running Sunfest,” she added.

On the fact that Sunfest’s website the festival’s lineup is divided

into International and National performers, so I asked her about that.

“It’s one way visitors can get a feel for the world music scene today,”

she replied. “Also, by separating Canadian acts from those we’ve

invited from abroad, we can highlight homegrown talent. Our main

aim is to represent as many cultures as possible, and to ensure that

Sunfest 2019 in the centre of London, Ontario, is an inclusive space.”

Indeed, the geographic scope of the festival is vast, covering music

from five continents. Caxaj listed groups from Cape Verde, Spain,

England, Scotland, Netherlands, Norway, Czech Republic, Russia,

Chile, Colombia, Peru, Mexico, Niger, Cameroon, Uganda, Palestine

and Canada. It would be impossible to list them all. I don’t think it

would be fair to highlight just a few either, so I invite you to visit the

Sunfest 2019 website for details. Perhaps I’ll see you there.

There is one more thing to note: Sunfest’s community-level arts

engagement, a key reason why it’s thriving and moving into its second

generation. “Sunfest has accomplished in 25 years what has eluded

municipal planners, politicians and corporations alone,” states its

media release. “From the beginning, the Sunfest Committee recognized

the inestimable power of the performing arts to effect cultural

Mercedes and Alfredo Caxaj, Sunfest co-artistic directors

and social change in this community and, despite the incredible challenges,

organizers, patrons and sponsors were willing to take a chance

on what’s arguably one of London’s most inspired utopian projects of

the past quarter century. At its heart, TD Sunfest is about vision and

hope: along with providing exemplary representation and accessibility

… [it] offers inclusiveness to our visitors through the common

denominator of their shared humanity.”

Is Sunfest’s inspirational model one that other festivals and

presenters could emulate?

Stratford Summer Music

One of Ontario’s most venerable annual summer music festivals takes

place in Stratford. Last year the award-winning Canadian violinist

Mark Fewer was appointed Stratford Summer Music’s new artistic

director, taking over the reins from John Miller who ran the extensive

multi-week festival for 18 years.

This year, 100 events featuring more than 350 musicians in both

indoor and outdoor venues will be heard throughout downtown

Stratford – a great opportunity for what I described earlier as surreptitious

musical discovery . As an example, two concerts with global

themes, both presented at Factory 163 in Stratford: July 25, the

Tehran-born Canadian musician Amir Amiri takes the stage. Amiri, a

soloist on the santur (72-string Persian hammer dulcimer), composer

and music director, strives to “explore the limits of music, stretching

beyond the constraints of classical thought.” July 29, Toronto’s brilliant

Payadora Tango performs a selection from their large repertoire

of original compositions and arrangements of Argentinean tango and

folk music.

Westben Concerts at The Barn

Also located in Southern Ontario, Westben Concerts at The Barn celebrates

its 20th anniversary this summer. This rural

music festival with a wide range of programs holds

most of its concerts at The Barn, 6698 County Road 30

in Campbellford.

July 28, it presents Toronto’s Kuné – Canada’s

Global Orchestra. Dubbing itself “a celebration of

Canada’s cultural diversity” Kuné’s eclectic ensemble

of Canadian musicians “hail from all corners of the

globe, play over 20 instruments,” representing the

musics of their home cultures. August 2, the 2018

Polaris Prize-winning Jeremy Dutcher, a classically

trained tenor and composer plays The Barn. Dutcher’s

music creatively blends his Wolastoq First Nation

linguistic and music roots with Euro-Canadian classical

and vernacular music. Come early for the 5pm

feast featuring Anishinaabe BBQ; reservations are

required two days in advance.

WORLD VIEW QUICK PICKS

!!

JUN 7, 8PM: Small World Music Society presents Arnab Chakrabarty Sarod Recital

featuring Arnab Chakrabarty (sarod), Zaheer-Abbas Janmohamed (tabla) in a concert

of Hindustani classical music at the Small World Music Centre, Artscape Youngplace.

!!

JUN 8, 8PM: Toronto’s most seasoned and celebrated taiko group Nagata Shachu

presents Nagata Shachu and American Rogues at the Harbourfront Centre Theatre.

Nagata Shachu directed by Kiyoshi Nagata performs with The American Rogues Celtic

Band.

!!

JUN 9, 7:30PM: The Toronto Chinese Orchestra presents The Butterfly Lovers,

featuring The Butterfly Lovers Concerto at the Markham People’s Community Church,

22 Esna Park Dr., Markham.

!!

JUL 21, 7:30PM: The Elora Festival presents Kuné, Canada’s Global Orchestra at the

Gambrel Barn, at the corner of Country Rd. 7 and 21 in Elora, ON.

!!

AUG 2 and 3, 7PM: The Collingwood Summer Music Festival presents Nhapitapi

from Zimbabwe at the New Life Church, Collingwood ON August 2, followed by the

Payadora Tango Ensemble at the same venue the following evening.

Andrew Timar is a Toronto musician and music writer. He

can be contacted at worldmusic@thewholenote.com.

30 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Beat by Beat | Music Theatre

Into the Summer

JENNIFER PARR

Luminato: Two years ago, in one of my first columns for The

WholeNote, I interviewed the creative team of Theaturtle’s

Charlotte: A Tri-Coloured Play with Music, Canadian librettist

Alon Nashman, acclaimed Czech composer Aleš Březina, and

legendary British director/scenographer Pamela Howard,

as they were presenting a series of work-in progress

performances at the Luminato Festival before touring to

Europe. The play is inspired by the real life and artwork of

Berlin-born Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon who was sent

to Auschwitz at age 26 in 1942, and who in the last two

years of her life created a sequence of nearly 800 paintings

accompanied by text and musical references to which she

gave the title “Life? Or Theatre?” – works which, against

all odds, survived. At the time I was bowled over by the

wild theatricality of their vision and the bright central

message of hope in the arc of Charlotte’s story.

This summer, they are about to go on another tour, this

time to Israel, Ukraine, and the Czech Republic, with first,

a one-performance-only send-off at Toronto’s Hart House

Theatre on June 1. Always curious about what happens

over time to things I first encountered as “works in progress,”

I plan to attend and to reach out to the creative team

again to catch up on what has been happening with this

exciting show between world tours. Stay tuned!

This year is, again, a Luminato hotbed of creation

including a number of exciting music theatre productions

from both home and abroad. Stories shaped by political

extremes, and the need to find a personal path through societies characterized

by prejudice and oppression, again are highlighted particularly

in two Canadian productions that caught my eye: Nicole Brooks’

large scale a cappella Obeah Opera and Tim Albery’s one-man (with

one-piano accompaniment) Hell’s Fury; or The Hollywood Songbook

starring Canadian opera superstar Russell Braun.

Obeah Opera has been in the works for ten years, a project of

personal passion for creator, librettist, and composer Nicole Brooks.

Inspired by a desire to tell the untold story of the female Caribbean

slaves who were as much a part of the Salem witch trials as the

white women and men whose stories have been recorded, Obeah

Opera uses Caribbean-inspired music and dance to tell that story.

Drawing on transcriptions of the actual trials in Salem, combined

with in-person consultation with African spiritual practitioners,

Brooks has created a libretto and score focused on the experience

of Tituba (the Caribbean slave whom we know from Arthur Miller’s

play The Crucible), and her fellow practitioners of “obeah” (witchcraft).

A necessary story for our times, it is a reminder of the dangers

of societal paranoia and also of histories lost that should be recovered

and shared. The cast is 20 strong, all female, all singing and dancing.

The dances, showcased last October as part of the Fall for Dance North

Festival at the Sony Centre, won rave reviews for their superb theatricality

and energy.

Hell’s Fury; or The Hollywood Songbook, on the other hand, is a

one-man musical journey through the life of Austrian Jewish Marxist

composer Hanns Eisler. Based on a concept from well-known opera

director Tim Albery, it was originally developed with Soundstreams

and Soundstreams’ artistic director Lawrence Cherney and given a

work-in-progress showcase during Luminato last year. Eisler fled Nazi

Germany in 1933 and landed in Hollywood where he worked successfully,

composing many film scores including the Academy Awardnominated

Hangmen Also Die (Fritz Lang) and None But The Lonely

Heart (Clifford Odets). Privately, at the same time he was writing

Hollywood Songbook, an evocative song cycle full of both wit and

melancholy, often using for words, poems by his frequent collaborator

Bertolt Brecht, weaving a tale of the horrors of Nazi Germany, the

seductions of Hollywood, and a longing to return home. In real life,

the seduction of Hollywood was interrupted in 1948 when the House

Committee on Un-American Activities banished Eisler from the US,

labelling him an “unperson.” The storyline is woven through the songs

of Eisler’s own Hollywood Songbook, and is performed by acclaimed

Canadian baritone Russell Braun accompanied by JUNO Awardwinning

pianist Serouj Kradjian.

In contrast to these two overtly political story lines, and yet

with a central theme illustrating the hidden masked cynical

truths of society, is Masquerade, a lavish spectacle presented by

The cast of Masquerade

DMITRIY DUBINSKY

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 31


the Vakhtangov State Academic Theatre of Russia, based on the

verse drama of Russian poet and playwright Mikhail Lermontov.

This production promises to be a tremendously theatrical event

employing a clown-influenced physical theatre style of staging

supported by and interwoven with a musical score by Faustas

Latenas that incorporates the famous Waltz by Aram Khachaturian

which was itself commissioned for a production of this play by the

Vahtankgov Theatre in 1941. It also promises us “heaps of snow.”

Judging by last year’s production of Uncle Vanya, this should be

another theatrical feast.

Luminato runs from June 7 to 23 at various venues around Toronto;

luminatofestival.com.

Stratford and Shaw

Once again we are entering the season of big musicals at the

Stratford and Shaw Festivals. There is already great word of mouth

about Stratford’s production of Billy Elliot, the 2005 Tony Awardwinning

musical inspired by the 2000 film set during the British

miners’ strikes of 1984/85. Here again is a political setting, and a

score that even includes a song, “Merry Christmas, Maggie,” mercilessly

mocking then-British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher. At

the same time as depicting the destruction of a community, however,

Billy Elliot is also a wonderful story of hope, of a young boy in a

mining town who discovers an inborn talent for dance and finds

a way to follow his dreams in spite of all the obstacles in front of

him. Director and choreographer Donna Feore has reimagined the

staging to work on the Stratford Festival thrust stage and talks in

the show program about the inspiration of Elton John’s brilliantly

contemporary score. Billy Elliot plays at the Festival Theatre through

November 3.

The Shaw Festival reaches further back into the traditional musical

theatre canon to bring us a much more escapist romance than the

musicals discussed above: Lerner and Loewe’s 1947 classic Brigadoon,

perhaps best known from the 1954 MGM movie starring Gene Kelly

and Cyd Charisse. A brash young New Yorker, Tommy Albright, on

holiday in the Scottish Highlands, falls in love with a girl from a

magical village, Brigadoon, that only exists for one day every 100

years. After leaving Scotland Tommy finds himself torn between his

increasingly empty life in the modern city and the love he left behind.

Naturally there is a happy ending, though one could imagine a dystopian

millennial sequel set 10 or 15 years later with Tommy now feeling

trapped in the magical but tiny village. One of the great draws of the

Shaw Festival’s production will be seeing former Stratford musical

star Alexis Gordon as Fiona. Brigadoon plays at the Shaw Festival until

October 13.

MUSIC THEATRE QUICK PICKS

Around Ontario over the summer, there are many more musicals to be seen, with

something for almost every taste. Consult our music theatre listings for details.

!!

JUN 5 TO 22: Drayton Entertainment. Thoroughly Modern Millie. Huron Country

Playhouse. The fun 1920s-set musical probably best known from the slightly goofy

movie version starring Julie Andrews, Mary Tyler Moore and Carol Channing. And

also from Drayton, Peter Colley’s You’ll Get Used to It!: The War Show, a nostalgic and

fun Canadian look back at WWII with period songs, starting at St. Jacobs Country

Playhouse, June 5 to 22, then continuing June 27 to July 13.

!!

JUN 27, 8PM: Silly Stages. Chasing Rainbows. Songs of Judy Garland. Regent

Theatre, Oshawa. The brilliant Canadian musical theatre star Louise Pitre sings Judy

Garland.

!!

JUL 24 TO AUG 16: Gravenhurst Opera House. Dean & Jerry: What Might Have

Been. Created by Jesse Collins this two man show about Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis

and their long partnership, has been gaining a growing loyal audience at summer

stock theatres around Ontario.

Jennifer Parr is a Toronto-based director, dramaturge, fight

director, and acting coach, brought up from a young age on a

rich mix of musicals, Shakespeare, and new Canadian plays.

Beat by Beat | In with the New

New Sounds for

the Summer

WENDALYN BARTLEY

The summer season is always full of a remarkable array of

opportunities to hear cutting-edge music in a variety of settings,

and the Luminato Festival that takes place in June in Toronto is

no exception. For this year’s edition, I decided to take a look at The

Cave, a new work created by composer John Millard, lyricist Tomson

Highway and dramaturge Martha Ross, which runs from June 18 to

23 at Soulpepper’s Tank House Theatre. An additional exciting feature

of this performance will be the opportunity to experience it across

the country through webcasting. Through partnerships with about

25 different institutions in places like Inuvik, Rumble Theatre in

Vancouver, the Banff Centre, Algoma University in Sault Ste. Marie,

and the Gander Institute for the Arts in Newfoundland, people will

be able to gather together in theatres to watch a simultaneous live

webcast. Home live streaming will also be possible.

John Millard

I spoke with the composer of the project, John Millard, to get an

inside look at what to expect from this project. He began by emphasizing

that the piece is not based on any particular story, but is

rather created from a premise. A group of animals find themselves

trapped together in an unnatural environment – a bear’s cave – with

a forest fire raging outside. What are their individual stories and what

brought them to this place? What do they think about the human

beings responsible for this fire? In the end Millard says, “we are

trying to figure out something about ourselves by using the voices of

animals,” with a particular focus on addressing the growing environmental

crisis we are facing. Millard also emphasized that traditional

Indigenous stories and legends are not used, but the lyrics come from

Highway’s imaginative crafting of the dilemmas and issues that arose

during the collaborative creative phase. One interesting example is

the use of the Garden of Eden story, what Millard calls “an expulsion

myth,” a type of myth that doesn’t exist in Indigenous mythologies.

In one of the songs of The Cave, the snake character speaks about

the tragic outcome that this myth has had culturally, a myth that has

demonized women and led to a separation and banishment of the

concept of paradise.

The piece is structured in the form of a cabaret with approximately

20 songs sung by both soloists and a quintet ensemble. The singers

are from diverse backgrounds and include Neema Bickersteth (classical),

Derek Kwan (opera), Andrea Koziol (cabaret/folk) and Alex

Samaras (popular/jazz), as well as Millard whose musical influences

include bluegrass, cabaret and classical. Each singer performs about

32 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


two or three solos and they also come together to form a quintet at

times. Instrumentation includes bass, percussion, reeds, accordion,

keyboard and banjo, and Millard has composed various instrumental

sections for this unusual ensemble. Since much of Millard’s work has

been composing for theatre and its requirements, he told me that this

piece is the first time he has written a through-composed piece that

is primarily music-focused. Although there is some text in the role

of the narrator who introduces the animals, this piece “is all about

the songs”, Millard said. Working with musical director Gregory Oh

and dramaturge Martha Ross, an emotional arc becomes the structure

for the piece, rather than a plot arc, with the goal of discovering

who these animals are, what’s important to them, and what the

critical issues are for these creatures. The set

design will be constructed as both a cave and a

cabaret environment with the audience experiencing

what it’s like to be inside this environment

with fires raging outside. Sound designer

Christopher Ross-Ewart will play an important

role in creating this sonic world, and various

elements of haute fashion will be incorporated

into the costume design.

The Something Else Festival is Hamilton’s

four-day festival of jazz and experimental music

that runs from June 20 to 23 presented by Zula

Music & Arts Collective Hamilton. It features an

eclectic lineup of performers and improvisers

including Czech virtuoso violinist/vocalist Iva

Bittová who will be performing solo in a free/

by donation concert on June 21 in the afternoon,

before teaming up in the evening with drummer

Hamid Drake. On Saturday June 22, the afternoon

begins with a performance by bassoonist

Sara Schoenbeck from Brooklyn, followed in the

Iva Bittová

evening with another solo performance by Bittová, followed by a set

featuring clarinet master Don Byron collaborating with Indigenous

Mind (Joshua Abrams, Hamid Drake and Jason Adasiewicz). Many

more cutting edge performances will occur, so do check out the

schedule both in our listings and at zulapresents.org.

Summer Music Residencies

The Toronto Creative Music Lab once again takes up residence for a

week in June at the Music Gallery. The TCML is an artistic and professional

development workshop for early-career musicians, ensembles

and composers committed to risk taking. This year they will engage

with members of Montreal’s Quatuor Bozzini to present the Toronto

premiere of legendary French electronic composer Eliane Radigue’s

Occam Delta XV on June 14. Other pieces on the

program include new works from Cléo Palacio-

Quintin and Andrea Young, along with Jason Doell’s

…amid the cannon’s roar.

The Westben Performer-Composer Residency

occurs in southeastern Ontario’s Northumberland

County near Campbellford and is an important

milestone in Westben’s ongoing evolution from

a summer festival to a multifaceted year-round

centre. Their mandate for the residency is to

encourage 11 young composers and performers

from diverse countries and backgrounds to take

creative risks by participating in a process of intergenerational

exchange. Participants are expected

to offer workshops to their peers featuring their

own specialized approaches, with some of these

workshops open to the public. This year’s residency

features participants from Canada, the US,

Chile, Argentina and Cuba, and the workshops

will include explorations in four-handed piano,

experimental luthiery, strings, dance, voice and

Dover Quartet

reGENERATION

CONCERTS

Join us on Saturday’s in Walter Hall as TSM Academy Fellows,

some of the most talented musicians of their generation, perform

compelling chamber music and art song with their mentors.

July 13 - 1:00pm, 4:00pm, 7:30pm

New Orford String Quartet

July 20 - 1:00pm, 4:00pm, 7:30pm

Dover Quartet and Charles Richard-Hamelin

July 27 - 1:00pm

Source and Inspiration – featuring the Rolston String Quartet,

Sarah Slean, John Southworth, and the Art of Time Ensemble

July 27 - 4:00pm, 7:30pm

Jennifer Koh, Beth Guterman Chu, Julie Albers,

Yegor Dyachkov, Philip Chiu

August 3 - 7:30pm

Barry Shiffman, Desmond Hoebig, Jennifer Frautschi,

Hsin-Yun Huang, and more!

TORONTOSUMMERMUSIC.COM

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 33


custom-built electronics. The entire process will culminate with

a performance on June 15 that will feature the collaborations and

experiments that have taken place throughout the week.

Toronto Summer Music Festival

This year’s Toronto Summer Music Festival celebrates the various

cultural influences on classical music from as far back as Mozart’s day

up to today’s living composers. Two established Toronto composers

will have world premieres at Walter Hall during the festival: Christos

Hatzis’ String Quartet No.5 (The Transforming) will be premiered by

the New Orford String Quartet on July 12; and Alexina Louie’s new (as

yet untitled) work will be performed on August 2. I asked each of the

composers to write a short description of their pieces for this column.

Hatzis writes that his String Quartet No.5 is “the closing statement

of a cycle depicting a psychic development spanning 25

years (1994-2019) which is best described by the subtitles of each

quartet: Awakening, Gathering, Questioning, Suffering and finally

Transforming.” This final work of the cycle is written in three

movements and is intended “as a psychological hermeneutic (or

explanation) of the story of Christ’s Passion and Resurrection.”

Psychologically there is a “strong resonance that radiates from these

well-known events,” he says, which have left their spiritually transformative

imprint upon humanity.

The inspiration for Louie’s new work began during a conversation

with Jonathan Crow in his capacity as TSO concertmaster, while

they were discussing her new piece, Triple Concerto For Three Violins

And Orchestra, which premiered in 2017. Crow, as artistic director

of Toronto Summer Music, suggested that she write a new piece for

the same instrumentation as Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire – flute,

clarinet, violin, cello, piano. Louie was inspired and got to work on

it immediately. She describes the new work in this way: “The two

outside movements are virtuosic and effervescent. In the middle

movement, in order to evoke the mysteries of the night, I instruct the

pianist to play on the inside of the piano, strumming and stopping the

strings. The movement unfolds with quiet twitterings and undulating

sounds played by the remaining musicians.”

Summer Music in the Garden

Celebrating its 20th season, this well-loved series, curated by Tamara

Bernstein, is held along the waterfront at Harbourfront Centre’s

Toronto Music Garden and offers several opportunities to hear new

music. The dynamic TorQ Percussion Quartet will perform four works

on July 21 by contemporary composers: Adam Campbell’s El Mosquito

Marron; Steve Reich’s Drumming, Part 1; ensemble members Richard

Burrows’ and Daniel Morphy’s Elements Suite; and Dinuk Wijeratne’s

Ersilia from Invisible Cities. On August 22, the cello duo VC2

combines works from 18th-century Europe with contemporary works,

including a commissioned world premiere by Kelly-Marie Murphy

and two pieces based on Beethoven cello sonatas: Five Little Pieces

by Andrew Downing and Entsprechung by Matt Brubeck. Towards

the end of the summer on September 8, percussionist Aiyun Huang

and violinist Mark Fewer join forces to present world premieres by

Michael Oesterle and John Hollenbeck, with Huang performing Javier

Alvarez’s Temazcal for two maracas and pre-recorded tape.

IN WITH THE NEW QUICK PICKS

!!

JUN 5, 8PM: Canadian Music Centre. The Canadian Piano Left Hand Commissioning

Project features new works for piano left hand by Christopher Butterfield, Taylor

Brook, Anna Hostman, Emilie LeBel, Adam Sherkin and others.

!!

AUG 7, 6PM: Festival of the Sound’s Discovery Concert. Continuum Contemporary

Music’s artistic director, Ryan Scott, invites three young composers to participate in a

residency under the mentorship of composer Gary Kulesha. This concert will feature

their works.

Wendalyn Bartley is a Toronto-based composer and electrovocal

sound artist. sounddreaming@gmail.com.

Beat by Beat | Art of Song

Amanda Hale on

Pomegranate at

Buddies

LYDIA PEROVIĆ

Antiquity is a foreign country: they love and desire differently

there. Or do they really, asks Amanda Hale in her libretto for

the lesbian-themed opera composed by Kye Marshall which is

about to have its premiere, June 5, onstage at Buddies in Bad Times

Theatre. Pomegranate is structured as a tale of two couples in two

different time periods, though the text is open to interpretation – it

could be the tale of one couple imagining their historical antecedents,

or the story of obstacles to same-sex love which never disappear

entirely even in liberal societies. The first couple is in Pompeii in

79 AD, before the Vesuvius eruption. In the second act, we are in a

downtown lesbian bar in 1980s Toronto.

“I had been to Pompeii in the early 2000s and my inspiration for

Pomegranate was the frescoes that I saw in the Villa of Mysteries

there,” says Hale. To this day archaeologists are not sure what the frescoes

depict, but it’s presumed to be some kind of a Dionysian ritual

that involved women. “The images stayed with me so I formed a story

for myself about two young girls falling in love. They’re teenage girls,

they’re innocent, and the setting is sort of a Roman girls boarding

school.” Worship of Isis was one of the unofficial religious traditions

practised in Rome of the time, so Hale introduced a temple of Isis, as a

refuge for the girls, and a temple priestess to the story.

Hale, a novelist and a poet, initially wrote a poem cycle about

two young Pompeii women. Cellist and composer, Kye Marshall,

set the poems to music, and the tale was told as a song cycle, at the

Heliconian Club in 2014. “The audience responded so strongly to it

that we decided to make an opera,” says Hale. It would take six years

of work, grant writing, collaborator hunting, creating contacts in the

opera world, two workshops, producer changes and cast changes

until Pomegranate the opera was ready to premiere. “I first contacted

Michael Mori from Tapestry who was always very supportive (and who

is directing the June 5 to 9 run). He put me in touch with Marjorie

Chan, who became my dramaturge. She helped me enormously. She

coached me in the arts of the libretto.”

Mount Vesuvius has an eerie presence in the first act and its own

changing soundscape. The catastrophic event brewing in the background,

says Hale, is another parallel with our time. “We all have

our little plans and machinations and arguments but we are facing

climate-related disasters all over the world.”

In the libretto, which Hale shared with me, there are hints of a

female-only utopia in the temple scenes and perhaps in the lesbian

bar in the second act, but the idea is complicated. Would an allwomen

religion or a political party or a living setup be, in her view, a

functioning social utopia of the Call the Midwife type, or a dystopia

where women merge too much and ignore interpersonal boundaries,

in the vein of Grey Gardens? “In my ardent feminist days in the 1980s

when I was much younger, feminism was a real vehicle for my political

education. I was quite a lesbian separatist and I had a lot of those

utopian ideas but I have aged and mellowed,” says Hale. “I didn’t see

it in those terms but there is a lot of conflict in the libretto. Another

character, Julia, is almost in love with the priestess but she becomes

jealous of Cassia, one of the principals. That, and the fear of being

crucified as an escaped slave, leads her to betray everybody. In the

second act there’s a big fight between the two women on whether one

of them should finally come out to her conservative family who’ve

34 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


come from a war-torn part of the

world. Her mother is the one who

betrays her and it’s often the women

who betray their daughters, unfortunately.

If you, for example, look at

the clitoridectomy and infibulation

today, it’s the mothers who take the

daughters to have it done.” As well,

the priestess of the women-centred

temple is, it turns out, the sister of the

Roman soldier pursuing one of the

women. “I think it’s a fairly realistic

view of how it might have been.”

The parallels between the past and

today do not end there. Pompeii was

a multicultural port city with people

of all backgrounds living there and

passing through; half the population

of Toronto is foreign-born. Politics on

the small and large scale was presumably

as present in Pompeii’s citizens’

lives as it is for Torontonians today.

Hale herself is foreign-born – British

– and moved to Canada in 1968.

She lived in Montreal through the

1970s and the War Measures Act and

Rebecca Gray (left) and Camille

Bill 101, but describes herself now as

Rogers in Pomegranate

“quite politically naïve at that time.”

Her politically active life started in Toronto, where she moved in the

1980s and got involved with Nightwood Theatre, wrote for the feminist

paper Broadside and founded Red Tree, a visual arts company, with

Lynn Hutchinson. Today she divides her time between Hornby Island,

BC and Toronto. Before returning to writing in the late 1990s, with her

first novel published by Raincoast Books, Hale earned her living as a

painter and sculptor in BC.

She still travels to England to visit family. “It was a good thing,

leaving England, because when you leave a place, you can see it.”

Her family’s story has been far from ordinary: Hale’s father was a

supporter of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists during the

Second World War, and died by suicide some years after the war.

“That legacy has hung over me all my life,” says Hale, who has written

about it in her latest novel, Mad Hatter (Guernica, Toronto), to be

launched in September. “I feel absolutely liberated for having told that

story. It’s been a great shame and humiliation so it was good for me to

leave England and be able to see all that. But it’s taken my lifetime to

process it.”

Hale’s own politics are at the opposite end of the spectrum to her

father’s. She often travels to Cuba and has developed a lot of connections,

personal and professional, over the last 15 years. “I went there

first to paint a mural with Lynn Hutchinson in solidarity with the

revolution and we made a connection with a gallery in Havana and

did an installation there on colonialism and sugar, then another one

about surveillance, which Cubans really understand.” Latin America

was always of great interest. “I’ve had a lot of connections with

Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Chile. A big change I saw here

in Toronto in the 1980s was the refugees coming from those countries

who’d experienced American interference, people who enriched

Toronto tremendously during the 1970s and 1980s. There were Greeks

coming here after the Junta and people emigrating to Canada after the

Iranian Revolution. On Hornby Island we have an Iranian man who’s

taken refuge there, who is a wonderful potter.”

While she would define herself as bisexual today (and is no fan of

labels), Hale’s view on the importance of lesbian presence in culture

hasn’t changed. “It’s still fairly new to see it – and women’s experience

in general–- and some of the terrible things that happen to us and

some of the great things that should be celebrated. I think it enriches

the culture generally, and for men as well. It’s not being against men:

it’s filling out a picture that has been half blank a long time.”

ART OF SONG QUICK PICKS

!!

JUN 4, 7PM: Icelandic Canadian Club of Toronto presents Hanna

Dóra Sturludóttir, mezzo & Snorri Sigfús Birgisson, piano; atTimothy

Eaton Memorial Church, Toronto.

!!

JUN 8, 4PM: Lisa Di Maria, soprano, and Adolfo De Santis, piano; at

St. Thomas’s Anglican Church, Toronto. Barber, Fauré, Puccini.

!!

JUN 10, 12:15PM: Music Mondays presents Heine’s Buch der Lieder.

James McLean, tenor, and William Aide, piano; at the Church of the

Holy Trinity, Toronto .

!!

Jun 19 TO 22, 7PM AND JUN 23, 2PM: Soundstreams, Luminato, &

Pinkhouse Productions present Hell’s Fury, The Hollywood Songbook.

Music by Hanns Eisler, staging and concept by Tim Albery with design

by Michael Levine. Russell Braun, baritone, and Serouj Kradjian, piano.

Harbourfront Centre Theatre, Toronto.

!!

JUN 27, 8PM: Muse 9 Productions/Village Opera present “Bon

Appétit! A Musical Tasting Menu.” Lee Hoiby: Bon Appétit!; Danika

Lorèn: The Secret Lives of Vegetables; Peter Tiefenbach: Chansons de

mon placard. Katy Clark, soprano, Victoria Borg, mezzo. Hyejin Kwon is

the music director, staging by Anna Theodosakis. Merchants of Green

Coffee, Toronto..

!!

JUL 11, 7:30PM: Toronto Summer Music opening night: “Beyond

Borders.” R. Strauss: Vier letze Lieder; Ravel: Cinq mélodies populaires

grecques; Sarasate, Mozart, Chopin and more. Adrianne Pieczonka,

soprano, Jon Kimura Parker, piano, Kerson Leong, violin, and Steven

Philcox, piano, with the New Orford String Quartet and Tom Allen

hosting. Koerner Hall.

!!

JUL 16, 7:30PM: Toronto Summer Music presents “Griffey & Jones

in Recital.” Anthony Dean Griffey, tenor, and Warren Jones, piano. Music by Bridge,

Griffes, Barber, Finzi, Laitman, Niles and Ives. Walter Hall, U of T.

Lydia Perović is an arts journalist in Toronto. Send her your

art-of-song news to artofsong@thewholenote.com.

GREG WONG

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 35


Beat by Beat | On Opera

Seek and You

Shall Find!

CHRISTOPHER HOILE

Opera performances in Southern Ontario are not quite as

abundant this summer as they were last summer, but there

is certainly enough activity to keep any opera-lover busy,

especially those who have an interest in new opera.

June

Outside Toronto, the young opera company Vera Causa Opera is

presenting its second annual Canadian Opera Fest in Cambridge,

Guelph and Waterloo. A contest was held for local high school and

middle students in the region to create the plot of an opera. Once

selected, the students collaborated with VCO to turn these initial ideas

into full stories with music, i.e. short operas.

Five winners were chosen. The first is The Village Girl, with a

concept by Chloe Bissada and words and music by Dylan Langan.

The story involves a young girl who wants to purchase a cow for

her family’s farm to help boost the town’s economy, but the meat

marketer refuses, putting the town on the brink of starvation. The

opera explores family and responsibility.

The second is Refracted, with a libretto by Charlotte Lilley and

music by Emma Verdonk. The work is a semi-abstract exploration of

the influence of media and technology on one’s self-perception. A

young girl debates with her reflection on how her culture is affecting

her, and whether it is a welcome influence or not.

Third is La jugement, with a libretto by Emma Lemieux and music

by Dylan Langan. This is an emotional musical soliloquy, relaying the

story of a young woman battling an eating disorder. La jugement is

performed in French.

Fourth is The Shoemaker’s Orphans, with a libretto by Rivi and

Kyri Friedman and music by Emma Verdonk. The action takes place

in France in the year 1600, during the outbreak of the Black Plague.

After losing their father to the terrible disease, two sisters embark on

a mission to prevent the spread of the disease, with the help of their

kindly aunt.

The last of the five is L’étrange et belle, with a libretto by Lexie

McCorkindale and Vanessa Kerr and music by Dylan Langan. The

opera tells the story of an unstable young woman and her tempestuous

relationships with her friends when she invites them to stay at

her house for a Christmas celebration. This is the second opera of the

five to be performed in French.

Performances will be held in Cambridge on June 14 at the

Cambridge Centre for the Arts, in Waterloo on June 15 at Knox

Presbyterian Church and in Guelph on June 16 at Harcourt

Memorial United Church. The operas will feature performances by

soprano Autumn Wascher, soprano Michaela Chiste and baritone

Jorge Trabanco.

General Director Dylan Langan says: “It is great to see everyone

coming together to make brand new opera, regardless of their

previous experience. These are truly original and Canadian stories

that need to be told.” VCO provides paid professional opportunities

for youth, aimed at improving their health and well-being, while

presenting affordable entertainment to the community with free

admission for students and kids.

Closer to Toronto, Opera by Request has three presentations in

June. On June 1 in Mississauga OBR presents Verdi’s Nabucco (1842)

in concert with piano accompaniment at Christ Church UCC. Gene

Wu sings the title role, Cristina Pisani is Abigaille, Dylan Wright is

Zaccaria, Cian Horrobin is Ismaele and Meghan Symon is Fenena.

In Toronto on June 7, OBR presents a triple bill under the title “A

Shiata Lewis in Obeah Opera

Summer Feast,” at College St. United Church. The works include

Henry Purcell’s If Music Be the Food of Love (1692), Lee Hoiby’s Bon

Appétit!(1989) in which an television episode of Julia Child making

a chocolate cake is set to music, and Lennox Berkeley’s A Dinner

Engagement (1954) about impoverished aristocrats having dinner

for a wealthy prince they hope their daughter will marry. Performers

include mezzo-soprano Meghan Symon, baritone Lawrence Shirkie,

soprano Gwendolynn Yearwood, tenor Josh Clemenger and tenor

Francis Domingue.

On June 15 in Toronto, OBR presents Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda

(1835) at St. Andrews United Church. Antonina Ermolenko sings

Maria, Cristina Pisani is Elizabeth I, Paul Wiliamson is Leicester, Dylan

Wright is Talbot, Henry Irwin is Cecil and Anna Belikova is Anna. For

all three OBR operas in concert, William Shookhoff is the pianist and

music director.

This year the Luminato Festival has two operas on its schedule.

The first is a remount of Obeah Opera by Nicole Brooks first seen in

Toronto in 2012. The work, which runs from June 13 to 22, is an allfemale

a cappella opera that retells the story of the Salem witch trials

from the perspective of the first woman accused, the young Caribbean

slave Tituba.

The second opera, running June 19 to 23, is Hell’s Fury, The

Hollywood Songbook. Last year Luminato presented it as a work in

progress. Now it presents the finished piece. The story follows the life

of composer Hanns Eisler (1898-1962), who escaped Nazi Germany for

the US in 1938, only to be rejected for his adherence to Communism

in 1948 and forced to return to Europe, finally settling in the new East

Germany. The opera, conceived and directed by Tim Albery, constructs

a song cycle of Eisler’s many Lieder to tell the story. Baritone Russell

Braun is the soloist, Serouj Kradjian is the pianist and Michael Levine

the designer.

July

This year the Brott Music Festival (June 27 to August 15) will again

present a fully staged opera as part of its overall schedule. This

summer’s opera will be Puccini’s La Bohème presented for one night

only in Italian with English surtitles on July 18 at the FirstOntario

Concert Hall. Natalya Gennadi sings Mimi, Andrew Derynck is

Rodolfo, Chelsea Rus is Musetta, Kyle Lehmann is Marcello, Cesar

Bello is Schaunard, Simon Chalifoux is Colline and John Fanning sings

both Alcindoro and Benoît. The production changes the location from

late 19th-century Paris to Hamilton in the 1930s. Boris Brott conducts

the Brott Festival Orchestra.

Those who missed the Canadian Children’s Opera Company’s

mainstage show earlier this year will have another chance to catch

The Snow Queen (1993) by John Greer to a libretto by Jeremy James

Taylor in Campbellford. On July 7 the CCOC will present the hourlong

opera based on the 1844 Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale at

Westben Concerts at The Barn. Rob Kempson is the stage director and

Teri Dunn is the conductor.

On July 20 the Elora Festival hosts Shoestring Opera’s Schoolyard

Carmen at the Heritage Barn in Fergus. In this adaptation for children

in Grades 1 to 8, Carmen is a feisty little girl and newcomer to Canada

OSATO EREBOR

36 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


who has a dark past. When Tory Adair, the

“coolest kid in school” tries to bully her, she

stands up to him. Shoestring Opera uses

Carmen’s story to look at the immigrant in

Canadian society, the child who is different,

schoolyard bullying, personal independence

and the saving properties of art.

Straddling July and August is Guillermo

Silva-Marin’s venerable Summer Lyric

Opera Theatre in Toronto. Founded in 1986,

the training program culminates in staged

concert performances. This year the operas

are Verdi’s La Traviata (1853) on July 26,

28, 31 and August 3; Victor Davies’ Earnest,

The Importance of Being (2008), an operetta

based on Oscar Wilde’s well-known

comedy, on July 27 and 30, August 1 and 4;

and a double bill of Ralph Vaughan Williams’

Riders to the Sea (1937) and Puccini’s

Gianni Schicchi (1918) on July 27 and 31,

August 2 and 3. All performances take place

at the Robert Gill Theatre on the downtown

campus of the University of Toronto.

August

Last year Stratford Summer Music presented a staged version of J.S.

Bach so-called Coffee Cantata of 1733 and followed this up with a

more contemporary version called The Cappuccino Cantata. This year

the festival keeps up with the times with a new work, the Cannabis

Cantata, A Musical ‘Pot’ Pourri, commissioned by Stratford Summer

Music and Ottawa Chamberfest from Peter Tiefenbach. Soprano

Mireille Asselin, tenor Matthew Dalen and baritone Adam Harris

explore the new landscape of legal weed in Canada through music

by J.S. Bach with a libretto reimagined by Tiefenbach, on August 1 at

Katy Clark is Shoestring Opera’s Schoolyard Carmen

Factory 163 in Stratford.

The Highlands Opera Studio is presenting

two programs of opera. On August 15 in

Haliburton and on August 17 in Orillia, it

presents a fascinating triple bill under the

title “Women in Opera: Then and Now.” First

on the bill is Puccini’s Suor Angelica (1918)

with Valerie Kuinka as stage director, Louise-

Andrée Baril as music director and Lauren

Margison in the title role. Next are two

short operas from 2019.The Chair, by Maria

Atallah to a libretto by Alice Abracen, focuses

on a teenaged girl who tries to cope with

the death of her best friend in an accident.

Book of Faces, by Kendra Harder to a libretto

by Michelle Telford, takes an irreverent

look at the many faces of social media. Both

short works were winners of the inaugural

Musique 3 Femmes prize for emerging

female opera creators. Jessica Derventzis is

the stage director for both and Jennifer Szeto

the pianist and music director.

In Haliburton on August 22, 24, 25 and 26,

HOS presents Richard Strauss’ Ariadne auf Naxos (1912) in German

with English surtitles with one cast on August 22 and 25 and another

on August 24 and 26. Valerie Kuinka directs the Prologue and Richard

Margison the main opera, while Philip Morehead is the music director

for both parts.

All of this operatic activity should be more than enough to occupy

any Southern Ontarian operagoer until the fall season.

Christopher Hoile is a Toronto-based writer on opera and

theatre. He can be contacted at opera@thewholenote.com.

JIAYIN LIU

JULY 25 – AUGUST 26

Celebrating Women in Opera

SPECIAL THANKS TO

OPERAS

MASTERCLASSES

WOMEN IN OPERA : THEN & NOW

Puccini’s Suor Angelica, followed by The Chair

and Book of Faces, two newly created short works

from winners of a new prize created by Musique

3 Femmes, honouring emerging Canadian women

composers and librettists

Suor Angelica (Puccini/Forzano) Tragedy, death and

redemption on the landscape of Puccini’s lush score

The Chair (Atallah/Abracen) Exploring friendship, loss,

and grief through the eyes of a teenager

Book of Faces (Harder/Telford) An irreverent, tonguein-cheek

operatic take on the many faces of social media

AUGUST 15 | 8pm

Northern Lights Performing Arts Pavillion, Haliburton

AUGUST 17 | 7pm

St Paul’s Centre, Orillia | Info & Tickets orilliacentre.com

ARIADNE AUF NAXOS

Join us for Strauss’ hilarious sitcom of an opera!

Sung in German with English Surtitles

AUGUST 22 & 26 | 7:30pm

AUGUST 24 & 25 | 2pm

Northern Lights Performing Arts Pavillion, Haliburton

RICHARD MARGISON MASTERCLASSES

Meet the 2019 HOS participants and hear what

makes a good young professional singer even better

JULY 25 | 7pm St George’s Anglican Church, Haliburton

JULY 26 | 7pm Abbey North, Haliburton

JULY 27 | 7pm Highland Hills United Church, Minden

TICKETS $15-$37.50 | SEASON PASSES $30-$200 | BOX OFFICE 1-855-455-5533 | HighlandsOperaStudio.com

CONCERTS

FROM OPERA TO BROADWAY

Best loved works from opera & musicals

JULY 31 | 8pm

St George’s Anglican Church, Haliburton

POP GOES THE OPERA!

A mix of opera & musical theatre favorites

AUGUST 3 | 8pm

Highlands Hills United Church, Minden

CELEBRATIONS!

Celebrating Offencach, Leoncavallo & others

AUGUST 7 | 8pm

St George’s Anglican Church, Haliburton

ART OF SONG

Poetry brought to life through voice & piano

AUGUST 10 | 8pm

St George’s Anglican Church, Haliburton

ALUMNI CONCERT

Soprano Mikayla Sager, Mezzo Danielle

MacMillan & Baritone Samuel Chan

AUGUST 10 | 8pm

St George’s Anglican Church, Haliburton

COMMUNITY MONDAYS

Take a chance on opera – pay what you can!

JULY 28, AUGUST 5 & 12 | 7pm

Follow us for locations, info & updates!

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 37


© MARIA BARANOVA

Beat by Beat | Choral Scene

Elevating the

Profane

BRIAN CHANG

On June 22 at 8pm, Luminato presents Triptych (Eyes of One on

Another), a new multidisciplinary work composed by Bryce

Dessner with libretto by Korde Arrington Tuttle, inspired by

the controversial and revolutionary work of Robert Mapplethorpe; at

the Sony Centre (soon to be Meridian Hall), Toronto.

A consistent throughline at Luminato has been introducing local

audiences to the international array of interesting, challenging collisions

of storytelling and performance. In this year’s festival we have

this multidisciplinary work inspired by Robert Mapplethorpe’s art.

His stark black and

white photography,

often focused upon

unapologetic queerness

in a striking visual

way, here collides with

an equally striking

vocal ensemble called

Roomful of Teeth. Handpicked

by Triptych

composer Bryce Dessner

to bring his score to life,

Roomful of Teeth is not

quite a choir, not quite

a band, not quite what

you’d think of for an

eight-voice ensemble. Their number includes bass-baritone Dashon

Burton, founder Brad Wells, and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer

Caroline Shaw.

Triptych’s subject is Robert Mapplethorpe himself. His photography

of provocative people was challenged in American courts under

obscenity laws in 1990. To this day, Mapplethorpe’s work is controversial,

but his unique approach has left an indelible impact in the intersection

of photography and viewer. The composer, Bryce Dessner is

an accomplished orchestral writer but is mostly known for his work

as guitarist in the American band, The National. Interestingly, he is a

native of Cincinnati, the city where Mapplethorpe’s exhibit was shut

down under obscenity laws. At the world premiere in Ann Arbor,

Michigan, in March of 2019, Dessner and librettist Korde Arrington

Tuttle participated in an hour-long talk with NPR’s Neda Ulaby. Their

interview, available on Youtube, is a fascinating look into the creative

process of collaboration and informed this month’s column.

“The images were always core to the work,” shares Dessner to

Ulaby. “There are so many images that stand out … there are the

images you can find which have been in exhibitions or on books or

on their website and then there’s 1000 times that; his archives [in

the Getty Institute] are extensive … [But] if he didn’t himself publish a

photo, we’re technically not allowed to show it.” So for Dessner and

Arrington Tuttle, they were able to see so much more than the public

has, and this personal look has shaped Triptych.

“Mapplethorpe’s work gets deep into the heart of all kinds of issues

around our identity and how we see one another,” continues Dessner.

“The images are so powerful; and his art is so powerful in that way.

The conflict within it is always unfolding.” Thirty years after the death

of Mapplethorpe, there are still discussions around what art is, the

lines of art and obscenity, and how to respond to it all. Many still call

the work obscene and profane, but there is a persistent draw in the

work that continues to make Mapplethorpe popular.

“I came to Mapplethorpe’s life and work in college... For me, it

Roomful of Teeth in Triptych (Eyes of One on Another)

had something to do with how he saw,” shares Arrington Tuttle. “It

had something to do with precision, it had something to do with

an attempt at how to grasp at what he describes as perfection. But

also a kind of transcendent beauty and a kind of love that might not

look like love. It might not look like how I’m used to perceiving love

or tenderness. There’s something about coming to terms with and

spending time intimately with discomfort and placing myself in that

discomfort … It was provocation that asked me and required my presence

…the way Mapplethorpe is mixing the sacred and the profane and

elevating images that some people might call pornographic but are

actually great works of art.”

“There’s been intense discomfort and reckoning,” says Dessner.

“Almost every day we’ll have a discussion or confront something new

in terms of the bigger work of what this is. I think for me the piece

has become the process of making the piece.” That process included

working with Roomful and writing the music knowing it was going

to be them performing it. In fact he can’t think of anyone other than

Roomful performing the work. As it travels, so too does the ensemble.

“They’re really like a band, Roomful, they bring a kind of intent.

They can’t just sing

something, they have

to know why they’re

singing something.”

Roomful of Teeth

as an ensemble name

sounds crass and

jarring., and their

music can sound like

that as well. There is a

lot of sound and a lot

of different techniques

all being thrown at

listeners at once. There

is something dynamic

about listening to a

female voice sing in the

style of Bulgarian women. It’s another feeling altogether to hear Tuvan

throat singing droning away. Sometimes it is just plain weird to listen

to –an example of “spending time intimately with discomfort” that

Arrington Tuttle referred to. Roomful constantly seeks to find all the

various ways that voices can make sound and confront you with them.

The seductive sound of Sardinian cantu, for example, provides a fullness

and constant envelope of sound much like a bagpipe. Higher

tones can then play around on top of the solid bass provided by the

style. Many of the singers in Roomful are composers; they understand

the interplay that art has between presenting, listening, invoking, and

creating. “They’ve been quite involved in shaping the work … it’s made

the piece much stronger,” says Dessner.

Roomful’s intersection with Dressner and Mapplethorpe in Triptych

(Eyes of One on Another) is just that – an intersection. It’s worth

checking out, and it will also be interesting to see what lies next on

their own path.

The 15th Latvian Song and Dance Festival

Latvian culture has a strong choral tradition of massive ensembles in

summer festivals. Here in Canada, many Latvians have made indelible

marks in the Canadian choral landscape. As part of the 15th Latvian

Song and Dance Festival, the State Choir LATVIJA comes to Canada for

the first time.

The Latvian Song and Dance Festival occurs every five years in

Latvia. A distinguishing feature of the festival is the massed power of

thousands of voices. These huge summer gatherings devoted to music

are cultural gems in Latvia. The Toronto version of the festival includes

choral, instrumental, and dance performances all centred around the

significant contributions of Latvians to choral art.

In their concert of Latvian sacred music on July 4 at Trinity St. Paul’s

Centre, State Choir LATVIJA performs a host of beautiful works

written by Latvian composers including Canadians Imant Ramnish,

George Juris Ķeniņš, Tālivaldis Ķeniņš, Arvīds Purvs and Ērika Yost.

38 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


The State Choir LATVIJA in Moscow, 2015

Raminsh’s stirring Ave Verum Corpus is a well-loved standard of

Canadian choral programming. Ķeniņš’ work, Miss Brevis Latviensis

was commissioned by the Choir and had its premiere in 2017 to celebrate

the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

On July 5, the State Choir LATVIJA – now in its 77th season – comes

to Koerner Hall, the grandest of spaces for this fine choir. Featuring

music from Latvian-Canadian composers Jānis Kalniņš, Tālivaldis

Ķeniņš and Imant Raminsh, the choir is joined by violinist Laura

Zariņa, pianist Arthur Ozolins and members of the Canadian Opera

Company Orchestra.

Finally, in keeping with the Latvian large choir tradition, on July 6

at 3pm, State Choir LATVIJA conductor Māris Sirmais will lead a Mass

Choir Concert – an expected 800 choristers – in a program of all-

Latvian composers at Mattamy Athletic Centre.

CHORAL SCENE QUICK PICKS

!!

JUN 13 TO 22: Asah Productions and Luminato present Obeah Opera. An a cappella,

all-female cast explore the Salem witch trials in a work conceived, written and

composed by Nicole Brooks. Tituba, a young Caribbean slave was the first woman

accused in the trials. This is her story amidst the paranoia that gripped colonial

FREE FRIDAY CONCERTS

KEEP

CALM

AND

CARILLON

Enjoy noon hour recitals from Met’s

historic 54-bell carillon, on the lawn

of 56 Queen St. E.

JUNE 7 Jonathan Lehrer (Vancouver)

JUNE 21 Mateusz Olechnowicz/Naoko Tsujita

JUNE 28 Andrée-Anne Doane (Montreal)

Massachusetts between February 1692 and May 1693: at the Fleck Dance Theatre,

Toronto.

!!

JUN 19, 20, 22, 8PM AND JUN-23, 3PM: The Toronto Symphony Orchestra

presents Carmina Burana conducted by Donald Runnicles. James Ehnes performs

Korngold’s Violin Concerto to open the concert. For the signature work of the

evening, Nichole Haslett, Sunnyboy Dladla and Norman Garrett anchor the solos. The

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir will be joined by the Toronto Youth Choir and the Toronto

Children’s Chorus in performing one of the greatest pieces in the choral canon. It may

well be the biggest presentation of Carmina Burana Toronto has ever seen at Roy

Thomson Hall.

!!

JUN 23, 8PM: The closing event of Luminato 2019, Maada’ookii Songlines,

composed by Cris Derksen, will bring together the power of over 200 performers,

including almost a dozen choirs, plus soloists and instrumentalists, in a free performance

meant to bridge the time between evening and night; at Harbourfront Centre.

!!

JUL 19, 7:30PM: The Festival of the Sound’s Opening Gala features the Elmer Iseler

Singers. With a host of guests including soprano Mary Lou Fallis; narrator Colin Fox;

the Penderecki String Quartet; and instrumentalists Guy Few, Suzanne Shulman,

James Campbell, Beverley Johnston, and Bob Mills. A huge assortment of choral

excerpts mark and evoke performances from the 40-year history of the Festival.

Excerpts include Handel’s Messiah, Bach’s Mass in B Minor, Carmina Burana, Mozart’s

Requiem, and the world premiere of The Sound: A Musical Evocation of Georgian Bay

by Eric Robertson and Gary Michael Dault. Lots of other musical experiences can be

found throughout the festival. Stockey Centre, Parry Sound.

!!

AUG 17 TO 25: Wellington Water Week is a celebration of the water in the idyllic

Price Edward County community of Wellington. Husband-and-wife duo Johannes

Debus, COC music director, and Elissa Lee, violinist, curate the musical offerings for

the celebration, including August 17, at 5:30pm, Opus 8 presenting an a cappella

program of folk songs titled “How Can I Keep from Singin’?” at Wellington United

Church, and, on August 23 at 6pm, Debus and singer/songwriter Sarah Slean

presenting SING!, a crowd-sourced mass choir event. The two will co-direct songs for

everyone to participate in; also at Wellington United Church.

Follow Brian on Twitter @bfchang Send info/media/

tips to choralscene@thewholenote.com.

VOICE

B OX

OPERA IN CONCERT

Guillermo Silva-Marin

General Director

Announcing the

2019/2020

SEASON

For a Subscription Brochure and ticket

information please call (416) 922-2147

or e-mail admin@operainconcert.com

L'enfant et les Sortilèges and

L'heure Espagnole by Maurice Ravel

(The Child and the Spells: A Lyric Fantasy in Two Parts)

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2019

Katya Kabanová

by Leoš Janáček

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2019

Kamouraska

by Charles M. Wilson

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2020

Adriana Lecouvreur

by Francesco Cilea

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2020

metunited.ca

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 39


Beat by Beat | Early Music

No Jacket

Required: Finding

Your Summer

Playlist

Angela Hewitt

KEITH SAUNDERS

MATTHEW WHITFIELD

Summer is a time when everything seems to move a little slower,

the days are longer, and there is more fun to be had than at any

other time of year. For musicians, however, the ending of the

formal concert season in May or June doesn’t necessarily signal a

slowdown, as festivals and special events, frequently featuring exciting

masterworks, begin to fill the calendar. Whether you’re looking for a

concert in downtown Toronto, scenic Collingwood, or further east in

Montreal, this year’s “second season” has something for everyone.

June

June is a transitional month, offerin season-ending performances by

organizations across the city, grand finales showcasing great ensembles

and equally great musical works. And as these seasons end,

others begin.

The Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute (TBSI), a worldrenowned

training program for advanced students, pre-professional

musicians and professionals, in instrumental and vocal Baroque

performance practice, is led by some of the world’s finest musicians

in the field. This year’s TBSI runs from June 10 to 23 and features five

separate performances by faculty and students at venues across the

Bloor-Annex corridor, including Jeanne Lamon Hall and Walter Hall,

with the grand finale slightly further north at Grace Church on-the-

Hill. As a former participant in this superb training program, I cannot

speak highly enough of the quality of repertoire and tutelage each

participant receives, and strongly encourage lovers of early music

to attend at least one of these performances. Keep the program,

too – you’ll be amazed at how many names return as fully formed

performers in following years.

If you are planning a trip to Montreal in June, make sure to explore

the Montreal Chamber Music Festival, taking place from June 7 to

16. This season marks the beginning of a three-year project by MCMF

to celebrate the life of the great Ludwig van Beethoven – Beethoven

Chez Nous – featuring cycles of complete works by Beethoven over

the course of the 2019, 2020, and 2021 Chamber Music Festival

seasons. Highlights this year are the Beethoven Violin Sonatas

performed by James Ehnes and pianist Andrew Armstrong, and the

Beethoven Symphonies as transcribed for piano by Franz Liszt, with

six outstanding pianists from across the world. Although the “early

music” classifier is often used for music written from the medieval era

until approximately 1750, as time progresses and musical art forms

develop in new ways, the works of classical composers such as Haydn,

Mozart and Beethoven grow older and, by relation, “earlier” within

the scope of music history. Fortunately for lovers of this wonderful

repertoire, events such as the Montreal Chamber Music Festival

provide opportunities to hear superb performers interpreting works

from this pantheon of musical history and ensure that, while this

music may be from ages past, the sounds it makes are as revitalizing

and sublime as ever.

July

Angela Hewitt is an Ottawa-born Canadian favourite and one of the

top pianists on the scene, especially for fans of Johann Sebastian

Bach’s music. Hewitt comes to Toronto this July as part of the 2019

Toronto Summer Music Festival in a performance of Bach’s mindand

finger-bending Goldberg Variations. Being a Canadian pianist

makes taking on the Goldbergs an even more daunting task, the

legacy of Glenn Gould looming large over this particular conglomeration

of notes and rhythms. Audiences are, of course, able to

understand that different performers bring necessarily different interpretations

to musical works, a combination of nature and nurture

that is almost impossible to define, yet readily perceptible to the ear,

especially in the case of Gould! And that individual performers’ take

on particular works evolves over time. Hewitt has lived with the

Goldberg Variations for a musical lifetime, including recordings in

1999 and 2015, and we look forward to hearing her current approach

to the work, as a continuation of her exploration of Bach’s keyboard

works and follow-up to last year’s performance of the complete Well-

Tempered Clavier. Both the Well-Tempered Clavier and the Goldbergs

are astonishing masterpieces and this will be a rare and memorable

opportunity to experience one the world’s most profound works of

creativity performed by one of today’s leading Bach interpreters.

Nestled in cottage country north of Toronto, Collingwood is perhaps

best known as the gateway to Blue Mountain ski resort. This year,

however, Collingwood becomes a hub for summer music through the

inaugural Collingwood Summer Music Festival, filling a gap in the

community that has been there since 2011 when Douglas Nadler’s

Collingwood Music Festival ended its 11-year run. Featuring the Elmer

Iseler singers performing Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy, the Gryphon

Trio and the Rolston String Quartet, the classical music component of

this multifaceted festival will be a delightful escape for those already

fleeing the hectic city for a more serene locale.

August

This July and August, Ottawa Chamberfest presents an all-star lineup

of Canadian performers, including James Ehnes, pianists Janina

Fialkowska and Angela Hewitt, as well as a noteworthy celebration

of Baroque composer Barbara Strozzi’s 400th birthday. Strozzi

(1619-1677) was an Italian singer and composer who studied with

famed composer Francesco Cavalli. Renowned for her poetic ability

as well as her compositional talent, Strozzi was said to be the most

prolific composer – man or woman – of printed secular vocal music in

Venice in the middle of the 17th century, a time when the publishing

of original material was in itself a remarkable accomplishment for a

female composer.

Although August marks the beginning of the end of summer and

back-to-school ads appear earlier and earlier each year, the music

continues by Toronto’s waterfront. Tucked away in Toronto’s waterfront,

the Toronto Music Garden was conceived by internationally

renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma and landscape designer Julie Moir Messervy

in partnership with the City of Toronto’s Parks and Recreation department.

Through its labyrinthine landscape, the garden interprets

Bach’s Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV 1007 for unaccompanied cello.

Each summer the Toronto Music Garden is home to Summer Music

in the Garden, presenting a tremendous range of chamber and world

music at 7pm most Thursdays and 4pm most Sundays throughout the

40 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


summer. On August 25, Baroque cellists Elinor Frey and Phoebe Carrai

present “Duetto Violoncello,” with works by Bach, Cirri, Thomas and

Dall’Abaco. These free concerts provide a fine opportunity to take

in music that may be new or unfamiliar, or to explore the sounds

of instruments that one does

not hear frequently, such as the

Baroque cello.

Other Performances

In addition to the larger multievent

festivals taking place,

there are also a number of interesting

early-music concerts this

summer occurring outside the

festal realm:

On June 9, fans of Bach’s

choral music will be delighted

to hear the Ascension Oratorio,

a dramatic work structured in 11

movements in two parts: approximately

the same size, layout,

and duration as Bach’s two-part

church cantatas. (Parts 1–6 were

performed before the sermon and

7–11 after the sermon.) Presented

by contralto Jacqueline Gélineau

in Heliconian Hall, and featuring

a solo vocal quartet and harpsichordist Brahm Goldhamer, this

chamber-sized, keyboard-and-voice performance will be of interest

both to those familiar with the master’s works and those wanting to

dig a little deeper and explore Bach’s music on a smaller scale.

On June 16, the Tudor Consort presents “The Song of Songs and

Songs of Love” at Historic Leaskdale Church in Leaskdale. Featuring

works by Schütz, Monteverdi, Marenzio, Palestrina, and Verdelot,

Toronto Music Garden

this concert provides a window into the Italianate stylings of the Late

Renaissance and Early Baroque eras.

On June 30, Westben presents “Viva Vivaldi! The Four Seasons and

Gloria,” featuring two of Vivaldi’s masterworks. The Four Seasons, a

captivating and expressive set of

four concerti is interpreted by

violinist Amy Hillis, while the

Westben Festival Orchestra &

Chorus tackle the Gloria. Make

sure to check it out – not only do

you get to hear one of the masters

of the Italian Baroque, but you get

to do so in a barn!

As anyone who has travelled

to an unfamiliar place knows

well, navigating is often the trickiest

part of going somewhere

new. This issue of The WholeNote

serves as your musical road map,

helping you traverse the winding

roads of summer music in all its

forms without a GPS shouting

“Recalculating!” With so many

opportunities to hear splendid

music, it is impossible to make a

wrong turn and I encourage you

to delve into some of these magnificent concerts and festivals.

If you have any questions or want to hear my two cents on anything

early music this summer, send me a note at earlymusic@thewholenote.com.

See you in September!

Matthew Whitfield is a Toronto-based harpsichordist and organist.

A WORLD CLASS

MUSIC FESTIVAL

AN ENCHANTING

SETTING

JUST TICKETS

AWAY!

The Elora Singers

Natalie MacMaster

State Choir Latvija

Lemon Bucket Orkestra

Unforgettable: Nat King Cole

Measha Bruegergossman

Kuné Global Orchestra

Voices Of Light

Daniel Taylor

Piano Six

. . .and much more!

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 41


Beat by Beat | Jazz Notes

In the Bad Old

Summertime

STEVE WALLACE

The weather in April and May was so cool, grey and damp it

barely felt like spring, yet here I am pondering a column for this

summer issue of WholeNote, which covers not only June, but

July and August as well. I’ve always found this tricky, as it involves a

time warp of looking three months into the future – something I’m

ill-suited to at the best of times – and the weather this year has only

made it worse. It’s like hugging thin air – what to write about? A

preview of the many upcoming festivals, perhaps? Well, yes, but they

haven’t happened yet and besides, they’re often covered elsewhere in

the issue.

For jazz musicians, summer means not only jazz festival season

but often playing in hot and muggy conditions, indoors or out. So,

after some head-scratching I’ve decided to write about what it’s like

to play in the sticky cauldron of summer. Lest the following litany of

complaints seems too petulant or kvetchy, remember they’re mostly

meant to be humorous, real though they are.

For starters, there’s what happens to instruments as the weather

grows more hot and humid, in particular my instrument, the double

bass, which vehemently protests the onset of each summer by

becoming almost impossible to play for two or three weeks in late

June to early July. It tightens up and the body swells, forcing the action

– i.e. the distance of the strings above the fingerboard – to get uncomfortably

high. Now, I generally like a high action, but what happens

right when the festivals are starting and you’re hoping to be at your

best, is just ridiculous. The bass feels like concrete and its sound gets

choked, not exactly what you need while having to deal with the enervation

of the heat yourself!

Then there’s the stickiness. The fingerboard and neck get all gummy

from sweat and the humidity, as do the strings, so you’re constantly

wiping them down, which works for about five seconds. All the stickiness

leads to greater friction, which leads to – you guessed it – blisters.

No matter how much I’ve been playing or how tough my calluses

are, I always end up with blisters playing in the summer as the skin

gets softer from the humidity. There’s usually one on my right thumb,

one or two on the plucking fingers and a couple of small ones on the

tips of my left fingers. All this while the action is so stiff it feels like

the strings are steel cables. But best of all – pinch me, I’m dreamin’ –

is when these blisters break, and sweat, never in short supply on a jazz

bandstand, gets into them. It feels roughly like squeezing lemon juice

onto a paper cut and brings a whole new meaning to “burning it up.”

The best part about jazz sweat though, is the sting when it runs

down into your eyes, rendering them useless for sight-reading

purposes. (Luckily, I don’t read music well enough to ruin my

playing.) Bassists and drummers often play continuously throughout

a piece, so they rarely have a chance to wipe their eyes, making the

rivulets of acid off the forehead a constant torture. I’ve had many

experiences with this, but the one that stands out came during a

performance of Two Bass Hit with Rob McConnell’s Tentet during the

Toronto festival years ago. It was late June at The Rex, always a steambath

in the summer, but especially so when packed.

Two Bass Hit eventually becomes a very fast blues in D-flat – not

a bassist’s favourite key – and our version devolved into a marathon

joust between the three saxophonists, P.J. Perry, Alex Dean and Mike

Murley, each having their way with the changes and giving the others

no quarter. This saxophone combat usually lasted 15 to 20 minutes,

with drummer Terry Clarke and me flailing away underneath, playing

time at this breakneck tempo. After about a minute there was so

much sweat running into my eyes all I could do was shut them tight to

keep it out. Eventually there was a break when the band stopped and

left all three saxophonists alone in a kind of Coltrane-meets-Dixieland

polyphonic wankfest. Terry and I couldn’t wipe ourselves down fast

enough but as soon as we resumed playing it was sweat blindness all

over again and I remember playing the head out by memory because

I couldn’t see my music. There’s a blown-up photograph on the wall

at The Rex showing Murley, Dean and me in the middle of this soggy

battle, hair soaked and faces beet-red, a testament to a jazz ordeal I

won’t ever forget.

Just to show that the trial-by-fire of tropical jazz conditions extends

beyond musicians to their audience, on that same night at The Rex, a

lady – and a youngish one at that – fainted from the heat, flopping out

of her seat onto the floor right in the middle of a tune. I remember the

band playing on as the paramedics arrived and carried her out on a

stretcher. As they say, the show must go on.

The conditions don’t improve much, if at all, when jazz moves

from sweatshop clubs to the other common summer venue – the

outdoor stage. It’s a general principle that often what’s good for the

paying customer – in this case, enjoying live jazz in the open air with

some shade and maybe a beer – is not so good for the performers.

And outdoor stages, even when adequately covered, present difficulties.

First of all there’s the sound, which dissipates into the open air

with nothing to hold it, or bounces back off tall buildings, creating a

weird echo-chamber effect. This causes musicians to play harder than

they should without getting much back and is often exacerbated by

soundmen of the louder-is-better school, who decide to “help you

out” by boosting things in the monitors to Thor-like levels. Great, my

prayers have been answered, now it sounds thin and deafening.

Beyond sound, there’s odour. As in the venerable jazz tent, which,

after a few days of use not only resembles a giant sneaker, but smells

like one too – a piquant mixture of sweat, stale beer, mildew, melted

plastic and barfed-up popcorn with just a hint of salami underneath.

Heavenly.

And for bands using written music, wind is always a useful ally,

tossing charts to and fro, or blowing cymbal stands to the ground –

“Wow, that drummer is really bringing it today!” There are solutions

like clothes pegs or see-through plexi-glass covers to hold sheet music

in place, but they never quite do the trick even if you can get them in

place. As for turning pages with these gizmos, forget it. And in some

jazz version of Murphy’s Law, it’s never a chart you hate that blows

away, but one that you actually were looking forward to playing.

But the best part of playing jazz al fresco is the wildlife, as in

insects. There’s nothing quite like being in the middle of a ballad and

watching several mosquitoes land on your forearm, all damp and

DON VICKERY / TD TORONTO JAZZ FESTIVAL

42 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


juicy, knowing they’re going to bite you and there’s nothing you can

do about it. Or flying into your eye and buzzing about your ears while

you’re in the middle of a solo. It’s also fun when a fly lands in the

middle of a complex passage of 16th notes on your music, lending a

whole new meaning to “reading fly shit.” Bees up the ante and have

been known to swarm bandstands; being bitten by mosquitoes is

one thing but being stung by a bee while playing is the frozen limit,

though all in a day’s work in the great jazz outdoors.

Sometimes the wildlife comes in human form, particularly in sweltering

tents where beer has been served all day long. I once played in a

tent at the Barrie Jazz Festival where the audience had been imbibing

for hours and were in something of a Belfast mood. The leader did

a little too much talking out front and someone bellowed out “Play

some *$#&ing music already!!” So we made with the sounds, but they

did not soothe the savage breast. The bird was definitely in the air

and I had the distinct feeling that if live produce had been on hand it

would have been hurtling toward us with a vengeance. Jazz is not an

open-air sport and when I approach playing an outdoor venue I often

feel like W.C. Fields – “On the whole, I’d rather be in Philadelphia” –

or at least indoors, with a frosty martini and a ballgame on.

So, outdoors or in a sweatbox, the next time you hear some live jazz

in the summer and notice the musicians seem a little bedraggled and

moist, perhaps a little red in the face or less focused than usual, you’ll

understand why and extend them some empathy. Or at least refrain

from throwing vegetables at them. After all, they’re not getting danger

pay – that’s if they’re getting paid at all. No pun intended, it’s hard to

play hot music while you’re melting.

I’d like to leave off by wishing everyone a happy summer of

listening to music, and with a favourite joke about the season: How

many singers does it take to sing Summertime?

All of them, apparently.

JAZZ NOTES QUICK PICKS

!!

AUG 3, 7:30PM: Festival of the

Sound. “Jazz Canada: That Latin

Flavour.” Guido Basso, trumpet;

Rémi Bolduc

Dave Young, bass; Terry Clarke,

drums; Reg Schwager, guitar; David

Restivo, piano. Charles W. Stockey

Centre, 2 Bay St, Parry Sound. What

amounts to a Canadian jazz allstar

band performing Latin jazz

in concert.

!!

AUG 4, 2PM: Westben.

“Sophisticated Ladies.” Music of

Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Nancy

Wilson, Dinah Washington, Etta

James, Blossom Dearie, Sarah

Vaughan. Barbra Lica and Sophia

Perlman, jazz vocals; Brian Barlow

Big Band. The Barn, 6698 County

Road 30, Campbellford. A fine big

band accompanying two good

singers paying tribute to some

of the jazz divas of the past, in a

wonderful setting.

!!

AUG 18, 7PM: Stratford Summer Music. John MacLeod’s Rex Hotel Orchestra. The

Avondale, 194 Avondale Ave, Stratford. A chance to hear Toronto’s premier big band

away from their natural habitat.

!!

AUG 25, 3PM: Stratford Summer Music. “Rémi Bolduc Jazz Ensemble: Tribute to

Dave Brubeck.” The Avondale, 194 Avondale Ave, Stratford. One of Canada’s best alto

saxophonists puts his own stamp on Brubeck’s music.

Toronto bassist Steve Wallace writes a blog called “Steve

Wallace jazz, baseball, life and other ephemera” which

can be accessed at wallacebass.com. Aside from the topics

mentioned, he sometimes writes about movies and food.

Beat by Beat | Bandstand

A Summery

Summary

JACK MACQUARRIE

Since we haven’t seen any snowflakes for two weeks, it is

probably safe to assume that spring is here, and that summer

won’t be far behind. But that being said, it is also true that

this will be the last issue of The WholeNote until the September

issue by which time fall will be looming. So there is a lot to cover

here, and a lot that will likely fall through the cracks. While we

frequently hear talk of the “paperless society,” it isn’t here yet,

and probably never will be. For The WholeNote, as with any other

paper publication, that means that there must always be a gap

between the time when all of the final copy is written and the day

when the first paper publication is available for our readers. A

number of events will take place during that gap. I hope to attend

several of them, but they will already be past history by the time

you read this, and long gone by the time I report next. I will take

notes as I go, though.

Innovations

In recent years there has been much talk about the demise of the

“town band” insofar as the traditional concert in the park and/or

parade of the town band. Yes! Developments in technology have

certainly changed much of community music. On the other hand,

some bands have embraced these developments to further their bands’

connection with their communities. Two such situations have come to

my attention recently.

The first of these, by the Uxbridge Community Concert Band

(UCCB), was an unusual way for a band to connect with their

community. This band, a summertime-only group, had a unique way

to contact citizens of Uxbridge. On the seasonal opening day of the

town’s Summer Farmers’ Market, the band had a display stand with a

dual purpose. One: Invite any potential members to consider joining

the band. Two: Invite anyone passing by to attend UCCB summer

events. One feature of their display was a laptop computer with a large

screen and loudspeakers showing the band in one of its concerts.

The photograph here shows the band’s membership chair, Terry

Christiansen with her French horn and conductor Steffan Brunette

with his computer.

Speaking of the UCCB’s Steffan Brunette, a couple of years ago,

he took a year off from teaching and studied composition and this

summer’s repertoire will include the premiere performance of a

new composition of his with a very unusual inspiration. Brunette is

recovering from major surgery and has appointed two assistants to

conduct rehearsals at times when he may not be able to do so. Well,

while recovering in the cardiology ward of St. Michael’s Hospital

in Toronto, he conceived this work. In his words: “The beeping of a

specific heart monitor (on an F-sharp, in 5/4 time) throughout the

day and night became the inspiration for the basis of a new piece.”

This summer, audiences will be treated to the world premiere of

Tachycardia.

The other town band innovation I want to mention here is by the

Newmarket Citizens Band. The band has had a YouTube channel for

about three years now, and have just announced that they currently

have 43 videos posted on the channel – audio recordings of their

performances from several of their various concerts that have taken

place during that period. One, in particular, jumps out as having

received exceptional numbers over a short period of time. Since

being posted last August, The Lord of the Rings by Richard Saucedo,

recorded at the Orillia Opera House, has had over 1200 views. That’s

the most for any of their posted videos!

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 43


JACK MACQUARRIE

The Uxbridge Community Concert Band connecting with their community

New Horizons

I heard recently from Heather Engli about a big move on the horizon

for her. I first met Heather many years ago when she was a music

student and trumpet player at university. Years later, when we moved

to Goodwood in Uxbridge Township, there was Heather, and she had

stopped playing trumpet. A few years later, she was back playing and

teaching trumpet. For some time now she has been my principal

contact with The Silverthorn Symphonic Winds. Very soon Heather

will be moving to Wolfville, Nova Scotia where she may even study

more music at Acadia University, and she has already made contact

with Dan and Lisa Kapp who moved there a couple of years ago, she

informed me.

Dan Kapp, as regular readers of this column will know, was the

driving force behind the first New Horizons Band of Toronto in 2010,

when they started with one band made up of 19 adults, who had

either never played music before, or who wanted to return to music

after having played in high school. The qualifications for becoming a

member were simple: you had to love music and be willing to do your

best. “I will never forget my first practice” said Randy Kligerman, who

is now president of NHBT. I too remember it well: a call from Dan

Kapp, telling me that the first NH band did not have any trombones

for their very first concert, I took action. I dug out, not one, but two

trombones. One was for myself. The other I handed over to Joan, “the

lady of the house,” and stated that “we are the trombone section.” I

thought that Dan was being more than ridiculous to schedule that

very first concert for a new beginner band to take place in the CBC’s

Glenn Gould Studio. I was wrong. The concert was appreciated and

applauded by a full-house audience.

NHBT has since grown to approximately 260 members, with eight

concert bands and two jazz bands, and offers a variety of mini-enrichment

programs throughout the year. Initially they rehearsed in a

studio space at Long & McQuade in Toronto. When they outgrew that,

they were able to rehearse at the Salvation Army location at Bloor and

Dovercourt. Again they have faced an enviable problem, many more

people wanted to join NHBT and enrich their lives with music, but the

bands had outgrown the space availability at their current Bloor and

Dovercourt location. “We are a difficult tenant” said Kligerman, “ We

have day and evening classes, require a band room with good acoustics

and lighting, and many of our members prefer not to drive, so

access from the Bloor Subway line is a priority. Not an easy thing to

find in Toronto, especially at a rent we could afford.” After looking at

numerous buildings and churches, Kligerman visited the Seicho-No-le

Centre, at Danforth and Victoria Park. He knew this would be their

new home as soon as he walked in. “The

building is beautiful and has all the amenities

we need, and our new landlords are

welcoming and supportive of what we do

with the community. Everyone is excited

about what the future holds for NHBT,

and most importantly, we can continue to

grow as an organization,” said Kligerman.

NHBT now offers summer classes in

beginner/advanced theory, beginner

concert, sight reading and jazz, starting

June 3. Their regular concert/jazz program

starts up again in September. Read more

about this on their website: newhorizonsbandtoronto.ca.

The Markham New Horizons Band is

one that I had not heard of before, but

met them for the first time recently. As a

member of New Horizons International

Music Association, the band serves as an

entry access point to music making for

adults, with or without musical background,

and for those who have missed

playing. They practise at Long & McQuade,

Markham (9833 Markham Road) every

Tuesday from 1pm to 3pm. During my

brief visit, it became apparent that they would love to welcome some

“low brass” members. For information contact their conductor Soah

Lu at markhamnewhorizonsband@gmail.com.

CBA

The Canadian Band Association (Ontario) just announced their next

Band Weekend. It will take place from June 14 to 16 in Barrie and be

hosted by the Barrie Concert Band. For those not familiar with these

events, the CBA Weekend brings together musicians from community

bands across the province to join together for a challenging, but fun

couple of days of music making. Under a number of different guest

conductors, attendees will rehearse all day Saturday. That evening is a

time for people to socialize. Then on Sunday afternoon, all will come

together as a massed band to perform in a public concert. If you or

your band have CBA membership, you will receive all information

needed to register.

Outdoor venues

Over the years we have usually received information on concerts at a

number of outdoor venues in Southern Ontario. So far we only have

information on the Orillia Sunday evening Concert Band Series. These

all take place on the Orillia Aqua Theatre in a park on the shore of

Lake Couchiching. If the weather is bad, the concerts are automatically

moved to the Orillia Opera House. This year’s lineup: June 23 -

Orillia Concert Band; June 30 - Baytowne Big Band; July 7 - Weston

Silver Band; July 14 - Orillia Silver Band; July 21 - Newmarket Citizens

Band; July 28 - Barrie Skyliners Big Band; August 4 - Muskoka Concert

Band; August 11 - Mississauga Pops Concert Band; August 18 - Simcoe

County Band; and August 25 - Markham Concert Band. So far we have

not heard anything from The Millennial Bandstand in Unionville or

the Civic Bandstand in Oshawa.

Humour

A community choir was plagued with attendance problems. Several

singers were absent at each rehearsal! As a matter of fact, every singer

in the choir had missed several rehearsals, except for one very faithful

alto! Finally at the dress rehearsal for their big concert, the conductor

took a moment to single out and thank the faithful alto. She, of

course, humbly responded, “Well it’s the least I could do, since I won’t

be able to make the performance!”

Jack MacQuarrie plays several brass instruments and

has performed in many community ensembles. He can

be contacted at bandstand@thewholenote.com

44 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


2019

GREEN PAGES

15th Annual Summer Music Guide


GREEN PAGES

GREEN PAGES COVER PHOTO: SUMMER MUSIC IN THE GARDEN, TORONTO, ON

SUMMER MUSIC GUIDE

Welcome to WholeNote’s 15th annual

Green Pages guide to summer music!

Though the regular concert season

is drawing to a close, there’s a lot

happening in the coming months, with

festivals from June to September, in

Toronto, other parts of Ontario, and

beyond. We hope you’ll enjoy perusing

these pages, with profiles provided

by the festivals themselves. There’s

something for everyone, whether

you love classical music, opera,

jazz, folk and more. Visit us online at

thewholenote.com/green for links

to the festivals’ websites and other

media links, photos and more.

2019 GREEN PAGES TEAM

PROJECT MANAGER: Karen Ages

PROJECT EDITOR: Kevin King

PROOFREADING: Danial Jazaeri

LAYOUT & DESIGN: Susan Sinclair

WEBSITE: Kevin King

For more information about

our Green Pages, contact

karen@thewholenote.com or

call Karen at 416-323-2232 x.26

THE 21ST CENTURY GUITAR

August 22 to 25

Ottawa, ON

The 21st Century Guitar is an international interdisciplinary conference examining

contemporary guitar composition, performance and pedagogy. Open to the

public, the conference will bring together researchers, academics, composers and

practitioners from different fields who are interested in guitar performance, pedagogy,

and contemporary composition for guitar and technology. Concerts featuring

new works for guitar duo, guitar orchestra and technology (surround projection,

8-channel sound) will be highlighted in special performances in Freiman Hall

and Dominion-Chalmers Church. Featured performers and composers include

JUNO-award winning guitarist Gordon Grdina, the Cowan-Chiccillitti Duo, and

jazz guitarist Miles Okazaki. Registration at the conference is $42 and provides

entry to all concerts and lectures.

902-986-5299

www.21cguitar.com

BEACHES INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

July 5 to 28

Toronto, ON

Toronto’s beloved music festival and summer mainstay, the Beaches International

Jazz Festival, returns from July 5 to 28 to celebrate its 31st year of unparalleled

music from both established and emerging artists. Featuring multiple stages and

venues, the return of festival favourites and leading musical talent, the 31st annual

Beaches International Jazz Festival is one that can’t be missed.

416-698-2152

www.beachesjazz.com

BIG ON BLOOR FESTIVAL

July 20

Toronto, ON

“Sonic Future Bloor” at BIG on Bloor Festival focuses on local emerging talent

with programming highlighting the incredible range of music production in

Toronto. Part of Bloordale’s interdisciplinary Festival now in its 12th year; enjoy

free live music from noon until midnight on car-free Dufferin to Lansdowne.

Headliner: up-and-coming artist Keynes Woods.

647-887-6739

www.bigonbloorfestival.com

Big on Bloor Festival, Toronto, ON

BROOKSIDE MUSIC “FESTIVAL OF THE BAY”

July 21 to August 16

Midland Alliance Church, Midland, ON

Brookside Music hosts “Festival of the Bay” at the Midland Alliance Church.

On July 21, Syrène Saxophone Quartet kicks off the festival in a lively fashion,

followed by The Swiss Trio on July 26, with guests James Campbell, Ken

MacDonald and Douglas Perry. Some of Canada’s foremost instrumentalists

combine July 29 to present Festival Baroque, including Bach’s “Brandenburg

Concerto” No.5. On Wednesday August 7 hear one of the finest guitar ensembles

in the world: Canadian Guitar Quartet, then dance and dine under the stars

to the sounds of the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s with this vivacious cast of young talent:

The Toronto All Star Big Band with a gourmet dinner at the Midland Golf and

Country Club Friday, August 16.

705-527-4420

www.brooksidemusic.com

46 | Summer 2019 thewholenote.com


BROTT MUSIC FESTIVAL

June 27 to August 15

Hamilton, ON

Now entering its 32nd season, the Brott Music Festival (est. 1988) is the largest

non-profit orchestral music festival in Canada, and, the only festival with a fulltime,

professional orchestra-in-residence. The Brott Music Festival is renowned

for its extremely high artistic standard, world class soloists, its exuberant young

orchestra and its eclectic mix of orchestral, opera, chamber, jazz, pop and education

concerts at various venues across Southern Ontario. We have attracted world

class soloists and other artists/personalities to Hamilton, including James Ehnes,

Anton Kuerti, Pinchas Zukerman, Marc Garneau, Karen Kain, Valerie Tryon,

former Prime Minister Kim Campbell, Mordecai Richler, Roberta Bondar and

Michael Ondaatje, to name only a few.

905-525-7664

www.brottmusic.com

CLASSICAL UNBOUND FESTIVAL

July 26 to 28

Prince Edward County, ON

Unbinding classical chamber music from its formal attire, and binding it more

closely to our hearts and souls. Join us for 3 concerts performed by the new artistic

directors, the Ironwood Quartet: Jessica Linnebach, Carissa Klopoushak, Julia

MacLaine, David Marks.

Friday, July 26: “Shoulders of Giants” – The Grange Winery, 7pm. Music by

Debussy, Nicole Lizée, Beethoven. Saturday, July 27: “Ironwood Unbound” –

Old Church Theatre, 7:30pm. Music by Pärt, Dessner, J.S. Bach, original songs,

and arrangements of folk music. Sunday, July 28: Summer Nocturne – Hillier

Creek Estates Winery, 7pm. Music by Mendelssohn, Puccini, Beethoven. Admission

(each concert) $30; weekend pass (all 3 concerts) $75. For tickets and more

information: www.classicalunbound.com

514-713-1082

www.classicalunbound.com

CLEAR LAKE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

July 24 to 28

Lorne Watson Recital Hall, Brandon University, Brandon, MB

Erickson Lutheran Church, Erickson, MB

Riding Mountain National Park, MB

The 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival, under the artistic direction of

Canadian pianists Daniel Tselyakov and Alexander Tselyakov, has become an

important part of Canada’s cultural calendar. The most exciting and first of its kind

that Manitoba has to offer, this festival is a celebration of summer with classical

music, jazz and outstanding musicians in the natural beauty of Riding Mountain

National Park, Manitoba. This year’s festival is comprised of six concerts: jazz

and five chamber concerts. This year’s ambitious schedule is sure to please and

promises to inspire new lovers of classical music as well as satisfy the appetites

of seasoned enthusiasts. The large scale roster of talented guest artists includes

Alexander Tselyakov and Daniel Tselyakov, pianists; Kerry DuWors, violin;

Simon Fryer, cello; Michael Cain, jazz piano.

204-571-6547

www.clearlakefestival.ca

Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival Manitoba

COLLINGWOOD SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL

July 17 - August 11

Collingwood, ON

The Collingwood Summer Music Festival celebrates its first season in 2019 by

presenting over 100 world-class artists in Collingwood, Ontario. The inaugural

concert on July 18 features the Elmer Iseler Singers together with ChoralWorks,

the Collingwood Festival Orchestra and guest soloists Mayumi Seiler and Daniel

Wnukowski. From traditional classical to cool jazz, you are sure to find events that

cater to your tastes - including two concerts geared specifically towards families

with children. For 2019, we’ve also invited award-winning ensembles and celebrated

personalities such as the Gryphon Trio, Quartetto Gelato, Rolston String

Quartet, Diana Braithwaite and Chris Whiteley Duo, R.H. Thomson, Trevor

Copp among others. Visit our website for more information.

705-445-2200

www.collingwoodfestival.com

ELORA FESTIVAL

July 12 to 28

Elora, ON

Experience a world of music at the Elora Festival! We present 3 weeks of vocal/

choral/chamber music delights in one of the prettiest towns in Ontario. Welcome

to our 40th season! Join us for The Elora Singers, State Choir LATVIJA, Natalie

MacMaster, Lemon Bucket Orkestra, Measha Breuggergosman, Piano Six,

“Unforgettable: Nat King Cole,’’ Laplante/Seilor/Carr Trio, Voices of Light film,

Jane Archibald, “KUNÉ, a Family Series” and “Elora Festival Kids Camp” -

and so much more. The Elora Festival has encompassed all forms of classical

music, jazz, international music, popular and folk since 1979. All concerts take

place in gorgeous Elora, Ontario, with its natural beauty, vibrant cultural scene,

shopping, restaurants and lodgings.

519-846-0331

www.elorafestival.ca

thewholenote.com Summer 2019 | 47


GREEN PAGES

FESTIVAL CLASSICA

➤ May 24 to June 16

Saint-Lambert, Montréal, QC

The 9th Festival Classica will be held in Saint-Lambert, along with satellite

concerts presented in 8 cities in the Montérégie region, on the island of Montréal

and on the North Shore. From Berlioz to the Bee Gees: more than 65 indoor

and outdoor concerts, featuring Natalie Choquette, Stéphane Tétreault, Jean-

Philippe Sylvestre, Valérie Milot, Alexandre Da Costa and many more artists!

In 2019, we mark the 150th anniversary of the death of the famous composer

Hector Berlioz (1803-1869), the 200th anniversary of the birth of composer and

cellist Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880), as well as the 150th anniversary of the

birth of composer Albert Roussel (1869-1937).

888-801-9906

www.festivalclassica.com

FESTIVAL OF THE SOUND

July 19 to August 10

Parry Sound, ON

Concerts - cruises - films - talks: Canada’s finest jazz and classical summer music

festival is back for it’s 40th great season! Experience world-class chamber, jazz

and folk music combined with the beautiful landscape of Georgian Bay! In its

illustrious history, the Festival of the Sound has become a go-to destination for

musicians and music lovers alike. The festival is recognized as a top summer

offering by organizations such as the CBC and Festivals & Events Ontario and

consistently attracts musicians of international acclaim. Cruise the bay with the

Hannaford Brass, Scantilly Plaid and Dave Young, or party on land with Janina

Fialkowska, Moshe Hammer, Leslie Fagan, New Zealand String Quartet and

many, many more! With a summer featuring tango, celtic, roots and latin jazz

concerts, make this your year to attend!

1-866-364-0061

www.festivalofthesound.ca

THE FIFTH CANADIAN CHOPIN PIANO

COMPETITION AND FESTIVAL

August 23 to 29

Royal Conservatory of Music, 273 Bloor St W., Toronto, ON

The Canadian Chopin Society presents a festival and competition celebrating

the legacy of Chopin and artistry of young Canadian pianists. The week-long

event is an opportunity to follow the pianists who will compete for the chance

to represent Canada in the prestigious “International Chopin Piano Competition”

in Poland. Plan to be a part of this excitement, and deepen your connection

with Chopin! Highlights include an evening with musicologist Alan Walker,

author of recently released biography of Chopin; a recital by Polish-Canadian

pianist Krzysztof Jablonski in Koerner Hall; and dazzling competition performances.

Full listing of events, schedules, festival passes are available on our website.

416-242-8601

www.canadianchopinsociety.com

GUELPH JAZZ FESTIVAL

➤ September 11 to 15

Guelph, ON

The 2019 Guelph Jazz Festival features world-class creative, improvised music

in ticketed and free concerts in a lively community setting. Highlights of this

year’s program include Jen Shyu, Nine Doors; Tomas Fujiwara’s 7 Poets Trio;

Ingrid Laubrock, Tom Rainey and Hank Roberts; Brodie West Quintet; Erwan

Keravec solo and duo with Hamid Drake; NAIL: Lori Freedman, Nicolas Caloia,

Ab Baars and Ig Henneman; Karuna: Hamid Drake and Adam Rudolph Duet;

Paula Shocron, Guillermo Gregorio and Pablo Díaz; Susan Alcorn; John Kameel

Farah; Chik White; The Titillators; Malcolm Goldstein and Rainer Wiens; Atlas

Revolt; Way North. Additionally, the festival’s free colloquium features artist talks,

keynotes, panel discussions, interviews, and other complementary programming.

Tickets and passes on sale July 2.

519-763-4952

www.guelphjazzfestival.com

HERITAGE MUSIC FESTIVAL

August 7 to 11

Shelburne, ON

The Heritage Music Festival, featuring the 69th Canadian “Open Old Time Fiddle

Championship”, will take place August 7 to 11 in Shelburne, Ontario. Sponsored by

the Rotary Club of Shelburne, the event features a variety of entertainers, including

The Washboard Union, Country Superstars “Live in Concert”, and Scott Woods,

as well as Canada’s top fiddlers in competition for thousands of dollars in prizes.

Community events include camping, “Bands and Brews” at the Fiddle Park, a giant

fiddle parade, a pork BBQ, and non-denominational church service. Proceeds of

the Heritage Music Festival support Shelburne Rotary’s many charitable projects.

519-278-0016

www.heritagemusicfestival.ca

HIGHLANDS OPERA STUDIO

July 22 to August 26

Haliburton, ON

Our 2019 season celebrates “Women in Opera”! Hear the best young opera

stars of today and tomorrow in the beauty of the Haliburton Highlands, only

2.5 hours northeast of the GTA. Established in 2007 by internationally-acclaimed

Canadian tenor Richard Margison and Canadian stage director/violist Valerie

Kuinka, Highlands Opera Studio is an advanced, intensive professional training

and networking program for emerging opera professionals. Chosen from 150+

applicants from across Canada and internationally, hear the 2019 participants

in public masterclasses, multiple concerts, community events, and fully-staged

operas; Ariadne auf Naxos, Suor Angelica, and 2 new prize-winning Canadian

operas: The Chair and Book of Faces. Love to sing? Get involved in the Highlands

Opera Community School!

1-855-455-5533

www.highlandsoperastudio.com

HONENS FESTIVAL

➤ September 5 to 8

Calgary, AB

Highlight performances for the 2019 Honens Festival include the Miró Quartet

(with Calgary native William Fedkenheuer), award-winning Polish piano /

accordion Duo 19:21, and pianists Jon Kimura Parker, Nicolas Namoradze

(2018 Honens Prize Laureate), Pedja Mužijević, Susanne Ruberg-Gordon, and

Katherine Chi (2000 Honens Prize Laureate). Honens Family Day at the Taylor

Centre for the Performing Arts takes place on Saturday, September 7 and includes

masterclasses (piano and violin), storytellers, and a 70th birthday tribute to revered

Canadian composer Alexina Louie (who will make a special cameo appearance).

The festival wraps up at Central Memorial Park with the ever-popular Open Air.

48 | Summer 2019 thewholenote.com


And headlining this year’s Bison Noir is rising star singer / songwriter Gabriel

Kahane performing his 2018 release, “Book of Travelers”.

403-975-7438

www.honens.com

KINCARDINE SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL

August 12 to 17

Kincardine, ON

Celebrating its 28th anniversary, KSMF is well-known for excellent programming

and presentations. This year, August 12 to 17, the Evening Concert Series

has a wonderfully eclectic, top-quality smorgasbord of music for you, from trailblazing

artists such as Ensemble Made In Canada – “Mosaïque” to relaxing

entertainment with Dan Needles and Ian Bell in “True Confessions from the

Ninth Concession,” to a classical extravaganza Saturday 17: Vivaldi’s Gloria and

excerpts from Mendelssohn’s Elijah with full chorus and symphony orchestra.

Don’t miss the free “4 O’Clock in the Park” concerts in downtown Victoria Park.

Music classes run August 12 to 16 for everyone from beginners to experienced

players. Guitar, strings, bands and vocals on Lake Huron - Music and the Beach!

519-396-9716

www.ksmf.ca

XV LATVIAN FESTIVAL OF SONG AND DANCE IN CANADA

July 3 to 7

Toronto, ON

The Latvian Song Festival Association in Canada has presented a festival every

five years since 1953. We present choral, instrumental and dance performances,

featuring Latvian composers and choreographers from Canada and abroad. This

summer, over 2000 Latvian singers and folk dancers from around the world will

perform at venues in downtown Toronto. Guest artists include the State Choir

LATVIJA (Maris Sirmais), folk-dance ensemble LIGO (Janis Purvins) and folk

ensemble RAXTU RAXTI. We will celebrate Latvia’s centenary and the contributions

of Latvian-Canadian artists to Canadian culture. Each of our concerts

will include music by Imant Raminsh, Talivaldis Kenins and Janis Kalnins. In

addition, we will launch a new Centrediscs recording of orchestral and chamber

music by these composers.

416-948-0634

www.latviansongfest.com

LEITH SUMMER FESTIVAL

June 29 to August 24

419134 Tom Thomson Lane, Leith, ON

Leith Summer Festival presents five concerts in the Historic Leith Church during

the summer. This acoustically wonderful venue offers an intimate encounter

between musicians and audience. The season opens on June 29 with Krisztina

Szabó, mezzo-soprano and Robert Kortgaard, piano. Next is Angela Park, piano;

and Andrea Tyniec, violin with a captivating program on July 13. The Payadora

Tango Ensemble performs on Sunday, July 28 in a matinee performance

of tango, drawing from the traditional to the contemporary. On August 10, Peter

Tiefenbach, piano; Mireille Asselin, soprano; Matthew Dalen, tenor; and Adam

Harris, baritone, present “The Cannabis Cantata”. The season wraps up with the

Rolston String Quartet performing Haydn, Ligeti and Schubert on August 24.

Tickets at the Roxy Box Office at 519-371-2833 or www.roxytheatre.ca.

519-664-2092

www.leithchurch.ca

Elora Festival Elora, ON

LUMINATO

June 7 to 23

Toronto, ON

Each June, Luminato, Toronto’s international festival of arts and ideas,

takes over the city with a flurry of cultural activities and events designed to

provoke, delight and inspire audiences of all ages. Over the festival’s 12-year

history, more than 9.1 million people have experienced over 3,600 productions

featuring 15,000+ artists from more than 40 countries around the world.

Luminato 2019 takes place June 7 to 23 at various venues across the city, jampacked

with the most exciting theatre, music, visual art, opera, dance, film and

more from Canada and around the world. Spanning 17 days, the festival lineup

features both paid and free indoor and outdoor events, including a larger-thanlife

mirrored maze and massive choral event.

416-368-4849

www.luminatofestival.com

MARKHAM VILLAGE MUSIC FESTIVAL

June 14 to 15

Main Street Markham Rd., Markham, ON

Markham Village Music Festival closes Markham Road from Hwy 7 to Bullock

on Friday evening and Saturday. The festival features 4 stages of entertainment

with a variety of music and dance. Special this year - a salsa stage on

Friday and Saturday night, “Exodus: Bob Marley” tribute. Throughout the

festival, there will be many performances from our diverse communities, lots

of craft and food vendors (including food trucks) and a Farmers’ Market.

The Kids Zone will be in Morgan Park, one block from Main Street. There will

be carnival rides, a youth entertainment stage, petting zoo, arts, crafts and much

more. Fun for the whole family!

647-983-9054

www.markhamfestival.com

MONTREAL CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

June 7: Salle Pollack, McGill University, 555 Sherbrooke Street West,

Montreal, QC

June 11 to 16: Salle Bourgie, Montreal Museum of Fine

thewholenote.com Summer 2019 | 49


GREEN PAGES

Arts, 1339 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC

This season marks the beginning of a three-year project by the Montreal Chamber

Music Festival to celebrate the life of the great Ludwig van Beethoven, entitled

“Beethoven Chez Nous!” In 2019, 2020 and 2021, the festival will feature cycles

of complete works by Beethoven, some with a very special twist! Highlights this

year are the Beethoven Violin Sonatas performed by 2019 Grammy winner James

Ehnes and pianist Andrew Armstrong; and the Beethoven Symphonies as transcribed

for piano by Franz Liszt, with six outstanding pianists from across the

world. The festival opens with a new show by Quebec’s star entertainer Gregory

Charles, an exuberant survey of the past 250 years in music. This year we also

showcase star tenor Joseph Kaiser and the best young talent in “BMO Hottest

Classical Artists Under 30!”

514-489-7444

www.festivalmontreal.org

MUSIC AND BEYOND

July 4 to 18

Ottawa, ON

Music and Beyond is a classical music and multidisciplinary arts festival that

takes place July 4 to 18 in Ottawa. It presents classical music in all formations and

pursues links between other art forms, cultural disciplines and music, including

visual art, drama, poetry, dance, architecture, circus, magic, science, comedy,

law, food and wine, and even yoga! Music and Beyond is virtually unique in the

international field of music festivals by making this a core part of its mandate.

By tying together a wide range of cultural disciplines, the festival creates a more

“festive” atmosphere, helping to attract an even broader audience to music.

613-241-0777

www.musicandbeyond.ca

MUSIC MONDAYS

➤ May 6 to Sept 2

Church of the Holy Trinity, Toronto, ON

A lunchtime concert series at the Church of the Holy Trinity - welcome to our

28th season! Music Mondays has served as a launching pad for emerging talent

since its inception in 1992. Our concerts take place in the warm acoustics of

Holy Trinity Church, just steps away from the Eaton Centre. We feature an

eclectic mix of everything from classical solo and chamber music to jazz, fusion

and world music. Our goal is to provide the highest possible musical experience

to a pay-what-you-can downtown Toronto audience. Suggested donation $10.

Please join us and bring your lunch - and a friend - every Monday at 12:15pm

from May to Labour Day.

416-598-4521 x223

www.musicmondays.ca

MUSIQUE ROYALE

June to September

Across Nova Scotia

Since 1985, Musique Royale presents a province-wide summer festival, touring

incredible musicians to some of the provinces most far off and precious venues.

In store for 2019, the summer festival includes emerging artists Aureas Voces

with romantic Nova Scotian folk arrangements, Bach and Vivaldi Sonatas with

violinist Mark Fewer and harpsichordist Hank Knox, The Best of Boxwood’s

annual salute to the Canadian Maritimes dance music, heartfelt “And So It

Goes” with baritone Brett Polegato and Robert Kortgaard, flashy artistry on the

violin with “Two Davids,” and “Pres du Soleil” exploring Medieval and Oriental

Music with Montreal’s Ensemble Caprice and Constantinople. Concerts are

across Nova Scotia in over 25 beautiful and historic venues. Stay tuned at www.

musiqueroyale.com!

902-692-8081

www.musiqueroyale.com

NYO CANADA - ODYSSEY TOUR

July 21 Ottawa, ON – presented by Chamberfest

July 22 Montreal, QC – Maison symphonique de Montréal

July 25 Parry Sound, ON – presented by Festival of the Sound

July 27 Stratford, ON – Presented by Stratford Summer Music

July 29 Toronto, ON – Koerner Hall

The National Youth Orchestra of Canada (NYO Canada) celebrates its 59th

season with a 5-city Canadian tour, preceding the orchestra’s first trip to Spain.

The country’s preeminent training orchestra, NYO Canada is comprised of

100 gifted musicians between the ages of 16 and 28, who come together each

summer to attend an 8-week intensive training institute, followed by a national

and international tour. This year’s orchestra includes musicians from nine provinces.

British conductor Michael Francis leads the summer tour, which features

Prokofiev’s Romeo & Juliet; Manuel de Falla’s The Three Cornered Hat; Mahler’s

Symphony No. 5; Sinfonia Sacra by Andrzej Panufnik; and a new work by Canadian

composer Jared Miller.

416-532-4470

www.nyoc.org

OPERAMUSKOKA FESTIVAL

August 20 to 23

Bracebridge and Windermere, ON

The OperaMuskoka Festival celebrates its 10th Anniversary this year. We are

pleased to welcome Toronto City Opera’s production of Verdi’s La Traviata to

the Rene M. Caisse Memorial Theatre in Bracebridge on August 20, 2019. On

August 21, we have scheduled our annual “Stars of Tomorrow” Concert which

will feature very talented young performers from around Ontario. The third

day, August 22, will be an instrumental masterclass and concert with the Mississauga

Youth Orchestra. For our closing day, August 23, we have scheduled a

piano and vocal masterclass, followed by an evening concert featuring the very

talented Jennifer Tung.

705-765-1048

www.muskokachautauqua.com

ORCHESTRA BREVA - EROICA: A SESQUICENTENNIAL

TRIBUTE TO LAURA SECORD

➤ May 25, 26 and June 20, 21, 23

Windsor, Tecumseh, Ingersoll, Brantford, Niagara, ON

Laura Ingersoll Secord’s remarkable and significant contributions to

our country’s history are recognized in this concert celebration highlighting

her heroic acts and life’s journey, illustrated through music significant

to her time and circumstance. All who have served humanity in times

of war and peace, through acts of bravery and sacrifice, will be honoured.

Featuring classical musicians, Indigenous artists, local historians, new works

and Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony, conducted by Melanie Paul Tanovich.

May 25, 8pm: Assumption Hall, Windsor; May 26, 8pm: Paroisse Ste Anne

Parish, Tecumseh; June 20, 8pm: Ingersoll Cheese Museum, Ingersoll;

50 | Summer 2019 thewholenote.com


June 21, 8pm: Sanderson Centre, Brantford; June 23, 2pm: Queenston Heights,

Niagara-on-the-Lake.

519-980-1113

www.orchestrabreva.com

OTTAWA CHAMBERFEST

July 25 to August 8

Ottawa, ON

This year presenting violinist James Ehnes, Canadian Brass, pianists Janina Fialkowska,

Hinrich Alpers, and Angela Hewitt, a celebration of baroque composer

Barbara Strozzi’s 400th birthday, Art of Time Ensemble performing the Beatles’

Abbey Road, the Netherlands’ Syrène Saxophone Quartet, Dover Quartet, and

many more! Celebrating 25 years, Ottawa Chamberfest brings together the boldest

names in ensemble and solo performance for musical celebration in the nation’s

capital throughout the year with a Concert Series and Community Engagement

and Education programming, culminating in the Chamberfest summer festival.

The world’s largest festival of its kind, the Ottawa Chamberfest summer festival

is a 2019 Festivals and Events (FEO) Ontario “Top 100” and winner of seven

consecutive Lieutenant-Governor’s Awards for the Arts.

613-234-6306

www.chamberfest.com

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

➤ September 13 to 22

Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Picton, ON

The 16th annual PEC Chamber Music Festival will warm up with a free familyfriendly

outdoor concert on Saturday September 7 at 2pm, featuring The True

North Brass at Macaulay Heritage Park. The Festival takes place over 2 weekends,

September 13-22, and will celebrate the piano in Chamber Music. First

weekend features the New Orford String Quartet with violist Alosysia Friedman,

esteemed pianists Jon Kimura Parker and Jamie Parker (in a rare 2-piano concert)

and the famed Gryphon Trio. Second weekend features soloists from the highlyregarded

Quebec ensemble Les Violins du Roy, mezzo-soprano and CBC broadcaster

Julie Nesrallah, and Charles Richard-Hamelin, silver medallist in the 2015

“Chopin Competition”. Tickets available at the door or online on our website.

613-393-3798

www.pecmusicfestival.com

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY JAZZ FESTIVAL

August 13 to 18

Picton, Prince Edward County, ON

The Prince Edward County Jazz Festival is proud to present a fresh and wideranging

mix of performances encompassing Newport and Cuba, big bands and

small, new faces, recent Juno winners and nominees, and a pivotal year when

transcendent albums shook jazz to its foundations. The all-star cast of performers

are simply Canada’s best. Wednesday: “Jazz Overture” dinner with the John

Sherwood Trio. Thursday matinee: Commodores Big Band featuring Hanna

Barstow. Thursday: “1959 Jazz Transformed” - featuring Colleen Allen Quintet.

Friday, Jane Bunnett and Maqueque. Saturday matinee: Robi Botos and Jodi

Proznick. Saturday evening: Jodi Proznick’s Sun Songs and the Mike Murley

Trio. Sunday: Brian Barlow Big Band spotlighting Oscar Peterson’s Canadiana

Suite. Free performances throughout several venues in the county.

1-877-411-4761

www.pecjazz.org

Ottawa Chamberfest Ottawa, ON

SOMETHING ELSE! FESTIVAL

June 20 to 23

The Rock on Locke, Church of St. John the Evangelist, 320 Charlton

Ave. W., Hamilton, ON (+ Free event Friday noon to 4pm only:

Whitehern House & Garden, 41 Jackson St. W., Hamilton, ON)

Zula Presents: Something Else! Tickets: ($20-25 adv.) Passes: ($100/125).

Info: www.zulapresents.org

Something Else! has established itself as one of North America’s most vital

exploratory music festivals. Each day offers an adventure in sound, embracing

beloved visionaries alongside emerging voices; longtime partnerships alongside

spontaneous collaboration. Its sixth year is headlined by virtuoso vocalist/

violinist Iva Bittová, clarinet innovator Don Byron, and percussionist Hamid

Drake (alongside his trio Indigenous Mind featuring Joshua Abrams & Jason

Adasiewicz). The festival’s international cast also includes William Hooker, Sara

Schoenbeck, Harris Eisenstadt, Sam Newsome, Joanna Duda, Eucalyptus, Yves

Charuest, EAR-CAM (Glen Hall, Tomasz Krakowiak, Christine Duncan, John

Oswald), Géraldine Eguiluz Trio & more.

289-993-1993

www.zulapresents.org

SOUTH COAST JAZZ

August 17 to 18

Port Dover Community Centre, 801 St. George St., Port Dover, ON

6th annual South Coast Jazz & Blues – Norfolk County. Beachside Port Dover,

rural Lake Erie. Tickets and information at www.southcoastjazz.com. Live music,

catered farm fresh food and fun! Saturday August 17 – Main Stage: Port Dover

Community Centre, 801 St George Street, 5-11pm – Powder Blues Band, Dave

Restivo, Alison Young, Eric St. Laurent, Juliann Kuchocki & more! Sunday

August 18 – Brant Hill Inn, 30 John Street, Port Dover, dinner show and river

cruise, 5:30-8pm. Email info@southcoastjazz.com or call 519-774-2787 (ARTS).

Indoor and outdoor venues. Norfolk County’s official premier event. Past headliners

include Holly Cole, David Sanborn, Jane Bunnett, Gene DiNovi and

hundreds more! Come stay and play, and make a memory that will last a lifetime!

519-774-2787

www.southcoastjazz.com

thewholenote.com Summer 2019 | 51


GREEN PAGES

STONEBRIDGE WASAGA BEACH BLUES

➤ September 13 to 15

Wasaga Beach, ON

Since the first wave of legendary Blues performers crashed ashore in Wasaga Beach

in 2010, Stonebridge Wasaga Beach Blues has exploded to become a world class

destination embraced by both new and die-hard blues fans. Keep an eye on the

Wasaga Beach Blues website for the updated schedule as performers are confirmed.

Until then, expect nothing less than an insanely talented lineup of musicians to be

burning up the two main stages. Stonebridge Wasaga Beach Blues 2019 is undoubtedly

gearing up to outdo itself - once again. For the time being, perhaps it can be

best described as a “hidden gem that features world class Blues, with an intimate

venue with a casual and relaxed atmosphere.” It does not get better than that.

705-607-7744

www.wasagabeachblues.com

STRATFORD SUMMER MUSIC

July 15 to August 25

Stratford, ON

A world of music for everyone. Canadian and international musicians of excellence

return to Stratford Summer Music for our 19th season of concerts and

events with new artistic director, Mark Fewer. Featured artists include Amir

Amiri, Tom Allen, Laila Biali, Isabel Bayrakdarian, Rémi Bolduc, James Campbell,

Steven Dann, Simone Dinnerstein, Janina Fialkowska, Ben Heppner, Jodi

Proznick, Stéphane Tétreault and Dave Young. Returning this year will be the

newly branded “Friday Night Live at Revival” (formally the “Cabaret Series”),

“Illustrated Musical Lectures” by Robert Harris, “Music for an Avon Morning”,

“BargeMusic” and “Musical Brunches” at The Prune. Also, new series added this

year include “Music and Health”, “Stratford Originals” and “Musical Families.”

Visit our website or call our box-office for more information.

1-866-288-4313

www.stratfordsummermusic.ca

SUMMER MUSIC IN THE GARDEN

June 27 to September 15

479 Queens Quay West, Toronto, ON

The popular “Summer Music in the Garden” concert series returns for its 20th

season by the shores of Lake Ontario. Treat yourself to 18 free concerts this

summer, featuring outstanding artists and a wide range of musical styles. Concerts

take place in the Toronto Music Garden on most Thursdays at 7pm and Sundays

at 4pm, and are approximately one hour in length. Bench seating is limited, so

feel free to bring a blanket or lawn chair - and don’t forget your hat or umbrella

and sunscreen as shade is also limited. Concerts proceed weather permitting.

Please call our info desk for up-to-the-minute rain call.

416-973-4000

www.harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic

SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE

July 26 to August

Robert Gill Theatre, Toronto, ON

Summer Opera Lyric Theatre (SOLT) continues its tradition of bringing the

summer opera mini-festival to the city. This summer, SOLT concentrates on

diversity and inclusion, comedy and tragedy, found in the great works for the

lyric stage and the lessons we can learn about ourselves and those who we love.

The festival includes 3 operas: Verdi’s La Traviata, Canadian Team Davies

and Benson’s Earnest, the Importance of Being, and the double bill of Puccini’s

Gianni Schicchi and Vaughn Williams’ Riders to the Sea, performed by aspiring

young artists. Music directors: Michael Rose, Suzy Smith and Jo Greenaway.

Tickets are available through the box office of St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts;

single tickets are $28.

416-366-7723

www.solt.ca

SUN LIFE FINANCIAL UPTOWN

WATERLOO JAZZ FESTIVAL

July 19 to 21

Waterloo City Centre, 100 Regina St. S, Waterloo, ON

This annual music Festival in downtown Waterloo is free and features world class

international, national and local jazz performers. Over the 3 days, we will feature

a wide variety of music that will appeal to music lovers of all ages and tastes

– from intimate solo performers to the high energy of rock/fusion; from traditional

small ensembles to dynamic big bands and even electro-funk-rap. There

will be something for everyone. After the performance, you can meet the artist

and purchase their latest CD. Between sets, there are many interesting food and

beverage options available onsite – enjoy a craft beer or your favourite wine with a

variety of food from different vendors. Since we are downtown, you can also head

to a local restaurant. Come and join us – it promises to be our best Festival yet!

519-394-0093

www.waterloojazzfest.com

SWEETWATER MUSIC FESTIVAL

➤ September 20 to 22

Owen Sound and Meaford, ON

SweetWater is all about ‘evolution’ for its 16th festival of world-class music.

The 2019 festival will be artistic director Mark Fewer’s final one at the helm.

He’s got a few musical treats left on his bucket list. The stellar line-up includes

the SweetWater debut of world-famous countertenor Daniel Taylor, Adrian

Butterfield, David Braid, Kenneth Slowik, and Rachel Brown. SweetWater’s next

artistic director, violinist Edwin Huizinga, will also be a featured performer. Free,

interactive activities include the family fav “Mozart for Munchkins”, community

play-along “Classical Jam”, and string instrument showcase “Luthier Exhibit”,

and “Luthier Performance” - moderated by Robert Harris. Friday night opening

gala ($55) Saturday early evening concert and Sunday matinee ($40), late night

jazz ($30). Festival pass (4 Concerts) $150.

519-371-2833

www.sweetwatermusicfestival.ca

TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE SUMMER FESTIVAL

June 3 to 15

Toronto, ON

Musicians from around the world gather in Toronto for the annual Tafelmusik Baroque

Summer Festival, featuring the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir,

and presented in conjunction with the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Institute. Join

us for a series of five free concerts in Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre;

Walter Hall, University of Toronto; and Grace Church on-the-Hill. All concerts

are open to the public. Tickets required for “Opening Night” on June 3 and “The

Grand Finale” on June 15. For tickets and more information, visit our website.

416-964-6337

www.tafelmusik.org/TBSF

52 | Summer 2019 thewholenote.com


TD MARKHAM JAZZ FESTIVAL

August 14, 16 to 18

Markham, ON

The TD Markham Jazz Festival is an exciting and vibrant 3 1/2 day musical

delight featuring well known professional jazz, blues and crossover musicians

performing on three stages on beautiful Main Street Unionville, in Markham.

The festival starts on Wednesday, August 14 with a ticketed opening night kickoff

party at the Markham Museum! From August 16-18, Main Street comes

alive with 30+ free performances all day and evening on outdoor stages, on the

street, and in bars and restaurants. Come and enjoy over 150 acclaimed professional

jazz musicians performing all styles of jazz and blues. While here, visit

art galleries, socialize in pubs and restaurants, dance up a storm at our beer and

wine garden stage, and enjoy one-of-a-kind shopping - all in a magical environment

that will create memories to last!

905-471-5299

www.markhamjazzfestival.com

TD NIAGARA JAZZ FESTIVAL

July 19 to 21 – St. Catharines, ON

July 26 to 28 – Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON

Recently voted “Best New Festival in Ontario,” the 6th annual TD Niagara Jazz

Festival is an exciting not-for-profit jazz festival dedicated to celebrating the art

form of jazz in the Niagara Region. The festival inspires, educates and develops

future jazz audiences while combining live jazz with a Niagara experience –

food, wine, culture and natural wonders. The summer festival (July 19 to 21 and

July 26 to 28) includes free family events: World Music on the Beach and Jazz

in the Park, as well as the all-new Niagara’s Summer Mardi Gras and Soul Jazz

in the Vineyard, a Dixieland Jazz Lunch, a Nat King Cole tribute and more…

Featuring: Shuffle Demons, Allison Young, Heavyweights Brass Band, Kellylee

Evans, Ori Dagan and more…. Info, tickets, & passes: www.niagarajazzfestival.

com; 1-844-LIV-JAZZ (548-5299); TW/INST/FB: @jazzniagara; #LiveLoveJazz

1-844-LIV-JAZZ (548-5299)

www.niagarajazzfestival.com

TD Niagara Jazz Festival Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON

TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC

July 11 to August 3

Toronto, ON

TSM’s 2019 festival, “Beyond Borders”, explores and celebrates the cross-cultural

influences that have pervaded classical music from the times of Mozart and

Mahler, right up to the composers of today. We attract music lovers of all ages,

and families across the GTA, to enjoy classical music in a relaxed, engaging,

and fun environment. Don’t miss performances by Adrianne Pieczonka, Jon

Kimura Parker, Daniel Taylor, Angela Hewitt performing Bach’s beloved Goldberg

Variations, the Dover Quartet, The Art of Time Ensemble with Canadian

singer-songwriter Sarah Slean, the Rolston String Quartet, conductor Gemma

New, and world premieres by celebrated Canadian composers Alexina Louie and

Christos Hatzis. In addition, we have a variety of free events and family events,

chats, educational activities and much more!

647-430-5699

www.torontosummermusic.com

TD SUNFEST: CANADA’S PREMIER

WESTBEN CONCERTS AT THE BARN

CELEBRATION OF WORLD CULTURES

June 2 to August 4

July 4 to 7

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford, ON

Victoria Park, London, ON

Welcome to Westben’s 20th anniversary season with 25 performances and events

Find your summer vibe - hot dancing shoes and cool Sunfest cerveza beer are of classical, broadway, jazz, folk, comedy, fiddle and Indigenous music. See James

a must during the special 25th edition of “Canada’s Premier Celebration of Ehnes, Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, Jeremy Dutcher, Basia Bulat, Brent Butt,

World Cultures”! Voted one of the best overseas music festivals by the UK’s Joyce El Koury, Jason Howard, Rose Cousins, Kuné, André Laplante, Mayumi

prestigious Songlines Magazine, TD Sunfest transfigures London’s Victoria Park Seiler, The Fitzgerald Family, Matt Dusk and more. Ask about our “Dare to

into a culturally diverse jewel, where 40 top world music and jazz groups from Pair” series of wine tasting, local foods and storytelling, as well as the new

all corners of the planet entertain on five stages. Our 2019 international headliners

range from Middle Eastern sensation 47Soul to Spain’s Grammy-winning the peaceful hills of Northumberland County two hours east of Toronto, near

“Secret Concert” and “VIP Chocolate Voices Experience”. Nestled amongst

Marinah and Chile’s 12-piece Newen Afrobeat orchestra. Canadian acts include Campbellford, Westben’s primary performance venue is a custom-built, timberframe

barn located on a 50-acre farm. Enjoy a glass of wine on the meadow or

Quebec’s AfrotroniX and Le Vent du Nord, and with more than 225 exhibitors,

this beloved free-admission event will whet festival goers’ appetites for scrumptious

global cuisine and unique crafts and visual arts.

877-883-5777

take a stroll by the pond. Westben - always a new experience!

519-672-1522

www.westben.ca

www.sunfest.on.ca

Thank you for taking a look at this year’s Green Pages! If you are looking for a specific

form of summer festivities, visit us online at thewholenote.com/green, where you can

do more browsing or conduct a more focused search.

thewholenote.com Summer 2019 | 53


Summer Festivals

Summer Festival Listings

Welcome to The WholeNote’s Summer Festival listings.

The following pages contain basic listings for these festivals,

where available at time of publication:

21st Century Guitar......................................................Aug 22 to 25

Beaches International Jazz Festival....................................Jul 5 to 28

BIG on Bloor Festival.............................................................Jul 20

Brookside Music “Festival of the Bay”..........................Jul 21 to Aug 16

Brott Music Festival.................................................Jun 27 to Aug 15

Celebration of Nations.....................................................Sep 6 to 8

Classical Unbound Festival............................................Jul 26 to 28

Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival..................................Jul 24 to 28

Collingwood Summer Music Festival..........................Jul 17 to Aug 11

Elora Festival.................................................................Jul 12 to 28

Festival Classica.....................................................May 24 to Jun 16

Festival of the Sound.................................................Jul 19 to Aug 10

The Fifth Canadian Chopin

Piano Competition & Festival........................................Aug 23 to 29

Guelph Jazz Festival.......................................................Sep 11 to 15

Heritage Music Festival...................................................Aug 7 to 11

Highlands Opera Studio..........................................Jul 22 to Aug 26

Honens Festival...............................................................Sep 5 to 8

Kincardine Summer Music Festival................................Aug 12 to 17

XV Latvian Festival of Song & Dance in Canada........................Jul 3 to 7

Leith Summer Festival............................................Jun 29 to Aug 24

Luminato......................................................................Jun 7 to 23

Markham Village Music Festival.....................................Jun 14 to 15

Montreal Chamber Music Festival................................Jun 7, 11 to 16

Music and Beyond............................................................Jul 4 to 18

Music Mondays.........................................................May 6 to Sep 2

Musique Royale.............................................................Jun to Sep

National Youth Orchestra of Canada: Odyssey Tour......................Jul

OperaMuskoka Festival...............................................Aug 20 to 23

Orchestra Breva – Eroica:

A Sesquicentennial Tribute to Laura Secord..May 25, 26, Jun 20, 21, 23

Ottawa Chamberfest.................................................Jul 25 to Aug 8

Prince Edward County Chamber Music Festival...............Sep 13 to 22

Prince Edward County Jazz Festival................................Aug 13 to 18

Something Else! Festival...............................................Jun 20 to 23

South Coast Jazz...........................................................Aug 17 to 18

Stonebridge Wasaga Beach Blues....................................Sep 13 to 15

Stratford Summer Music..........................................Jul 15 to Aug 25

Summer Music in the Garden....................................Jun 27 to Sep 16

Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.....................................Jul 26 to Aug 4

Sun Life Financial

Uptown Waterloo Jazz Festival.........................................Jul 19 to 21

Sweetwater Music Festival............................................Sep 20 to 22

Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival..............................Jun 3 to 15

TD Markham Jazz Festival...........................................Aug 14, 16, 18

TD Niagara Jazz Festival..................................................Jul 19 to 28

TD Sunfest:

Canada’s Premier Celebration of World Cultures..................Jul 4 to 7

Toronto Summer Music..............................................Jul 11 to Aug 3

Westben Concerts at The Barn......................................Jun 2 to Aug 4

Check our website www.thewholenote.com for repertoire

details, updates and additional information.

Did you know that you can search these listings on our

website (TheWholeNote.com/JustASK) and obtain further

information about ticket pricing, performers and repertoire?

You also have the ability to search by keywords,

geographical region and music genres.

21st Century Guitar

Aug 22 to 25

Ottawa, ON

902-986-5299

www.21cguitar.com

Listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green Pages.

Beaches International Jazz Festival

Jul 5 to 28

Toronto, ON

416-698-2152

www.beachesjazz.com

All events are free admission.

●●Jul 5–7: Sounds of Leslieville & Riverside

Main Stage & Block Party, Jimmie Simpson

Park, Queen St. E.

●●Jul 12–14: Beaches Jazz Latin Carnival,

Woodbine

●●Jul 19–21: Beaches Jazz TD Woodbine Park

Series, Woodbine

●●Jul 26–28: Beaches Jazz OLG Woodbine

Park Series, Woodbine

●●Jul 25–27: Beaches Jazz StreetFest, Queen

St. E. (between Woodbine and Beech Ave.)

BIG on Bloor Festival

Jul 20

Toronto, ON

647-887-6739

www.bigonbloorfestival.com

●●Jul 20 12:00 noon: Sonic Future Bloor.

Keynes Woods, Selené, Jeff Burke, and

others. Bloor Collegiate Institute, 1141 Bloor

St. W. 416-801-5910. Free.

Brookside Music “Festival of the Bay”

Jul 21 to Aug 16

Midland Alliance Church

829 Yonge St.

Midland, ON

705-527-4420

www.brooksidemusic.com

Concerts are at 7:00pm. Ticket price: $30.

●●Jul 21 7:00: Syrène Saxophone Quartet.

●●Jul 26 7:00: The Swiss Trio. Guests: James

Campbell, clarinet; Ken McDonald, horn;

Douglas Perry, viola; Lydia Adams, conductor.

●●Jul 29 7:00: Festival Baroque. Guests:

Sebastien Singer, cello; Andre Fischer, guitar.

●●Aug 07 7:00: Canadian Guitar Quartet.

Guests: Sebastien Singer, cello; Andre

Fischer, guitar.

Brott Music Festival

Jun 27 to Aug 15

Hamilton, ON

905-525-7664

www.brottmusic.com

Performances take place in Burlington

and Hamilton. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jun 27 7:30: Fascinating Rhythm. Chelsea

Rus, soprano; David Curry, tenor; Raymond

Huang, pianist; Boris Brott, conductor.

●●Jul 04 7:30: PopOpera. National Academy

Orchestra; BrottOpera Singers; Boris Brott,

conductor.

●●Jul 11 7:30: Connoisseur Classics 1. National

Academy Orchestra; Rachel Mercer, cello;

Boris Brott, conductor.

●●Jul 18 7:30: La bohème. National Academy

Orchestra; BrottOpera Cast; John Fanning,

baritone; Boris Brott, conductor. 6:30pm:

pre-concert chat (free).

●●Jul 25 7:30: Fly Me to the Moon. National

Academy Orchestra; Chris Jason, Sinatra

Impersonator; Boris Brott, conductor.

●●Jul 28 3:00: Connoisseur Classics 2.

National Academy Orchestra; Adrian Anantawan,

violin; Boris Brott, conductor.

●●Aug 08 7:30: For Your Eyes Only. National

Academy Orchestra; Jeans N Classics; Boris

Brott, conductor.

●●Aug 15 7:30: My Fair Lady.

Celebration of Nations

Sep 6 to 8

FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre

250 St Paul St.

St. Catharines, ON

905-688-0722

A gathering featuring music, theatre, dance,

film, interactive workshops and teachings

to honour and celebrate Indigenous culture.

Details TBA.

Classical Unbound Festival

Jul 26 to 28

Prince Edward County, ON

514-713-1082

www.classicalunbound.com

Performances take place in various venues in

Hillier and Trenton. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jul 26 7:00: Shoulders of Giants. Ironwood

Quartet.

●●Jul 27 7:30: Ironwood Unbound. Ironwood

Quartet.

●●Jul 28 7:00: Summer Nocturne. Ironwood

Quartet. Cocktail reception 6pm.

Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival

Jul 24 to 28

204-571-6547

www.clearlakefestival.ca

Performances take place in Erickson, Brandon,

and Riding Mountain National Park. Visit

our website for further information.

●●Jul 24 7:30: Opening Night. Sabina Rzazade,

piano; Kerry Duwors and Katie Gannon,

violins; and others; Alla Turbanova and Paul

Shore, hosts; Alexander Tselyakov and Daniel

DANIEL

TSELYAKOV,

piano, artistic director

JULY 25-28

clearlakefestival.ca

54 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Tselyakov, artistic directors and pianos. Wine

and cheese reception follows.

●●Jul 25 7:30: Concert 2: Chamber Masterworks

I. Kerry Duwors and Katie Gannon, violins;

and others.

●●Jul 26 7:30: Concert 3: Chamber Masterworks

II. Alla Turbanova and Sabina Rzazade

pianos; and others.

●●Jul 27 11:00am: Coffee Concert: Serious

Fun! Nancy Hennen, flute; Cris Byman, clarinet;

Alla Turbanova, piano. Coffee and pastries;

7:30: Jazz Concert. Michael Cain, jazz

piano; Eric Platz, drums; Diogo Peixoto, guitar;

Julian Bradford, bass.

●●Jul 28 3:00: Festival Grand Finale. Nancy

Hennen, flute, Cris Byman, clarinet; Alla Turbanova,

piano.

Collingwood Summer Music Festival

Jul 17 to Aug 11

Collingwood, ON

705-445-2200

www.collingwoodfestival.com

Inaugural Concert

A Choral

Extravaganza

Individual ticket price:

$50 + HST

Thursday, July 18th,

6:30pm

●●Jul 18 6:30: A Choral Extravaganza! Inaugural

Concert. Elmer Iseler Singers; Choral-

Works Choir; Collingwood Festival Orchestra;

Mayumi Seiler, violin; Daniel Wnukowski,

piano and others.

●●Jul 19 7:00: Gryphon Trio.

●●Jul 20 7:00: Quartetto Gelato.

●●Aug 01 12:00 noon: Underground Railway

Story for the Family - Diana Braithwaite &

Chris Whiteley Duo; 7:00: Sugar and Gold -

Diana Braithwaite & Chris Whiteley Quintet.

●●Aug 02 7:00: Nhapitapi (Zimbabwe).

●●Aug 03 7:00: Payadora Tango Ensemble.

●●Aug 09 7:00: Rolston String Quartet. Guest:

Daniel Wnukowski, piano.

●●Aug 11 3:00: Family Fun - Carnival of the Animals

/ The Hockey Sweater - World Premiere.

RH Thomson, actor; Trevor Copp, mime;

Michael Schulte, violin.

Elora Festival

Jul 12 to 28

519-846-0331

www.elorafestival.com

Performances take place at Elora and Fergus.

Visit our website for further information.

● ● Jul 12 7:30: Opening Night 40th Anniversary

Gala. Elora Singers; State Choir Latvija;

Members of the Grand Philharmonic Children’s

and Youth Choirs; Jane Archibald,

James Westman and Daniel Taylor, soloists;

and others; Maris Sirmais and Mark Vuorinen,

conductors.

●●Jul 13 1:00: State Choir Latvija in Recital;

3:15 Pre-concert chat for Piano Six; 4:00:

Piano Six. Daniel Wnukowski, Marika Bournaki,

David Jalbert, Angela Park, Ian Parker

and Anastasia Rizikov; 7:30: Natalie Mac-

Master with The Elora Singers. Natalie Mac-

Master, fiddle.

●●Jul 14 1:30: Jane Archibald, Soprano in

Recital; 4:00: The Laplante/Seilor/Carr Trio

in Recital. André Laplante, piano; Mayumi

Seiler, violin; Colin Carr, cello; 6:00: Singers

Unplugged 3.0. Michael Cressman, baritone

and director. Also 8pm.

●●Jul 18 5:00: Evensong. Elora Singers; Matthew

Larkin, organ; Mark Vuorinen, conductor;

7:30: Elora Singers: Path of Miracles.

Mark Vuorinen, conductor.

●●Jul 19 7:30: Lemon Bucket Orkestra.

●●Jul 20 10:00 Pre-concert activities for

Shoestring Opera; 11:00am: Shoestring

Opera: Schoolyard Carmen. Katy Clark, soprano.

Free post-concert Museum tour; 1:00:

Gloria: French Choral Music for the Soul.

Elora Singers; Matthew Larkin, organ; Mark

Vuorinen, conductor; 4:00: Cheng2 Duo.

Bryan Cheng, cello; Silvie Cheng, piano; 7:30:

Unforgettable: The Nat King Cole Story. Thom

Allison, performer; big band; Elora Singers.

●●Jul 21 2:00: Daniel Taylor with Charles Daniels

and Ellen McAteer in Recital. Daniel Taylor,

countertenor; Charles Daniels, tenor;

Ellen McAteer, soprano; Steven Philcox, piano;

4:30: Hymn to St. Cecilia: Music from the English

Tradition. Elora Singers; Matthew Larkin,

organ; Mark Vuorinen, conductor; 7:30: Kuné,

Canada’s Global Orchestra.

●●Jul 25 5:00: Evensong. Elora Singers; Matthew

Larkin, organ; Mark Vuorinen, conductor;

7:30: COC Competition Winner:

Matthew Cairns, Tenor; 9:00: Elora Singers at

Twilight: From Darkness to Light.

●●Jul 27 10:00am: Pre-concert art activities

for From Winkle to Stardom; 11:00am:

Family Series (all ages): From Twinkle to

Stardom. Music Comedy Duo Millan & Faye.

Free post-concert Museum tour; 1:00: Penderecki

Quartet with Daniel Lichti, Baritone;

4:00: Festival of the Sound Ensemble

with Elora Singers. Swiss Piano Trio; James

Campbell; Ken MacDonald; Doug Perry;

James Mason; 7:30: An Evening With Measha

Brueggergosman.

●●Jul 28 3:00: 40th Anniversary Finale: Magnificat!

Elora Singers; Festival Orchestra with

sitar and tabla.

Festival Classica

May 24 to June 16

Saint-Lambert, Montréal, QC

888-801-9906

www.fesivalclassica.com

Performances take place at various venues

throughout the Saint-Lambert area. Visit our

website for further information.

●●Jun 01 10:00am: Natalie Choquette - Sorcière

Malbouffa; 10:00am: Cordes Suzuki violins

and cellos; 11:30am: The World of Julien

Brody; 12:00 noon: Cégep de Saint-Laurent

presents: Pianomania 2019. Asparuh Ivanov,

Anaïs Lemay, Salomé Marcotte-Hurtubise,

Émile Rose, Ada Vuong and others;

1:00: The Jealous Lover. Valérie Milot, harp;

Mathieu Lussier, bassoon; Marianne Lambert,

soprano; 1:15: Voces de España. Les

Rugissants; Jonathan Barriault, guitar; Xavier

Brossard-Ménard, director; Myriam Allard,

flamenco dancer; 2:00: Pascal Amoyel - The

Day I Met Franz Liszt; 2:30: Concert by the

Conservatoire de musique de la Montérégie’s

emerging talent; 3:00: Romances for Voice

and Guitar. Magali Simard-Galdès, soprano;

Antonio Figueroa, tenor; David Jacques, guitar;

4:00: Collège Durocher Saint-Lambert’s

Pop’N’Jazz Band. Pierre Richard, director;

5:30: Cégep Marie-Victorin students

in concert; 7:00: Trio Con moto - French

Impressions; 7:00: Radiotango; 7:00: Poetry

Jam! Bertrand Laverdure, Gabrielle Boulianne-Tremblay,

poets; Marianne Trudel,

piano; Sophie Lemaire, singer; 7:30: Joannie

Labelle - Bea Box Invites the Pascale Croft

String Quartet; 8:00: The French Art of the

Trio. Stéphane Tétreault, cello; Mark Djokic,

violin; Jean-Philippe Sylvestre, piano; 9:00:

Saturday Night Fever. Orchestre symphonique

du Conservatoire de la Montérégie;

Classica Choir; Simon Fournier, conductor;

Élizabeth Blouin-Brathwaite, soloist.

●●Jun 02 9:00am: Yoga and Gregorian Chant.

Ensemble Scholastica; 10:00am: The Drum

Garden. Marise Demers, percussion; Karine

Cloutier, dancer. In French; 10:00am: Principessa

Emma Cloutier; 11:00am: Children Sing

in the Rhythm of Life; 11:00am: Poetry Jam!;

1:00: Block 15 or Music as a Form of Resistance.

Pascal Amoyel, piano; Emmanuelle

Bertrand, cello. In French; 1:00: Symphonie

Fantastique by Berlioz. Orchestre Philharmonique

de Montréal; 2:45: In Concert. École de

musique Vincent-d’Indy Jazz Combo; 3:30: I

Giardini - Piano Quartets; 4:00: An Afternoon

with Friends with Marc Hervieux; 8:00: Clair

de lune. Guests: Laetitia Grimaldi, soprano;

Marc Boucher, baritone; Marc David, director.

●●Jun 03 7:00: David Jacques - Guitar Stories.

In French.

●●Jun 04 7:00: La Petite Bande de Montréal.

Orchestre de chambre de la Montérégie;

Martin Dagenais, director; Caroline Gélinas,

mezzo; Dominique Côté, baritone.

●●Jun 05 7:30: Bach Reimagined. Matt Herskowitz,

piano; Charles Papsoff, saxophone/

flute.

●●Jun 06 7:00: Songs of Twilight. Kateryna

Bragina, Stéphane Tétreault, cello; 7:00: François

Dompierre - Dompierre in cinémascope.

François Dompierre; McGill Chamber Orchestra;

Mark Djokic, violin; Elisabeth Pon, piano.

In French.

●●Jun 07 8:00: Mômes de Paris. Clémentine

Decouture, soprano; Paul Colomb, cello; David

Bros, accordian, Cédric Barbier, percussion.

●●Jun 08 9:00: Tribute to the Rolling Stones.

Orchestre symphonique du Conservatoire de

la Montérégie; Classica Choir; Marc Ouellette,

conductor. Rain date: June 9(2pm).

●●Jun 11 7:00: Les larmes de Jacqueline.

Orchestre Métropolitain; Alain Trudel,

conductor; Jean-Philippe Sylvestre, piano;

Stéphane Tétreault, cello.

●●Jun 14 7:00: 3rd International Recital Competition

of French Art Songs - Semifinals.

●●Jun 15 5:00: Symphonic Picnic; 7:00: Keyboard

Frenzy! Luc Beauséjour, Jean-Philippe

Sylvestre, harpsichord/piano; 9:00: Francophonique

- Big Concert Under the Stars.

Orchestre symphonique de Longueuil; Marc

David, conductor.

●●Jun 16 4:00: 3rd International Recital Competition

of French Art Songs - Finals.

Festival of the Sound

Jul 19 to Aug 10

Parry Sound, ON

1-866-364-0061

www.festivalofthesound.ca

Performances take place at various venues in

Parry Sound and Elora. Visit our website for

further information.

●●Jul 19 7:30: Gala Opening Concert. Elmer

Iseler Singers; Mary Lou Fallis, soprano; Colin

Fox, narrator; Penderecki String Quartet; Guy

Few, piano and others.

●●Jul 21 2:30: Up Close & Personal. Gene

DiNovi, piano; 7:30: Viennese Opera Party.

Leslie Fagan, Kristina Szabó, sopranos; Colin

Ainsworth, tenor; Sam Chan, baritone; Guy

Few, trumpet and others.

●●Jul 22 10:30am: Office Hour: Accordion

Postcards. Joseph Petric, Guy Few, accordion;

2:00: Music for Trumpet & Organ. William

McArton, organ; Guy Few, trumpet; 6:30:

Brass on the Bay Cruise. Ten members of

Hannaford Street Silver Band.

●●Jul 23 1:30: Anagnoson & Kinton in Recital.

Anagnoson and Kinton, piano duo; Alan

Stein, visual art.; 3:30: Fantasy & Romance.

Gryphon Trio; James Campbell, clarinet;

Douglas McNabney, viola; Joel Quarrington,

bass; 6:00: Bands on the Bay; 8:00: Strike Up

the Band. Hannaford Street Silver Band; Russell

Braun, baritone.

●●Jul 24 1:30: Carolyn & Russell in Concert.

Russell Braun, baritone; Carolyn Maule,

piano; 3:30: Swiss Trio & Friends. Swiss

Piano Trio; Douglas McNabney, viola; James

Campbell,clarinet; Ken MacDonald, horn;

7:30: Beethoven I. Janina Fialkowski, piano;

Rolston String Quartet.

●●Jul 25 1:30: Rolston String Quartet; 7:30:

National Youth Orchestra of Canada: A Look

Into The Future. Michael Francis, conductor.

●●Jul 26 10:30am: Office Hour: Swiss Piano

Trio - Musical Life in Switzerland; 2:00: Janina

Fialkowska Plays Chopin; 7:30: Payadora

Tango Ensemble.

●●Jul 27 11:00am: Strings Across the Sky;

4:00: Festival of the Sound Ensemble with

Elora Singers. Swiss Piano Trio; James Campbell;

Ken MacDonald; Doug Perry; James

Mason; 7:30: Jayme Stone’s Folklife. Jayme

Stone, banjo/voice; Moira Smiley, voice/

accordion; Sumaia Jackson, fiddle/voice; Joe

Phillips, bass/voice.

●●Jul 28 6:30: Celtic Magic Cruise. Scantily

Plaid.

●●Jul 30 1:30: Beethoven II. Leopoldo Erice,

piano; Yegor Dyachkov, cello; 3:30: Sonatas

for Strings & Piano. Duo Concertante; Yegor

Dyachkov, cello; Martin Roscoe, piano; 7:30:

The Four Seasons. Mark Fewer, violin; John

Rice, narrator; Julie Nesrallah, soprano; Robert

Kortgaard, piano; Festival Ensemble and

others.

●●Jul 31 1:30: Festival Baroque. James Mason,

oboe; Julie Baumgartel, violin; Borys Medicky,

harpsichord; Suzanne Shulman, flute; Karl

Stobbe and others; 3:30: Blue Ocean. Andrea

Ratuski, host; Paul Marleyn, cello; Karl Stobbe,

violin; Martin Roscoe, piano; James Campbell,

clarinet and others; 7:30: Three Centuries of

Choral Music. Elora Festival Singers; Mark

Vuorinen, conductor; Festival Ensemble.

●●Aug 01 1:30: Mozart & Beethoven. Atis

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 55


Bankas, violin; Victoria Korchinskaya-Kogan,

Martin Roscoe, piano; James Campbell, clarinet;

Paul Marleyn, cello; 3:30: Mendelssohn

& Brahms. Julie Nesrallah, mezzo; Douglas

McNabney, viola; Robert Kortgaard, piano;

Min-Jeong Koh, violin; Adrian Fung, cello and

others; 7:30: Just Friends. Julie Nesrallah,

mezzo; Martin Roscoe, piano; Robert Kortgaard,

piano; Karl Stobbe, Min-Jeong Koh,

violin and others.

●●Aug 02 7:30: The Joni Book. Mandy Lagan,

vocals with ORIGINS.

●●Aug 03 7:30: Jazz Canada: That Latin Flavour.

Guido Basso, trumpet; Dave Young,

bass; Terry Clarke,drums; Reg Schwager, guitar;

David Restivo, piano.

●●Aug 04 2:00: Craig Harley & Friends.

John Southworth and the South Seas; 7:30:

Toronto All-Star Big Band: Party Like It’s

1940.

●●Aug 05 2:00: “And So We Began”. Bryan

Cheng, cello; Sylvie Cheng, piano; Yolanda

Bruno, violin; Moshe Hammer, violin; Glen

Montgomery, piano and others; 6:30: Jazz

Canada Cruise. Dave Young, Terry Clarke,

David Restivo; Heather Bambrick, vocals.

●●Aug 06 5:30: Elegance at Seguin Valley.

New Zealand String Quartet; Canadian Guitar

Quartet; Moshe Hammer, violin. Fundraising

dinner.

●●Aug 07 1:30: Gillian’s Viola. Gillian Ansell,

viola; Joel Quarrington, double bass; Yolanda

Bruno, violin; Alexander Tselyakov, piano;

3:30: Fables & Folk Tales. Cheng² Duo: Bryan

Cheng, cello; Silvie Cheng, piano; 6:00: Discovery

Concert. Continuum Contemporary

Music; 7:30: Good Friends. New Zealand

Summer Festivals

String Quartet; James Campbell, clarinet.

●●Aug 08 1:30: A Family Affair. Alexander

Tselyakov, Daniel Tselyakov, piano; Graham

Campbell, guitar; James Campbell, clarinet;

New Zealand String Quartet; 3:30: Canadian

Guitar Quartet & Swiss Friends; 7:30: Haydn,

Ravel & Mozart. New Zealand String Quartet;

Yolanda Bruno, violin; Joel Quarrington,

double bass;Alexander Tselyakov, piano; Canadian

Guitar Quartet.

●●Aug 09 10:00am: Celebration Daytime Concerts;

10:30am: Celebration Musical Cruise;

7:30: Celebration Concert: Into the Future.

●●Aug 10 7:30: National Academy Orchestra.

Boris Brott, conductor; Alexander Tselyakov,

piano.

The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition & Festival

Aug 23 to 29

416-242-8601

www.canadianchopinsociety.com

For full festival details, see Green Pages and

ETCeteras section.

Guelph Jazz Festival

Sep 11 to 15

Guelph, ON

519-763-4952

www.guelphjazzfestival.com

Listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green Pages.

Heritage Music Festival

Aug 7 to 11

Shelburne, ON

519-278-0016

www.heritagemusicfestival.ca

All concerts at Centre Dufferin Recreation

Complex, 200 Fiddle Park Lane, Shelburne

except where noted.

●●Aug 07 7:00: Country Jamboree with Greg

Holmes.

●●Aug 08 7:30: Country Superstars Live in

Concert.

●●Aug 09 7:30: The Washboard Union. with

Sweet Fire.

●●Aug 10 10:00am: 69th Canadian Open Old

Time Fiddle Championships – Playdowns;

2:30: Bands and Brews in the Fiddle Park;

6:30: 69th Canadian Open Old Time Fiddle

Championships - Finals.

●●Aug 11 10:00am: Non-denominational

Church Service. Religious service.

Highlands Opera Studio

Jul 22 to Aug 26

Haliburton, ON

1-855-455-5533

www.highlandsoperastudio.com

Performances take place at various venues in

Minden, Haliburton, and Orillia. Visit our website

for further information.

●●Jul 31 8:00: From Opera to Broadway.

●●Aug 03 8:00: Pop Goes the Opera.

●●Aug 07 8:00: Celebrations!

●●Aug 10 8:00: Art of Song.


● Aug 15 8:00: Women in Opera: Then and

Now. Suor Angelica: Lauren Margison, soprano

(Suor Angelica); Sara Schabas, soprano

(Suor Genovieffa); Megan Quick, mezzo

(La Principessa); Louise-Andrée Baril, music

director; Valerie Kunka, stage director; The

Chair: Rebecca Cuddy, mezzo (Melanie); Sara

Schabas, soprano (Vanessa); Jennifer Szeto,

music director; Jessica Derventzis, stage

director; Book of Faces: Carol Anne Roussel,

soprano (Rachel); Megan Quick, mezzo

(Stephanie); Jennifer Szeto, music director;

Jessica Derventzis, stage director. Northern

Lights Performing Arts Pavilion, 5358 County

Rd. 21, Haliburton. Also Aug 17 (Orillia).

●●Aug 17 7:00: Women in Opera: Then and

Now. See Aug 15. St. Paul’s Centre, 62 Peter

St. N., Orillia. Also Aug 15(Haliburton).

●●Aug 20 8:00: Alumni Concert. Singers from

previous years of the Highland Opera Studio

in opera and musical theatre favourites

including Mikayla Singer, soprano; Danielle

MacMillan, mezzo; and Samuel Chan,

baritone.

●●Aug 22 7:30: Ariadne auf Naxos. Casts vary.

See website or daily listings for details. Opens

Aug 22, 7:30pm. Also Aug 24(2pm), 25(2pm),

26(7pm).

Honens Festival

Sep 5 to 8

Calgary, AB

403-975-7438

www.honens.com

Concerts take place in various venues

in Calgary. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Sep 05 4:30: Duo 19:21. Iwo Jedynecki,

accordion; Aleksander Kryzanowski, piano;

7:30: Nicolas Namoradze: A Study in Etudes.

Nicolas Namoradze, piano.

●●Sep 06 12:30: 176 Keys. Aleksander Kryzanowski,

The State

Choir LATVIJA

CANADIAN DEBUT TOUR

MĀRIS SIRMAIS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR

JULY 3 – 5, 2019

XV LATVIAN FESTIVAL OF SONG

AND DANCE IN CANADA

TORONTO

WWW.LATVIANSONGFEST.COM

JULY 8 – 9, 2019

MUSIC AND BEYOND /

MUSIQUE ET AUTRES MONDES

OTTAWA

WWW.MUSICANDBEYOND.CA

JULY 12 – 13, 2019

ELORA FESTIVAL

ELORA

WWW.ELORAFESTIVAL.CA

The New York Times has characterized the State Choir LATVIJA’s

sound as “exquisite, beautiful and magnificent”. Celebrating its

77th season in 2019, the choir is internationally recognized as

one of the best in the world, presenting the unique Latvian choral

sound to audiences everywhere. Tour repertoire will include

Baltic, Latvian-Canadian and international composers. They will

present a seminar on Latvian choral traditions and a solo concert

at each festival. Book your tickets now!

Tour Producer: Laura Adlers

The Adlers Agency

laura@lauraadlers.com

(416) 948-0634

56 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


piano; Pedja Muzijevic, piano; Nicolas Namoradze,

piano; Jon Kimura Parker, piano; 7:30: Pedja Muzijevic:

Bach Dialogues. Pedja Muzijevic, piano; 9:30:

Bison Noir - Gabriel Kahane: Book of Travelers.

Gabriele Kahane, composer/piano/singer; special

Hohens Festival guest artists.

●●Sep 07 1:00: Storytellers: Same, Only Different.

Susanne Ruberg-Gordon, piano; Jonathan

Love, narrator; Iwo Jedynecki, accordion; William

Fedkenheuer, violin; 3:00: Alexina Louie @

70. Alexina Louie, composer; Katherine Duncan,

host; Katherine Chi, piano; Nicolas Namoradze,

piano; Jon Kimura Parker, piano; Select

piano students from Calgary; 7:30: Miró Quartet

with Jon Kimura Parker: Love Triangle.

Kincardine Summer Music Festival

Aug 12 to 17

Kincardine, ON

519-396-9716

www.ksmf.ca

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

XV Latvian Festival of Song & Dance in

Canada

Jul 4 to 7

Toronto, ON

416-948-0634

www.latviansongfest.com

Performances take place at various venues

in Toronto. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jul 04 3:30: Concert of Latvian Sacred

Music. Latvija State Choir; and others; Lauma

Akmene, organ; Ilze Paegle, soprano; Maris

Sirmais and Brigita Alks, conductors.

●●Jul 05 4:00: Concert of Latvian Orchestral

and Chamber Music. Laura Zarina, violin; Arthur

Ozolins, piano; Janis Laurs, cello; and others;

members of COC orchestra; Maris Sirmais, conductor;

7:30: State Choir Latvija Canadian Concert

Debut. Maris Sirmais, conductor.

●●Jul 06 3:00: Mass Choir Concert.

●●Jul 07 4:00: Folk Dance Spectacle. Raxtu

Raxti folk ensemble; 300-voice festival choir;

over 1000 Latvian folk dancers.

Leith Summer Festival

Jun 29 to Aug 24

419134 Tom Thomson Lane

Leith, ON

519-664-2092

www.leithchurch.ca

All concerts at Historic Leith Church,

419134 Tom Thomson Lane, Leith.

●●Jun 29 7:30: Amor. Krisztina Szabó, mezzo;

Robert Kortgaard, piano.

For further details please see Green Pages

and the festival’s website.

Luminato

Jun 7 to 23

Toronto, ON

416-368-4849

www.luminatofestival.com

Performances take place at various venues

in Toronto. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jun 06 8:00: Kira: the Path/La Voie (premiere).

Lua Shayenne Dance Company. Also

Jun 7(8pm), 8(8pm), 9(3pm).

●●Jun 13 8:00: Obeah Opera. Also Jun 14, 15,

16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22(all at 8pm).

●●Jun 18 8:00: The Cave. Also Jun 19(8pm),

20(8pm), 21(8pm), 22(8pm), 23(2pm).

●●Jun 19 7:00: Hell’s Fury, The Hollywood

Songbook. Russell Braun, baritone; Serouj

Kradjian, piano. Also June 20(7pm), 21(7pm),

22(7pm), 23(2pm).

Markham Village Music Festival

Jun 14 to 15

Main Street Markham Rd.

Markham, ON

647-983-9054

www.markhamfestival.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Montreal Chamber Music Festival

Jun 7, 11 to 16

Montreal, QC

514-489-7444

www.festivalmontreal.org

Performances take place at various venues

in Montreal. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jun 07 8:00: Gregory Charles: L’Air du

Temps. Gregory Charles, piano and entertainer.

festivalmontreal.org.

●●Jun 11 12:00 noon: BMO Hottest Classical

Artists Under 30! Bruno Tobon, Denis

Brott, cello. Includes free snack; 5:00: The

Beethoven Symphonies Transcribed for Piano

by Franz Liszt. Alexander Ullman, piano.

Complete listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Music and Beyond

Jul 4 to 18

Ottawa, ON

613-241-0777

www.musicandbeyond.ca

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Music Mondays

May 6 to Sep 2

Church of the Holy Trinity

Toronto, ON

416-598-4521 x223

www.musicmondays.ca

All concerts at the Church of the Holy Trinity,

19 Trinity Sq. Admission is PWYC (suggested

donation of $10).

●●Jun 03 12:15: Acquired Taste Choir. Proceeds

donated to a local charity.

●●Jun 10 12:15: Heine’s Buch der Lieder.

James McLean, tenor; William Aide, piano.

●●Jun 17 12:15: In Concert. Andrew Sords, violin;

Cherul Duvall, piano.

●●Jun 24 12:15: If I Only Had A Brain: The

Songs of Harold Arlen. Ilana Waldston, singer.

●●Jul 01 12:15: Jason Wilson’s Sumach Roots.

Jason Wilson Band.

●●Jul 08 12:15: Unspoken Poetry. Interro

String Quartet.

●●Jul 15 12:15: Chamber Music Concert.

Marco Verza, clarinet; Odin String Quartet.

●●Jul 22 12:15: A Musical Journey Through

China & Iran. Wendy Zhou, Chinese pipa;

Padideh Ahrarnejad, Persian tar; Ali

Massoudi, percusssion.

●●Jul 29 12:15: Journey to Klezmer. Jonno

Lightstone; Brian Katz Klezmer Duo.

●●Aug 05 12:15: War of the Foxes. Stanford

Cheung.

●●Aug 12 12:15: The Ageless Beauty of Maturity.

Albert Seo, cello; Tristan Savella, piano.

●●Aug 19 12:15: Michael Arnowitt’s ImproVisions

Jazz Quartet.

●●Aug 26 12:15: Of Foreign Lands and Peoples.

Kevin Ahfat, piano.

●●Sep 02 12:15: Penrose Trio.

Musique Royale

Jun 1 to Sep 1

Across Nova Scotia

902-692-8081

www.musiqueroyale.com

Detailed listings available on festival website.

For general description, see Green Pages.

National Youth Orchestra of Canada

Jul 21, 22, 25, 27, 29

416-532-4470

www.nyoc.org

See festival or venue websites for details.

●●Jul 21 5:30: Ottawa Chamberfest.

●●Jul 22 7:30: Maison Symphonique de

Montréal.

●●Jul 25 7:30: Festival of the Sound.

●●Jul 28 4:00: Stratford Summer Music.

●●Jul 29 7:30: Koerner Hall, Telus Centre.

OperaMuskoka Festival

Aug 20 to 23

Bracebridge and Windermere, ON

2 weekends in Picton

705-765-1048

www.muskokachautauqua.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Orchestra Breva – Eroica: A

Sesquicentennial Tribute to Laura

Secord

May 25, 26, Jun 20, 21, 23

Windsor, Tecumseh, Ingersoll, Brantford,

and Niagara, ON

519-980-1113

www.orchestrabreva.com

●●Jun 20 8:00: Ingersoll Cheese and Agricultural

Museum. 290 Harris St., Ingersoll.

●●Jun 21 8:00: Sanderson Centre for the Performing

Arts, 88 Dalhousie St., Brantford.

●●Jun 23 2:00: Queenston Heights Park

Bandshell, 14184 Niagara Parkway,

Niagara-on-the-Lake.

Ottawa Chamberfest

Jul 25 to Aug 8

Ottawa, ON

613-234-6306

www.chamberfest.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Prince Edward County Chamber Music

Festival

Sep 13 to 22

Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Picton, ON

613-393-3798

6 INSPIRED CONCERTS!

Gryphon Trio

Jamie Parker

Julie Nesrallah

Robert Kortgaard

True North Brass

Aloysia Friedman

Les Violons Du Roy

Charles Richard-Hamelin

Jon Kimura Parker

New Orford String Quartet

SEPTEMBER 13-22

pecmusicfestival.com

16

YEARS

Artistic Directors ~ New Orford String Quartet

Jamie Parker

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 57


www.pecmusicfestival.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Prince Edward County Jazz Festival

Aug 13 to 18

Picton, Prince Edward County, ON

1-877-411-4761

www.pecjazz.org

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Something Else! Festival

Jun 20 to 23

Various venues

289-993-1993

www.zulapresents.org

Performances take place at various venues

in Hamilton. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jun 20 7:00: Earth Wind & Choir (Sarah

Good, conductress); Yves Charuest, alto sax;

Indigenous Mind (Hamid Drake, drums/percussion;

Joshua Abrams, double bass/guimbri;

Jason Adasiewicz, vibraphone); William

Hooker, drums/percussion/poetry.

●●Jun 21 12:00 noon: The Archives of Eternity

(Mike Hundevad, vibes/comp; Mike

Gennaro, drums; Patrick Smith, tenor

sax; Andrew Furlong, double bass); Jason

Adasiewcz, vibraphone; Brodie West, alto

sax; Hamid Drake, drums/percussion; Iva

Bittová, violin/vocals; 7:00: Picastro (Liz

Hysen, guitar/piano/vocals); Gilliam/Milmine/Pottie

(Bill Gilliam, piano; Kayla Milmine,

soprano sax; Ambrose Pottie, drums);

Hooker/Charuest/Newsome/Eguiluz (William

Hooker, drums/percussion; Yves

Charuest, alto sax; Sam Newsome, soprano

sax; Géraldine Eguiluz, voice, various

instruments); Iva Bittová, violin/vocals;

Hamid Drake, drums/percussion.

●●Jun 22 1:00: Sara Schoenbeck, bassoon;

Harris Eisenstadt’s Poschiavo

50 Ensembles (Harris Eisenstaedt, drums/

conductor/composition; Sara Schoenbeck,

bassoon; Yves Charues, alto sax; Sam

Newsome, soprano sax; Don Byron, reeds,

Géraldine Eguiluz, voice/guitar/trumpet;

David Lee, double bass; Connor Bennett,

sax; Chris Palmer, guitar; Nick Fraser,

drums); Joshua Abrams, double bass/guimbri;

No Silenz (Susanna Hood, voice; Jason

Sharp, bass sax; Fredéric B Briet, double

bass; Christophe Rocher, clarinets); 7:00:

Tidal Pool (Connor Bennett, sax/electronics);

Eguiluz Trio (Géraldine Eguiluz, voice/

guitar/pocket trumpet/Bulgarian flute/

kalimba; Jean René, viola/voice; Stéphane

Diamantakiou, double bass/voice); Iva Bittová,

violin/vocals; Indigenous Mind (Hamid

Drake, drums/percussion; Joshua Abrams,

double bass/guimbri; Jason Adasiewicz,

vibraphone; Don Byron, reeds).

●●Jun 23 1:00: Joanna Duda, piano/electronics;

Eucalyptus (Brodie West, alto sax;

Ryan Driver, clavinet; Rebecca Hennessy,

trumpet; Kurt Newman, guitar; Mike Smith,

bass; Blake Howard, percussion; Nick Fraser,

drums; Evan Cartwright, drums);

Sam Newsome, soprano sax; 5:00: Sourpussy

(Victoria Alstein, Becky Katz, Jessica

Summer Festivals

Somers, Heather South, various instruments/vocals);

Ear-Cam (Christine Duncan,

voice; John Oswald, alto sax; Tomasz

Krakowiak, percussion; Glen Hall, woodwinds/percussion/electronics);

Don Byron,

clarinets.

South Coast Jazz

Aug 17 to 18

Port Dover Community Centre

801 St. George St., Port Dover ON

519-774-2787 (ARTS)

www.southcoastjazz.com

Performances take place at various venues

in Port Dover. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Aug 17 5:00: Powder Blues Band, Dave Restivo,

Alison Young, Eric St Laurent, Juliann

Kuchocki and others.

●●Aug 18 5:30: Dinner Show and River Cruise.

Stonebridge Wasaga Beach Blues

Sep 13 to 15

Wasaga Beach, ON

705-607-7744

www.wasagabeachblues.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Stratford Summer Music

Jul 15 to Aug 25

Stratford, ON

1-866-288-4313

www.stratfordsummermusic.ca

Performances take place at various venues

in Stratford. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jul 17 7:00: Manitoba Chamber Orchestra.

Guest: Simone Dinnerstein; Anne Manson,

music director.

●●Jul 18 7:00: Leslie Ting Speculation.

●●Jul 19 9:00: Stephen Prutsman.

●●Jul 21 3:00: Chamber Music Concert. Stephen

Prutsman, piano; Stéphane Tétreault,

cello; Mark Fewer, violin.

●●Jul 24 7:00: The Brothers Creeggan.

Guests: Tom Allen, Robert Carli, Mark Fewer.

●●Jul 25 7:00: Amir Amiri.

●●Jul 26 9:00: Duane Andrews and Friends.

●●Jul 27 11:00am: Musical Brunches with Graham

Hargrove; 3:00: Oh Happy Day! Ben

Heppner with the Toronto Mass Choir.

●●Jul 28 4:00: National Youth Orchestra of

Canada. Michael Francis, conductor.

●●Jul 29 7:00: Payadora.

●●Jul 31 3:00: Joe Trio; 7:00: Laila Biali.

●●Aug 01 11:00am: Guy Few, trumpet & Stephen

Mara, piano & Mark Fewer, interviewer;

7:00: The Cannabis Cantata. Mireille Asselin,

soprano; Matthew Dalen, tenor; Adam Harris,

baritone. Restricted to 19+. Photo ID

required.

●●Aug 02 3:00: Hatch – Continuum; 9:00: Phil

Dwyer Trio.

●●Aug 03 11:00am: Musical Brunches with

Joseph Phillips; 7:00: Janina Fialkowska.

●●Aug 05 7:00: Nat Cole: A King’s Centennial.

Paul Marinaro, vocals; Ben Paterson, piano;

Jim Doxas, drums; Mike Downess, bass.

●●Aug 07 7:00: Harmen Fraanje & Lucas

Dann; 7:00: Bernice. Robin Dann, Felicity Williams,

vocals; Philippe Melanson, e-drums;

Thom Gill, synths; Dan Fortin, bass.

A WORLD OF

MUSIC FOR

EVERYONE

●●Aug 08 3:00: Steven Dann & Friends. Steven

Dann, viola; Clark Schaufele, piano; Drew

Comstock, cello; Mark Fewer, violin; 7:00:

Nico Dann Trio.

●●Aug 09 3:00: Isabel Bayrakdarian. Robert

Kortgaard, piano; Mark Fewer, violin; 9:00:

Jodi Proznick Trio. Heather Bambrick, vocals.

●●Aug 10 11:00am: Musical Brunches with

Clark Schaufele; 11:00am: Sing For Health!

Rachel Shubert.

●●Aug 15 3:00: Nevermore, Inspired by Edgar

Allen Poe. Tom Allen; Lori Gemmell; The Rosebud

Quartet.

●●Aug 16 9:00: Tom Allen & Co.: Bohemians

in Brooklyn. Tom Allen, voice/trombone; Lori

Gemmell, harp/guitar/voice; Bryce Kulak,

piano/voice; Patricia O’Callaghan, voice/

percussion.

●●Aug 17 11:00am: Musical Brunches with

Andrew Downing.

●●Aug 18 7:00: John MacLeod’s Rex Hotel

Orchestra.

●●Aug 19 1:00: Vocal Academy Performance.

●●Aug 21 3:00: Vocal Academy Finale Concert;

7:00: Art of Time Ensemble.

●●Aug 22 3:00: Party Like It’s 1689! Suzie

LeBlanc, soprano; Mark Fewer, violin; Matthias

Maute, recorder; 7:00: John Novacek.

James Campbell, clarinet; Mark Fewer, violin.

●●Aug 23 9:00: Rhapsody in Blue. The Campbells;

Mark Fewer; INNERchamber.

●●Aug 24 11:00am: Musical Brunches with

Thomas Wiebe; 7:00: Two Bass Hit with Dave

Young and Joel Quarrington. Dave Young,

Joel Quarrington, bass; John Novacek, piano.

●●Aug 25 3:00: Rémi Bolduc Jazz Ensemble:

Tribute to Dave Brubeck.

Summer Music in the Garden

Jun 27 to Sep 15

Toronto Music Garden

470 Queens Quay W., Toronto, ON

416-793-4000

www.harbourfrontcentre.com/

summermusic

All concerts are free.

●●Jun 27 7:00: War and Peace. Madawaska

Quartet.

●●Jun 30 4:00: Four Seasons, Four Viols: Vivaldi’s

Quattro Stagioni Revisited. Les Voix

Humaines, viol quartet.

●●Jul 04 7:00: Tastes of Home: New Music for

Traditional Chinese & Korean Instruments.

Amely Zhou, erhu; Lipeng Wu, dizi; Roa Lee,

gayageum, Evan Lamberton, cello.

●●Jul 07 4:00: Tea for Three. Cénacle.

●●Jul 11 7:00: Mistrāl: Songs from around

the Mediterranean. Tamar Ilana; Ventanas

Ensemble.

●●Jul 18 7:00: Passion and Solace: Early 20th

Century Duos for Violin and Cello. Andréa

Tyniec, violin; Stéphane Tétreault, cello.

●●Jul 21 4:00: Global Inspirations. TorQ Percussion

Quartet.

●●Jul 25 7:00: Inner Journey V. Rumi Canada.

●●Jul 28 4:00: Choro! Trio Chorinho; Guest:

Flavia Nascimento.

●●Aug 01 7:00: New and Special Ways. New

Zealand String Quartet.

●●Aug 08 7:00: From Greece to Granados.

Maria Soulis, mezzo; William Eauvais, guitar;

Tanya Charles Iveniuk, violin.

●●Aug 11 4:00: Raags of Love and Devotion.

Ramneek Singh, voice; Ravi Naimpally, tabla;

Hardeep Chana, harmonium.

58 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


●●Aug 15 7:00: Voices from Eastern Europe.

BLISK Quartet.

●●Aug 18 4:00: Laüsa: Spark of Gascony.

●●Aug 22 7:00: Something Old, Something

New. VC2 Cello Duo.

●●Aug 25 4:00: Duetto Violoncello. Elinor Frey

and Phoebe Carrai, baroque cellos.

Summer Opera Lyric Theatre

Jul 26 to Aug 4

Robert Gill Theatre, Toronto, ON

214 College St.

416-363-7723

www.solt.ca

All tickets are $28.

●●Jul 26 8:00: La traviata. Also Jul 28(2pm);

31(2pm); Aug 3(8pm).

●●Jul 27 2:00: Earnest, The Importance of

Being. Also Jul 30(8pm); Aug 1(8pm); 4(2pm).

●●Jul 27 8:00: Riders to the Sea and Gianni

Schicchi. Also Jul 31(8pm); Aug 2(8pm);

3(2pm).

Sun Life Financial Uptown Waterloo

Jazz Festival

Jul 19 to 21

Waterloo City Center, 100 Regina St. S.,

Waterloo, ON

519-394-0093

www.waterloojazzfest.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Sweetwater Music Festival

Sep 20 to 22

Owsen Sound and Meaford, ON

519-371-2833

www.sweetwatermusicfestival.ca

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Tafelmusik Baroque Summer Festival

Jun 3 to 15

Toronto, ON

416-964-6337

www.tafelmusik.org/TBSF

Performances take place at various venues

in Toronto. Visit our website for further information.

Jun 03 8:00: Opening Night. Tafelmusik

Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir;

Ivars Taurins, choir director; Elisa Citterio;

director.

●●Jun 08 12:30: Baroque Portraits. Members

of the Faculty of Tafelmusik Baroque Summer

Institute.

●●Jun 09 12:30: Many Strings Attached.

Participants of the Tafelmusik Baroque Summer

Institute Viola d’Amore Workshop;

Thomas Georgi, leader.

●●Jun 12 1:00: Afternoon Concert. Tafelmusik

Baroque Summer Institute Orchestras and

Choirs; Elisa Citterio, Jeanne Lamon and Ivars

Taurins, directors.

●●Jun 15 7:30: The Grand Finale. Tafelmusik

Baroque Summer Institute Orchestra and

Choir; Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and

Chamber Choir; Jeanne Lamon and Ivars

Taurins, directors.

TD Markham Jazz Festival

Aug 14, 16, 18

Markham, ON

905-471-5299

www.markhamjazzfestival.com

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

TD Niagara Jazz Festival

Jul 19 to 21 – St. Catharines, ON

Jul 26 to 28 – Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON

1-844-LIV-JAZZ (548-5289)

Detailed listings available on festival website.

For general description, see Green Pages.

TD Sunfest: Canada’s Premier

Celebration of World Cultures

Jul 4 to 7

Victoria Park, London, ON

519-672-1522

www.sunfest.on.ca

Detailed listings not available at time of publication.

For general description, see Green

Pages.

Toronto Summer Music

Jul 11 to Aug 3

Toronto, ON

647-430-5699

www.torontosummermusic.com

Performances take place at various venues

in Toronto. Visit our website for further

information.

●●Jul 11 7:30: Opening Night: Beyond Borders.

Adrianne Pieczonka, soprano; Jon Kimura

Parker, piano; Kerson Leong, violin; Steven

Philcox, piano; New Orford String Quartet;

Tom Allen, host.

●●Jul 12 7:30: Celebrating 10 Years. New

Orford String Quartet.

●●Jul 13 1:00: reGENERATION: Art Song

& Chamber Music. Singers, pianists and

chamber musicians from the Toronto

Summer Music Academy’s Art of Song

program and Chamber Music Institute;

New Orford String Quartet. Also

Jul 13(4pm, 7:30pm), 20(1pm, 4pm,

7:30pm).

●●Jul 15 7:30: Crossings: In the Footsteps of

the Griot. Ablaye Cissoko, griot storyteller;

Constantinople.

●●Jul 16 7:30: Griffey & Jones in Recital.

Anthony Dean Griffey, tenor; Warren Jones,

piano.

●●Jul 17 7:30: Dover Quartet.

●●Jul 18 7:30: Voices Across the Atlantic.

Toronto Summer Music Academy Vocal Fellows;

Steven Philcox, harpsichord; Daniel Taylor,

countertenor/conductor. Post-concert

reception.

●●Jul 19 7:30: Charles Richard-Hamelin.

Charles Richard-Hamelin, piano; Members of

the Dover Quartet.

●●Jul 20 1:00: reGENERATION: Art Song

& Chamber Music. Singers, pianists and

chamber musicians from the Toronto Summer

Music Academy’s Art of Song program

and Chamber Music Institute; Dover

Quartet; Charles Richard-Hamelin, piano.

Also Jul 13(4pm, 7:30pm), 20(1pm, 4pm,

7:30pm).

●●Jul 22 7:30: Kleztory.

●●Jul 23 7:30: Rolston String Quartet.

●●Jul 24 7:30: Collectìf.

●●Jul 25 7:30: From Franz Schubert to Freddie

Mercury. Sarah Slean, vocalist; John

Southworth, singer/songwriter; Art of Time

Ensemble; 10:30: TSM Late Night. Jonathan

Crow, violin; Toronto Summer Music Academy

Fellows.

●●Jul 26 7:30: Souvenir de Florence. Jonathan

Crow, violin; Jennifer Koh, violin; Beth Guterman,

viola; Julie Albers, cello; Yegor Dyachkov,

cello, Philip Chiu, piano.

●●Jul 27 1:00: reGENERATION: Source and

Inspiration. Rolston String Quartet; Sarah

Slean and John Southworth, singers/

songwriters; Art of Time Ensemble; 4:00:

reGENERATION: Chamber Music. Chamber

musicians from the Toronto Summer

Music Academy’s Chamber Music Institute;

Jennifer Koh, Beth Guterman Chu,

FREE

ADMISSION

Julie Albers, Yegor Dyachkov, Philip Chiu.

Also 7:30pm.

●●Jul 29 7:30: Europe and the New World.

Jonathan Crow, violin; Philip Chiu, piano.

●●Jul 30 7:30: Angela Hewitt Plays the Bach

Goldberg Variations. Angela Hewitt, piano.

Pre-concert chat with author and storyteller

Madeleine Thien.

●●Jul 31 7:30: Ensemble Made in Canada.

●●Aug 01 7:30: Song of the Earth. Mario Bahg,

tenor; Rihab Chaleb, mezzo; Jonathan Crow,

violin; Gemma New, conductor.

●●Aug 02 7:30: Mendelssohn Octet. Jennifer

Frautschi, violin; Elissa Lee, violin; Aaron

Schwebel, violin; Barry Shiffman, violin; Hsin-

Yu Huang, viola; and others.

●●Aug 03 4:00: reGENERATION: Chamber

Music. Chamber musicians from the Toronto

Summer Music Academy’s Chamber Music

Institute; Barry Shiffman, Desmond Hoebig,

Jennifer Frautschi, Hsin-Yun Huang, and

others.

●●Aug 03 7:30: Toronto Summer Music Finale.

Westben Concerts at The Barn

Jun 2 to Aug 4

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford, ON

877-883-5777

www.westben.ca

All concerts at The Barn, 6698 County Road

30, Campbellford, except where noted.

●●Jun 01 2:00: From the Top! Donna Bennett,

soprano; Virginia Hatfield, soprano; Kim

Dafoe, mezzo; Gabrielle Prata, mezzo; Mark

DuBois, tenor; and others; Westben Choruses

& Alumni. Also Jun 2.

●●Jun 09 2:00: Sounds of a Better World.

Westben Youth, Teen, B Natural, Cookie Choruses;

(Donna Bennett & Brian Finley, directors);

Westben Community Bands (Nancy

Elmhirst, director).

●●Jun 30 2:00: Viva Vivaldi! The Four Seasons

& Gloria. Amy Hillis, violin; Westben Festival

Orchestra & Chorus. 1:15: Pre-Concert Chat.

●●Aug 02 9:00: Westben Jazz Fringe. Also

Aug 3 & 4. Various venues.

July 4- 7, 2019

Victoria Park, London, Ontario

Canada’s Premier

Celebration of

World Cultures

5 Stages ~ 225 Food, Craft & Visual Art Exhibitors

40 International & Canadian World Music & Jazz Groups

For a complete list of performers and more information visit sunfest.on.ca

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 59


The WholeNote listings are arranged in five sections:

A.

GTA (GREATER TORONTO AREA) covers all of Toronto

plus Halton, Peel, York and Durham regions.

B.

BEYOND THE GTA covers many areas of Southern

Ontario outside Toronto and the GTA. Starts on page 70.

C.

MUSIC THEATRE covers a wide range of music types:

from opera, operetta and musicals, to non-traditional

performance types where words and music are in some

fashion equal partners in the drama. Starts on page 76.

D.

IN THE CLUBS (MOSTLY JAZZ)

is organized alphabetically by club.

Starts on page 77.

E.

THE ETCETERAS is for galas, fundraisers, competitions,

screenings, lectures, symposia, masterclasses, workshops,

singalongs and other music-related events (except

performances) which may be of interest to our readers.

Starts on page 80.

A GENERAL WORD OF CAUTION. A phone number is provided

with every listing in The WholeNote — in fact, we won’t publish

a listing without one. Concerts are sometimes cancelled or postponed;

artists or venues may change after listings are published.

Please check before you go out to a concert.

HOW TO LIST. Listings in The WholeNote in the four sections above

are a free service available, at our discretion, to eligible presenters.

If you have an event, send us your information no later than the

8th of the month prior to the issue or issues in which your listing is

eligible to appear.

LISTINGS DEADLINE. The next issue covers the period from

September 1 to October 7, 2019. All listings must be received by

11:59pm, Thursday August 8.

LISTINGS can be sent by email to listings@thewholenote.com

or by using the online form on our website. We do not receive

listings by phone, but you can call 416-323-2232 x27 for further

information.

LISTINGS ZONE MAP. Visit our website to search for concerts

by the zones on this map: thewholenote.com.

Lake

Huron

6

Georgian

Bay

7

2 1

5

Lake Erie

3 4

8

City of Toronto

LISTINGS

Lake Ontario

Saturday June 1

●●2:00: The Parahumans. Triad. Scotiabank

Studio Theatre, 6 Noble St. theparahumans.

com. $20; $15(sr/st/dance artists). Also 8pm.

●●3:00: Singing Out. Changing Currents.

Jane Mallett Theatre, St. Lawrence Centre for

the Arts, 27 Front St. E. singingout.com. $27.

Also 7:30. A fundraiser for Rainbow Camp.

●●7:00: Claire de Sévigné/Aviva Fortunata.

Two Sopranos, One Friendship. Works by

Mozart, Strauss, Donizetti and others. Claire

de Sévigné and Aviva Fortunata, sopranos;

Jenna Simeonov, piano. St. John’s United

Church (Oakville), 262 Randall St., Oakville.

n/a. $40.

●●7:30: Annex Singers. Underneath the

Stars. Cabaret concert of jazz standards

and popular songs. Works by Gershwin, Porter,

Berlin and other Songbook composers.

Maria Case, artistic director. Parish Hall,

Grace Church on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd.

416-458-4434. $30; $25(sr/st). Light fare;

cash bar.

●●7:30: Cantemus Singers. Tanzen und

Springen/Dancing and Leaping. Franck: Bierlied;

Lasso: Un jeune moine; Pange Lingua;

Schütz: Tornate cari baci; Buxtehude: Missa

Brevis for 5 voices. Michael Erdman, conductor.

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity

Sq. 416-578-6602. $20; free(under 12). Also

June 2(3pm).

●●7:30: Etobicoke Centennial Choir. After

the Rain. Apostolov: After the Rain, Barefoot

Dance, Guardian Angel, and Mystic Mountain;

Lauridsen: Les chansons des roses; and

works by Byrd, Delibes, Fauré and others.

Anton Apostolov, guitar; Jacek Karlowski,

tamboura (Bulgarian lute); Nikola Gaidarov,

kaval (Bulgarian wooden flute); Sunjung Park,

keyboard; Hasheel Lodhia, bansuri (Indian

flute); Rosendo Chendy Leon, percussion; Carl

Steinhauser, piano. Humber Valley United

Church, 76 Anglesey Blvd., Etobicoke. 416-

779-2258. $30. Venue is accessible.

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. Physical

Thinking. Music by Franz Schubert and Thom

Willems. William Forsythe, choreographer

and designer. Four Seasons Centre for the

Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-345-

9595. $39 and up. Opens Jun 1, 7:30pm. Runs

to Jun 8. Sat/Sun(2pm), Wed-Fri(7:30pm).

●●7:30: Opera by Request. Nabucco. Music

by Verdi; libretto by Solera. Gene Wu, baritone

(Nabucco); Cristina Pisani, soprano (Abigaille);

Dylan Wright, bass (Zaccaria); Cian

Horrobin, tenor (Ismaele); and others; William

Shookhoff, piano and conductor. Christ

Church UCC, 1700 Mazo Crescent, Mississauga.

416-455-2365. $20.

●●7:30: Resonance. Resonance in Performance:

Spring Concert. Part of Mississauga

Festival Choir family. First United Church

(Port Credit), 151 Lakeshore Rd W., Mississauga.

416-986-5537. $35; $30(sr/st).

●●7:30: Singing Out. Changing Currents. Jane

Mallett Theatre, St. Lawrence Centre for the

Arts, 27 Front St. E. singingout.com. $27. Also

7:30. A fundraiser for Rainbow Camp.

●●7:30: Toronto Messiaen Ensemble. Portrait

of a Friendship. Gideon Gee-Bum Kim: Riddle,

Two Poems and Epilogue, Impromptu on the

Korean Folk tune “Doraji”; Ofer Ben-Amots:

Montage Music, Bulgar Genevois; and other

works. Esther Choi, flute; Peter Pinteric, clarinet;

Steve Koh; violin; Yoon Woo Kim, viola;

A. Concerts in the GTA

Evan Lamberton, cello; Amy Seulky Lee,

piano; Gideon Gee-Bum Kim, artistic director/conductor.

Guest: Daniel Ramjattan, guitar.

Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph St.

torontomessiaen@hotmail.com. Donation.

●●8:00: Acoustic Harvest/Live Music East.

Angelique Francis. St. Paul’s United Church

(Scarborough), 200 McIntosh St., Scarborough.

lillian.wauthier@gmail.com.

$25/$22(adv).

●●8:00: Canadian Sinfonietta. Wine and

Cheese Concert. R. Strauss: Sonata in E-flat

for Violin and Piano; Taneyev: Piano Quintet

in g Op.30. Erika Crino, piano; Joyce Lai and

Alain Bouvier, violins; Ian Clarke, viola; Andras

Weber, cello. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton

Ave. canadiansinfonietta.yapsody.com. $35;

$30(sr); $25(st).

●●8:00: Confluence. At the River. Larry Beckwith,

Dylan Bell, James Mead, Marion Newman,

Patricia O’Callaghan, and others. St. Thomas’s

Anglican Church (Toronto), 383 Huron St. 416-

410-4561. $30; $25(sr); $20(st). 7:15pm: preconcert

chat and season announcement with

Larry Beckwith and special guests.

●●8:00: Greater Toronto Philharmonic

Orchestra. A Night at the Movies. Music

from blockbuster movies: Lord of the Rings,

Superman, 007, Harry Potter, Doctor Zhivago,

and Mission Impossible. John Palmer conductor.

Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle

Ave. 647-238-0015 or gtpo.ca. $30; $25(sr);

$15(st).

●●8:00: Kir Stefan The Serb Choir. Music

Knows No Borders. Works by Manojlović;

sacred and secular 19th- and 20th-century

works. Jasmina Vucurović, conductor. Trinity-

St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W. universe.com.

$40; $30(sr/st). Dedicated to 70th anniversary

of the death of Kosta P. Manojlović.

●●8:00: North York Concert Orchestra/

Jubilate Singers/Hart House Chorus. Ode to

Joy. Beethoven: Symphony No.9. Andrea Lett,

soprano; Danielle MacMillan, mezzo; Michael

Barrett, tenor; Bradley Christensen, baritone;

Jubilate Singers; Hart House Chorus; Rafael

Luz, conductor. Yorkminster Citadel, 1 Lord

Seaton Rd., North York. 416-628-9195. $30;

$25(sr); $10(st). Pre-concert chat at 7:30pm.

Also June 2(7:30pm, Church of St. Peter and

St. Simon-the-Apostle).

●●8:00: SING! The Toronto Vocal Arts Festival.

Soundcrowd: Dance Party. Opera House,

735 Queen St. E. 416-694-6900. $30.

●●8:00: The Parahumans. Triad. Scotiabank

Studio Theatre, 6 Noble St. theparahumans.

com. $20; $15(sr/st/dance artists). Also 2pm.

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Denk

Plays Mozart. Mozart: Overture to Don Giovanni

K527; Piano Concerto No.14 in E-flat

K449; Rondo in a K511 (for solo piano); Piano

Concerto No.25 in C K503. Jeremy Denk,

leader and piano; Simon Rivard, RBC Resident

Conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.

416-598-3375. $34.75-$148.

●●10:15: Jewish Music Week in Toronto. After

Dark: Community Melaveh Makla. Shir Harmony;

Toronto Jewish Chorus; Toronto Jewish

Male Choir; Jonno Lightstone, clarinet.

Beth David B’nai Israel Beth Am, 55 Yeomans

Rd. 416-638-4492. Free.

Sunday June 2

● ● 10:30am: Jewish Music Week in Toronto.

Cool Kids’ Concert: Sonshine & Broccoli!

Lisa Sonshine; Brock Burford. Beth Sholom

60 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Synagogue, 1445 Eglinton Ave. W. 416-633-

4492. Free.

●●11:30am: Mississauga Big Band Jazz

Ensemble. Bread & Honey Festival. Memorial

Park Streetsville, 355 Church St., Mississauga.

905-270-4757 or

rboniface@rogers.com. Free.

●●2:00: Choralairs Choir. Annual Public Concert.

Beatles in Revue (medley), Hallelujah,

Blue Skies and Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor

Dreamcoat medley. SATB Choir. B’nai

Torah Synagogue, 465 Patricia Ave. 416-787-

8307. $10; free(under 10); $8(10 or more

group rate). Accessible.

●●2:00: National Ballet of Canada. Physical

Thinking. Music by Franz Schubert and Thom

Willems. William Forsythe, choreographer

and designer. Four Seasons Centre for the

Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-345-

9595. $39 and up. Opens Jun 1, 7:30pm. Runs

to Jun 8. Sat/Sun(2pm), Wed-Fri(7:30pm).

●●2:00: Spectrum Music. Voyages Extraordinaires.

Jazz Ensemble; Florian Francois,

Genevieve Fontaine, actors. Alliance Française

de Toronto, 24 Spadina Rd. 416-576-

8890. $20; $10(child).

●●3:00: Cantemus Singers. Tanzen und

Springen/Dancing and Leaping. Franck: Bierlied;

Lasso: Un jeune moine; Pange Lingua;

Schütz: Tornate cari baci; Buxtehude: Missa

Brevis for 5 voices. Michael Erdman, conductor.

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-578-

6602. $20; free(under 12). Also June 1(7:30pm).

●●3:00: Jewish Music Week in Toronto.

Sing Together with Sawuti African Children’s

Choir. St. Andrew’s Church (Toronto),

73 Simcoe St. 416-638-4492. Free.

●●3:00: St. Paul’s Bloor Street Anglican

Church. Organ Concert. Gerald Loo, organ.

227 Bloor St. E. 416-961-8116. Free.

●●3:30: North Toronto Community Band.

Spring Rhythms. Marches, classics, show

tunes, big band and more. Danny Wilks, conductor;

Phil Coonce, violin; Sharon Smith,

vocalist. Tribute Communities Recital Hall,

June 3 - Acquired

Taste Choir

June 10 - James

McLean & William

Aide

June 17 - Andrew

Sords

June 24 - Ilana

Waldston

www.musicmondays.ca

Accolade East Building, YU, 4700 Keele St.

416-736-5888. $20; $10(children 12 and

under). Silent auction.

●●4:00: Church of St. Mary Magdalene.

Organ Fireworks. Andrew Adair, organ.

Church of St. Mary Magdalene (Toronto),

477 Manning Ave. 416-531-7955. Free.

●●4:00: St. Philip’s Anglican Church. Jazz

Vespers. Felix Pastorius, bass; Tom Reynolds,

piano; Michael Occhipinti, guitar. 31 St. Phillips

Rd., Etobicoke. 416-247-5181. PWYC.

●●7:00: Strings Attached Orchestra. Family

& Friends Annual Year End Concert. Isabel

Bader Theatre, 93 Charles St. W.

info@stringsattachedorchestra.com. $20.

●●7:00: Strings Attached Orchestra. Family

& Friends Gala Concert. Isabel Bader Theatre,

93 Charles St. W. 416-219-2862 or

stringsattachedorchestra.com/tickets. $20.

●●7:30: Jewish Music Week in Toronto. Jerusalem

Swings! The Manhattan Transfer;

Simon Spiro; Wendy Lands, singer; Canadian

All-Star Swing Orchestra. Winter Garden

Theatre, 189 Yonge St. 416-872-1212 or mirvish.com/ticketing.

$60-$150.

●●7:30: North York Concert Orchestra/Jubilate

Singers/Hart House Chorus. Ode to Joy.

Beethoven: Symphony No.9. Andrea Lett, soprano;

Danielle MacMillan, mezzo; Michael Barrett,

tenor; Bradley Christensen, baritone;

Jubilate Singers; Hart House Chorus; Rafael

Luz, conductor. Church of St. Peter and St.

Simon-the-Apostle, 525 Bloor St. E. 416-485-

1988 or brownpapertickets.com or nyco.ca.

$30; $25(sr); $10(st). Also June 1(8pm, Yorkminster

Citadel).

●●7:30: SING! The Toronto Vocal Arts Festival.

SING! Cuban Fantasies with Vocal Sampling

and Freeplay. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas

St. W. 416-694-6900. $25.

●●7:30: The Bronze Foundation. America

the Beautiful. Handbell Ensemble. Wexford

Heights United Church, 2102 Lawrence

Ave. E., Scarborough. 905-764-6903. $20;

$10(st).

Monday June 3

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Acquired Taste

Choir. Stephen Chatman: Remember; and

other works. Church of the Holy Trinity,

19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521x223. PWYC($10

suggested). Proceeds donated to a local

charity.

●●7:30: Soundstreams. Encounters Series:

Encounters in Exile. Excerpts by Feliz and Eisler.

Juro Kim Feliz, spacialized recording.

Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen St. W. 416-504-

1282. Free; PWYC(reserved seating).

●●8:00: Blythwood Winds. Return of the Jedi.

Williams: Star Wars: Return of the Jedi (arr.).

Tim Crouch, flute; Elizabeth Eccleston, oboe;

Anthony Thompson, clarinet; Kevin Harris,

bassoon; Curtis Vander Hyden, horn. Burdock

Music Hall, 1184 Bloor St. W. 416-546-

4033. $20/$15(adv). Seating is limited; doors

open 7:30.

●●8:00: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer

Festival: Opening Night. Tafelmusik Baroque

Orchestra and Chamber Choir; Ivars

Taurins, choir director; Elisa Citterio; director.

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W.

416-964-6337. Free. Advanced general admission

tickets will be available online for priority

seating.

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June 3at8pm

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Tuesday June 4

●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime

Chamber Music. Jacqueline Leung,

piano. Yorkminster Park Baptist Church,

1585 Yonge St. 416-241-1298. Free, donations

welcome.

●●4:45: Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.

MNjcc Suzuki End of Season Ensemble

Concert. Al Green Theatre, Miles Nadal JCC,

750 Spadina Ave. 416-924-6211 x0 or

gretchena@mnjcc.org. Free.

●●7:00: Icelandic Canadian Club of Toronto.

Vocal Recital. Hanna Dóra Sturludóttir,

mezzo; Snorri Sigfús Birgisson, piano. Timothy

Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair

Ave. W. 416-762-8627. Freewill offering at the

door; reserve tickets at icct.info/hanna. Postconcert

reception.

●●7:30: City Choir. In Concert. An evening

of unique choral music, including original

compositions and arrangements. Gregory

Oh, John Millard, Patricia O’Callaghan,

Suba Sankaran and Waleed Abdulhamid, directors.

Dixon Hall, 188 Carlton St. 416-963-

9374. PWYC.

The world premiere of a

lesbian opera comes to

Buddies in Bad Times

Theatre in Toronto

June 5-9, 2019

Music by Kye Marshall

Libretto by Amanda Hale

#PomOpera

@pomegranateopera

www.pomegranateopera.comm

Wednesday June 5

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Mimi O’Bansawin. Union Summer Stage,

65 Front St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist

Church. Organ Recital. John Palmer, organ.

1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167. Free.

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. Physical

Thinking. See Jun 2. Also Jun 6(7:30pm),

7(7:30pm), 8(2pm).

●●7:30: Pomegranate Opera Productions/

Pride Toronto. Pomegranate. Music by Kye

Marshall, libretto by Amanda Hale. Buddies

in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander St. pomegranateopera.com.

$30-$50. Opens Jun 5,

7:30pm. Runs to Jun 9. Wed-Sat(7:30pm),

Sat/Sun(2pm).

●●8:00: Canadian Music Centre. The Canadian

Piano Left-Hand Commissioning Project.

New works for piano left-hand by

Christopher Butterfield, Taylor Brook, Anna

Hostman, Emilie LeBel, Adam Sherkin and

others. Adam Scime, piano left-hand; Adam

Sherkin, piano two-hands. 20 St. Joseph St.

416-961-6601. PWYC. Volumes of the commissioned

pieces will be on sale. Reception

to follow.

●●8:00: Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.

MNjcc Community Choir Concerts. Popular

hits by Sting and The Lumineers; The Wiz

(selections); Avenue Q (selections); choral

works by Bevan and Jenkins; Gjeilo: Across

the Vast Eternal Sky. MNjcc Suzuki string program

members; Mark Ramsay, choir director;

Briony Glassco, assistant director; Asher Farber,

piano. Al Green Theatre, Miles Nadal JCC,

750 Spadina Ave. 416-924-6211 x0 or

Mnjcc.org/choirconcert. $15. Also Jun 6.

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.

Brahms Symphony 4. Schumann: Overture to

Manfred; Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No.1;

Brahms: Symphony No.4. Jan Lisiecki, piano;

Karl-Heinz Steffens, conductor. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-

$148. Also Jun 6, 8.

Thursday June 6

●●12:00 noon: Roy Thomson Hall. Noon-

Hour Concert Series: Here’s to Song! Oakville

Choir for Children and Youth. 60 Simcoe St.

BOOK NOW!

416-975-8555

buddiesinbadtimes.com/

show/pomegranate

Opening Night Gala

June 6 @ 7:30 pm

Performances

June 5-9 @ 7:30 pm & 2:00 pm

Tickets: $30 / $40 / $50

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 61


416-872-4255. Free.

●●7:30: Helga Schmidt/Attila Glatz Concert

Productions/Elev8 Global Entertainment.

Jonathan Antoine: Live In Concert, Beyond

the Curtain. Crossover tenor and star of

Britain’s Got Talent. Disney anthems; popular

songs; Puccini: Nessun Dorma; and other

arias. Jonathan Antoine, tenor; Tina Guo,

cello; DCappella, a cappella group. Winter

Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge St. 416-872-1212.

$45-$150. Also June 8.

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. Physical Thinking.

See Jun 2. Also Jun 7(7:30pm), 8(2pm).

●●7:30: Pomegranate Opera Productions/

Pride Toronto. Pomegranate. See Jun 5. Also

Jun 7(7:30pm), 8(2pm & 7:30pm), 9(2pm).

●●7:30: Syrinx Concerts Toronto. Ishay

Shaer in Concert. Beethoven: Piano Sonata

Op.111; Debussy: 2 Etudes; Chopin: Piano

Sonata No.3 in b Op.58; Coulthard: Image

Astrale. Peter Harvey, baritone. Mazzoleni

Concert Hall, Royal Conservatory, 273 Bloor

St. W. 416-654-0877. $30; $20(st).

●●8:00: Luminato Festival/Lua Shayenne

(Shayenne Productions). Kira: the Path/La

Voie (premiere). Tolno. Lua Shayenne Dance

Company. Fleck Dance Theatre, Harbourfront

Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-368-4849.

$35-$50. Runs June 6-9 as part of Luminato

Festival 2019.

●●8:00: Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.

MNjcc Community Choir Concerts. Popular

hits by Sting and The Lumineers; The Wiz

(selections); Avenue Q (selections); choral

works by Bevan and Jenkins; Gjeilo: Across

the Vast Eternal Sky. MNjcc Suzuki string program

members; Mark Ramsay, choir director;

Briony Glassco, assistant director; Asher Farber,

piano. Al Green Theatre, Miles Nadal JCC,

750 Spadina Ave. 416-924-6211 x0 or

Mnjcc.org/choirconcert. $15. Also Jun 5.

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.

Brahms Symphony 4. Schumann: Overture to

Manfred; Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No.1;

Brahms: Symphony No.4. Jan Lisiecki, piano;

Karl-Heinz Steffens, conductor. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-

$148. Also Jun 5, 8.

●●8:30: Music Gallery. Dwarfs of East

Agouza + Fresh Snow + Omar Bongo. Tranzac

A. Concerts in the GTA

Club, 292 Brunswick Ave. 416-204-1080.

$18/$15(adv); $10(members).

Friday June 7

●●12:00 noon: Music at Metropolitan. Keep

Calm and Carillon. Jonathan Lehrer, carillonist.

Metropolitan United Church (Toronto),

56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26. Freewill

offering. On the front lawn. Also Jun 21, 28.

Music, She Wrote

William O’Meara | Organ

Etsuko Kimura | Violin

Friday, June 7

7:00 PM

St. Michael’s

Cathedral Basilica

●●7:00: St. Michael’s Concerts. Music, She

Wrote. Henderson: Suite for Organ & Violin;

Higdon: Ceremonies Suite; Tabakova: Diptych;

Tailleferre: Nocturne; Archer: Improvisation

on Veni Creator. William O’Meara, organ;

Etsuko Kimura, violin. St. Michael’s Cathedral,

65 Bond St. 416-397-6367. By donation($25

suggested).

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. Physical

Thinking. See Jun 2. Also Jun 8(2pm).

●●7:30: Opera by Request. A Summer Feast.

Purcell: If Music Be the Food of Love; Hoiby:

Bon Appetit (complete with real chocolate

cake); Berkeley: A Dinner Engagement.

Meghan Symon, mezzo; Lawrence Shirkie,

baritone; Gwendolynn Yearwood, soprano;

Josh Clemenger and Francis Domingue,

tenors; William Shookhoff, piano and conductor.

College Street United Church,

452 College St. 416-455-2365. $20.

●●7:30: Pomegranate Opera Productions/

Pride Toronto. Pomegranate. See Jun 5. Also

Jun 8(2pm & 7:30pm), 9(2pm).

●●8:00: Didgori/MusiCamp/Clay and Paper

Theatre/Folk Camp Canada. Didgori Ensemble

in Toronto. Georgian polyphony. 6 members

of Didgori ensemble from Georgia singing and

accompanying themselves on traditional instruments.

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon

Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. 647-836-4852 or musicampto.com.

$30; $15(st/underemployed).

●●8:00: Luminato Festival/Lua Shayenne

(Shayenne Productions). Kira: the Path/La

Voie (premiere). Tolno. Lua Shayenne Dance

Company. Fleck Dance Theatre, Harbourfront

Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-368-4849.

$35-$50. Runs June 6-9 as part of Luminato

Festival 2019.

●●8:00: Small World Music Society. Arnab

Chakrabarty Sarod Recital. Arnab Chakrabarty,

sarod; Zaheer-Abbas Janmohamed,

tabla. Small World Music Centre, Artscape

Youngplace, 180 Shaw St. 416-536-5439.

$30/$20(adv).

Saturday June 8

●●12:30: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque

Summer Festival: Baroque Portraits. Members

of the Faculty of Tafelmusik Baroque

Summer Institute. Walter Hall, Edward

Johnson Building, University of Toronto,

80 Queen’s Park. 416-964-6337. Free.

Assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

No tickets required.

●●2:00: National Ballet of Canada. Physical

Thinking. See Jun 2.

●●2:00: Pomegranate Opera Productions/

Pride Toronto. Pomegranate. See Jun 5. Also

Jun 8(7:30pm), 9(2pm).

●●4:00: Lisa Di Maria. In Recital. Barber:

Knoxville Summer of 1915; works by Fauré,

Puccini and others. Lisa Di Maria, soprano;

Adolfo De Santis, piano. St. Thomas’s Anglican

Church (Toronto), 383 Huron St. 647-201-

5762. $25; $19(st under 18).

●●7:00: North Wind Concerts. Alternate Takes.

Works by Schumann, Brahms, Bruch and

KINDRED SPIRITS ORCHESTRA

10 th anniversary concert season

Kodály. Colin Savage, clarinet; Mary-Katherine

Finch, cello; Laurence Schaufele, viola; Stephanie

Chua, piano. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton

Ave. 416-588-4301 or bemusednetwork.com.

$32; $25(sr); $18(st/arts); $12(12 and under).

●●7:00: St. Elizabeth Scola Cantorum Hungarian

Choir. Spring Choir Concert. Vivaldi:

Gloria and other works. Christa Lazar, soprano;

Ágnes Kurfis, alto; Orsolya Szalados,

Renee Anton violin; Imre Olah, conductor, and

others. St. Elizabeth of Hungary Roman Catholic

Church, 432 Sheppard Ave. E. 416-300-

9305 or scola.cantorum@gmail.com. $20;

$10(st). Post-concert reception.

●●7:30: Counterpoint Community Orchestra.

In Concert. Andrew Chung, conductor.

Church of St. Peter and St. Simon-the-Apostle,

525 Bloor St. E. 647-970-8057. $25;

$15(st).

●●7:30: Helga Schmidt/Attila Glatz Concert

Productions/Elev8 Global Entertainment.

Jonathan Antoine: Live In Concert, Beyond

the Curtain. Crossover tenor and star of

Britain’s Got Talent. Disney anthems; popular

songs; Puccini: Nessun Dorma; and other

arias. Jonathan Antoine, tenor; Tina Guo,

cello; DCappella, a cappella group. Winter

Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge St. 416-872-1212.

$45-$150. Also June 6.

●●7:30: Pomegranate Opera Productions/

Pride Toronto. Pomegranate. See Jun 5. Also

Jun 9(2pm).

●●7:30: TO Live. Ghostbusters in Concert.

Movie screening accompanied by live orchestra.

Peter Bernstein, conductor. Sony Centre

for the Performing Arts, 1 Front St. E. 1-855-

872-7669. $55-$111.

●●7:30: Toronto Cantata Chorus. A Concert

for Hope. Fauré: Requiem. North York

Temple Band. Toronto Christian Community

Church, 100 Acadia Ave., Markham. 647-

869-6035. $20.

●●8:00: Alliance Française de Toronto. Ariko

- Concert Folk. 24 Spadina Rd. 416-922-2014.

$25; $20(sr/st); $12(members).

●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Schnittke

and Schoenberg. Schnittke: Concerto for

piano and strings; Schoenberg: Kammersymphonie

Op.9. Featuring films about Schnittke

and Schoenberg. Antonia de Wolfe, piano;

Kristian Alexander, conductor. Cornell Recital

Hall, 3201 Bur Oak Ave., Markham. 905-604-

8339. $30-$40; $25(sr); $15(under 30).

●●8:00: Labyrinth Ontario. Modal Music

Summit: Ross Daly with This Tale of Ours plus

Tzvetanka Varimezova. Transcultural instrumental

and vocal modal music from Greece,

Bulgaria, Iran. Ross Daly; This Tale of Ours;

Tzvetanka Varimezova. Eastminster United

Church, 310 Danforth Ave. labyrinthontario.

com. $25; $20(st/arts).

●●8:00: Luminato Festival/Lua Shayenne

(Shayenne Productions). Kira: the Path/La

Voie (premiere). Tolno. Lua Shayenne Dance

Company. Fleck Dance Theatre, Harbourfront

Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-368-4849.

$35-$50. Runs June 6-9 as part of Luminato

Festival 2019.

●●8:00: Nagata Shachu and American

Rogues. Taiko x Celtic. Nagata Shachu (Aki

Takahashi, taiko, shamisen, vocals; Tony

Nguyen, taiko, woodwinds; and others;

Kiyoshi Nagata, director, taiko, shinobue/

flute); American Rogues Celtic Band (Nelson

Stewart, leader). Harbourfront Centre Theatre,

235 Queens Quay W. 416-973-4000 x1.

$27-$37; $20(sr/st).

62 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.

Brahms Symphony 4. Schumann: Overture to

Manfred; Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No.1;

Brahms: Symphony No.4. Jan Lisiecki, piano;

Karl-Heinz Steffens, conductor. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-

$148. Also Jun 5, 6.

Sunday June 9

●●12:30: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque

Summer Festival: Many Strings Attached.

Participants of the Tafelmusik Baroque

Summer Institute Viola d’Amore Workshop;

Thomas Georgi, leader. Walter Hall,

Edward Johnson Building, University of

Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-964-6337. Free.

Assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

Tickets are not required.

●●2:00: Pomegranate Opera Productions/

Pride Toronto. Pomegranate. See Jun 5.

●●2:30: Venuti String Quartet. In Concert.

Borodin: String Quartet No.2; Puccini: Crisantemi;

Jurecka: New Jazz String Quartet. West

Toronto Baptist Church, 3049 Dundas St. W.

647-391-4645. $20; $10(st); $5(child 12 and

under). Childcare provided (included in child

ticket price). Refreshments will be served.

●●3:00: Faustina Chamber Music. Composers

from A to Z: Music of the Baroque Era.

Handel: Gloria; Works by Bach, Vivaldi, Abinoni,

Corelli and others. Iris Krizmanic, soprano;

Dora Krizmanic, organ/harpsichord;

Axeff Janos Ungvary, flute. St. Paul’s Anglican

Church (Uxbridge), 59 Toronto St. S.,

Uxbridge. 905-852-7016. By donation.

●●3:00: Jacqueline Gélineau presents. Bach

Ascension Oratorios. Himmelfahrts-Oratorium

BWV11; Gott fähret auf mit Jauchzen BWV43.

Darlene Shura, soprano; Jacqueline Gelineau,

contralto; William Ford, tenor; Noah Grove,

baritone; Brahm Goldhamer, conductor and

harpsichord. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave.

416-922-3618. Free; donations welcomed.

●●3:00: Luminato Festival/Lua Shayenne

(Shayenne Productions). Kira: the Path/La

Voie (premiere). Tolno. Lua Shayenne Dance

Company. Fleck Dance Theatre, Harbourfront

Centre, 235 Queens Quay W. 416-368-4849.

$35-$50. Runs June 6-9 as part of Luminato

Festival 2019.

●●3:00: Off Centre Music Salon. Russian Salon:

Ages & Stages. Works by Mussorgsky, Shostakovich

and Tchaikovsky. Ilana Zarankin, soprano;

Tyler Duncan, baritone; Ernesto Ramirez,

Russian

Salon:

Ages & Stages

JUNE 9, 2019

3:00 pm

tenor; Julie Hereish, cello; Sheila Jaffe, violin;

and others. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor

St. W. 416-466-6323. $50; $40(sr); $15(young

adult). offcentremusic.com.

●●3:00: Voices Chamber Choir. Handel and

Haydn. Handel: Coronation Anthems and

choral works by Michael and Joseph Haydn.

Ron Ka Ming Cheung, conductor; John Stephenson,

organ. St. Martin-in-the-Fields

Anglican Church, 151 Glenlake Ave. 416-519-

0528. $20; $15(sr/st).

●●4:00: Leaside United Church. A Festival

of Hymns. Chancel Choir; Brass Ensemble.

822 Millwood Rd. 416-425-1253. Donations

accepted. Dinner follows festival. Donations

are towards purchase of grand piano.

●●4:00: Penthelia Singers. Shirei Penthelia

(Songs of Penthelia). Whitacre Five Hebrew

Love Songs (arr. Leck/Ellis): Mir Zeinen

Alle (Ale Brider); Youngest Daughter’s Wedding

(Di Mezinke Oysgegebn); Gershon: Kumi

Lach. Scott Metcalf, piano; Alex Toskov, violin;

Kinneret Sagee, clarinet; Max Senitt, drums.

Rosedale Presbyterian Church, 129 Mt. Pleasant

Rd. 416-579-7464. $20; pay age(under 13).

●●4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz Vespers.

1570 Yonge St. 416-920-5211. Freewill

offering. Religious service.

●●7:30: LARK Ensemble. Quaternity. Works by

Ries, Van Delden and McGrath. Corkin Gallery,

LARK

ENSEMBLE

QUATERNITY

JUNE 9, 7:30pm

CORKIN GALLERY,

DISTILLERY DISTRICT

7 Tank House Ln. 647-869-2559. $35; $20(st).

●●7:30: Toronto Chinese Orchestra. The Butterfly

Lovers. Jon Lin Chua: Princess Miao Shan

(premiere); Gang Chen: The Butterfly Lovers

Concerto; Jianmin Wang: Night Mooring by

Maple Bridge; Cecilia Heejeong Kim: Madam

Su-Ro. Lina Cao, guzheng; Vivian Yang Li, erhu/

gaohu; wHOOL, jango/superjango; Chih-Sheng

Chen, conductor. Markham People’s Community

Church, 22 Esna Park Dr., Markham. 647-299-

9209. $25; $20(st). 7pm: Pre-concert talk.

Monday June 10

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Heine’s Buch der

Lieder. James McLean, tenor; William Aide,

piano. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.

416-598-4521 x223. PWYC(suggested donation

$10).

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Modern

Broadway. Selections from Broadway

hits including The Book of Mormon, Once,

The Baker’s Wife, The Last Five Years, The

Civil War, and other works. Betsy Wolfe, soprano;

Jeremy Jordan, tenor; Steven Reineke,

conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe

St. 416-598-3375. $35.75-$107. Also Jun 11,

Jun 12(mat), Jun 12(eve).

Tuesday June 11

●●12:00 noon: Montreal Chamber Music Festival.

BMO Hottest Classical Artists Under

30! Barriere: 6 Cello Sonatas; Bach: Suite

No.4 BWV 1010 arr. Varga; Kummer: Cello

duets No.2 Opus 22; Gliere: Cello duets Op.53.

Bruno Tobon, Denis Brott, cello. Salle Bourgie,

1339 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal. 514-489-

7444. Free. Includes free snack.

●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime

Chamber Music. Allan Pulker, flute. Yorkminster

Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St.

416-241-1298. Free, donations welcome.

●●4:45: Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.

Suzuki End of Season Group Repertoire

Concert. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor

St. W. gretchena@mnjcc.org. Free.

●●5:00: Montreal Chamber Music Festival.

The Beethoven Symphonies Transcribed for

Piano by Franz Liszt. Beethoven: Symphony

1 & 3. Alexander Ullman, piano. Salle Bourgie,

1339 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal. 514-

489-7444. $25.

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Modern

Broadway. Selections from Broadway

hits including The Book of Mormon, Once,

The Baker’s Wife, The Last Five Years, The

Civil War, and other works. Betsy Wolfe, soprano;

Jeremy Jordan, tenor; Steven Reineke,

conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe

St. 416-598-3375. $35.75-$107. Also Jun 10,

Jun 12(mat), Jun 12(eve).

Wednesday June 12

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Moskitto Bar. Union Summer Stage, 65 Front

St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints Kingsway.

Kingsway Organ Concert Series. Eric

Hanbury and Ian Sadler, organ duo. All Saints

Kingsway Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W.

416-571-3680 or organixconcerts.ca. Freewill

offering. 45-minute concert.

●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.

Organ Recital. Eric Robertson, organ.

1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167. Free.

●●1:00: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer

Festival: Afternoon Concert. Tafelmusik

Baroque Summer Institute Orchestras

and Choirs; Elisa Citterio, Jeanne Lamon

and Ivars Taurins, directors. Walter Hall,

Edward Johnson Building, University of

Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-964-6337. Free.

Assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

Tickets are not required.

●●2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Modern

Broadway. Selections from Broadway

hits including The Book of Mormon, Once, The

Baker’s Wife, The Last Five Years, The Civil War,

and other works. Betsy Wolfe, soprano; Jeremy

Jordan, tenor; Steven Reineke, conductor.

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-

3375. $35.75-$107. Also Jun 10, 11, Jun 12(eve).

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Modern

Broadway. See 2pm. Also Jun 10, 11.

Thursday June 13

●●1:30: Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.

Woodstock 50th Anniversary Concert.

Sebastian Agnello, Michael Bar, Stephen

Court, Keith McKie, Judith Orban and others.

Miles Nadal JCC, 750 Spadina Ave. 416-924-

6211 x0 or mnjcc.org. $5 (includes refreshments).

Refreshments at 1pm.

●●7:30: Ann Cooper and Errol Gay. Let’s

Make a Fuss! A benefit concert for focused

ultrasound research at Sunnybrook Health

Sciences Centre. Jean Stilwell, mezzo; Jonathan

Crow, violin; Russell Braun, baritone;

Peter Barcza, baritone; Adi Braun, piano;

and performers from the TSO, COC, CCOC

and friends. St. Andrew’s Church (Toronto),

73 Simcoe St. $20(suggested donation).

●●8:00: Solomiya Moroz. Docu_Presence.

Brook: Stagger; Manulyak: Transgressions;

Moroz: artefacts of presence. Solomiya Moroz,

flute/electronics; Ilana Waniuk, violon; Julian

Kytasty, bandura. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave.

416-532-3019. $15-$20. Also Jun 17 (7pm, La

Vitrola, 4602 St-Laurent, Montreal).

Friday June 14

●●8:00: Music Gallery. Quatuor Bozzini. Eliane

Radigue: Occam Delta XV. Music Gallery

at 918 Bathurst, 918 Bathurst St. 416-204-

1080. $20/$15(adv); $10(members/st).

●●9:00: Batuki Music Society. Okavango African

Orchestra. Alliance Française de Toronto,

24 Spadina Rd. okay2019.eventbrite.ca or 416-

922-2014. $25/$20(adv).

Saturday June 15

Tour Send-off Concert

Up Top

to Down Under

Saturday, June 15 | 5PM

Church of the Redeemer

Tickets:

torontochildrenschorus.com

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 63


●●5:00: Toronto Children’s Chorus. Tour

Send-off Concert: Up Top to Down Under.

Works by Bach, Brahms and Debussy. Toronto

Children’s Chorus’s Chamber Choir. Church of

the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W. 416-932-8666

x231. $35; $30(st/sr); $20(child).

●●7:30: Opera by Request. Maria Stuarda.

Donizetti. Antonina Ermolenko, soprano

(Maria Stuarda); Cristina Pisani, soprano

(Elizabeth I); Paul Wiliamson, tenor (Leicester);

Dylan Wright, bass-baritone (Talbot);

Henry Irwin, baritone (Cecil); William Shookhoff,

piano/music director; and others. St.

Andrew’s United Church (Bloor St.), 117 Bloor

St E. 416-455-2365. $20.

●●7:30: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer

Festival: The Grand Finale. Tafelmusik

Baroque Summer Institute Orchestra and

Choir; Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and

Chamber Choir; Jeanne Lamon and Ivars

Taurins, directors. Grace Church on-the-Hill,

300 Lonsdale Rd. 416-964-6337. Free. Limited

tickets available beginning Jun 11. Tickets

must be obtained in advance at Tafelmusik

Box Office. Maximum 2 tickets per person.

Sunday June 16

●●2:00: Canzona Chamber Players. The Music

Speaks. Original works for flute and marimba

by Canadian and American contemporary

composers. Tangera (Amelia Lyon, flute; Evan

Mitchell, marimba). St. Andrew by-the-Lake

Anglican Church, Cibola Ave., Toronto Island.

416-822-0613 or reservations@canzona.org.

$30. Brunch at 12:30pm $20 (reservations

required). Also Jun 17 (7:30pm, St. George the

Martyr Church).

●●2:00: Trio 103. Bloom’s Day in Vienna.

J. Haydn: Divertimento in G; Beethoven:

Romance in F; Schubert: Trio in B-flat D471;

Brahms: Sonata in A (1st mvnt); Weiner:

String Trio No.1 in g. John Jull, piano; Baird

Knechtel, viola; Daniel Kushner, violin; John

Trembath, cello. St. Barnabas Anglican

Church, 361 Danforth Ave. 416-465-7443.

Free; donations welcomed.

●●3:00: Tudor Consort. The Song of Songs &

Songs of Love. Works by Schütz, Monteverdi,

Marenzio, Palestrina, Verdelot and others.

Historic Leaskdale Church, 11850 Regional

A. Concerts in the GTA

Road 1, Leaskdale. 705-357-2459. By donation.

In support of Lucy Maud Montgomery Society

of Ontario.

●●4:00: St. Olave’s Church. Choral Evensong

for Trinity Sunday. St. Olave’s Anglican

Church, 360 Windermere Ave. 416-769-5686.

Contributions appreciated. Religious service.

Followed by Strawberry Tea and Music from

18th-Century Italy at 5pm.

●●5:00: Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre.

Klez-mish Concert. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,

427 Bloor St. W. gretchena@mnjcc.org.

Free.

SUN 16 JUNE AT 4

Choral Evensong

for Trinity Sunday

plus Strawberry Tea and at 5:

IMPROVISATION AND

THE ITALIAN

BAROQUE

with Emily Klassen, soprano

and Ben Stein, lute, tenor

●●5:00: St. Olave’s Church. Improvisation

and the Italian Baroque. Music from 18thcentury

Italy. Emily Klassen, soprano; Ben

Stein, tenor and lute. St. Olave’s Anglican

Church, 360 Windermere Ave. 416-769-5686.

Contributions appreciated.

●●6:30: Karim Khakimov. Karim & Friends.

Works by Bach, Fauré, Poulenc, Amirov and

others. Prater Ensemble. Helconian Hall,

35 Hazelton Ave. 416-875-3131. PWYC($10

suggested).

Monday June 17

●●12:15: Music Mondays. In Concert. Andrew

Sords, violin; Cherul Duvall, piano. Church of

the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521

x223. PWYC(suggested donation $10).

●●7:30: Canzona Chamber Players. The Music

Speaks. Original works for flute and marimba

by Canadian and American contemporary composers.

Tangera (Amelia Lyon, flute; Evan Mitchell,

marimba). St. George the Martyr Church,

30 Stephanie St. 416-822-0613 or reservations@canzona.org.

$30. Also June 16 (2pm, St.

Andrew-by-the-Lake Church, Toronto Island).

Tuesday June 18

●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime

Chamber Music. Naoko Sakata, piano.

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge

St. 416-241-1298. Free, donations welcome.

Wednesday June 19

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Polky Village Band. Union Summer Stage,

65 Front St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.

Organ Recital. Nicholas Schmelter, organ;

Tyler Kivel, piano. 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-

1167. Free.

●●7:00: Soundstreams, Luminato, & Pinkhouse

Productions. Hell’s Fury, The Hollywood

Songbook. Music by Eisler. Russell

Braun, baritone; Serouj Kradjian, piano.

Harbourfront Centre Theatre, 235 Queens

Quay W. 416-504-1282. $45-$95; $30-

$71.25(st/youth/arts worker/under 30). Also

June 20, 21, 22, 23(2pm).

●●7:30: Church of St. Mary Magdalene.

Music of Healey Willan. The Gallery Choir.

Church of St. Mary Magdalene (Toronto),

477 Manning Ave. 416-531-7955. PWYC.

●●7:30: Etobicoke Community Concert Band.

Summer Concerts in the Park. Applewood/

The Shaver House, 450 The West Mall, Etobicoke.

416-410-1570. Free. Also Jul 3, 17.

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. Music by Franz Lehár. Ronald Hynd,

choreographerJohn Meehan and Steven

Woodgate, stage directors. Four Seasons

Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St.

W. 416-345-9595. $40 and up. Opens Jun 19,

7:30pm. Runs to Jun 23. Wed-Sat(7:30pm),

Thurs/Sat/Sun(2pm).

InSpirations

Ensemble

With Organist

Jean-Willy Kunz

June 19

7:30 p.m.

organixconcerts.ca

●●7:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints Kingsway.

Special Presentation Concert.

Jean-Willy Kunz, organ; InSpirations Jazz

Ensemble. All Saints Kingsway Anglican

Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-571-3680

or organixconcerts.ca. $35; $25(RCCO

members).

●●7:30: Oshawa Civic Band. Brass-issimo!

Ball: Petit Suite; Mussorgsky: Night on Bare

Mountain; Schifrin: Mission Impossible;

Unger: Ashoken Farewell; and other works.

Guests: Whitby Brass Band. R.S. McLaughlin

Bandshell, 110 Simcoe St. S., Oshawa.

oshawacivicband.ca. Free.

TS

Toronto

Symphony

Orchestra

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Carmina

Burana. Korngold: Violin Concerto; Orff:

Carmina Burana. James Ehnes, violin; Nicole

Haslett, soprano; Sunnyboy Dladla, tenor;

Norman Garrett, baritone; Toronto Mendelssohn

Choir; Toronto Youth Choir; Toronto

Children’s Chorus; Donald Runnicles, conductor.

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-

598-3375. $34.75-$148. Also Jun 20, 22, 23.

Thursday June 20

●●2:00: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. See Jun 19. Also June 20(7:30pm),

21(7:30pm), 22(2pm & 7:30pm), 23(2pm).

●●7:00: Soundstreams, Luminato, & Pinkhouse

Productions. Hell’s Fury, The

Hollywood Songbook. See Jun 19. Also

Jun 21(7pm), 22(7pm), 23(2pm).

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. See Jun 19. Also June 21(7:30pm),

22(2pm & 7:30pm), 23(2pm).

●●8:00: Canadian Chinese Orchestra.

Music Passion Destiny. Fragrance of Jasmine

Flower; Legend of Joel Young; Hanging

the Red Lantern; Loess Plateau; Night of

the Torch Festival. Lina Cao, guzheng; Roa

Lee, gayageum; Huiming Li, suona; Lilian

Yang, pipa; Lipeng Wu, dizi. Chinese Cultural

Centre of Greater Toronto, 5183 Sheppard

Ave. E., Scarborough. 647-889-8042. $38;

$25(sr/st).

●●8:00: Near to the Wild Heart. Impossibly

Happy. Susanna Hood, dancer, singer, choreographer.

Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-

532-3019. $20 or PWYC.

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Carmina

Burana. Korngold: Violin Concerto; Orff:

Carmina Burana. James Ehnes, violin; Nicole

64 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Haslett, soprano; Sunnyboy Dladla, tenor;

Norman Garrett, baritone; Toronto Mendelssohn

Choir; Toronto Youth Choir; Toronto

Children’s Chorus; Donald Runnicles, conductor.

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-

598-3375. $34.75-$148. Also Jun 19, 22, 23.

Friday June 21

●●12:00 noon: Music at Metropolitan. Keep

Calm and Carillon. Mateusz Olechnowicz

and Naoko Tsujita, carillonists. Metropolitan

United Church (Toronto), 56 Queen St. E. 416-

363-0331 x26. Freewill offering. On the front

lawn. Also Jun 7, 28.

●●7:00: Soundstreams, Luminato, & Pinkhouse

Productions. Hell’s Fury, The

Hollywood Songbook. See Jun 19. Also

Jun 22(7pm), 23(2pm).

●●7:00: University Settlement Music & Arts

School. End of Term Student Concert. St.

George the Martyr Church, 30 Stephanie St.

416-598-3444 x244. Free. Also June 22(10am

& 12pm).

●●7:30: Caliban Arts Theatre and Trane

Live Events. In the Spirit - Kahil El’zabar &

David Murray. Remix Lounge, 1305 Dundas

St. W. remixlounge.ca or 647-722-4635.

$40/$35(adv)/$25(early bird until 5pm

June 9).

●●7:30: Global News Radio 650. Rocky Mountain

High: An Evening of John Denver. Annie’s

Song; Country Roads; Back Home Again;

Calypso; Sunshine on My Shoulders. Hamilton

Philharmonic Orchestra; Rick and Steve

Worrall; Miriam Khalil, soprano; David Curry,

tenor; Canadian Allstar Band. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-872-4255. $59-$99.

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. See Jun 19. Also June 22(2pm &

7:30pm), 23(2pm).

Saturday June 22

●●10:00am: University Settlement Music &

Arts School. End of Term Student Concert.

St. George the Martyr Church, 30 Stephanie

St. 416-598-3444 x244. Free. Also June

21(7pm), 22(12 noon).

●●12:00 noon: University Settlement Music

& Arts School. End of Term Student Concert.

St. George the Martyr Church, 30 Stephanie

St. 416-598-3444 x244. Free. Also June

21(7pm), 22 (10 am).

●●2:00: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. See Jun 19. Also June 22(7:30pm),

23(2pm).

●●7:00: Soundstreams, Luminato, & Pinkhouse

Productions. Hell’s Fury, The

Hollywood Songbook. See Jun 19. Also

Jun 23(2pm).

●●7:30: Borealis BIg Band. Spring Can Really

Hang You Up the Most. Well You Needn’t, Too

Close for Comfort (vocal), Spring Can Really

Hang You Up the Most (arr. Kris Berg), Granada

Smoothie, Swingin’ Shepherd Blues

and other songs. Newmarket Old Town Hall,

460 Botsford St., Newmarket. 905-717-3319.

$20; $10(under 17). Cash Bar with Dinner

Theatre seating.

●●7:30: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. See Jun 19. Also June 23(2pm).

●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Voices

of the World. Copland: Fanfare for the Common

Man; Chan Wing-wah: Symphony No.9;

Scriabin: Symphony No.1 Op.26. Stephanie

DeCiantis, mezzo; Ryan Downey, tenor;

Hong Kong Oratorio Society; Vancouver Oratorio

Society; Chan Wing-wah, conductor;

Kristian Alexander, music director; Michael

Berec, host. Richmond Hill Centre for the Performing

Arts, 10268 Yonge St., Richmond Hill.

905-787-8811. $68; $58(sr/under 30). 7:15pm

pre-concert recital; 7:30pm pre-concert talk;

intermission discussion with Chan Wing-wah.

●●8:00: Mixx Musik. Live in Concert: Gloria

Gomez and King Cosmos. Emiy Wood, accompanist.

Freedom Factory, 22 Dovercourt Rd.,

Unit 8. 416-266-2156. $15.

●●8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Carmina

Burana. Korngold: Violin Concerto; Orff:

Carmina Burana. James Ehnes, violin; Nicole

Haslett, soprano; Sunnyboy Dladla, tenor;

Norman Garrett, baritone; Toronto Mendelssohn

Choir; Toronto Children’s Chorus; Donald

Runnicles, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-$148.

Also Jun 19, 20, 23.

Sunday June 23

●●1:00: Opticianado. Chris Bartos & Danny

Simmons. Chris Bartos, fiddle; Danny Simmons,

banjo. 2919 Dundas St. W. 416-604-

2020. Free.

●●2:00: National Ballet of Canada. The Merry

Widow. See Jun 19.

●●2:00: Soundstreams, Luminato, & Pinkhouse

Productions. Hell’s Fury, The Hollywood

Songbook. See Jun 19.

●●3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Carmina

Burana. Korngold: Violin Concerto; Orff:

Carmina Burana. James Ehnes, violin; Nicole

Haslett, soprano; Sunnyboy Dladla, tenor;

Norman Garrett, baritone; Toronto Mendelssohn

Choir; Toronto Children’s Chorus; Donald

Runnicles, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-$148.

Also Jun 19, 20, 22.

●●4:30: Christ Church Deer Park. Jazz Vespers:

The Sacred Music of Duke Ellington.

Brian Barlow Big Band. 1570 Yonge St. 416-

920-5211. Freewill offering. Religious service.

●●8:00: Trio Hyperion. From Schubert to

Piazzolla. Brahms: Trio Op.114; Piazzolla:

The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires; Schubert:

4 Impromptus Op.90. Helconian Hall,

35 Hazelton Ave. 647-332-3352 or

eventbrite.com. $25.

Monday June 24

●●12:15: Music Mondays. If I Only Had A Brain:

The Songs of Harold Arlen. Ilana Waldston,

singer. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity

Sq. 416-598-4521 x223. PWYC(suggested

donation $10).

●●8:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Diana Ross.

Opening Set: Rhonda Ross. Sony Centre for

the Performing Arts, 1 Front St. E. 1-855-872-

7669. $75-$200.

Tuesday June 25

●●12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation/

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church. Lunchtime

Chamber Music. Jenny Cheong, cello.

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge

St. 416-241-1298. Free, donations welcome.

●●8:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Emilie-

Claire Barlow. Koerner Hall, Telus Centre,

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208. $40-$70.

●●8:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Tower of

Power. Danforth Music Hall, 147 Danforth Ave.

ticketmaster.ca. $55-$65.

Wednesday June 26

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Tich Maredza Band. Union Summer Stage,

65 Front St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints Kingsway.

Kingsway Organ Concert Series.

Stefani Bedin, organ. All Saints Kingsway

Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-571-

3680 or organixconcerts.ca. Free-will offering

appreciated.

●●7:30: Long Reach Opera Workshop. Le

nozze di Figaro. Music by Mozart, libretto by

Da Ponte. GenerWu, baritone (Figaro); Jeffrey

Smith, bass (Basilio); and undergraduate and

Masters students from UofT, Western, Dalhousie,

McGill, Mount Allison, and other institutions.

Trinity-St. Paul's Centre, 427 Bloor

St. W. ticketscene.ca/series/716. $20; $10(sr/

st/culture works); free(LROW alumni). Also

Jun 27, 28, 29.

●●8:00: Stephen Tam/Teresa Suen-Campbell.

From Debussy to Shankar: Flute and

Harp Music of Diverse Cultures. Miyagi:

Haru No Umi; Ravi Shankar: L’ Aube Enchantée;

Piazzola: History of Tango; Debussy:

Trio Sonata for Flute, Harp and Viola. Stephen

Tam, flute; Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp;

Chau Luk, viola. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton

Ave. 647-222-3349. $25; $20(sr/st). Cash at

the door.

●●8:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Norah

Jones. Sony Centre for the Performing Arts,

1 Front St. E. 1-855-872-7669. $60-$120.

●●8:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. From the

Buena Vista Social Club Omara Portuondo:

One Last Kiss Tour. Koerner Hall, Telus Centre,

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208. $60-$80.

●●9:00: Roy Thomson Hall on Stage. Alexandra

Stréliski. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe

St. 416-872-4255. $25.40.

●●9:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Rinsethealgorithm

/ Ghost-Note. Horseshoe Tavern,

370 Queen St. W. 1-888-655-9090. $30.

Thursday June 27

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. War

and Peace. Haydn: Quartet in f Op.20 No.5;

Shostakovich: String Quartet No.3 in F. Madawaska

Quartet. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

●●7:30: Brott Music Festival. Fascinating

Rhythm. S’wonderful, Summertime, Someone

to Watch Over Me, An American, Rhapsody in

Blue in Paris and other songs. Chelsea Rus,

soprano; David Curry, tenor; Raymond Huang,

pianist; Boris Brott, conductor. Burlington

Performing Arts Centre, 440 Locust St., Burlington.

905-525-7664. $44; $39(sr); $20(st);

$33(Brott35). Festival runs Jun 27 to Aug 8.

●●7:30: Long Reach Opera Workshop. Le

nozze di Figaro. Music by Mozart, libretto by

Da Ponte. GenerWu, baritone (Figaro); Jeffrey

Smith, bass (Basilio); and undergraduate and

Masters students from UofT, Western, Dalhousie,

McGill, Mount Allison, and other institutions.

Trinity-St. Paul's Centre, 427 Bloor

St. W. ticketscene.ca/series/716. $20; $10(sr/

st/culture works); free(LROW alumni). Also

Jun 26, 28, 29.

●●8:00: Muse 9 Productions/Village Opera.

Bon Appétit! A Musical Tasting Menu. Lee

Hoiby: Bon Appétit!; Danika Lorèn: The Secret

Lives of Vegetables; Peter Tiefenbach: Chansons

de mon placard. Katy Clark, soprano;

Victoria Borg, mezzo; Hyejin Kwon, music

director; Anna Theodosakis, stage director.

Merchants of Green Coffee, 2 Matilda St.

muse9food.bpt.me. $30; $25(st/artists).

●●8:00: TD Toronto Jazz Festival. Cécile

McLorin Salvant and Sullivan Fortner.

Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.

416-408-0208. $50-$75.

Friday June 28

●●12:00 noon: Music at Metropolitan. Keep

Calm and Carillon. Andrée-Anne Doane,

carillonist. Metropolitan United Church

(Toronto), 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x26.

Freewill offering. On the front lawn. Also

Jun 7, 21.

●●7:30: Long Reach Opera Workshop. Le

nozze di Figaro. Music by Mozart, libretto by

Da Ponte. GenerWu, baritone (Figaro); Jeffrey

Smith, bass (Basilio); and undergraduate and

Masters students from UofT, Western, Dalhousie,

McGill, Mount Allison, and other institutions.

Trinity-St. Paul's Centre, 427 Bloor

St. W. ticketscene.ca/series/716. $20; $10(sr/

st/culture works); free(LROW alumni). Also

Jun 26, 27, 29.

●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Gustavo

Gimeno Conducts The Firebird. Sibelius:

Violin Concerto; Prokofiev: Symphony

No.1 “Classical”; Stravinsky: Suite from The

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 65


TS

Firebird (1945 revision). Jonathan Crow, violin;

Gustavo Gimeno, conductor. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.

$34.75-$148. Also Jun 29, 30(3pm). Postconcert

chat with Gustavo Gimeno and Matthew

Loden.

Saturday June 29

●●6:00: Terry Cade. Terry Cade Quartet. Burdock

Music Hall, 1184 Bloor St. W. 416-546-

4033. TBD.

●●7:30: Long Reach Opera Workshop. Le

nozze di Figaro. Music by Mozart, libretto by

Da Ponte. GenerWu, baritone (Figaro); Jeffrey

Smith, bass (Basilio); and undergraduate and

Masters students from UofT, Western, Dalhousie,

McGill, Mount Allison, and other institutions.

Trinity-St. Paul's Centre, 427 Bloor

St. W. ticketscene.ca/series/716. $20; $10(sr/

A. Concerts in the GTA

Toronto

Symphony

Orchestra

July 1 - Jason Wilson

Band

July 8 - Interro

Quartet

July 15 - Odin

Quartet

July 22 - Journey from

China to Iran

July 29 - Lightstone

Katz Duo

www.musicmondays.ca

st/culture works); free(LROW alumni). Also

Jun 26, 27, 28.

●●7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Gustavo

Gimeno Conducts The Firebird. Sibelius:

Violin Concerto; Prokofiev: Symphony

No.1 “Classical”; Stravinsky: Suite from The

Firebird (1945 revision). Jonathan Crow, violin;

Gustavo Gimeno, conductor. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-

$148. Also Jun 30(3pm). Post-concert chat

with Gustavo Gimeno and Matthew Loden.

●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Iron and

Steel. Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis

of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber; André

Mathieu: Piano Concerto No.4; Prokofiev:

Symphony No.2 Op.40. Christina Petrowska

Quilico, piano; Jiří Petrdlík, conductor. Glenn

Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W. 905-604-8339.

$15-$40. 7:15pm pre-concert recital; 7:30pm

pre-concert talk; intermission discussion

with Christina Petrowska Quilico.

●●8:00: TO Live. Youn Sun Nah. Toronto Centre

for the Arts, 5040 Yonge St., North York.

1-855-985-2787. $47-$71.

Sunday June 30

●●2:00: Mississauga Big Band Jazz Ensemble.

Jazz at the Legion. Port Credit Legion,

35 Front St. N., Port Credit. 905-270-4757.

PWYC.

●●3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Gustavo

Gimeno Conducts The Firebird. Sibelius:

Violin Concerto; Prokofiev: Symphony

No.1 “Classical”; Stravinsky: Suite from The

Firebird (1945 revision). Jonathan Crow, violin;

Gustavo Gimeno, conductor. Roy Thomson

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. $34.75-

$148. Also Jun 28 & 29(both at 7:30pm).

Post-concert chat with Gustavo Gimeno and

Matthew Loden.

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Four

Seasons, Four Viols: Vivaldi’s Quattro Stagioni

Revisited. Les Voix Humaines, viol quartet.

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay

W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

Monday July 1

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Jason Wilson’s

Sumach Roots. Jason Wilson Band. Church

of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521

x223. PWYC. Suggested donation $10.

●●8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Unionville

Canada Day Celebration. Beethoven:

Overture to King Stephen Op.117; J. Strauss:

Radetzky March; Ravel: Boléro; Brahms:

Hungarian Dance No.1; Saint-Saëns: Danse

macabre; Tchaikovsky: The Year 1812, solemn

overture, Op.49. Alexander Gangurean, violin;

Michael Berec, conductor. Unionville Millennium

Bandstand, 143 Main St., Unionville.

905-604-8339. Free.

Wednesday July 3

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Anwar Khurshid. Union Summer Stage,

65 Front St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●7:30: Etobicoke Community Concert Band.

Summer Concerts in the Park. Applewood/

The Shaver House, 450 The West Mall, Etobicoke.

416-410-1570. Free. Also Jun 19, Jul 17.

Thursday July 4

●●3:30: XV Latvian Festival of Song and

Dance in Canada. Concert of Latvian Sacred

Music. Works by Raminsh, Kenins, Ešenvalds,

SACRED MUSIC

JULY 4, 3:30PM

TRINITY-ST. PAUL’S

UNITED CHURCH

Purvs, Juris Kenins and others. Latvija State

Choir; and others; Lauma Akmene, organ;

Ilze Paegle, soprano; Maris Sirmais and Brigita

Alks, conductors. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,

427 Bloor St. W. songfesttickets.com.

$30/$40. Festival runs Jul 4-7.

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Tastes

of Home: New Music for Traditional Chinese

& Korean Instruments. Amely Zhou, erhu;

Lipeng Wu, dizi; Roa Lee, gayageum, Evan

Lamberton, cello. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

Friday July 5

CONCERT OF LATVIAN

ORCHESTRAL &

CHAMBER MUSIC

JULY 5, 4:00PM

KOERNER HALL

●●4:00: XV Latvian Festival of Song and

Dance in Canada. Concert of Latvian

Orchestral and Chamber Music. Kenins:

Scherzo concertante; Kalnins: Violin Concerto

in f-sharp; Raminsh: Aria for violin and

piano; Ritmanis: Overture to Light; and other

works. Laura Zarina, violin; Arthur Ozolins,

piano; Janis Laurs, cello; and others; members

of COC orchestra; Maris Sirmais, conductor.

Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor

St. W. 416-408-0208. $45/$55. Festival runs

Jul 4-7.

●●7:30: XV Latvian Festival of Song and

Dance in Canada. State Choir Latvija

STATE CHOIR

LATVIJA

JULY 5, 7:30PM

KOERNER HALL

Canadian Concert Debut. Works by Raminsh,

Kenins, Ešenvalds, Vasks, Tormiss and others.

Maris Sirmais, conductor. Koerner Hall,

Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208.

$45/$55. Festival runs Jul 4-7.

Saturday July 6

●●3:00: MRG Concerts. The Strumbellas.

Guests: Dan Mangan; Donovan Woods; Dizzy.

Royal Botanical Gardens, 680 Plains Rd. W., Burlington.

905-926-6440 or eventbrite.ca. $65;

free(child under 10 accompanied by adult);

$149.50(VIP package).

MASS CHOIR

CONCERT

JULY 6, 3:00PM

MATTAMY

ATHLETIC CENTRE

●●3:00: XV Latvian Festival of Song and

Dance in Canada. Mass Choir Concert. Works

by Beloglazovs, G.J. Kenins, Pinsonneault,

Purvs, T. Kenins and others. Mattamy Athletic

Centre, 50 Carleton St. 416-408-0208

or songfesttickets.com. $50-$60. Festival

runs Jul 4-7.

Sunday July 7

●●1:00: Opticianado. Sarah & Filthy Rich.

Sarah Dishart and Filthy Rich serve sweet

covers live at Opticianado until 4pm.

2919 Dundas St. W. 416-604-2020. Free.

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Tea

for Three. Cénacle. Toronto Music Garden,

66 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

●●4:00: XV Latvian Festival of Song and

Dance in Canada. Folk Dance Spectacle.

Works by Beloglazovs, G.J. Kenins, Pinsonneault,

Purvs, T. Kenins, and others. Raxtu

Raxti folk ensemble; 300-voice festival choir;

over 1000 Latvian folk dancers. Mattamy Athletic

Centre, 50 Carleton St. 416-408-0208

or songfesttickets.com. $50-$60. Festival

runs Jul 4-7.

Monday July 8

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Unspoken Poetry.

Haydn: Quartet in C Op.74; works written

by female composers. Interro String Quartet.

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.

416-598-4521 x223. PWYC. Suggested donation

$10.

Wednesday July 10

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Baobá. Union Summer Stage, 65 Front St. W.

416-536-5439. Free.

●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints Kingsway.

Kingsway Organ Concert Series. Zoe

Kai Wai Lei, organ. All Saints Kingsway Anglican

Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-571-3680

or organixconcerts.ca. Free-will offering

appreciated.

●●7:30: Nocturnes in the City. Clarinet Factory.

Jazz group from Prague. Prague Restaurant

at Masaryktown, 450 Scarborough

Golf Club Rd. 416-481-7294. $20 at the door.

Thursday July 11

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden.

Mistrāl: Songs from around the Mediterranean.

Tamar Ilana; Ventanas Ensemble.

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W.

harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Opening

Night: Beyond Borders. R. Strauss: Vier

letze Lieder; Ravel: Cinq mélodies populaires

grecques; Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen Op.20;

Mozart: Piano Sonata No.11 in A K331; Chopin:

Ballade No.4 in f Op.52; works by Kreisler

and others. Adrianne Pieczonka, soprano;

Jon Kimura Parker, piano; Kerson Leong, violin;

Steven Philcox, piano; New Orford String

Quartet; Tom Allen, host. Koerner Hall, Telus

Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208.

$20-$82.

Friday July 12

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Celebrating

10 Years. Haydn: String Quartet No.34

in D Op.20; Christos Hatzis: String Quartet

No.5 “The Transforming” (world premiere);

Beethoven: String Quartet No.9 in

C Op.59 No.3. New Orford String Quartet.

Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.

416-408-0208. $20-$56.

Saturday July 13

●●1:00: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Art Song & Chamber Music. Singers,

pianists and chamber musicians from

the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s Art

of Song program and Chamber Music Institute;

New Orford String Quartet. Walter

Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$10-$20. Also Jul 13(4pm, 7:30pm), 20(1pm,

4pm, 7:30pm).

●●4:00: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Art Song & Chamber Music. Singers,

pianists and chamber musicians from

the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s Art

of Song program and Chamber Music Institute;

New Orford String Quartet. Walter

Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$10-$20. Also Jul 13(1pm, 7:30pm), 20(1pm,

4pm, 7:30pm).

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Art Song & Chamber Music. Singers,

pianists and chamber musicians from

the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s Art

of Song program and Chamber Music Institute;

New Orford String Quartet. Walter

Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$10-$20. Also Jul 13(1pm, 4pm), 20(1pm, 4pm,

7:30pm).

Monday July 15

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Chamber Music

Concert. Works by Weber and Ravel. Marco

Verza, clarinet; Odin String Quartet. Church

of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521

KINDRED SPIRITS ORCHESTRA

10 th anniversary concert season

Saturday, June 29, 2019, 8 pm

CBC Glenn Gould Studio

HINDEMITH

Symphonic Metamorphosis

MATHIEU

Piano concerto No. 4

PROKOFIEV

Symphony No. 2 Jiri Petrdlik Christina Petrowska Quilico

conductor

416.645.9090 250 Front St. W

Ticke tPro.ca Toronto Gleoa Go,ld Swdio

pianist



You be/0Y19.

x223. PWYC. Suggested donation $10.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Crossings:

In the Footsteps of the Griot. Ablaye Cissoko,

griot storyteller; Constantinople. Walter

Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$20-$56.

Tuesday July 16

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Griffey &

Jones in Recital. Works by Dowland, Ives and

Beach. Anthony Dean Griffey, tenor; Warren

Jones, piano. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson

Building, University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s

Park. 416-408-0208. $20-$56.

Wednesday July 17

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Fränder. Union Summer Stage, 65 Front St.

W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●7:30: Etobicoke Community Concert Band.

Summer Concerts in the Park. Applewood/

The Shaver House, 450 The West Mall, Etobicoke.

416-410-1570. Free. Also Jun 19, Jul 3.

●●7:30: Oshawa Civic Band. Stage & Screen.

Mile: Music; Lloyd Webber: Phantom of the

Opera; R. and R. Sherman: Mary Poppins; and

other works. Guests: Whitby Brass Band. R.S.

McLaughlin Bandshell, 110 Simcoe St. S., Oshawa.

info@oshawacivicband.ca. Free.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Dover Quartet.

Britten: String Quartet No.1 in D Op.25;

Bartók: String Quartet No.3; Dvořák: String

Quartet in F Op.96 “American”. Koerner Hall,

Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208.

$20-$82.

Thursday July 18

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Passion

and Solace: Early 20th Century Duos

for Violin and Cello. Works by Kodály, Ravel,

Glière. Andréa Tyniec, violin; Stéphane

Tétreault, cello. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Voices

Across the Atlantic. Monteverdi: Madrigals;

Brahms: Vocal Quartets; Britten: “Still falls the

rain” and “The Journey of the Magi”; Barber:

Dover Beach. Toronto Summer Music Academy

Vocal Fellows; Steven Philcox, harpsichord;

Daniel Taylor, countertenor/conductor.

Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W. 416-

408-0208. $90. Post-concert reception.

VOICES

ACROSS THE

ATLANTIC

July 18 at

Church of the Redeemer

Friday July 19

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Charles

Richard-Hamelin. Rachmaninoff: Morceaux

de fantaisie Op.3; Chopin: Andante spianato

et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat

Op.22; Brahms: Piano Quartet No.1 in g Op.25.

Charles Richard-Hamelin, piano; Members

of the Dover Quartet. Walter Hall, Edward

Johnson Building, University of Toronto,

80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208. $20-$56.

Saturday July 20

●●12:00 noon: BIG on Bloor Festival. Sonic

Future Bloor. Keynes Woods, Selené, Jeff

Burke, and others. Bloor Collegiate Institute,

1141 Bloor St. W. 416-801-5910. Free.

●●1:00: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Art Song & Chamber Music. Singers,

pianists and chamber musicians from

the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s Art of

Song program and Chamber Music Institute;

Dover Quartet; Charles Richard-Hamelin,

piano. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,

University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park.

416-408-0208. $10-$20. Also Jul 13(4pm,

7:30pm), 20(1pm, 4pm, 7:30pm).

●●1:30: Oshawa Civic Band. Music in the Gardens.

Bratton: Teddy Bear’s Picnic; Saint-

Saëns: The Swan; Williams: Jurassic Park;

and other works. Oshawa Museum, Henry

House lawn, 1450 Simcoe St. S., Lakeview

Park, Oshawa. info@oshawacivicband.ca.

Free.

●●4:00: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Art Song & Chamber Music. Singers,

pianists and chamber musicians from

the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s Art of

Song program and Chamber Music Institute;

Dover Quartet; Charles Richard-Hamelin,

piano. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,

University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park.

416-408-0208. $10-$20. Also Jul 13(1pm,

7:30pm), 20(1pm, 4pm, 7:30pm).

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Art Song & Chamber Music. Singers,

pianists and chamber musicians from

the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s Art of

Song program and Chamber Music Institute;

Dover Quartet; Charles Richard-Hamelin,

piano. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,

University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-

408-0208. $10-$20. Also Jul 13(1pm, 4pm),

20(1pm, 4pm, 7:30pm).

Sunday July 21

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden.

Global Inspirations. Works by Reich, Wijeratne,

and members of TorQ. TorQ Percussion

Quartet. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

Monday July 22

●●12:15: Music Mondays. A Musical Journey

Through China & Iran. Wendy Zhou, Chinese

pipa; Padideh Ahrarnejad, Persian tar;

Ali Massoudi, percusssion. Church of the

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223.

PWYC(suggested donation $10).

●●7:30: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.

In Concert. Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet

Op.63; Panufnik: Sinfonia Sacra; Mahler:

Symphony No.5; Brahms: Concerto for Violin

and Cello Op.102. Michael Francis, conductor.

Maison Symphonique de Montreal,

1600 Saint-Urbain, Montreal. 514-842-2112.

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 67


$29.95.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Kleztory.

Klezmer music from the late 19th century to

the klezmer revival of the 1970s to the 21st

century return to klezmer’s pre-jazz traditions.

Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,

University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-

408-0208. $20-$56.

Tuesday July 23

Organized

Crime Duo

in concert

July 23

7:30 p.m.

organixconcerts.ca

●●7:30: Organix Concerts/Timothy Eaton

Memorial Church. Organized Crime Duo.

Rachel Mahon and Sarah Svendsen, organ.

Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair

Ave. W. 416-571-3680 or organixconcerts.ca.

$35/$25(RCCO members).

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Rolston

String Quartet. Lula Lounge, 1585 Dundas St.

W. 416-408-0208. $20.

Wednesday July 24

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Waleed Kush. Union Summer Stage, 65 Front

St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●12:30: Organix Concerts/All Saints Kingsway.

Kingsway Organ Concert Series. Christopher

Reynolds, organ. All Saints Kingsway

Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. 416-571-

3680 or organixconcerts.ca. Free-will offering

appreciated.

●●7:30: 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music

Festival. Opening Night. Mozart: Piano

Concerto No.23 in A, K488; Tchaikovsky:

Piano Concerto in B-flat. Sabina Rzazade,

piano; Kerry Duwors and Katie Gannon, violins;

and others; Alla Turbanova and Paul

Shore, hosts; Alexander Tselyakov and Daniel

Tselyakov, artistic directors and pianos.

Lorne Watson Recital Hall, Brandon University,

School of Music, 270-18th St., Brandon.

204-571-6547. $15-$25/$90(fest. pass);

$70(sr fest. pass); $35(st fest. pass). Wine

and cheese reception follows. Festival runs

Jul 24-28.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Collectìf.

Mahler: Kindertotenlieder (selections); Canadian

folk song arrangements; and other

works. Collectìf. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson

Building, University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s

Park. 416-408-0208. $20-$56.

A. Concerts in the GTA

Thursday July 25

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Inner

Journey V. Rumi Canada. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

●●7:30: 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music

Festival. Concert 2: Chamber Masterworks

I. Liszt: Piano Concerto No.2 in

A; Shostakovich: Piano Quintet Op.57.

Kerry Duwors and Katie Gannon, violins;

and others; Alla Turbanova and

Paul Shore, hosts; Alexander Tselyakov

and Daniel Tselyakov, artistic directors

and pianos. Lorne Watson Recital

Hall, Brandon University, School of Music,

270-18th St., Brandon. 204-571-6547. $15-

$25/$90(fest. pass); $70(sr fest. pass);

$35(st fest. pass). Festival runs Jul 24-28.

FROM FRANZ

SCHUBERT TO

FREDDIE MERCURY

July 25 at Koerner Hall

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. From Franz

Schubert to Freddie Mercury. Sarah Slean,

vocalist; John Southworth, singer/songwriter;

Art of Time Ensemble. Koerner Hall,

Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208.

$20-$82.

●●10:30: Toronto Summer Music. TSM Late

Night. Beethoven: String Quartet No.13 in

B-flat Op.130; Grosse Fuge Op.133. Jonathan

Crow, violin; Toronto Summer Music Academy

Fellows. Koerner Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor

St. W. 416-408-0208. $16-$38.

Friday July 26

●●7:30: 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival.

Concert 3: Chamber Masterworks II.

Mendelssohn: Piano Sextet Op.110; Shostakovich:

Concertino for 2 pianos; Saint-Saëns:

Carnival of the Animals. Alla Turbanova and

Sabina Rzazade pianos; and others; Paul

Shore, host; Alexander Tselyakov and Daniel

Tselyakov, artistic directors and pianos.

Lorne Watson Recital Hall, Brandon University,

School of Music, 270-18th St., Brandon.

204-571-6547. $15-$25/$90(fest. pass);

$70(sr fest. pass); $35(st fest. pass). Festival

runs Jul 24-28.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Souvenir

de Florence. Tchaikovsky: Pezzo Capriccioso

Op.62; String Sextet in d Op.70 “Souvenir de

Florence”; Prokofiev: Five Melodies for Violin

and Piano Op.35-bis; Debussy: Piano Trio

in G. Jonathan Crow, violin; Jennifer Koh, violin;

Beth Guterman, viola; Julie Albers, cello;

Yegor Dyachkov, cello, Philip Chiu, piano. Walter

Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$20-$56.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La

traviata. Music by Verdi. Robert Gill Theatre,

University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-

366-7723. $28. Also Jul 28(2pm); 31(2pm);

Aug 3(8pm).

Saturday July 27

●●11:00am: 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music

Festival. Coffee Concert: Serious Fun!

Works by Shchedrin, Gershwin, Shaw, Piazzolla,

Heisler and others. Nancy Hennen,

flute; Cris Byman, clarinet; Alla Turbanova,

piano; Paul Shore, host; Alexander Tselyakov

and Daniel Tselyakov, artistic directors

and pianos. Erickson Lutheran Church,

30 Third St. SW, Erickson. 204-571-6547.

$15-$25/$90(fest. pass); $70(sr fest. pass);

$35(st fest. pass). Coffee and pastries. Festival

runs Jul 24-28.

●●1:00: Toronto Summer Music. reGENERA-

TION: Source and Inspiration. Where the 19th

century meets the 21st - The Dvořák Piano

Quintet and the contemporary pop songs it

inspired. Rolston String Quartet; Sarah Slean

and John Southworth, singers/songwriters;

Art of Time Ensemble. Walter Hall, Edward

Johnson Building, University of Toronto,

80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208. $10-$20.

●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.

Earnest, The Importance of Being. By Victor

Davies and Eugene Benson. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 30(8pm);

Aug 1(8pm); 4(2pm).

●●4:00: Toronto Summer Music. reGENER-

ATION: Chamber Music. Chamber musicians

from the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s

Chamber Music Institute; Jennifer Koh, Beth

Guterman Chu, Julie Albers, Yegor Dyachkov,

Philip Chiu. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson

Building, University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s

Park. 416-408-0208. $10-$20. Also 7:30pm.

●●7:30: 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival.

Jazz Concert. Michael Cain, jazz piano;

Eric Platz, drums; Diogo Peixoto, guitar; Julian

Bradford, bass; Alexander Tselyakov and Daniel

Tselyakov, artistic directors. Wasagaming

Community Arts Gallery, 110 Wasagaming

Dr., Wasagaming (Clear Lake), Riding Mountain

National Park. 204-571 6547; 204-727

9631; 204-573 2423. $15-$25/$90(fest. pass);

$70(sr fest. pass); $35(st fest. pass). Festival

runs July 24-28.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. reGENERA-

TION: Chamber Music. Chamber musicians

from the Toronto Summer Music Academy’s

Chamber Music Institute; Jennifer Koh, Beth

Guterman Chu, Julie Albers, Yegor Dyachkov,

Philip Chiu. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson

Building, University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s

Park. 416-408-0208. $10-$20. Also 4pm.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Riders

to the Sea and Gianni Schicchi. Music by

Vaughan Williams and Puccini. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 31(8pm);

Aug 2(8pm); 3(2pm).

Sunday July 28

●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La

traviata. Music by Verdi. Robert Gill Theatre,

University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-

366-7723. $28. Also Jul 26(2pm); 31(2pm);

Aug 3(8pm).

●●3:00: 14th Clear Lake Chamber Music Festival.

Festival Grand Finale. Saint-Saëns:

Romance Op.36 for flute and piano; Sonata

for clarinet and piano Op.167; Tarantella:

Op.6 for flute, clarinet and piano; Gershwin:

Rhapsody in Blue; Tchaikovsky: Scherzo

from 6th Symphony for two pianos 4 hands.

Nancy Hennen, flute, Cris Byman, clarinet;

Alla Turbanova, piano; Paul Shore host; Daniel

Tselyakov and Alexander Tselyakov, artistic

directors and pianos. Erickson Lutheran

Church, 30 Third St. SW, Erickson. 204-

571-6547. $15-$25/$90(fest. pass); $70(sr

fest. pass); $35(st fest. pass). Festival runs

Jul 24-28.

●●4:00: St. Olave’s Church. Patronal Festival.

Festal Evensong for St. Olave’s Eve. St. Olave’s

Anglican Church, 360 Windermere Ave. 416-

769-5686. Contributions appreciated. Followed

by barbecue.

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden.

Choro! Trio Chorinho; Guest: Flavia Nascimento.

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens

Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

Monday July 29

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Journey to Klezmer.

Jonno Lightstone; Brian Katz Klezmer

Duo. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.

416-598-4521 x223. PWYC. Suggested donation

$10.

●●7:30: National Youth Orchestra of Canada.

In Concert. Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet;

Panufnik: Sinfonia Sacra; Mahler: Symphony

No.5; Brahms: Concerto for Violin & Cello

Op.102. Michael Francis, conductor. Koerner

Hall, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-

0208. $23-$33.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Europe and

the New World. Franck: Sonata for Violin and

Piano in A; Corigliano: Sonata for Violin and

Piano; Brahms: Sonatensatz; Gershwin: Porgy

and Bess Suite (arr. Heifetz). Jonathan Crow,

violin; Philip Chiu, piano. Walter Hall, Edward

Johnson Building, University of Toronto,

80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208. $20-$56.

68 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Tuesday July 30

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Angela

Hewitt. Bach: Goldberg Variations. Angela

Hewitt, piano. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson

Building, University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s

Park. 416-408-0208. $20-$82. Pre-concert

chat with author and storyteller Madeleine

Thien.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.

Earnest, The Importance of Being. By Victor

Davies and Eugene Benson. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 27(2pm);

Aug 1(8pm); 4(2pm).

Wednesday July 31

●●12:00 noon: Small World - Summer Lunch.

Amadou Kienou. Union Summer Stage,

65 Front St. W. 416-536-5439. Free.

●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La

traviata. Music by Verdi. Robert Gill Theatre,

University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-

366-7723. $28. Also Jul 26(8pm); 28(2pm);

Aug 3(8pm).

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Ensemble

Made in Canada. Mozart: Piano Quartet No.2

in E-flat K493; Fauré: Piano Quartet No.1 in c

Op.15; and other works. Ensemble Made in

Canada. Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building,

University of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park.

416-408-0208. $20-$56.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Riders

to the Sea and Gianni Schicchi. Music by

Vaughan Williams and Puccini. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 27(8pm);

Aug 2(8pm); 3(2pm).

Thursday August 1

●●12:00 noon: Collingwood Summer Music

Festival. Underground Railway Story for the

Family - Diana Braithwaite & Chris Whiteley

Duo. Venue TBA. 705-445-2200 or 1-866-382-

2200. Free.

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden.

New and Special Ways. Haydn: Quartet in G

Op.33 No.5; Janáček: Quartet No.1 “Kreutzer

Sonata; Puccini: Crisantemi; Campbell:

Fiddle Tunes. New Zealand String Quartet.

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens

Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

SONG OF

THE EARTH

August 1 at Koerner Hall

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Song of

the Earth. Mozart: Violin Concerto No.5 in

A K219; Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde (arr.

Schoenberg/Riehn). Mario Bahg, tenor;

Rihab Chaleb, mezzo; Jonathan Crow, violin;

Gemma New, conductor. Koerner Hall,

Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208.

$20-$82.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.

Earnest, The Importance of Being. By Victor

Davies and Eugene Benson. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 27(2pm);

30(8pm); Aug 4(2pm).

Friday August 2

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Mendelssohn

Octet. Mendelssohn: Octet for Strings

in E-flat Op.20; Cowell: Homage to Iran; Sarasate:

Introduction et Tarantelle Op.43; Alexina

Louie: New Work (world premiere).

Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Elissa Lee, violin;

Aaron Schwebel, violin; Barry Shiffman, violin;

Hsin-Yu Huang, viola; and others. Walter

Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$20-$56.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Riders

to the Sea and Gianni Schicchi. Music by

Vaughan Williams and Puccini. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 27(8pm);

31(8pm); Aug 3(2pm).

Saturday August 3

●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Riders

to the Sea and Gianni Schicchi. Music by

Vaughan Williams and Puccini. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 27(8pm);

31(8pm); Aug 2(8pm).

●●3:00: Labyrinth Musical Workshop

Ontario. Labyrinth Flemingdon Concerts.

Flemingdon Park, 747 Don Mills Rd., North

Aug 5 - Stanford

Cheung

Aug 12 - Albert Seo

& Tristan Savella

Aug 19 - Michael

Arnowitt

Aug 26 - Kevin Ahfat

Sept 2 - Penrose Trio

www.musicmondays.ca

York. 647-702-8680. Free.

●●7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Toronto

Summer Music Finale. Performances by

TSM Artists, Academy Fellows, and Community

Academy participants. Walter Hall,

Edward Johnson Building, University of

Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-408-0208.

$20-$56.

●●8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La

traviata. Music by Verdi. Robert Gill Theatre,

University of Toronto, 214 College St. 416-

366-7723. $28. Also Jul 26(8pm); 28(2pm);

31(8pm).

Sunday August 4

●●2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.

Earnest, The Importance of Being. By Victor

Davies and Eugene Benson. Robert Gill

Theatre, University of Toronto, 214 College

St. 416-366-7723. $28. Also Jul 27(2pm);

30(8pm); Aug 1(8pm).

Monday August 5

●●12:15: Music Mondays. War of the Foxes.

Stanford Cheung. Church of the Holy Trinity,

19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223. PWYC. Suggested

donation $10.

Thursday August 8

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. From

Greece to Granados. Works by Theodorakis,

Lorca, and Falla. Maria Soulis, mezzo;

William Eauvais, guitar; Tanya Charles Iveniuk,

violin. Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens

Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

Saturday August 10

●●3:00: Labyrinth Musical Workshop

Ontario. Labyrinth Flemingdon Concerts.

Flemingdon Park, 747 Don Mills Rd., North

York. 647-702-8680. Free.

Sunday August 11

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Raags

of Love and Devotion. Ramneek Singh, voice;

Ravi Naimpally, tabla; Hardeep Chana, harmonium.

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens

Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

Monday August 12

●●12:15: Music Mondays. The Ageless Beauty

of Maturity. Korndorf: Triptych for Cello and

Piano; Brahms: Cello Sonata No.2 in F Op.99;

Beethoven: Sonata for Cello and Piano No.4

in C Op.102. Albert Seo, cello; Tristan Savella,

piano. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.

416-598-4521 x223. PWYC. Suggested donation

$10.

Thursday August 15

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden.

Voices from Eastern Europe. BLISK Quartet.

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens

Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.com/summermusic.

Free.

Saturday August 17

●●3:00: Labyrinth Musical Workshop

Ontario. Labyrinth Flemingdon Concerts.

Flemingdon Park, 747 Don Mills Rd., North

York. 647-702-8680. Free.

Sunday August 18

●●3:00: Ukrainian Art Song Project. Artists

in Performance. Vocal participants of

the 2019 Ukrainian Art Song Summer Institute;

Robert Kortgaard, piano; Albert Krywolt,

piano; Pavlo Hunka, artistic director,

commentary. Temerty Theatre, Telus Centre,

273 Bloor St. W. 416-346-8283 or ukrainianartsong.ca.

$37; $18(st).

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Laüsa:

Spark of Gascony. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

Monday August 19

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Michael Arnowitt’s

ImproVisions Jazz Quartet. Church of the

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223.

PWYC. Suggested donation $10.

Thursday August 22

●●7:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Something

Old, Something New. Works by Mozart,

Romberg, Downing, Brubek and Murphy.

VC2 Cello Duo. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

Friday August 23

●●7:00: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Opening Concert.

Previous Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition winners. John Paul II Polish

Cultural Centre, 4300 Cawthra Rd., Mississauga.

canadianchopinsociety.com.

$25; $15(st). For full festival details, see

ETCeteras pages.

●●7:30: Japan Foundation, Toronto. AGA-

SHIO: Japanese-Originated Contemporary

Music Concert. Kobayashi Hall. AGA-SHIO

(Hiromitsu Agatsuma, tsugaru shamisen;

Satoru Shionoya, piano). Japanese Canadian

Cultural Centre, 6 Garamond Ct.

416-441-2345 or jftor.org. $25; $22(JCCC

members).

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 69


AGA-SHIO

Tsugaru Shamisen

& Piano Duo

August 23 7:30PM

Kobayashi Hall @JCCC

www.jftor.org

Saturday August 24

●●10:00am: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Senior Division

Preliminary Round. Mazzoleni Concert Hall,

Royal Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

Free. For full festival

details see ETCeteras section.

●●3:00: Labyrinth Musical Workshop

Ontario. Labyrinth Flemingdon Concerts.

Flemingdon Park, 747 Don Mills Rd., North

York. 647-702-8680. Free.

A. Concerts in the GTA

CANADIAN

CHOPIN

SOCIETY

●●7:00: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Insights: An Evening

with Alan Walker. Mazzoleni Concert Hall,

Royal Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

$25; $15(st). For full

festival details see ETCeteras section.

Sunday August 25

●●10:00am: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Senior Division

Preliminary Round. Mazzoleni Concert Hall,

Royal Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

Free. For full festival

details see ETCeteras section.

●●4:00: Summer Music in the Garden. Duetto

Violoncello. Works by Bach, Cirri, Thomas

and Dall’Abaco. Elinor Frey and Phoebe Carrai,

baroque cellos. Toronto Music Garden,

479 Queens Quay W. harbourfrontcentre.

com/summermusic. Free.

●●7:00: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Conversations:

An Evening with the Jury. Mazzoleni Concert

Hall, Royal Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

$25; $15(st). For full

festival details see ETCeteras section.

Monday August 26

●●10:00am: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Senior Division

Semi-Finals. Mazzoleni Concert Hall, Royal

Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

Free. For full festival details

see ETCeteras section.

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Of Foreign Lands

and Peoples. Kevin Ahfat, piano. Church of the

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 x223.

The Fifth

Canadian Chopin

Piano Competition

and Festival

August 23 - 29, 2019

The Royal Conservatory

Toronto, Ontario

Highlights include:

An evening with Alan Walker

Solo Recital by Krzysztof Jablonski

Competition Finals in Koerner Hall

For more information please visit:

www.canadianchopinsociety.com

PWYC. Suggested donation $10.

●●7:00: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Portraits: Words

and Music. Mazzoleni Concert Hall, Royal

Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

$25; $15(st). For full festival

details see ETCeteras section.

Tuesday August 27

●●10:00am: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Junior Division

Preliminary Round. Mazzoleni Concert Hall,

Royal Conservatory, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

Free. For full festival

details see ETCeteras section.

Wednesday August 28

●●7:00: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Piano Recital.

Krzysztof Jablonski, piano. Koerner Hall, Telus

Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

$40-$60. For full festival details see

ETCeteras section.

B. Concerts Beyond the GTA

Thursday August 29

●●2:00: The Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano

Competition and Festival. Junior Division

& Senior Division Finals. Koerner Hall, Telus

Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.com.

$30-$50. Note: Ticket price includes

all events on Aug 29. For full festival details

see ETCeteras section.

●●7:00: Fifth Canadian Chopin Piano Competition

and Festival. Senior Division Finals &

Awards Ceremony. Koerner Hall, Telus Centre,

273 Bloor St. W. canadianchopinsociety.

com. $30-$50. Note ticket price includes all

events on Aug 29. For full festival details see

ETCeteras section.

Monday September 2

●●12:15: Music Mondays. Penrose Trio.

Brahms: Piano Trio in B Op.8; and other

works. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity

Sq. 416-598-4521 x223. PWYC. Suggested

donation $10

IN THIS ISSUE: Barrie, Bracebridge, Brantford, Campbellford,

Collingwood, Corbyville, Elora, Fergus, Gravenhurst,

Haliburton, Hamilton, Hastings, Hillier, Ingersoll, Kingston,

Kitchener, Leith, London, Midland, Minden, Niagara-on-the-

Lake, Orillia, Parry Sound, Picton, Port Hope, Shelburne,

Stratford, Trenton, Warkworth, Waterloo, Wellington

Saturday June 1

●●2:00: Westben. From the Top! 20th Anniversary

Celebration. Excerpts from The

Sound of Music, Fiddler on the Roof, The

Selfish Giant, Joseph and the Technicolour

Dreamcoat, and other works. Donna Bennett,

soprano; Virginia Hatfield, soprano; Kim

Dafoe, mezzo; Gabrielle Prata, mezzo; Mark

DuBois, tenor; and others; Westben Choruses

& Alumni. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $20; $15(under

30); $5(under 19). Also Jun 2.

●●7:30: Barrie Concert Band. 150 Years -

Let’s Celebrate! Pauze: New work; and other

works. Mark Tetrault, tuba; Peter Volsey,

music director; and former conductors of the

Barrie Concert Band. Collier Street United

Church, 112 Collier St., Barrie. 705-252-3484.

$20; $10(st); free(5 and under).

●●7:30: Cellar Singers. The Road Less Travelled.

Works by R. Murray Schafer, Derek

Heleay and Harry Somers. St. James Anglican

Church (Orillia), 58 Peter St. N., Orillia. thecellarsingers.com.

$25; $10(under 30).

●●7:30: Kokoro Singers. Eclectic - Ah! Scarlatti:

Exsultate Deo; K. A. Arnesen: Flight Song;

A. Edenroth: Bumble Bee. Brenda Uchimaru,

conductor. Rockway Mennonite Church,

47 Onward Ave., Kitchener. 905-630-0748.

$20; $15(sr/st); free(under 13). Tickets at the

door, cash only. Also May 26(mat, Ancaster).

Sunday June 2

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer

Concerts. Works by Turina, Rodrigo, Albéniz,

Tarrega, Scarlatti and others. Adam Cicchillitti,

guitar. St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston),

270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill

donations.

●●2:00: SweetWater Music Festival. Next

Wave Showcase. Olivia Adams, piano; Adrian

Little, piano; Anne Perone, piano; Adams and

Busch, piano duo; Vanessa Bosman, vocals;

Cydney Morris, vocals; Jeffrey Palk, cello; Emily

Weaver, clarinet; Suwan Yu, flute. Historic Leith

Church, 419134 Tom Thomson Lane, Leith. 519-

477-1403. By donation ($10 suggested).

●●2:00: Westben. From the Top! See Jun 1.

●●3:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Community

Orchestra. Youth Concerto Concert. Mendelssohn:

Wedding March; Ravel: Menuet

from Le tombeau de Couperin; Bizet: Farandole

from L’Arlésienne Suite No.2; Sibelius:

Valse triste; Mussorgsky: Night on Bald

Mountain. Knox Presbyterian Church (Waterloo),

50 Erb St. W., Waterloo. kwcommunityorchestra@gmail.com.

$18; $15(univ or

college st); free(high school st or younger).

●●3:00: Rosewood Consort. Love, Loss, and

Passion: A Musical Tour of Renaissance Europe.

Works by des Prez, Willaert, Susato,

Palestrina and others. David Federman, conductor.

Grace Lutheran Church (Hamilton),

1107 Main St. W., Hamilton. 905-648-5607. By

donation at the door.

Wednesday June 5

●●12:00 noon: Midday Music with Shigeru. Vocal

Recital. Works by Mozart, Korngold, Schubert,

Wagner, Liszt, and Choi. Clarence Frazer, baritone;

Julie Choi, piano. Hiway Pentecostal Church,

50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-726-1181. $10; free(st).

Thursday June 6

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer

Concerts. Works by Bach, Bertino and Castelnuovo-Tedesco.

SHHH!! Ensemble (Zac

Pulak, percussion; Edana Higham, piano). St.

George’s Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E.,

Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill donations.

Friday June 7

●●8:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music

70 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


Society. QuartetFest I. Schubert: Winterreise

(arr. for string quartet and voice); and other

works. Daniel Lichti, baritone. Maureen Forrester

Recital Hall, 75 University Ave., Waterloo.

519-886-1673. $40; $25(st).

●●8:00: St. George’s Cathedral. June Choirs

Festival: Opening Choral Concert. Libertas

Male Choir; Groot Mannenkoor Nederland.

St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King

St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617 or

stgeorgescathedral.ca. $20.

Saturday June 8

●●7:30: À La Mode Choir. Phoenix: Rising From

the Ashes of Adversity. Works by Whitacre,

Runestad, Tin and Sirett. À La Mode Choir;

Kanto Vocal Ensemble; EmBoddiement Gospel

Trio; Erika Reiman, piano. Church of the Ascension

(Hamilton), 64 Forest Ave., Hamilton. 289-

689-8056. $20; free(under 12). Refreshments.

Parking available. Wheelchair accessible.

●●7:30: Arcady. Voices of Summer. New

music by Ronald Beckett. 2019 Arcady Emerging

Artists; Arcady Singers, Arcady Youth

Chorus. Central Presbyterian Church (Brantford),

97 Wellington St., Brantford. 519-428-

3185. $25; $10(st); free(under 12).

●●8:00: Gravenhurst Opera House. The Jive

Bombers. Johnny Max, vocalist. 295 Muskoka

Rd. S., Gravenhurst. 705-687-5550. $40;

$20(st); $30(groups of 10+).

Peace by Piece

Ontario Handbell

Festival 2019

June 6 - June 8

Fanshawe College

London, ON

ogehr.ca/festival2019

●●8:00: Ontario Guild of English Handbell

Ringers. Festival 2019: Peace by Piece. Featuring

300 handbell ringers from across

Ontario with piano, flute and violin accompaniment.

Peace in Our Time; Serenity, Joyance;

Make Me an Instrument of Thy Peace;

The Lord’s My Shepherd; and other works.

Stuart Sladden and Lisa Kyriakides, directors.

Fanshawe College, 1001 Fanshawe College

Blvd., London. 905-891-1650. $20; $10(st).

Free parking (Lots 4 & 6).

Sunday June 9

●●2:00: Westben. Sounds of a Better World.

Music from Mary Poppins, The Greatest

Showman, Prayer from Hansel & Gretel, Lavender’s

Blue, Try Everything and many more.

Westben Youth, Teen, B Natural, Cookie Choruses;

(Donna Bennett & Brian Finley, directors);

Westben Community Bands (Nancy

B. Concerts Beyond the GTA

Elmhirst, director). The Barn, 6698 County

Road 30, Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $10;

$5(under 19).

Monday June 10

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. June Choirs

Festival: Didgori Ensemble. Traditional Georgian

folk and chant music. St. George’s Cathedral

(Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-

4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca. Freewill offering.

June Choirs Festival runs Jun 7-22.

Wednesday June 12

●●2:30: Seniors Serenade. Top Students of

Cheryl Graham. Bethel Community Church,

128 St. Vincent Street, Barrie. 705-726-1181. Free.

●●7:30: St. George’s Cathedral. June Choirs

Festival: St. Martin’s Boy’s Choir. St. George’s

Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.

613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca.

$25/$20(adv). Also June 13. June Choirs Festival

runs June 7-22.

Thursday June 13

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer

Concerts. Works by Rachmaninoff, Grieg,

and John Beckwith. Peletsis-Dardykina

Piano Duo. St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston),

270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617. Freewill

donations.

●●7:30: St. George’s Cathedral. June Choirs

Festival: St. Martin’s Boy’s Choir. St. George’s

Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.

613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca.

$25/$20(adv). Also June 12. June Choirs Festival

runs June 7 to June 22.

Friday June 14

●●7:00: Vera Causa Opera. Canadian Opera

Fest 2019. The Village Girl (concept by Chloe

Bissada, words and music by Dylan Langan);

Refracted (words by Charlotte Lilley and music

by Emma Verdonk); La jugement (words by

Emma Lemieux and music by Dylan Langan);

The Shoemaker’s Orphans (words by Rivi and

Kyri Friedman and music by Emma Verdonk);

L’étrange et belle (words by Leslie McCorkindale

and Vanessa Parr with music by Dylan

Langan). Cambridge Centre for the Arts,

60 Dickson St., Cambridge. vcopera.ca or 519-

277-9277. $15; free(st/child). Also Jun 15(7pm,

Waterloo), 16(2pm, Guelph).

Saturday June 15

●●3:00: 5 at the First Chamber Players.

Beethoven Blowout I. Beethoven: Complete

Sonatas for piano and cello; selections from

Downing: Five Little Pieces; Weinroth-Browne:

Triumvirate; Evans: Evans Ridge & Furrow; Brubeck:

Entsprechung; and others. Mercer-Park

Duo; VC2 Cello Duo. First Unitarian Church,

Hamilton, 170 Dundurn St. S., Hamilton. 905-

399-5125. $20; $15(sr); $5(st). Also at 7pm.

●●7:00: 5 at the First Chamber Players.

Beethoven Blowout II. Beethoven: Complete

Sonatas for piano and cello; selections from

Downing: Five Little Pieces; Weinroth-Browne:

Triumvirate; Evans: Evans Ridge & Furrow; Brubeck:

Entsprechung; and others. Mercer-Park

Duo; VC2 Cello Duo. First Unitarian Church,

Hamilton, 170 Dundurn St. S., Hamilton. 905-

399-5125. $20; $15(sr); $5(st). Also at 3pm.

●●7:00: Vera Causa Opera. Canadian Opera Fest

2019. See Jun 14. Knox Presbyterian Church

(Waterloo), 50 Erb St. W., Waterloo. vcopera.

ca or 519-277-9277. $15; free(st/child). Also

5 at the First

Mercer-Park

Duo

Hamilton

VC2 Cello

Duo

SAT, JUNE 15

Beethoven Blowout I, 3pm

Beethoven Blowout II, 7pm

WWW.5ATTHEFIRST.COM

Jun 14(7pm, Cambridge), 16(2pm, Guelph).

●●7:00: Westben. CDHS Music Night. Campbellford

District High School Music Ensembles;

Dave Noble, director. The Barn,

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 877-

883-5777. $10; $5(under 19).

Sunday June 16

●●2:00: Vera Causa Opera. Canadian Opera

Fest 2019. See Jun 14. Harcourt Memorial

United Church, 87 Dean Ave., Guelph. vcopera.

ca or 519-277-9277. $15; free(st/child). Also

Jun 14(7pm, Cambridge), 15(7pm, Waterloo).

Wednesday June 19

●●12:00 noon: Music at St. Andrew’s. Organ

Recital. Andrew Adair, organ. St. Andrew’s

Presbyterian Church (Barrie), 47 Owen St.,

Barrie. 705-726-1181. $10; free(st).

Thursday June 20

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral. Summer

Concerts. Works by Buxtehude, Ravel, Houbart,

David McIntyre, and Pierre Cholley. Tom

Fitches, organ. St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston),

270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617.

Freewill donations.

●●7:00: Zula. Something Else! Festival. Earth

Wind & Choir; Yves Charuest, alto sax; Indigenous

Mind; William Hooker, drums/percussion/poetry.

Church of St. John the Evangelist,

320 Charlton Ave. W., Hamilton. zulapresents.

org. $30-$35/$25(adv). Festival runs Jun 20-23.

●●8:00: Orchestra Breva. Eroica: A Sesquicentennial

Tribute to Laura Secord. Beethoven:

Eroica Symphony; Gluck: Iphigénie en Aulide

Overture; Newly commissioned works. Melanie

Paul Tanovich, conductor. Ingersoll

Cheese and Agricultural Museum, 290 Harris

St., Ingersoll. 519-980-1113. $40/$35(adv);

$30(sr)/$25(adv); $20(st)/$15(adv);

$10(child)/$5(adv). Also June 21(Sanderson

Centre, Brantford), 23(2pm, Queenston

Heights Park, Niagara-on-the-Lake).

Friday June 21

●●12:00 noon: Zula. Something Else! Festival.

The Archives of Eternity; Jason Adasiewcz,

vibraphone; Brodie West, alto sax; Hamid Drake,

drums/percussion; Iva Bittová, violin/vocals.

Whitehern House and Garden, 41 Jackson St.

W., Hamilton. zulapresents.org. Free. Donations

accepted. Festival runs Jun 20-23.

●●7:00: Zula. Something Else! Festival.

Picastro; Gilliam/Milmine/Pottie; Hooker/

Charuest/Newsome/Eguiluz; Iva Bittová, violin/vocals;

Hamid Drake, drums/percussion.

Church of St. John the Evangelist, 320 Charlton

Ave. W., Hamilton. zulapresents.org. $30-

$35/$25(adv). Festival runs Jun 20-23.

●●8:00: Orchestra Breva. Eroica: A Sesquicentennial

Tribute to Laura Secord. Beethoven:

Eroica Symphony; Gluck: Iphigénie en Aulide

Overture; Newly commissioned works. Melanie

Paul Tanovich, conductor. Sanderson Centre for

the Performing Arts, 88 Dalhousie St., Brantford.

519-758-8090. $40; $30(sr); $20(st);

$10(child); free(veterans). Advance discounts

available. Also June 20(Ingersoll Cheese & Agricultural

Museum, Ingersoll), 23(2pm, Queenston

Heights Park, Niagara-on-the-Lake).

Saturday June 22

●●1:00: Zula. Something Else! Festival. Sara

Schoenbeck, bassoon; Harris Eisenstadt’s

Poschiavo 50 Ensembles; Joshua Abrams,

double bass/guimbri; No Silenz. Church

of St. John the Evangelist, 320 Charlton

Ave. W., Hamilton. zulapresents.org. $30-

$35/$25(adv). Festival runs Jun 20-23.

●●7:00: Zula. Something Else! Festival. Tidal Pool;

Eguiluz Trio; Iva Bittová, violin/vocals; Indigenous

Mind. Church of St. John the Evangelist,

320 Charlton Ave. W., Hamilton. zulapresents.

org. $30-$35/$25(adv). Festival runs Jun 20-23.

●●7:30: St. George’s Cathedral. June Choirs

Festival: Stratford Concert Choir. St. George’s

Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.

613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca.

$25/$20(adv). Also Jun 12. June Choirs Festival

runs Jun 7-22.

●●8:00: Night Kitchen Too. In Concert.

Invited musicians, poets and spoken word

artists. Henry’s Place, 79 River Rd., Corbyville.

613-849-1976. $10.

Sunday June 23

●●1:00: Westben. Annual Garden Gala

Fundraiser. Blend of musical styles fusing

orchestra breva

EROICA

A Sesquicentennial Tribute to

Laura Secord

Windsor | May 25

Tecumseh | May 26

Ingersoll | June 20

Brantford | June 21

Niagara-on-the-Lake | June 23

orchestrabreva.com

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 71


traditional Québécois music with jazz and

electronica. Marc Maziade, electric guitar,

banjo, vocals; Rémi Pagé, violin, foot percussion;

Roxane Beaulieu, keyboards, vocals;

Hugo Blouin, double bass. Garden, near

Campbellford, Campbellford. 877-883-5777.

$125 + tax. Includes luncheon by Chef Ravi

Anandappa and wine; silent auction.

●●1:00: Zula. Something Else! Festival. Joanna

Duda, piano/electronics; Eucalyptus; Sam

Newsome, soprano sax. Church of St. John

the Evangelist, 320 Charlton Ave. W., Hamilton.zulapresents.org.

$25$20(adv). Festival

runs Jun 20-23.

●●2:00: Orchestra Breva. Eroica: A Sesquicentennial

Tribute to Laura Secord. Beethoven:

Eroica Symphony; Gluck: Iphigénie en Aulide

Overture; Newly commissioned works. Melanie

Paul Tanovich, conductor. Queenston

Heights Park Bandshell, 14184 Niagara Parkway,

Niagara-on-the-Lake. 905-357-7808.

Free. Also June 20(8pm, Ingersoll Cheese

& Agricultural Museum, Ingersoll), 21(8pm,

Sanderson Centre, Brantford).

THE AMERICAN

SOUND

Sunday, June 23rd,

2pm

Art Gallery of Hamilton

CHAMBER

MUSIC

HAMILTON.CA

●●2:00: Chamber Music Hamilton. The

American Sound. Works by MacDowell,

Copland, Gershwin, Barber, Porter and

others. Caitlin Boyle, viola; Cameron Crozman,

cello; Michael Schulte, violin; Aaron

Schwebel, conductor. Art Gallery of Hamilton,

123 King St. W., Hamilton. 905-719-6457.

$35; $30(sr); $15(st).

●●5:00: Zula. Something Else! Festival. Sourpussy;

Ear-Cam; Don Byron, clarinets. Church

of St. John the Evangelist, 320 Charlton Ave.

W., Hamilton. zulapresents.org. $25$20(adv).

Festival runs Jun 20-23.

Saturday June 29

●●11:00am: Northumberland County. Multicultural

Festival. Music and dances from

around the world. Jerry Rivera. Memorial

Park, 56 Queen St., Port Hope. 905-372-

3329x6256. Free. Also 9pm.

●●7:30: Leith Summer Festival. Amor. Songs

from opera and the classical repertoire.

Krisztina Szabó, mezzo; Robert Kortgaard,

piano. Leith Church, 419134 Tom Thomson Ln.,

Leith. 519-371-2833. $35.

●●9:00: Northumberland County. Multicultural

Festival. Music and dances from

B. Concerts Beyond the GTA

around the world. Jerry Rivera. Memorial

Park, 56 Queen St., Port Hope. 905-372-

3329x6256. Free. Also 11am.

Sunday June 30

●●2:00: Westben. Viva Vivaldi! The Four

Seasons & Gloria. Amy Hillis, violin; Westben

Festival Orchestra & Chorus. The Barn,

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 877-

883-5777. $65; $63(sr); $15(under 30);

$5(under 19). 1:15pm: Pre-Concert Chat.

Wednesday July 3

●●12:00 noon: Midday Music with Shigeru.

Chamber Music Concert. Works by Fauré

and Saint-Saëns. Emma Meinrenken, violin;

Benjamin Smith, smith. Hiway Pentecostal

Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. 705-726-1181.

$10; free(st).

Thursday July 4

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer Concerts.

Chris Alfano Jazz Quartet. Tribute to

Benny Goodman. Avalon, Moonglow, Memories

of You and others. St. George’s Cathedral

(Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.

613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca. Free.

Freewill offering collected.

●●7:30: Brott Music Festival. PopOpera. Rossini:

Il barbiere di Siviglia (Sinfonia); Leoncavallo:

I pagliacci (Prologo); Strauss: Die Fledermaus

(Mein Herr Marquis); Mozart: Die Entführung

aus dem Serail (O wie will ich triumphieren);

Donizetti: L’elisir d’amore (Caro elisir, sei mio).

National Academy Orchestra; BrottOpera

Singers; Boris Brott, conductor. FirstOntario

Concert Hall, 1 Summers Ln., Hamilton. 905-

525-7664. $55; $50(sr); $20(st); $33(Brott35).

Festival runs Jun 27 to Aug 8.

Friday July 5

●●7:00: Westben. Basia Bulat. Folk singersongwriter.

Basia Bulat, autoharp, charango,

vocals. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $48; $46(sr);

$15(under 30); $5(under 19). 5pm: BBQ (reservations

required 48 hrs. prior).

Saturday July 6

●●2:00: Westben. Tony McManus. Celtic

guitarist. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $48; $46(sr);

$15(under 30); $5(under 19).

Sunday July 7

●●2:00: Westben. The Snow Queen. Sung in

English with piano and percussion accompaniment.

Jeremy Taylor & John Greer: musical

adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen fable.

Canadian Children’s Opera Company. The Barn,

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 877-883-

5777. $39; $37(sr); $15(under 30); $5(under

19). 1pm: Pre-Concert Chat.

Wednesday July 10

●●2:30: Seniors Serenade. Popular Jazz.

Mark Hathaway, piano; Bruce Rumble, bass.

Bethel Community Church, 128 St. Vincent

Street, Barrie. 705-726-1181. Free.

Thursday July 11

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer Concerts.

John Burge, piano. Burge: Prelude and

Fugue No. 2 in c, Mata Hari Suite. St. George’s

Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.

613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca.

Free. Freewill offering collected.

●●7:30: Brott Music Festival. Connoisseur

Classics 1. Dvořák: Cello Concerto; Shostakovich:

Symphony No.5; Dénommé-Welch/

Magowen: Bottlenecked. National Academy

Orchestra; Rachel Mercer, cello; Boris Brott,

conductor. L.R. Wilson Concert Hall, McMaster

University, 1280 Main St. W. , Hamilton. 905-

525-7664. $60. Festival runs Jun 27 to Aug 8.

Friday July 12

●●7:00: Westben. TGIFun! Brent Butt. Creator

and star of Canadian sitcom Corner Gas. The

Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.

877-883-5777. $65; $63(sr); $15(under 30);

$5(under 19). 5pm: BBQ (reservations not

required); 9:30pm: After Party with Brent;

Capers Tap House; $45+tax (limited seating).

●●7:30: Elora Festival. Opening Night 40th Anniversary

Gala. Elora Singers; State Choir Latvija;

Members of the Grand Philharmonic Children’s

and Youth Choirs; Jane Archibald, James Westman

and Daniel Taylor, soloists; and others;

Maris Sirmais and Mark Vuorinen, conductors.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

Saturday July 13

●●1:00: Elora Festival. State Choir Latvija in

Recital; 3:15 Pre-concert chat for Piano Six;

4:00: Piano Six. Daniel Wnukowski, Marika

Bournaki, David Jalbert, Angela Park, Ian Parker

and Anastasia Rizikov; 7:30: Natalie MacMaster

with The Elora Singers. Natalie MacMaster, fiddle.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. Beethoven & Ravel Piano

Trios. Beethoven: Trio in B-flat Op.97 “Archduke”;

Ravel: Piano Trio in a. Mayumi Seiler,

violin; Colin Carr, cello; André Laplante, piano.

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.

877-883-5777. $55; $53(sr); $15(under

30); $5(under 19).

●●7:00: Westben. Performer-Composer

Showcase. Performance of never-beforeheard

music by diverse collection of international

performing composers. Participants

of the performer-composers’ week-long

residency. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $30; $28(sr);

$15(under 30); $5(under 19).

Sunday July 14

●●1:30: Elora Festival. Jane Archibald, Soprano

in Recital; 4:00: The Laplante/Seilor/

Carr Trio in Recital. André Laplante, piano;

Mayumi Seiler, violin; Colin Carr, cello; 6:00:

Singers Unplugged 3.0. Michael Cressman,

baritone and director. Also 8:00. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. The Fitzgerald Family.

Canadian Celtic music, Ottawa-Valley step

dancing, and Old Time vocal and fiddle

arrangements. Chair Dance; Dance Off; A

Capella. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $49; $47(sr);

$15(under 30); $5(under 19).

Wednesday July 17

●●12:00 noon: Music at St. Andrew’s. Organ

Recital. Simon Walker, organ. St. Andrew’s

Presbyterian Church (Barrie), 47 Owen St.,

Barrie. 705-726-1181. $10; free(st).

●●2:00: Westben. ABBA Mia! Performance in

concert style featuring music of ABBA from the

Broadway musical and movies. Mamma Mia;

Here We Go Again; and other ABBA hits. Caitlin

Wood, soprano; Adrianna Longo, soprano; Kim

Dafoe, mezzo; Adam Fisher, tenor; Jeff Soucy,

baritone; Andy Thompson & Friends. The Barn,

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 877-883-

5777. $50; $48(sr); $15(under 30); $5(under 19).

Also Jul 18, 23, 24, 25, 27(7pm).

●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. Manitoba

Chamber Orchestra. Guest: Simone Dinnerstein;

Anne Manson, music director. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

Thursday July 18

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer Concerts.

Matthew Larkin, organ. Willan: Introduction,

Passacaglia, and Fugue; Works by

Ager and Messiaen. St. George’s Cathedral

(Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston. 613-548-

4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca. Free. Freewill

offering collected.

●●2:00: Westben. ABBA Mia! See Jul 17.

●●5:00: Elora Festival. Evensong. Elora Singers;

Matthew Larkin, organ; Mark Vuorinen,

conductor; 7:30: Elora Singers: Path of Miracles.

Mark Vuorinen, conductor. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●6:30: Collingwood Summer Music Festival.

A Choral Extravaganza! Inaugural Concert.

Mozart: Divertimento in F; Hermann:

Capriccio; Beethoven: Choral Fantasy. Elmer

Iseler Singers; ChoralWorks Choir; Collingwood

Festival Orchestra; Mayumi Seiler, violin;

Daniel Wnukowski, piano and others. New

Life Church, 28 Tracey Ln., Collingwood. 705-

445-2200 or 1-866-382-2200 or collingwoodfestival.com/buy-tickets.

$50.

●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. Leslie Ting

Speculation. See Summer Festival Listings

for details.

●●7:30: Brott Music Festival. La bohème.

Music by Giacomo Puccini, libretto by Luigi

Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. National Academy

Orchestra; BrottOpera Cast; John Fanning,

baritone; Boris Brott, conductor.

FirstOntario Concert Hall, 1 Summers Ln.,

Hamilton. 905-525-7664. $68; $62(sr);

$25(st); $33(Brott35). 6:30pm: pre-concert

chat (free). Festival runs Jun 27 to Aug 8.

Friday July 19

●●7:00: Collingwood Summer Music Festival.

Gryphon Trio. New Life Church, 28 Tracey

Ln., Collingwood. 705-445-2200 or 1-866-

382-2200 or collingwoodfestival.com/buytickets.

$35.

●●7:00: Westben. Abbey Road to Woodstock.

Celebration of the 50th anniversary of Abbey

Road with a chaser of Woodstock. Hits from

the Beatles’ 1969 album and other Woodstock

favourites; music of the Kinks, Dave

Clark Five, Animals, Hollies, Stones, The Who,

and more. Andy Forgie & Big Black Smoke.

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.

877-883-5777. $40; $38(sr); $15(under

30); $5(under 19). 5:00: BBQ with British fare

(reservations required 48 hrs. prior).

●●7:30: Elora Festival. Lemon Bucket Orkestra.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●7:30: Festival of the Sound. Gala Opening

Concert. Elmer Iseler Singers; Mary Lou Fallis,

soprano; Colin Fox, narrator; Penderecki

String Quartet; Guy Few, piano and others.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department

of Music. Conrad Grebel Concerts:

orchestra@uwaterloo -- German & Austrian

Masterpieces. Brahms: Piano Concerto

No.2 in b-flat; Von Suppé: Poet and Peasant

Overture; Bruckner: Overture in g; and other

works. Eric Liang, piano; Daniel Warren,

72 | June | July | August 2019 thewholenote.com


conductor. First United Church (Waterloo),

16 William St. W., Waterloo. 519-885-0220

x24226. Free.

●●9:00: Stratford Summer Music. Stephen

Prutsman. See Summer Festival Listings for

details.

Saturday July 20

●●10:00am Elora Festival. Pre-concert activities

for Shoestring Opera; 11:00am: Shoestring

Opera: Schoolyard Carmen. Katy Clark,

soprano. Free post-concert Museum tour;

1:00: Gloria: French Choral Music for the Soul.

Elora Singers; Matthew Larkin, organ; Mark

Vuorinen, conductor; 4:00: Cheng2 Duo.

Bryan Cheng, cello; Silvie Cheng, piano; 7:30:

Unforgettable: The Nat King Cole Story. Thom

Allison, performer; big band; Elora Singers.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. Manitoba Chamber

Orchestra. Glass: Piano Concert No.3; Fung:

Double Concerto for Violins; Dvořák: American

String Quartet (arr. for string orchestra).

Simone Dinnerstein, piano; Anne

Manson, conductor. The Barn, 6698 County

Road 30, Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $65;

$63(sr); $15(under 30); $5(under 19). 1pm:

Pre-Concert Chat.

●●7:00: Collingwood Summer Music Festival.

Quartetto Gelato. La Vie en Rose, Meditango,

Besame Mucho, C’era Una Volta and O Sole

Mio. New Life Church, 28 Tracey Ln., Collingwood.

705-445-2200 or 1-866-382-2200 or

collingwoodfestival.com/buy-tickets. $35.

●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department

of Music. Conrad Grebel Concerts: University

of Waterloo Choir - Voicescapes. Works by

Jaakko Mäntyjärvi, Stephen Hatfield, Morten

Lauridsen and Sarah Hopkins. Liska Jetchick,

director. The Cedars, 543 Beechwood

Dr., Waterloo. 519-885-0220 x24226. $10;

$5(sr/st).

●●10:00: Westben. Moonlight. Commemoration

of the 50th anniversary of the first

lunar landing. Beethoven: Moonlight Sonata;

Schubert: Impromptus Op.90 in a. Brian Finley,

piano. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $48; $46(sr);

$15(under 30); $5(under 19).

Sunday July 21

●●10:00am: Westben. Secret Concert. Can’t

say what, can’t say where – but curiosity and

a bit of walking will get you there! Meet at The

Barn to catch a ride to the Secret Concert

adventure. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $65 + tax. Picnic

lunch included (reservation required; limited

space).

●●2:00: Elora Festival. Daniel Taylor with

Charles Daniels and Ellen McAteer in Recital.

Daniel Taylor, countertenor; Charles Daniels,

tenor; Ellen McAteer, soprano; Steven Philcox,

piano; 4:30: Hymn to St. Cecilia: Music from

the English Tradition. Elora Singers; Matthew

Larkin, organ; Mark Vuorinen, conductor;

7:30: Kuné, Canada’s Global Orchestra. See

Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. John McDermott, tenor.

Scottish and Irish music. Mark Lalama, multiinstrumentalist;

Dala, folk music duo. The

Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.

877-883-5777. $60; $58(sr); $15(under 30);

$5(under 19).

●●2:30: Festival of the Sound. Up Close &

Personal. Gene DiNovi, piano; 7:30: Viennese

Opera Party. Leslie Fagan, Kristina Szabó,

sopranos; Colin Ainsworth, tenor; Sam Chan,

baritone; Guy Few, trumpet and others. See

Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●3:00: Stratford Summer Music. Chamber

Music Concert. See Summer Festival Listings

for details.

●●5:30: Ottawa Chamberfest. National Youth

Orchestra of Canada. Prokofiev: Romeo and

Juliet Op.63; Panufnik: Sinfonia Sacra; Mahler:

Symphony No.5; Brahms: Concerto for

Violin and Cello Op.102. Michael Francis, conductor.

Dominion-Chalmers United Church,

355 Cooper St., Ottawa. 613-234-6306. $20.

●●7:00: Brookside Music Association. Syrène

Saxophone Quartet. Midland Alliance Church,

829 Yonge St., Midland. 705-528-0521. $30.

●●7:30: Festival of the Sound. Viennese

Opera Party. Strauss: Chacun à son goût

from Die Fledermaus; Lerner & Loewe: If Ever

I Would Leave You from Camelot; Bizet: Je dis

que rien ne m’épouvante from Carmen; Puccini:

Nessun dorma from Turandot; Verdi:

Sempre libera from La Traviata and others.

Leslie Fagan, Kristina Szabó, sopranos; Colin

Ainsworth, tenor; Sam Chan, baritone; Guy

Few, trumpet and others. Charles W. Stockey

Centre, 2 Bay St, Parry Sound. 705-746-2410

or 1-866-364-0061. $48-$53; $43-$48(sr).

Monday July 22

●●10:30am: Festival of the Sound. Office

Hour: Accordion Postcards. Joseph Petric,

Guy Few, accordion; 2:00: Music for Trumpet

& Organ. William McArton, organ; Guy Few,

trumpet; 6:30: Brass on the Bay Cruise. Ten

members of Hannaford Street Silver Band.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

Tuesday July 23

●●1:30: Festival of the SoundAnagnoson &

Kinton in Recital. Anagnoson and Kinton,

piano duo; Alan Stein, visual art.; 3:30: Fantasy

& Romance. Gryphon Trio; James Campbell,

clarinet; Douglas McNabney, viola; Joel

Quarrington, bass; 6:00: Bands on the Bay;

8:00: Strike Up the Band. Hannaford Street

Silver Band; Russell Braun, baritone. See

Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. ABBA Mia! See Jul 17.

Wednesday July 24

●●1:30: Festival of the Sound.Carolyn & Russell

in Concert. Russell Braun, baritone; Carolyn

Maule, piano; 3:30: Swiss Trio & Friends.

Swiss Piano Trio; Douglas McNabney, viola;

James Campbell,clarinet; Ken MacDonald,

horn; 7:30: Beethoven I. Janina Fialkowski,

piano; Rolston String Quartet. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. ABBA Mia! See Jul 17.

●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. The Brothers

Creeggan. See Summer Festival Listings

for details.

Thursday July 25

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer

Concerts. Cranberry Dixie Band. High Society;

Sleepy Time Down South; Memories of

You; What a Wonderful World; The Saints.

St. George’s Cathedral (Kingston), 270 King

St. E., Kingston. 613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca.

Free. Freewill offering collected.

●●1:30: Festival of the Sound. Rolston String

Quartet; 7:30: National Youth Orchestra of

Canada: A Look Into The Future. Michael

Francis, conductor. See Summer Festival Listings

for details.

●●2:00: Westben. ABBA Mia! See Jul 17.


● 5:00: Elora Festival. Evensong. Elora Singers;

Matthew Larkin, organ; Mark Vuorinen,

conductor; 7:30: COC Competition Winner:

Matthew Cairns, Tenor; 9:00: Elora Singers

at Twilight: From Darkness to Light. See Summer

Festivals Listings for details.

●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. Amir

Amiri. See Summer Festival Listings.

●●7:30: Brott Music Festival. Fly Me to the

Moon. Music of Frank Sinatra. National

Academy Orchestra; Chris Jason, Sinatra

Impersonator; Boris Brott, conductor. Liuna

Station, 360 James St. N., Hamilton. 905-525-

7664. $54; $49(sr); $20(st); $33(Brott35).

Festival runs Jun 27 to Aug 8.

●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department

of Music. Conrad Grebel Concerts: Fairy

Tales and Legends - orchestra@uwaterloo.

Works by Massenet, Gounod, Dvořák, Mozart

and Offenbach. Natasha Campbell and

Autumn Wascher, sopranos; Daniel Warren,

music director. Knox Presbyterian Church

(Waterloo), 50 Erb St. W., Waterloo. 519-885-

0220 x24226. Free.

Friday July 26

●●10:30am: Festival of the Sound. Office

Hour: Swiss Piano Trio - Musical Life in Switzerland;

2:00: Janina Fialkowska Plays Chopin;

7:30: Payadora Tango Ensemble. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●7:00: Brookside Music Association. The

Swiss Trio. Guests: James Campbell, clarinet;

Ken McDonald, horn; Douglas Perry,

viola; Lydia Adams, conductor. Midland Alliance

Church, 829 Yonge St., Midland. 705-

528-0521. $30.

●●7:00: Classical Unbound Festival. Shoulders

of Giants. Debussy: Quartet in g; Lizée:

Isabella Blow at Somerset House; Beethoven:

Quartet in e Op.59 No.2. Ironwood Quartet.

Grange of Prince Edward Vineyards and

Estate Winery, 990 Closson Rd, Hillier. 514-

713-1082. $30.

●●7:00: Westben. TGIFolk! Rose Cousins.

Prince Edward Island folk singer-songwriter.

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.

877-883-5777. $48; $46(sr); $15(under

30); $5(under 19). 5pm: BBQ (reservations

not required).

●●9:00: Stratford Summer Music. Duane

Andrews and Friends. See Summer Festival

Listings.

Saturday July 27

●●10:00am: Elora Festival. Pre-concert

art activities for From Winkle to Stardom;

11:00am: Family Series (all ages): From Twinkle

to Stardom. Music Comedy Duo Millan &

Faye. Free post-concert Museum tour; 1:00:

Penderecki Quartet with Daniel Lichti, Baritone;

4:00: Festival of the Sound Ensemble

with Elora Singers. Swiss Piano Trio; James

Campbell; Ken MacDonald; Doug Perry;

James Mason; 7:30: An Evening With Measha

Brueggergosman. See Summer Festival Listings

for details.

●●11:00am: Festival of the Sound. Strings

Across the Sky; 4:00: Festival of the Sound

Ensemble with Elora Singers. Swiss Piano

Trio; James Campbell; Ken MacDonald; Doug

Perry; James Mason; 7:30: Jayme Stone’s

Folklife. Jayme Stone, banjo/voice; Moira

Smiley, voice/accordion; Sumaia Jackson, fiddle/voice;

Joe Phillips, bass/voice. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●11:00am: Stratford Summer Music.

Musical Brunches with Graham Hargrove;

3:00: Oh Happy Day! Ben Heppner with the

Toronto Mass Choir. See Summer Festival

Listings for details.

●●2:00: Westben. Saturday at the Opera.

Vissi d’Arte from Tosca; Credo from Otello;

other arias and duets from Don Giovanni, La

traviata, Eugene Onegin, The Merry Widow,

and other works. Joyce El-Khoury, soprano;

Jason Howard, baritone; Brian Finley, piano.

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.

877-883-5777. $60; $58(sr); $15(under

30); $5(under 19). 1:15pm: Pre-Concert Chat.

●●7:00: Westben. ABBA Mia! See Jul 17.

●●7:30: Classical Unbound Festival. Ironwood

Unbound. Pärt: Fratres; Dessner:

Aheym; Bach: Chaconne; Marks: Original

Songs. Ironwood Quartet. Old Church Theatre,

940 Bonisteel Rd., Trenton. 514-713-

1082. $30.

●●7:30: Music at Port Milford. En songs je

t’ai vu. Works by Mendelssohn, Dompierre,

Dvořák and Landry. Quatuor Saguenay; Allison

Gagnon, piano; Becca Kenneally, soprano.

St. Mary Magdalene, 355 Main St., Picton.

914-439-5039. $30; $10(st); $5(youth 12 and

under).

Sunday July 28

●●2:00: Westben. Kuné -- Canada’s Global

Orchestra. A celebration of Canada’s cultural

diversity. Music using over 20 traditional

instruments. An eclectic ensemble of Canadian

musicians that hail from all corners of

the globe. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,

Campbellford. 877-883-5777. $58; $56(sr);

$15(under 30); $5(under 19).

●●3:00: Brott Music Festival. Connoisseur

Classics 2. Lalo: Symphonie espagnole Op.21;

Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique; Croall: Nimkii

N’gamwin (Thunder Song). National Academy

Orchestra; Adrian Anantawan, violin;

Boris Brott, conductor. L.R. Wilson Concert

Hall, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W. ,

Hamilton. 905-525-7664. $60. Festival runs

Jun 27 to Aug 8.

●●3:00: Elora Festival. 40th Anniversary

Finale: Magnificat! Elora Singers; Festival

Orchestra with sitar and tabla. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●4:00: Stratford Summer Music. National

Youth Orchestra of Canada. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●6:30: Festival of the Sound. Celtic Magic

Cruise. Scantily Plaid. See Summer Festival

Listings for details.

●●7:00: Classical Unbound Festival. Summer

Nocturne. Mendelssohn: String Quartet

Op.44 No.1; Puccini: Crisantemi; Beethoven:

String Quartet Op.18 No.6. Ironwood Quartet.

Hillier Creek Estates Winery, 46 Stapleton Rd.,

Hillier. 514-713-1082. $30. Cocktail reception

6pm.

●●7:30: University of Waterloo Department of

Music. Conrad Grebel Concerts: Instrumental

Chamber Ensembles. Works by Mozart and

Peterson. Conrad Grebel University College,

140 Westmount Rd. N., Waterloo. 519-885-

0220 x24226. Free. Post-concert reception.

Monday July 29

● ● 7:00: Brookside Music Association. Festival

Baroque. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto

No.5 and works by Vivaldi and Telemann.

Guests: Sebastien Singer, cello; Andre

Fischer, guitar. Midland Alliance Church,

thewholenote.com June | July | August 2019 | 73


B. Concerts Beyond the GTA

829 Yonge St., Midland. 705-528-0521. $30.

●●7:00: Stratford Summer Music. Payadora.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

Wednesday July 31

●●1:30: Festival of the Sound. Festival Baroque.

James Mason, oboe; Julie Baumgartel, violin;

Borys Medicky, harpsichord; Suzanne Shulman,

flute; Karl Stobbe and others; 3:30: Blue Ocean.

Andrea Ratuski, host; Paul Marleyn, cello; Karl

Stobbe, violin; Martin Roscoe, piano; James

Campbell, clarinet and others; 7:30: Three Centuries

of Choral Music. Elora Festival Singers;

Mark Vuorinen, conductor; Festival Ensemble.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●3:00: Stratford Summer Music. Joe Trio;

7:00: Laila Biali. See Summer Festival Listings

for details.

●●8:00: Highlands Opera Studio. From Opera

to Broadway. St. George’s Anglican Church

(Haliburton), 617 Mountain St., Haliburton.

1-855-455-5533. $32.50.

Thursday August 1

●●11:00am: Stratford Summer Music. Guy

Few, trumpet & Stephen Mara, piano & Mark

Fewer, interviewer; 7:00: The Canabis Cantata.

See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●12:00 noon: Collingwood Summer Music Festival.

Underground Railway Story for the Family

- Diana Braithwaite & Chris Whiteley Duo. Venue

TBA. 705-445-2200 or 1-866-382-2200. Free.

●●12:15: St. George’s Cathedral Summer Concerts.

Jan LeClair, accordian. St. George’s Cathedral

(Kingston), 270 King St. E., Kingston.

613-548-4617 or stgeorgescathedral.ca. Free.

Freewill offering collected.

●●1:30: Festival of the Sound. Mozart &

Beethoven. Atis Bankas, violin; Victoria Korchinskaya-Kogan,

Martin Roscoe, piano; James

Campbell, clarinet; Paul Marleyn, cello; 3:30:

Mendelssohn & Brahms. Julie Nesrallah, mezzo;

Douglas McNabney, viola; Robert Kortgaard,

piano; Min-Jeong Koh, violin; Adrian Fung, cello

and others; 7:30: Just Friends. Julie Nesrallah,

mezzo; Martin Roscoe, piano; Robert Kortgaard,

piano; Karl Stobbe, Min-Jeong Koh, violin and

others. See Summer Festival Listings for details.

●●7:00: Collingwood Summer Music Festival.

Sugar and Gold - Diana Braithwaite & Chris

Whiteley Quintet. New Life Church, 28 Tracey

Ln., Collingwood. 705-445-2200 or 1-866-

382-2200 or collingwoodfestival.com/buytickets.

$35.

Friday August 2

●●2:00: Westben. James Ehnes, violin.

Beethoven: Violin Sonatas Nos.3, 6, 9 “Kreutzer”.

Andrew Armstrong, piano. The Barn,

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 877-

883-5777. $65; $63(sr); $15(under 30);

$5(under 19). 1pm: Pre-Concert Chat.

●●3:00: Stratford Summer Music. Hatch –

Continuum; 9:00 Phil Dwyer Trio. See Summer

Festival Listings for details.

●●7:00: Collingwood Summer Music Festival.

Nhapitapi (Zimbabwe). New Life Church,

28 Tracey Ln., Collingwood. 705-445-2200 or

1-866-382-2200 or collingwoodfestival.com/

buy-tickets. $35.

●●7:00: Westben. Jeremy Dutcher. Classically

trained tenor/composer who blends his Wolastoq

First Nation roo