Jeweller - June 2019

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VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN JEWELLERY INDUSTRY

JUNE 2019

Go for bloke

UNDERSTANDING TODAY’S MAN

AND THE MEN’S JEWELLERY MARKET

Brand plan

+ +

GETTING IT RIGHT WHEN IT COMES

TO BRANDED JEWELLERY

Attention!

HOW TO KEEP CONSUMERS ENGAGED

IN A WORLD OF DISTRACTIONS


Peridot

In stock & online now

Visit our website or call our Melbourne office for details:

Room 405, 4th Floor, Wales Building, 227 Collins Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

Ph: +61 (0) 3 9654 5200 / Interstate Orders 1300 843 141 E: sales@oagems.com www.oagems.com


WORLD SHINER PTY. LTD.

www.worldshiner.com

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Melbourne

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www.rmdistributors.com.au


UNDERSTANDING TODAY’S MAN

AND THE MEN’S JEWELLERY MARKET

VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN JEWELLERY INDUSTRY

GETTING IT RIGHT WHEN IT COMES

TO BRANDED JEWELLERY

JUNE 2019

HOW TO KEEP CONSUMERS ENGAGED

IN A WORLD OF DISTRACTIONS

CONTENTS

JUNE 2019

19/

27/

35/

FEATURES REGULARS BUSINESS

19/ MALE ORDER

Find out how to make the most

of the men’s jewellery category

with smart retailing techniques.

27/ BRAND OF GLORY

Jeweller explores the complexity

of stocking branded jewellery and

how to get the right brand mix.

9/ Editorial

12/ Upfront

14/ News

18/ New Products

33/ Gems

Organic Gems Part III:

Ivory alternatives

41/ My Store

42/ 10 Years Ago

43/ Calendar

44/ My Bench

46/ Soapbox

David Paterson is excited about

fostering community spirit in

the industry.

35/ Business feature

Francesca Nicasio reveals how to

eliminate shopper distractions.

37/ Selling

Jeremy Miller’s advice for

overcoming sales obstacles.

38/ Management

Comparison is the key to

decisions, writes Bernadette

McClelland.

39/ Marketing

Embrace bad feedback to get

ahead, says Jeannie Walters.

40/ Logged On

Why Mandy Edwards has

‘Facebook fatigue’.

Go for bloke

Brand plan

+ +

Attention!

Front cover description:

Men’s jewellery is a small

but dynamic category.

June 2019 Jeweller 5


GEOCUBE®

THE TIMELESS DESIGN CLASSIC

Inspired by the Bauhaus style, in 1999

Carola Eckrodt successfully created

a timeless design classic with her

GEOCUBE®: featuring clean lines and

beautifully nuanced colours that can be

reinterpreted over and over again with

fresh colour compositions in a variety

of materials. The GEOCUBE® is the

perfect complement to any outfit.

Although Carola creates new and

diverse jewellery designs the multi

award winning GEOCUBE® continues

to be the signature collection. It is

now regarded as a design classic and is

prized by women all over the world.

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sales@timesupply.com.au

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exclusive distributor AU & NZ


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OVER 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN DIAMOND MANUFACTURING AND WHOLESALING


The Jewellery Design

Awards are back

Returning to the 2019 International Jewellery & Watch Fair, the Jewellery Design Awards represent the industry in

recognising and celebrating the best of the best in Australian and New Zealand craftsmanship.

The Awards Finalists will have their designs showcased as part of an exclusive display at the

International Jewellery Fair 2019 held at ICC Sydney, with cash prizes to be won!

AWARD CATEGORIES

• 1st & 2nd Year Apprentice/Student Award • 3rd & 4th Year Apprentice/Student Award

• Australian Opal Award • Bridal Award • CAD/CAM/Cast Award • Coloured Gemstone Award • Diamond Award

• Innovative Timepiece Award • Men’s Accessories & Jewellery Award • Pearl Award • Precious Metal Award

Do you have what it takes?

Enter the Awards online at www.jewelleryfair.com.au

INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY & WATCH FAIR

AUGUST 24 > 26, 2019

ICC Sydney I Exhibition Centre I Darling Harbour

Organised by

For further information regarding the awards, including full terms and

conditions, please visit www.jewelleryfair.com.au or give our

team a call on 02 9452 7513


EDITORIAL

SELLING ON PRICE IS A COSTLY MISTAKE

On reading this month’s Selling column, I was

reminded of an experience I had many years

ago when I decided to buy a watch. I visited

a jewellery store and after greeting me, the

salesperson began to ask a few questions

about the type of watch that I might prefer –

classic or sports, mechanical or quartz, etc.

My responses were very specific because I

wanted to analyse how she would handle

me, and the sale. Good sales staff quickly

recognise shopper types and alter their sales

pitch accordingly.

For example, on this day I was not the

‘chatty customer’, nor was I a ‘wanderer’ or a

‘showroomer’. And most of all I was definitely

not a ‘bargain hunter’. I was an ‘on-a-mission’

shopper wanting to identify a suitable watch,

and buy it.

The salesperson began qualifying me by

asking about my budget. I was clear that

I had just started looking and price was

less important than quality. I emphasised

that I wanted to buy a watch that would last

for many years.

It had to be water resistant, suitable to be

worn on all occasions, and I was not brandconscious:

the watch, rather than the brand,

was most important.

She gathered three models that might suit

my needs and immediately started talking

about price. One model caught my eye and

I asked her about its features. She continued

talking about the price – and then offered a

large discount before I had even handled

the other two! She either ignored all my

cues or didn’t understand them.

She had one approach to selling: price. Not

value, price.

As Jeremy Miller points out this month,

price is not a feature: “Unless you’re selling

a commodity, price is not the reason why

consumers buy products. Price may be a

factor for helping consumers select one brand

over another, but it’s rarely the reason why

that consumer sought to buy that product

in the first place. Selling on price should

therefore be avoided.”

All too often sales staff don’t ‘read’ customer

cues and continue on their merry way, selling

to everyone in exactly the same way.

Most importantly, they often don’t understand

the difference between features, benefits,

value and price. All four are important in

varying ways to the customer.

A feature is fact: “This product can do X.”

It is something that your product has or is,

and usually has no inherent value. However,

it is important for the salesperson to mention

and demonstrate the features because what

might be obvious to him or her may not be

obvious to the customer.

Crucially, a feature might be very important to

one person but not to another. For example,

a water resistant watch was critical to me but

another customer might not care at all.

ALL TOO OFTEN

SALES STAFF

DON’T ‘READ’

CUSTOMER

CUES AND

CONTINUE ON

THEIR MERRY

WAY, SELLING

TO EVERYONE

IN EXACTLY THE

SAME WAY

That’s where ‘benefits’ come in. Whereas a

feature is a fact – the watch is water resistant –

a benefit is subjective.

These are the outcomes or results that

users will hope to experience by using the

product, and this can be the very reason

why they purchase.

The benefit to me of having a water resistant

watch is that I can wear it when I hit the

surf. For another person who does not swim

or surf, this feature is not relevant because

there’s no benefit.

A benefit is something that is designed

to help the customer – it’s about what’s

in it for them. That’s why benefits should

be mentioned after the product’s features,

because it’s about customer preference.

Value is another subjective issue. What

has value to one person can be worthless to

another. It’s often about longer-term goals

and objectives – for example, I wanted to own

the watch for many years.

Value extends beyond what your product or

service can do for your customer and aligns its

benefits with their larger goals and objectives.

Again, value is about the customer’s

perspective, whereas price is another fact.

Most customers – not all – care more about

value than price. Price is about today; value is

about tomorrow and long after.

Coleby Nicholson

Managing Editor

June 2019 Jeweller 9


UPFRONT

n RARE FOSSIL FOUND

A 3cm piece of Burmese amber has

been revealed to contain an ammonite,

an ancient ancestor to the modern

squid, which lived around 100 million

years ago. It’s extremely rare for seadwelling

creatures to be preserved

in amber, as it is made from fossilised

tree resin. The ammonite amber also

contained around 40 other creatures,

and was purchased for just $750

by a Chinese collector.

n MUM’S THE WORD

A British mum-to-be has caused a stir

on social media after revealing she’s

planning to turn her breastmilk into

jewellery. As it turns out, the unusual

trend first found popularity in 2013.

Usually a ring or pendant, the pieces

feature a hollow accent stone that can

be filled with the milk.

n ANCIENT GEM FRAUD

Archaeologists excavating a prehistoric

burial ground in southern Spain

believe they have discovered the

oldest example of jewellery fraud in

Europe. Two sets of beads, dating back

to 3,000BCE, were thought to be real

amber. However, they turned out to be

seeds that had been coated in resin. The

fakes were found near real amber beads,

suggesting the owner had been duped!

MOONSTONE:

JUNE BIRTHSTONE

DID YOU KNOW?

This mystical stone is so named for its

unearthly glow – in fact, the Ancient Romans

believed moonstones were actually made

of moonlight. In Hindu mythology, the

moonstone was thought to bring beautiful

dreams. Today, moonstones are associated

with femininity, serenity and peace. While

they come in many colours, the most prized

have a clear body with a blue sheen.

DIGITAL

BRAINWAVE

WHO SAID?

“The brand debate has been

going on for years. The critical

thing for any brand is to ensure

they are constantly evolving with

design and presentation.”

To find out who, turn to page 27>

BLOCK THE ROCK

Earlier this year, the first ‘blockchain

diamond’ engagement ring was

created in the UK, assisted by Australian entrepreneur Leanne Kemp’s tech company

Everledger. The ring’s central stone was chosen from a selection of diamonds from

mines in Russia, Botswana and Canada, which were cut and polished by three different

manufacturers in India. It was then fashioned into a ring at London jewellers Taylor &

Hart. Once finished, the customer was presented with the piece and a ledger of timestamped

transactions showing every step of his diamond’s journey. He had specifically

requested a blockchain-tracked diamond for the ultimate guarantee of provenance,

which was accomplished through Everledger’s technology.

TOP PRODUCT

Maillon is the latest addition

to the Les Georgettes by

Altesse family. Part of the Les

Essentielles collection, this

new bracelet design features

intertwining lines. Maillon is available in widths

8mm, 14mm, 25mm and 40mm, as well as

silver, gold and rose gold finishes. Each leather

insert is reversible, giving two beautiful colour

options. Made in France. Available from 13 June,

distributed by Renaissance Luxury Group.

VOICE OF THE AUSTRALIAN

JEWELLERY INDUSTRY

jewellermagazine.com

Publisher & Editor

Coleby Nicholson

Associate Publisher

Angela Han

angela.han@gunnamattamedia.com

Journalists

Arabella Roden

arabella.roden@jewellermagazine.com

Production Manager

& Graphic Design

Jo De Bono

art@gunnamattamedia.com

Accounts

Paul Blewitt

finance@gunnamattamedia.com

Subscriptions

info@jewellermagazine.com

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Reproduction in whole or in part is

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Gunnamatta Media Pty Ltd strives to

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12 Jeweller June 2019


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DESIGN . PRINTING . CASTING . FINISHING . FABRICATED METALS . FINDINGS . REFINING

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Palloys, AGS|PJW, Regentco and A&E Metals will shortly combine under one name – Palloys.

The singular jewellery production destination.

1300 886 108 | AUSTRALIA WIDE

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A PALLION COMPANY


NEWS

NEWS

Questions over ‘sustainable’ synthetics

A US-based synthetic diamond industry

group has announced it will be issuing a

‘sustainability badge’ to complying members.

The newly-established Lab-Grown Diamond

Council (LGDC) is working with SCS Global

Services to create benchmarks across the

synthetic diamond supply chain, against

which members will be assessed.

These benchmarks will include environmental

stewardship, social responsibility and

economic viability. Successful companies

will be awarded the SCS Sustainably Grown

Diamond certification mark.

The move comes after the US Federal Trade

Commission warned a number of lab-grown

diamond producers against using ‘green’ and

‘eco-friendly’ wording in their advertising.

“The challenge is that these terms are

currently unsubstantiated,” Chris Casey,

president LGDC, said. “The development of a

fully-certified sustainability standard will help

put an end to incorrect assumptions

and descriptions.”

Meanwhile, the Diamond Producers’

Association (DPA) has released the results of

TRUCOST ASSESSED THE IMPACT OF MINING

a comprehensive investigation into the

impact of diamond mining.

The report, titled Total Clarity: The Reality

Of Modern Diamond Mining, examines the

environmental and human impact of the

world’s seven largest diamond-producing

companies.

Independent assessor Trucost found that

mined diamonds produce 69 per cent less

carbon per carat than synthetic diamonds,

which require huge amounts of energy to

produce in factories.

Additionally, diamond mining from DPA

members was shown to have generated

US$16 billion in socioeconomic benefits.

Palloys attains new ethical certification

Palloys, part of the Pallion group, has become

Australia’s first jewellery manufacturer and

wholesaler to be certified by the Responsible

Jewellery Council (RJC).

Chris Botha, operations manager jewellery

division at Palloys, said, “This is a significant

event for Palloys and more broadly the

Australian jewellery industry. Palloys’

certification evidences our commitment

to responsible and environmentally-friendly

jewellery sourcing and production and

the increasing emphasis on chain of

custody certification.”

Botha also explained that metal used in

Palloys production is sourced from ABC

Refinery, the only independent Australian

refinery certified by the London Bullion

Market Association (LBMA) and Shanghai

Gold Exchange (SGE).

“RJC accreditation is not only an

acknowledgement of our jewellery

manufacturing processes – it’s also an

acknowledgement of the Pallion bullion

division,” he said.

Ethical and environmentally sustainable

practices have become a growing focus

in the casting and refining industry, as

reported by Jeweller.

The RJC is a not-for-profit international

organisation that independently audits

companies against its own rigorous Code

of Practices for the responsible handling of

diamonds, gold and platinum group metals.

These standards cover areas including human

rights, labour rights, environmental impact,

mining practices, product disclosure and

other supply chain elements. It has more than

1,100 members worldwide.

+ MORE BREAKING NEWS

JEWELLERMAGAZINE.COM

IN BRIEF

*

WORLD-FIRST PEARL TEST

In what is believed to be a world first,

radiocarbon dating has been used

to establish the age of a pearl. The

30.24-carat Ana Maria Pearl – a natural

saltwater baroque valued at $1.5 million –

was examined by two Swiss laboratories,

which confirmed it formed sometime

between 1500 and 1650 – consistent

with its reported origin.

*

THE GODFATHER’S WATCH SOLD

A Rolex Datejust once belonging

to Marlon Brando has been sold at

auction, fetching $49,200 – four times its

estimated price. The 31mm stainless steel

watch was gifted to the Hollywood icon

after he won the Best Actor Oscar for

The Godfather in 1973. It is engraved

with his character’s name, Vito.

*

WA FUNGUS ABSORBS GOLD

The CSIRO has discovered a fungus in

Western Australia that draws gold from

its surroundings. The Fusarium oxysporom

– found near Perth – is believed to use

the gold particles for protection. While

fungi are able to recycle other metals

like aluminium, iron and manganese,

researchers described the gold reaction

as “both unusual and surprising”.

*

SYNTHETIC DIAMOND TENDER

The first-ever tender of rough lab-grown

diamonds has taken place, hosted by the

Dubai Multi Commodities Centre. The

tender, held at the Almas Tower at the

Dubai Diamond Exchange, was organised

by a Hong Kong-based trader. It involved

55 parcels of Chemical Vapour Deposition

(CVD) diamonds, totalling 50,000 carats.

*

KING TUT’S MYSTERY GEM

A study published in the journal

Geology has shed new light on one of

Tutankhamun’s treasures. The pharaoh

was buried with a captivating yellowgreen

stone, later discovered to be ultra

rare Libyan Desert Glass (LDG). In the new

study, researchers found that LDG is likely

created by the intense heat and pressure

of meteorites hitting the African desert.

14 Jeweller June 2019


Hollywood calls for QLD jeweller

SAMS GROUP

AUSTRALIA

A stunning pink diamond and morganite

engagement ring from Calleija, based on

the Gold Coast in Queensland, has taken a

starring role in Hollywood film The Hustle.

The ‘Aria’ ring, valued at $75,000, gets stolen

by on-screen thieves Anne Hathaway and

Rebel Wilson in the action comedy, which

takes place on the French Riviera.

The ring features an Astar-cut 9.54-carat

morganite centre stone surrounded by a

halo of Argyle pink diamonds and white

diamonds. Jeweller John Calleija said, “To

be selected to play a role within the film

THE CALLEIJA ‘ARIA’ RING HAS HIT THE BIG SCREEN

and to showcase such incredible Australian

Argyle pink diamonds within Aria’s setting is

something we are extremely proud of.”

West End adds Claude Bernard

Following the collapse of Lion Brands

earlier this year, Swiss watch company

Claude Bernard has found a new distributor

in West End Collection.

John Rose, managing director West

End Collection, said, “After Lion Brands

discontinued their distribution earlier in the

year, West End Collection met with Claude

Bernard in Basel, Switzerland to discuss the

future of the brand and were very impressed.”

“Claude Bernard is a high quality entry-level

Swiss watch brand offering a stunning range

of fashion and sport watches.”

“Their strength lies in their design, quality

and attention to detail. Despite the high

quality Swiss made finish, retail pricing of the

Claude Bernard range starts in Australia at

$299,” Rose added.

Founded in 1973, Claude Bernard

manufactures both mechanical and

quartz watches in Les Genevez in the

Jura region of Switzerland.

Iconic Perth jeweller saved after collapse

Receivers for Rosendorff Diamonds have

announced the business has been sold on

behalf of creditors. It is believed the buyer is a

local West Australian diamond dealer, and the

sale includes the Rosendorff trading name,

stock and intellectual property.

The business – an institution of Perth’s Hay

Street for more than 50 years – collapsed last

month, owing more than $18 million.

An administrator’s report lists Rosendorff

Diamonds as owing $17.9 million to

three companies of which founder Craig

Rosendorff is sole director, as well as $2.1

million to asset advisory and investment

firm Gordon Brothers, and $165,000 to the

Australian Taxation Office.

In addition, The West Australian reports that

administrators from FTI Consulting found

“anomalies” in company accounts – though

there is no suggestion of wrongdoing.

CUSTOMERS QUEUE AT ROSENDORFF DIAMONDS

IMAGE CREDIT: LISA BARNES/WA TODAY

Receivers KordaMentha held a huge $9

million clearance sale of all stock beginning

last month, with huge discounts and

negotiations offered on big-ticket items.

Shoppers were seen queuing around the

block for a chance to snap up a bargain.

The sale will continue while the takeover

deal is finalised.

Precious Gemstone & Diamond Set Jewellery

Sapphire, Paraiba & Emerald with Argyle Pink Diamonds

A delicious range of natural precious gemstone

jewellery set with sparkling white diamonds,

available in every colour of the rainbow!

Beautifully crafted in 18ct gold.

E pink@samsgroup.com.au

W samsgroup.com.au

P 02 9290 2199


NEWS

Breakthrough in diamond exploration

Scientists at the Diamond Research Group of

the University of Alberta – which is partially

funded by De Beers – have found that

Canadian diamonds are formed in a very

different way to other stones.

It was previously believed that diamonds

could only be found in the kimberlites of

very old geological formations called cratons,

as they are in South Africa. All South African

diamonds are more than 2.5 billion years old.

In contrast, samples from the Victor Mine in

Ontario were just 700 million years old. They

also formed in a different type of rock.

The discovery opens up the possibility

of exploring parts of Canada which were

thought to be incompatible with diamond

production due to their geology.

Jeweller previously reported that the

Canadian diamond industry was facing

challenges due to low-value yields and

difficult terrain in its remote mining regions.

“The outcome of the project fundamentally

changes our understanding of where

diamonds come from,” study lead Thomas

Stachel said. “[It] has the potential to

cause diamond companies to retool their

approach to exploration.”

Canada’s mining industry is worth US$2

billion per year, and it is the third-largest

producer of diamonds by volume.

Synthetic coating found on diamond

The Gemological Institute of America (GIA)

has discovered a natural diamond coated in

a synthetic layer, which was used to change

the stone’s size and colour.

The 0.64-carat stone was surrounded by

about 0.10-carats of Chemical Vapour

Deposition synthetic diamond, with the GIA

noting its colour was noticeably different

from the natural material.

The outer layer was greyish-blue, while the

inside was yellowish, giving the stone a

fancy greenish-blue appearance.

It’s the second time the GIA has identified

such a stone: a 0.33-carat fancy blue

diamond was found to have the same type

of synthetic layer back in 2017.

“With the second of these composites seen

at GIA, this could be a new type of product

entering the market,” research associate

Troy Ardon and analytics technician Garrett

McElhenny wrote in a lab note, published

in the spring 2019 issue of the GIA

journal, Gems & Gemology.

Meanwhile, 25 undisclosed synthetic

diamonds were recently submitted to

a GIA lab in California, with 16 showing

unusual signs of colour. They ranged from

faint yellow-green to very light green – the

result of higher nickel concentrations. The

synthetic diamonds were created using the

High Pressure-High Temperature method.

Pandora woes continue as sales fall

Pandora International has reported soft

figures for the first quarter of 2019, with

global sales falling six per cent and net

profits down 31 per cent.

over the next year. Pandora will also sack

a further 1,200 employees at its Thailand

manufacturing facility, following the

dismissal of 700 workers in February.

SAMS GROUP

AUSTRALIA

PinkKimberley.com.au

E pink@samsgroup.com.au

W samsgroup.com.au

P 02 9290 2199

ALEXANDER LACIK,

PANDORA CEO

One of the steepest drops was in the US,

with sales falling 12 per cent.

Anders Boyer, chief financial officer Pandora,

said: “As expected, the first quarter was

characterised by continued weak like-for-like

[figures], further burdened by our deliberate

commercial reset.”

The company’s cost-cutting measures

will include closing 50 ‘concept stores’

Pandora’s net growth has been falling

steadily since 2014, and is now in the

single digits.

New CEO Alexander Lacik, who took the

reins on 23 April, urged patience and said

Pandora was focusing on “understanding

where we went wrong with the consumer”

as well as sharpening its product offering

and merchandising.


De Beers expands marine mining

Leading diamond producer De Beers is

expanding its marine diamond recovery

fleet – which is owned and operated in

partnership with the Namibian government

– by building a new custom vessel.

Superior Quality

Ring Mounts

The US$468 million ship is a world-first

and “represents the largest-ever single

investment in the marine diamond industry”

according to the company.

It is expected to be operational by 2022

and will add an estimated 50,000 carats to

Debmarine’s production, an increase of

35 per cent.

Bruce Cleaver, CEO De Beers Group, said in

a press release, “Some of the highest quality

diamonds in the world are found at sea off

the Namibian coast.”

“With this investment we will be able

to optimise new technology to find

and recover diamonds more efficiently

and meet growing consumer demand

across the globe.”

The Debmarine Namibia project was set

up in 2002 in order to mine diamonds from

the ocean floor. It currently has five mining

vessels and one exploration and sampling

vessel, and employs 975 people.

However, it’s not entirely good news for De

Beers. The company’s most recent rough

A NEW DEBMARINE VESSEL IS BEING BUILT

diamond sales report, published on 21 May,

showed totals of US$415 million for this

cycle – a drop of US$166 million compared

to the previous cycle.

De Beers releases 10 sales reports a year,

which combine the totals for global sightholder

sales and auction sales.

While this time of year is usually slow in the

diamond trade, sales were also down 25 per

cent when compared with the same period

in 2018. It is De Beers’ worst sales result since

the first quarter of 2017.

Cleaver attributed the weak result to

“macroeconomic uncertainty” and

the closing of Indian factories for the

holiday period.

More Jho Low jewellery handed over

The mother of disgraced Malaysian

businessman Jho Low has handed over

jewellery valued at US$1.7 million to

government officials, as legal proceedings

continue against her son.

Low commissioned US celebrity jeweller

Lorraine Schwartz to design the pieces – a

pair of diamond earrings and a matching

7.53-carat ring – back in 2012.

He is alleged to have paid for the jewellery

using money embezzled from the 1Malaysia

Development Berhad (1MDB) fund, though

according to the terms of the agreement,

the returning of the jewellery cannot be

considered an admission of guilt.

During the police investigation in 2017,

Australian supermodel Miranda Kerr was

forced to return US$8 million in jewellery

to the authorities, which had been gifted

DISGRACED MALAYSIAN BUSINESSMAN JHO LOW

to her by Low. Authorities have also seized

a mansion and US$250 million super yacht

from the Low family.

The 1MDB scandal involves billions in

misappropriated funds, with former

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak

currently facing trial for his role. Low has

been charged with money laundering, but

has consistently denied any wrongdoing.

Princess,

6 claw & 4 claw

ring settings

Enquire Now

1800 811 116

sales@peekays.com.au

www.peekays.com.au

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Bridal Jewellery

NEW PRODUCTS

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HERE, JEWELLER HAS COMPILED A SNAPSHOT

OF THE LATEST PRODUCTS TO HIT THE MARKET.

BLUSH PINK

DIAMONDS

The Aida is a fabulous three-band

dress ring with a row of Argyle pink

diamonds sitting beautifully on top of

two rows of claw-set white diamonds.

Set in 18-carat rose and white gold.

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OPALS

DOUBLETS & BOULDER

COEUR DE LION

The stylish new haematite crystal-set, rose gold-plated bangle from

Coeur de Lion teams beautifully with a variety of the Coeur de Lion

GeoCube bracelets, including this onyx and rose gold Swarovski

Crystal model. Handmade in Germany. Visit: timesupply.com.au

CLUSE

Cluse introduces their first-ever

collection for men. Named

Aravis, the range features polished,

brushed and sandblasted cases

with either Italian leather or

stainless steel straps for a

classically elegant look.

Distributed by Heart & Grace.

Visit: heartandgrace.com.au

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enquiries@ikecho.com.au

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MEN’S JEWELLERY

Eyes on

the

guys

MEN’S JEWELLERY HAS LONG BEEN

CONSIDERED ONE OF THE GREAT-

UNTAPPED JEWELLERY MARKETS.

ARABELLA RODEN DISCOVERS

WHAT’S GOING ON IN THIS SMALL

BUT DYNAMIC CATEGORY

he reason Australian men don’t buy more

jewellery seems simple enough: they don’t put

the same value on jewellery that women do.

Jewellery represents values that marketers

traditionally say men just don’t respond to – it’s not

functional or efficient, it doesn’t eliminate a negative issue

or solve a problem and it’s perceived as feminine – but

that’s not the case for all men.

Men’s jewellery is a small market and it may never reach

the scale of the women’s sector, yet it shouldn’t be

ignored, according to David Paterson, managing director

Paterson Fine Jewellery, which manufactures men’s ring

and cufflink range Alfie Black.

“Absolutely it’s still a growing trend in the jewellery

industry,” he says.

Phil Edwards agrees, the managing director of Thomas

Sabo distributor Duraflex Group Australia noting,

“For some men, jewellery is a very important fashion

statement and form of personal expression.”

June 2019 Jeweller 19


WEST END COLLECTION

WATCH BANDS

Quality watch bands in an array of colours and styles.

Extra long and extra wide sizes available.

For the more conservative males, purchasing fashion jewellery

is usually out of the question but these consumers may be

tempted by the simple luxury of a beautiful wedding ring, even

if they rarely wear it.

Indeed, there are ways to overcome the resistance men have for

buying pieces of their own: creating spaces that appeal specifically

to men, tailoring sales techniques to the different types of men

who buy jewellery and developing a product offering that

combines timeless favourites with the latest trends.

Chris Scanlan is manager of RJ Scanlan & Co, which distributes

Dora men’s wedding rings. “It comes back to demographics,” he

explains of selling to men.

“There are a lot of different types of men around the country,

different people out there buying things for different reasons.

There’s also different retailers promoting different types of

products, and there’s the online component too.”

KNOW YOUR MAN

The key to selling jewellery to men is to consider how they

perceive it. The men’s market can generally be divided into three

categories: those that are open to jewellery on their own terms,

those that embrace heritage jewellery pieces and those that do

not consider buying jewellery at all.

“It really depends on the man,” says Darren Roberts, director of

Cudworth Enterprises. “Bracelets can be part of accessorising.

Cufflinks can make a statement – especially designer brands.

Men are relaxed wearing jewellery, as long as it

remains masculine.”

For the first group, it’s important to

differentiate men’s jewellery from

women’s. Marketing it as a fashion

accessory and focusing on masculine

design are both central to courting

this segment.

Timesupply

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To these men, the accessory – be it

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is part of a particular outfit, rather

than something to be worn

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MEN’S JEWELLERY

John Rose, managing director of West End Collection, which distributes Paul

Hewitt, says, “We find that men’s jewellery sells very well alongside our watch

brands. They are designed to complement the design of the watches and

enhance the look of the watch itself when worn alongside each other.

“The ‘stacked’ look is very on trend right now and is a great up-sell for

any retailer.”

He adds that the Paul Hewitt range uses nautical symbols like the anchor and

shackle, which appeals to men while calling back to the brand’s northern

German heritage.

DURAFLEX

CUDWORTH

These customers will buy different pendants for the same chain or rings with

different finishes for each look.

The Thomas Sabo men’s collection Rebel at Heart speaks to this type of man

by using a palette of silver, black and turquoise to create a masculine feel, as

well as tough materials like leather and blackened silver. The design motifs

present as a rock’n’roll take on religious iconography and wild animal themes.

Pendants can be bought separately from the chain to create a custom look,

appealing to a male consumer’s sense of control and individuality.

Mark Boldiston, director of men’s jewellery boutique Lord Coconut in

Melbourne, caters to this market too.

“The guys who enter my store love the purchase process,” he says. “It probably

helps that I’m up on level five so they’ve already made the commitment to

come into the store and, nine times out of 10, they’ve already looked at the

range online. They’ve come to make a decision.”

Items stocked in the store have unique, masculine design elements like

uneven, jagged edges, fingerprints and cratering, as well as motifs like skulls,

grenades, knives and hands.

Social media remains the major purchasing influence on these men, who tend

to be younger – either Millennials or Gen Z. Influencers, overseas trends and

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the personal style of stars like entertainer Jaden Smith, singer Harry

Styles and model and jewellery designer Anwar Hadid inspire them.

Gen Z in particular is less-rigidly bound to gender roles and

shopping habits. A recent Ipsos MORI survey found that Gen Z

are far less likely than any other generation to want “gendered

clothes, shoes, sports goods, perfume and deodorant”.

Though it is considered a men’s range, Edwards reveals that

Thomas Sabo’s Rebel at Heart is nearly as popular with female

consumers as it is with men. “I feel all men’s jewellery may be

considered unisex and this has not really changed over the recent

years,” he says.

Boldiston too has seen a narrowing in the gender divide.

“Although we sell ourselves as being a men’s jewellery store – so

any guy who comes into the store has the confidence to know

everything in stock is made for blokes – there is no denying

that everything in the shop is in fact unisex,” he says. “As gender

boundaries are getting closer and closer together, there is a huge

market for unisex jewellery.”

For Roberts, it comes down to the individual. “Some of our pieces

can be worn by both men and women – it’s a personal choice.”

Rose agrees: “There is a large section of the jewellery mix that can

be worn by men and women. Paul Hewitt’s Phreps bracelets are

certainly designed to be worn by both sexes.”

When it comes to the men’s jewellery market, however, the

generational gap is clear. “For younger generations [jewellery

is] more of a fashion accessory,” Paterson explains. “I think for

many older men it’s a heritage piece that has significant meaning

to them.”

Alfie Black plays into this sense of history and heritage with its

collection of signet rings and cufflinks inspired by classic British

design. Paterson notes that engravable, flattop signet rings are

proving very popular.

Boldiston has also seen significant growth in the signet-ring

market. “These allow people to have something a bit more

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MEN’S JEWELLERY

individual that matches their personality or the look and style they are trying to

achieve,” he explains.

On the other hand, Scanlan has noticed a significant number of men of all

ages trending back towards a more conservative outlook on jewellery. “There’s

been a shift to plainer, more-conservative wedding bands in straight colours

like white or yellow gold. Guys are toning down the rings that they’re wearing,”

he says.

Scanlan believes the most marked divide is not age but geography, existing

between urban and regional consumers.

“You’ve got men who live in metropolitan, urban areas who are likely to

be spending a little bit more on their rings and spending on rings that have

flashy design, look a little different and are more individual and customised,”

he explains.

RJ SCANLAN

DURAFLEX

“Whereas there are guys on the complete other side of the coin that are coming

from, say, regional areas, where at times it’s a battle to get him to wear a ring – or

perhaps he can’t wear a ring at work for safety reasons. He wants to potentially

just buy something simple and hardwearing. You’ve really got to know your

market when choosing stock because there’s a lot of factors in play.”

Rachel Vellacott, director of Jamies Jewellers in Central Otago and Queenstown,

New Zealand, agrees: “In our area, a large number of guys aren’t into jewellery;

they want a work watch and their wives force them to wear a wedding band

and that’s it!”

ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT

When it comes to selling to men, simplicity is key.

“The retail space has to make men feel comfortable spending time in your

store; nothing too fancy, definitely little or no bling and not too bright,”

Boldiston says.

“The store has to be welcoming but staff have to know how to read the guy

as soon as he walks in the store and either offer assistance or to leave him

alone – he will ask if he needs help.”

Boldiston’s boutique Lord Coconut has a “19th-century, natural history look

and feel” that’s welcoming but interesting enough that even men who

mistakenly walk in will stay to admire the fit-out, rather than “racing out

and feeling like a fool”.

For retailers targeting a mixed clientele with mostly female customers,

it’s still important to ensure the men’s section is discrete and has the

right ambience.

“The men’s jewellery line should be a separate category within a store or

brand collection,” Edwards advises.

Vellacott confirms that Jamies Jewellers stores have a separate section for

the men’s range, featuring “a nice range of items including rings, bracelets,

pendants, pocket watches, cufflinks, tie slides and bangles”.

The same principle applies to e-commerce. Some brands such as Thomas

Sabo have separate social-media channels for their men’s collection. These

channels link to specific men’s sections of a retail website.

Marketing materials and displays specific to the men’s market can also work

well if a retailer is stocking branded men’s jewellery; however, Vellacott

notes that online shoppers are still mostly women.

“Our online men’s jewellery sales tend to be women buying for their men!”

Norwegian Children’s Jewellery

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Retailers should consider offering gifting options and styling tips as part

of the men’s section of their websites, giving customers an idea of exactly

how a piece should be worn and if it will fit with the personal style of the

man who will wear it.

According to market research firm NPD Group, rings are by far the largest


SEEKING EXPERIENCED

Wellington Goldsmith

Partridge Jewellers are looking for an experienced

Goldsmith to join our Wellington team.

jewellery category for men,

generating a third of jewellery

sales. This means they should be a

major focus of the retail display.

RJ Scanlan & Co introduced carbon

fibre rings nearly two years ago after

PATERSON FINE

noticing their popularity in Europe. The

JEWELLERY

combination of a textured black surface with

yellow gold and even rose gold has proved a hit with consumers.

“We’ve been surprised by the popularity of rose gold with carbon

fibre and I think that just comes down to the contrast of the rose

gold with the black – it’s a nice look that’s been our best colour

combination,” Scanlan says. “I know other suppliers have other

black materials – things like zirconium and zirconium with rose

gold have been popular for them.”

Vellacott agrees, saying, “For wedding bands, we’ve noticed a

definite trend for black zirconium and more modern-looking rings.”

Meanwhile, Boldiston says the average width of wedding rings is

narrowing from 7mm two years ago to 5mm and even 3mm today.

Retailers should carry a range of widths as well as sizes.

Other popular ring trends are industrial-style metals like tungsten

and titanium. While Scanlan notes that these rings have brought

the average price of wedding bands down, there’s no denying

their popularity.

“If you Google men’s wedding bands, one of the first things you

see is a tungsten ring or a black ring,” he says. “These cheaper,

alternative metals are flooding that sphere. That’s creating an

expectation with men and they like what they’re seeing.”

“Many consumers are sold on the appearance and the

maintenance aspect; they’re hard and black and strong. Men like

the price but it’s about those other selling points,” he adds.

Finally, when it comes to closing a men’s jewellery sale, Boldiston

advises streamlining the process.

“We try to make the purchase straightforward, such as having a

fixed price on our gold rings. Uncertainty leads to them feeling not

in control; we like to keep it simple,” he says.

Indeed, for the whole of the men’s jewellery market, “keep it simple”

seems to be the best advice of all. i

This is a new role and exciting opportunity to join a 5th

generation family business specialising in the design and

manufacture of fine jewellery. Partridge Jewellers are a

family owned business and have operated in New Zealand

for over 150 years. Our reputation is a culmination of

over six generations of experience within the jewellery

and watch industries in New Zealand.

Specialising in diamonds, precious gems, pearls, gold

and platinum we design and manufacture much of our

own jewellery but also import a selection of pieces from

leading international jewellery houses.

We are seeking a Goldsmith who is experienced in

all facets of jewellery manufacturing including hand

fabrication, model making and the ability to use

or learn CAD. We require minimum of five years’

experience and a high degree of skill commensurate to

the jewellery we sell throughout our seven stores. The

ability to deal directly with customers if required is a

benefit. You will work alongside one of our designers

turning customers’ requirements and dreams into

reality, as well as crafting pieces for sale in our stores.

The position is based in Wellington city close to our

existing retail store on Lambton Quay.

Partridge Jewellers is an exciting company to work for,

with International exposure, allowing the successful

applicant to learn more about our interesting and

fascinating trade and the Partridge brand.

Please apply in writing to Grant Partridge with relevant

CV and a list of skills and images of your work to date:

grant.partridge@partridgejewellers.co.nz

CUDWORTH

PATERSON FINE JEWELLERY

www.partridgejewellers.com


lesgeorgettes.com

contactaus@lesgeorgettes.com


BRANDED JEWELLERY

DURAFLEX

Brand and

deliver

NAVIGATING THE BRANDED-JEWELLERY LANDSCAPE REQUIRES

AN UNDERSTANDING OF NOT ONLY YOUR CUSTOMERS BUT ALSO

THE BRAND STORY OF THE RETAILER. ARABELLA RODEN REPORTS

hether to stock branded jewellery is a decision every retail jeweller

must consider. If so, how much of one’s inventory should brands

occupy and what are the right brands to stock?

There are many factors in play in this decision, including price and margin, brand

image and marketing, and supplier support. There’s also the matter of trust –

newer brands don’t have the same prestige or built-in customer base as wellestablished,

international brands.

But there are major positives to stocking a variety of branded jewellery and

various ways to overcome the misgivings retailers might have about embracing

this category.

Phil Edwards, managing director at Duraflex Group Australia, which supplies

Thomas Sabo and Ania Haie, says, “Branded jewellery comes with much more than

just the product itself. It should come with the complete story, from point-of-sale

(POS), packaging, marketing material and even social-media content. Ideally a

branded product should be bringing consumers to the retailer’s door with its own

brand awareness.”

Frédéric Brunel Acquaviva, vice-president of sales at Renaissance Luxury

Group, says, “A brand identity is not only about the product itself, but the whole

universe that the brand has to offer. Retailers worldwide are struggling with instore

traffic; they are struggling to differentiate from other stores and to compete

with e-commerce. “

“They need to create a memorable shopping experience for the consumer by

having real and true storytelling – a creative, unique and emotional message that

encourages the consumer to come back often.”

Renaissance developed the Les Georgettes By Altesse range, which was first

introduced to the French market in 2015 before expanding overseas, as a

unique product offering which is not only eye-catching and colourful, but also

customisable. This means consumers will keep coming back to purchase the

interchangeable elements.

One benefit for retailers is that suppliers heavily support brands by building brand

awareness, managing distribution lines and providing retailers with the right tools

to promote the product.

“The brand debate has been going on for years,” Helen Thompson-Carter, director

of Fabuleux Vous, explains. “The critical thing for any brand is to ensure they are

constantly evolving with design and presentation. Retailers now are wanting to

feel the love from suppliers and suppliers have had to become a lot more flexible

in their approach and offering.”

June 2019 Jeweller 27


# f a b u l o u s y o u # f a b u l o u s j e w e l l e r y

# w e a r y o u r f a b u l o u s

F V J E W E L L E R Y . C O M

SAMS GROUP AUSTRALIA

LES GEORGETTES BY ALTESSE

TRIED AND TRUE

It’s hard to establish a brand and even harder to see it grow and thrive

over time. Retailers must know what they seek in a brand, what it takes

to make that brand succeed and how to get the brand mix right in

their retail stores.

Edwards says there are many reasons retailers might hesitate to stock

a brand: “Will it actually sell? How many nearby competitor stores may

discount the brand? What’s the minimum buy-in or investment? How

will the brand be supported and marketed? Is it a trend or a long-term

investment? Are the staff actually engaged with the brand and willing

to drive sales?”

The majority of these concerns can be addressed by choosing a

bigger, more established brand.

Steve Der Bedrossian is CEO of SAMS Group, which has established

the Pink Kimberley Diamonds and Blush Pink Diamonds brands. While

they were started in 2008 and 2014 respectively, SAMS Group has a

long history. “The benefit to retailers is working with a company that

has been around for more than 50 years in the jewellery and watch

trade,” he says.

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FV Jewellery, we are a brand with a

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Brunel Acquaviva describes the support for retailers of Les Georgettes

By Altesse as “a 360-degree plan offered each season which brings

together marketing, communication and merchandising tools to

promote the brand and increase sales in the best way”.

For many retailers, the decision to stock a brand is contingent on one

thing: its ability to get customers through the door. Simply put, bigger,

more established brands have name recognition and a built-in market,

as well as the budget to promote the brand to consumers.

Der Bedrossian says, “Our award-winning creative designs are easy

to sell due to our market research and pre-selection. We have brand

recognition and a lot to offer, with both on-trend and classic designs.”

FVJEWELLERY.COM

sales@fabuleuxvous.com | Helen +64 274 203 137

Bevan Hill, business manager at Jewellery By

Design in Townsville, Queensland, says,

“We stock well-known brands such

as Adina, Najo, Swarovski, Ikecho,

Australian Chocolate Diamonds

and Pink Kimberley. We find that

there is already brand recognition

within the community, which

makes selling the items much easier

as customers already feel connected

to a brand from what they have seen

IKECHO

PEARLS


BRANDED JEWELLERY

Have you experienced challenges

in establishing a jewellery brand?

“Our market research showed that more than 65 per cent

of retailers only wanted to stock what was tried, tested

and true. There were only five to 15 per cent of retailers

– who we referred to as the ‘innovators’ – that were

very keen to give something new a go, and they were

critical to getting the brand up and running.” – Helen

Thompson-Carter, director Fabuleux Vous

“Initially retailers wanted to still weigh the branded

sterling silver product [from Thomas Sabo] and convert

to a cost per gram – clearly not a relevant option for

a branded product that has so many other features

and elements to the story!” – Phil Edwards, managing

director Duraflex Group Australia

“As with any new brand, there are many hurdles that

need to be overcome. Low brand awareness is always

a significant challenge – brand awareness is needed

to gain the retailers’ trust as well as the confidence of

the end customer.” – Frédéric Brunel Acquaviva, vicepresident

of sales Renaissance Luxury Group

in the media and feel more compelled to purchase those items over

non-branded.”

The other advantage is that buying and wearing well-known brands

makes consumers feel on-trend, with a certain social cache attached.

“A well-known brand gives the customer a confidence in their

purchase – not only because there is a perception of quality in that

item but also because customers like to feel that they are wearing

something that is fashionable and trendy,” Rachel Vellacott, director

of Jamies Jewellers in Central Otago and Queenstown, New Zealand,

explains. “Especially to younger customers, we sell a lot of certain styles

because friends are wearing that piece or wearing that brand.”

Timesupply distributes Nomination, Coeur de Lion and Dansk

Smykkekunst, all of which were founded between 1971 and 1987.

Managing director Ken Abbott puts the continuing popularity of these

brands down to “timeless designs” as well as passion, innovation and

high-quality craftsmanship. That pedigree continues to appeal to

consumers year after year.

For the last two years, Timesupply has distributed German brand

Qudo, which was founded comparatively recently in 2009. Receiving

a very positive reception from local retailers, Abbott says the brand’s

philosophy – “to inspire and excite jewellery lovers with clever and

innovative ideas using the latest technologies and creative elements” –

has been a key selling point.

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FABULEUX VOUS

Similarly, Ikecho was founded 20 years ago and

continues to keep customers intrigued.

“We have two seasonal collections per year and I think customers

like that we are always keeping on trend with pearl designs,” Erica

Miller, founder and director of Ikecho, says. She adds that her biggest

challenge over the years has been finding consistently high-quality

pearls to use in her designs, as it’s the commitment to exceptional

gems that’s sustained her brand.

When it comes to merchandising, established brands can offer clear

guides and support with stock presentation and sales techniques.

“In 1999, we started off slowly with a small amount of POS, strut cards

and packaging,” Miller explains, “then we brought in our core pearl

studs on stands, as well as earrings and pendant stands with the logo.

This worked well in-store. We then introduced window displays in two

different sizes.”

Many international brands have marketing teams that tailor content

to specific markets and increase brand awareness among consumers.

They may also appoint international celebrity ambassadors.

“Well-established brands tend to have expert backing with dedicated

teams who constantly update their product ranges while investing

in marketing to let customers know what’s on offer,” Pranay Parekh,

manager of Springfield Jewellers in Springfield, Queensland, explains.

Indeed, SAMS Group established Blush Pink in order to make rare and

expensive Argyle pink diamonds more accessible to a wider range

of consumers. “Blush Pink features fancy light pinks, more pave-style

settings and a smaller price tag,” Der Bedrossian explains.

Recently, brands have been embracing social media and digital

marketing to target younger consumers, generating word-of-mouth

and building their brand stories.

“Facebook and Instagram play a big part nowadays for branding,”

Miller says, adding that Ikecho’s website has been revamped three

times over the years and has a great e-commerce offering that funnels

sales to retailers through a ‘click and collect’ function. “We’re always

making improvements to our site,” she adds.

In the digital realm, Thomas Sabo and Ania Haie have country-specific

websites and have also embraced influencer marketing, forming

partnerships with social-media stars from the US, UK and Europe.

Proudly distributed by

SMALL AND MIGHTY

From a practical perspective, the supplier for a larger brand will

generally have strong existing infrastructure and support staff on hand

to assist retailers; however, there are some drawbacks.

Simply put, the more well-known the brand, the more likely it is that

multiple stores in the same area will stock the range. This can dilute

02 9417 0177 | www.dgau.com.au


BRANDED JEWELLERY

sales and erode a retailer’s point of difference. “It can be limiting,” Miller

says of retail oversupply. “In a small town, there should really only be

one retailer that stocks that brand.”

That’s where smaller and younger brands come in.

“Depending on who your target market is as a retailer, brands will

bring consumers to the store but they can also have an adverse effect

– those consumers who don’t want to be like everyone else could

bypass that store,” Fabuleux Vous founder Thompson-Carter says.

There can also be problems for retailers when a larger brand decides

to change direction. A recent example is Pandora’s restructure, which

has seen it withdraw from third-party distribution both in Australia and

around the world.

As many as 100 Australian accounts were closed in 2018, with reports

of back orders not being honoured and widespread stock liquidation;

this damaged the reputation of retailers as well as their relationship

with loyal customers.

Retailers can also become too reliant on branded products and

displays, neglecting their own sales techniques and merchandising

skills and assuming that customers already know what they want.

While seeming like a risk at first, stocking younger brands can pay off

in the long-term. Flexibility is the key with small local brands able to

offer lower buy-ins, a deeper understanding of the different factors

and customer needs in the local market, and more freedom with sales,

packaging, marketing and merchandising.

“Smaller brands do all the things that big brands do, but are nimble in

changing design direction with much care and attention,” Thompson-

Carter explains.

“I have seen a shift from retailers wanting everything from smaller

brands to wanting the choice to integrate product into their own

store’s story versus the brand’s story,” she adds, noting that many

retailers have confessed to feeling like the identity of their stores had

been overwhelmed by a large brand’s display.

Meanwhile, Brunel Acquaviva notes, “Today, customers are turning

to niche brands which put more emphasis on producing quality

products that reflect the consumer’s personal sense of style.”

THE BRAND MIX

There are both benefits and challenges to stocking larger, mature

brands and smaller, younger ones. The right brand mix is crucial.

SAMS GROUP AUSTRALIA

IKECHO PEARLS

Timesupply

jewellery + watches

p +61 (0)8 8221 5580

sales@timesupply.com.au

exclusive distributor AU & NZ


BRANDED JEWELLERY

Springfield Jewellers stocks 12 per cent branded jewellery. “Since we relocated to

our new premises in November 2015, we have stocked Nikki Lissoni and Thomas

Sabo as well as Pink Kimberley,” Parekh explains.

“We stock branded jewellery to ensure we offer our customers a full range

of jewellery products. While we specialise in custom-made jewellery and

workshop-related services, branded jewellery fills a huge potential gap in

our retail offering.”

Vellacott has been building the brand offering of both her stores over the last six

years and the ratio is now at 38 per cent branded jewellery. She says that brands

“give your customers a certain degree of confidence in the store – they can

provide a sense of comfort and help entice customers into the shop where they

can see our other products.”

FABULEUX VOUS

THOMAS SABO

Vellacott advises other retailers to “do more research and ask more questions”

before deciding whether to bring in a new brand. “I think there is a risk in

stocking unproven brands – there seems to be a fairly large buy-in for new

products that then don’t offer the support and back-up that they promise,” she

says. “We are a little more wary of promises that some brands make!”

Jewellery By Design has stocked brands since opening 13 years ago.

“Approximately 40 per cent of our current range is branded jewellery,” Hill

says, adding, “It’s important to consider if a brand is a good fit for current

customers or if there has been demand that may bring in new customers. While

it is important to stock a well-known, high-quality brand, it is also important to

consider that brand’s after-service care and how they interact with their retailers.”

Meanwhile, Parekh notes, “Most brands invest in product development ensuring

their newest releases are in line with the latest fashion trends. Products are

backed up with quality finishing, a decent warranty and after-sales care, all of

which builds trust.”

When deciding whether to stock branded jewellery, there are many factors to

consider. Retailers should choose carefully but not be too timid to experiment.

By carefully selecting brands that match well with a store’s customer base and

offer plenty of support, retailers can attract new customers and boost sales. i

Christian Paul

SYDNEY

Australia’s leading jewellery brand, distributed by

West End Collection. Georgini’s exciting new collections

fuse modern elegance with fashion forward design


GEMS

ORGANIC GEMS PART III: IVORY ALTERNATIVES

of vegetable ivory. A sustainable and effective

imitation of animal ivory, vegetable ivory is

derived from the large nuts of these trees, as

well as several other species of palm found in

Africa and the South Pacific.

The central part of the nut is a dense white

material that, once dried, can be easily carved

and polished to leave surfaces with a waxy

lustre – perfect for carving figurines and other

aesthetic objects. It was historically used to

make buttons, chess pieces and dice.

Bone, sourced from the long bones of large

animals or the antlers of deer and moose,

is also used as an ivory imitant. It can be

distinguished from ivory by its porosity, along

with its bright whiteness in contrast to the

yellowish hue of ivory – although in some

cases it is stained to appear less bright.

Ivory is a biological gem material used by

humans for thousands of years, with early

artefacts including carvings and jewellery

dating back 32,000 years. However, due to

ethical concerns, possession and import

of modern elephant ivory harvested after

1975 is an offence in Australia.

The use of ethical alternatives has become

increasingly popular, including imitants,

vegetable ivory and fossil ivory.

Ivory is composed of dentin, also spelled

dentine. This is a whitish yellow and

moderately hard tissue of the continuously

growing teeth (tusks) that belong to certain

species of mammal. Elephants are the most

well-known source, but ivory may also come

from walrus, hippopotamus, sperm whale,

narwhal, dugong and various species of

ungulates such as the boar and the warthog.

The opaque material is relatively soft without

physical constraints that may arise in other

crystalline gem materials. Fine details can be

captured by skilled artisans, making it ideal for

carvings. It is often used in antique artworks,

musical instruments, jewellery and other

personal and decorative items.

Elephant ivory is recognised as the principal

ivory of commerce, and is associated with

the illegal poaching of threatened species of

African and Indian elephants. Fossil elephant

ivory comes from the now-extinct woolly

mammoth or American mastodon. Whilst

rare, it is considered an ethical alternative,

with large and well-preserved specimens

attracting great value.

The legalities and ethical conflict surrounding

elephant ivory has led to a market flooded

with imitations including glass, plastic and

organic alternatives.

The corozo or tagua palm from Central

America and northern South America is a

long-used and commercially available source

WHILE ELEPHANT

IVORY IS A SCARCE

ORGANIC GEM

ASSOCIATED

WITH MUCH

GLOBAL CONFLICT,

VEGETABLE IVORY

HAS PROVIDED

THE MARKET WITH

AN ATTRACTIVE

ALTERNATIVE

Ivory can be easily distinguished from its

imitants by careful visual examination with a

10x hand lens. Elephant ivory is characterised

by the identification of ‘Schreger lines’,

sometimes referred to as ‘engine turning’, a

pattern visible on the surface or cross section

of the tusk. This pattern is a result of the

internal structure of dentinal tubes.

Plastic ivory imitants lack these Schreger

lines, and are much lighter than true ivory.

They may also show gas bubbles or mould

marks. Glass imitants are largely identified by

coldness, compared to the soft warmth of

animal ivory.

While elephant ivory is a scarce organic

gem associated with much global conflict,

vegetable ivory has provided the market with

an attractive alternative that can allow for

creative expression without threatening harm

to Earth’s remaining wildlife. i

STACEY LIM FGAA BA Design, is a qualified

gemmologist and gemmology teacher/assistant.

She is a jewellery designer, marketing manager

and passionate communicator on gemmology.

For information on gemstones, visit: gem.org.au

June 2019 Jeweller 33


Behind every gemstone,

there is a fascinating story

waiting to delight clients

around the world. Studying

with GAA brings the

expertise, networking and

confidence to build a solid

career in a multimilliondollar

industry. Joining

one of the most supportive

and passionate professional

communities of gemmologists

in Australia was one of the

best decision I ever made.

Gina Barreto FGAA DipDT

Gemmologist and Diamond Technologist

Diamond

Courses

Practical Diamond Grading &

Diploma in Diamond Technology

Enrolments now open

For more information

1300 436 338

learn@gem.org.au

www.gem.org.au

Be

Confident

Gem-Ed Australia

ADELAIDE BRISBANE HOBART MELBOURNE PERTH SYDNEY

Passionately educating the industry, gem enthusiasts

and consumers about gemstones


BUSINESS

DEALING WITH DISTRACTED SHOPPERS

Keeping customers engaged can be

a struggle for retailers but there are

strategies that can help. FRANCESCA

NICASIO reports.

It’s no secret that shoppers these days are

more distracted. Between social media

updates, smartphone notifications and life

in general, people simply have a lot more on

their plate, and all of these can distract them

from shopping.

The problem is particularly prevalent with

online shoppers. Research from software

company Namogoo found that the majority

of consumers are multitasking while

shopping online. Of those surveyed, 57 per

cent shop online while at work, 51 per cent

shop while doing household chores and 32

per cent shop while cooking.

Other activities include shopping while

dining out with family and friends, running

errands, commuting to work and exercising.

Throw in distractions such as smartphone

alerts, children, pets and competing stores

and it’s easy to see why it can be hard to grab

the attention of consumers.

While some interruptions are hard to avoid,

such as an unexpected call or a crying

baby, other distractions such as shoppers

checking their phones in the middle of

sales interactions can be overcome or even

prevented altogether.

Here are some ways to do just that.

MIND THE DECOMPRESSION ZONE

The decompression zone is the first few

feet inside a store. It’s the entry area

that customers use to adjust to the new

environment. Think of it as the first impression

zone of your store. Here, shoppers are prone

to distractions, which is why retailers should

keep it simple and uncluttered. Avoid placing

too many products or fixtures in this area, as

people will likely just walk past them.

Paco Underhill, author of Why We Buy: The

Science of Shopping, says, “By the time the

person is starting to engage with the physical

environment, some of the stuff you’ve put by

the door is blown past.”

Underhill advises sellers to display a small

number of key items in this area and use

EACH SHOPPER

REQUIRES

A DIFFERENT

APPROACH

DEPENDING ON

HIS OR HER MOOD

AND PERSONAL

PREFERENCES

– FOR INSTANCE,

WHILE SOME

CUSTOMERS MAY

FEEL DISTRACTED

BY NEARBY

SALESPEOPLE,

OTHERS MAY NEED

HANDHOLDING

“lighting and flooring that contrast with the

outside environment” so customers will slow

down and take note of what’s around them.

In addition, retail experts Rich Kizer and

Georganne Bender recommend that

shopping trolleys, baskets and floor signs

be placed at the end of the decompression

zone to ensure that customers actually see

and use them.

KEEP SHOPPERS INTERESTED

Train salespeople to recognise that each

shopper requires a different approach

depending on his or her mood and personal

preferences. For instance, while some

customers may feel distracted by nearby

salespeople, others may need handholding.

Generally speaking, it’s a good idea to greet

shoppers and acknowledge their presence

when they walk into your store. Aside from

deterring potential shoplifters, greeting

people makes them more aware of their

surroundings and helps them focus.

Greeting customers also gives you an

opportunity to direct them to the right aisle or

June 2019 Jeweller 35


BUSINESS

to remind them of any deals or hot items that

they may have missed when they were in the

decompression zone.

Have salespeople offer shopping trolleys or

baskets. As Kizer and Bender note, “Studies

show that customers with shopping [trolleys]

spend 25 per cent more in the store and up

to 15 minutes longer browsing.”

OFFER RELEVANT CONTENT

The best way to grab someone’s attention

is to present them with messages that

are relevant to their needs. This holds true

whether you’re trying to reach people

online or offline.

On the e-commerce front, effective websites

offer content that speaks directly to each

customer. This can come in the form of

an extremely relatable Instagram ad or an

online assortment curated for the shopper.

An example of this is Showpo, an Australian

e-commerce company that sells women’s

clothing. Showpo uses AI to personalise

web content so that each user sees products

that are relevant to their individual tastes

and preferences.

“With this visual merchandising tool, [the

website’s content] is based on what you

looked at and what people like you have

checked out,” Showpo founder Jane Lu

explains, adding that her company doesn’t

want “to show content or products that

don’t matter to the individual” since the

attention spans of consumers are dwindling.

You can apply this same principle offline

by making sure that you treat customers

as individuals. If dealing with returning

customers, have a look at their purchase

history so you can recommend the

right products.

This level of personalisation gives customers

a more compelling shopping experience,

which makes them less prone to distractions.

USE TECHNOLOGY

Worried that customers are too distracted

by their smartphones? Don’t be. Instead of

being frustrated with technology, find ways

to use it to your advantage.

For instance, T-We Tea in San Francisco

embraces technology through mobile

payments. Rather than discouraging

smartphone use, they invite shoppers

to download the PayPal app so they can

complete purchases without having to whip

out their wallets.

This not only gives people faster checkout

but also allows T-We Tea to add a cool

factor to their shopping experience. Owner

Christopher Coccagna calls it “a very sexy

sales experience” and it helps the business

make a big impression on customers.

Other stores are using smartphones and

social media to spread the word about their

businesses. DK’s Donuts & Bakery in Los

Angeles offers deals to customers who

make a purchase and check-in via Yelp.

Doing so encourages sales while putting

the business in front of their customers’

friends and followers.

Team Manila, a clothing store in the

Philippines, has special hashtag stickers

on its fitting-room mirrors to encourage

shoppers to snap social-media selfies while

trying on clothes.

These are just a few examples of retailers

utilising technology to be more awesome.

Instead of seeing smartphones as shopper

distractions, they see them as tools that can

help forward their business. Adopt the same

mindset and find ways put your customers’

gadgets to good use.

SPRUCE UP STORE DISPLAYS

Make use of updated and attractive store

fixtures. Don’t skimp on shelves, counters

and equipment as these all contribute to the

shopper experience. For instance, you may

want to replace your clunky cash register

with a sleek iPad-based POS system. Doing

so frees up more space and reduces visual

noise for your customers, thus helping them

focus on the products that you’re selling.

You should also think about your displays.

Are they directing shoppers to focus on the

right items or are there too many things

going on? A good rule of thumb is to decide

on a focal point – highlight just one item

and lay out the rest of the products around it

or use complementary elements like plants to

enhance the look and feel of a shop window.

USE FOOT-TRAFFIC ANALYTICS

Your store’s design can either grab customer

attention or scatter it. One of the most

ARE YOUR VISUAL

MERCHANDISING

EFFORTS

DISTRACTING

PEOPLE OR

CONVERTING

THEM? WHICH

PARTS OF YOUR

STORE ARE

CONFUSING YOUR

CUSTOMERS?

effective ways to ensure that your store is

doing the former is by using in-store analytics

to track shopper movement.

Are your visual merchandising efforts

distracting people or converting them?

Which parts of your store are confusing your

customers? Beacons, people counters and

other foot-traffic tools can help you answer

these questions.

GO OMNICHANNEL

Whether you’re selling online, offline or

both, you can bet that your customers

will be looking at multiple screens as they

go through their shopping journey. That’s

why it’s important to establish an

omnichannel presence.

You need to adapt and ensure that shoppers

can easily engage with your brand if and

when they switch to a different device.

This starts with creating a responsive website

that works equally well on various screens.

If possible, allow your customers to create

accounts so that they can access their

shopping trolleys via multiple retail channels.

If you’re running a bricks-and-mortar store,

find ways to gather customer data in-store so

you can connect with them via email or text.

There are two easy ways to do this:

Collect customer details at checkout – Ask

shoppers if they’d like to provide their email

addresses or phone numbers so you can

get in touch with updates. Consider using

your loyalty program to further incentivise

customers who give you their info.

Offer free WiFi – If possible, set up a guest WiFi

network to which shoppers can connect so

they can go online while in your location.

Set up your WiFi system in such a way that

shoppers would need to provide their contact

info before connecting.

Using these strategies will help stop

distractions, keep customers happy and

encourage sales conversion. i

FRANCESCA NICASIO

is a retail expert from

Vend, a POS, inventory and

customer loyalty software for

merchants. vendhq.com

36 Jeweller June 2019


SELLING

HOW TO OVERCOME COMMON SALES OBSTACLES

IN ANY APPROACH TO SALES, THERE ARE TWO INEVITABLE HURDLES: THE PRICE CONVERSATION AND CUSTOMER REJECTION.

THE WAY TO DEAL WITH BOTH THESE CHALLENGES IS WITH TIMING, CONFIDENCE AND RESILIENCE, WRITES JEREMY MILLER.

Premature price conversation is a problem

afflicting thousands of salespeople every

year. Like the more well-known premature

affliction, premature price conversations can

leave both parties feeling underwhelmed,

disappointed and maybe even a little

embarrassed. This doesn’t need to happen.

Premature price conversations are

preventable. With a little self-awareness

and some training, any salesperson – or

anyone responsible for selling anything

– can kick this dreadful habit.

The first thing to acknowledge is that

price is not a feature. Unless you’re selling

a commodity, price is not the reason why

consumers buy products.

Price may be a factor for helping consumers

select one brand over another but it’s rarely

the reason why that consumer sought to

buy that product in the first place. Selling on

price should therefore be avoided.

When you focus on what makes your

services unique and how your service or

product solves a problem for consumers,

you automatically rise above premature

price conversations.

If you can explain what makes your products

and services special, clearly and concisely,

customers will not only welcome having the

price conversation with you but also want to

know how to get started.

PRICE IS NOT A DIRTY WORD

We’ve clarified that price should never come

first in any sales conversation; however,

talking about price remains a fact of sales.

You shouldn’t avoid price conversations

because customers will eventually want

to know what products and services cost.

Avoiding price conversations altogether is as

bad as having them too soon.

When a customer asks for the price, be direct

and specific. Don’t be shy about it – your

products cost what they cost. Salespeople

establish credibility by talking about price

PRICE MAY

BE A FACTOR

FOR HELPING

CONSUMERS

SELECT ONE BRAND

OVER ANOTHER

BUT IT’S RARELY

THE REASON WHY

THAT CONSUMER

SOUGHT TO BUY

THAT PRODUCT IN

THE FIRST PLACE

DISCUSS PRICE AT THE RIGHT TIME

with authority. Customers don’t want to

dance around and play games; they want

the facts.

LEARN TO LOVE ‘NO’

In sales, as in life, rejection is inevitable.

Fortunately, rejection can also be the key

that unlocks remarkable opportunities –

Walt Disney was turned down 302 times

before he got financing for his Walt Disney

World theme park; JK Rowling was rejected

by 12 publishers before Bloomsbury took

a chance on Harry Potter; Colonel Sanders

pitched his secret recipe for Kentucky

Fried Chicken 1,009 times before he got

his first “yes”.

“No” is not a bad word but unfortunately

we’re taught that it is!

In his well-known sales book How to Master

the Art of Selling, Tom Hopkins takes a

contrarian stance, teaching the reader to

“learn to love no”.

Equally philosophical is author Jack Canfield,

whose best-selling self-help book Chicken

Soup for the Soul was originally rejected by

144 publishers.

“If we had given up after 100 publishers,

I likely would not be where I am now,”

Canfield writes. “I encourage you to reject

rejection. If someone says no, just say next!”

It’s how you respond to rejection that

matters, as every “no” you receive is a

valuable opportunity for input.

Listen to it, understand the fears and doubts

you’re hearing from your customers or

clients and learn from the experience.

The next time you pitch, you can adapt your

message and get better. More importantly,

keep moving forward. Every time you hear

no, you’re one step closer to yes.

More challenging than an external “no” is

internal rejection. You know that voice inside

your head, the one that only talks about

worst-case scenarios and what-ifs? Tell that

voice to back off.

Steven Pressfield describes this type of

internal rejection as ‘resistance’ in his book

The War of Art.

“Resistance cannot be seen, touched, heard,

or smelled but it can be felt,” Pressfield

explains. “We experience it as an energy

field radiating from a work-in-potential. It’s

a repelling force. It’s negative. Its aim is to

shove us away, distract us, prevent us from

doing our work.”

Resist the “no” inside your head with all your

might. It is the hardest to overcome but

resistance is essential because you can’t get

anyone else to say yes until you believe in

what you’re doing.

Thomas Edison said, “I have not failed; I’ve

just found 10,000 ways that won’t work. I

am not discouraged because every wrong

attempt discarded is another step forward.”

Every time you hear a “no”, smile a little.

You’ve just passed another milestone and it’s

time to try again. i

JEREMY MILLER is a brand

builder, keynote speaker and

bestselling author of Sticky

Branding. stickybranding.com

June 2019 Jeweller 37


MANAGEMENT

THE ART OF MAKING BETTER DECISIONS

IN ORDER TO MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICES, MANAGERS NEED CLARITY OF PURPOSE AND A WAY TO DETERMINE THE VALUE OF THEIR

OPTIONS. BERNADETTE MCCLELLAND EXPLORES THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS – AND WHY INDECISION CAN BE PARALYSING.

It was a very simple question between two

very simple options – should I have the

carrot cake or the friand?

I chose neither, and it had nothing to do with

calorie counting. In fact, I don’t actually know

what it was that made me so uncertain.

This rattled me, the fact that I couldn’t

make the decision. The choice should’ve

been simple and insignificant and it got me

thinking about the millions of decisions we

make – or don’t make – every single day,

minute by minute.

There are decisions that we don’t think

twice about, and decisions that cause us

stress and confusion.

What causes this indecision and how does

it impact our businesses, our roles and even

our lives?

What are the decisions we aren’t making that,

if we did, would catapult us off in a different

direction?

MAKE CHOICES BY DEFINING WHAT’S IMPORTANT

of what we save against the actual cost and

a saving of $20 seems more valuable in the

first example.

Providing a second example gives us a

reference of value, the contrast that enables

us to decide.

and going off half-cocked. That’s when

we can make mistakes.

• Similarly, if we rely too much on our

head, wanting things to be perfect, we

may miss an opportunity.

In this volatile and fast moving world,

we don’t have time to gather all the

information we need to make decisions

that are 100 per cent factual.

If we do, we’ll miss the boat so we need to

make decisions intuitively but also smartly

– not too fast, not too slow, just right!

We can’t fall to pieces over which cake

to have, just as we can’t delay decisions

in our day-to-day business operations.

Responsiveness is key.

Defining what’s important to us goes a

long way toward helping us clarify the issue

we need to decide about. We can make

more informed decisions when we know

what we want – and why.

THE VALUE OF COMPARISON

Fear is said to stop people making decisions.

From a psychological standpoint, it creates

procrastination and paralyses people from

acting; however, what if you don’t feel afraid

of anything but you’re still indecisive?

Many decisions come down to a comparison

or choice between two items, activities or

pathways – left or right, red or green, the

carrot cake or the friand?

When we compare one thing with another, it

gives us contrast and we can assess the value

of one thing against the value of another.

Would you travel half an hour to save $20 on

a pair of shoes that cost $80 or would you

drive half an hour to save $20 on a pair of

shoes that cost $200?

You’d probably choose the first option. Why,

though – $20 is $20, isn’t it?

Yes, but one is a 25 per cent saving and the

other a 10 per cent saving. We base the value

THE SCIENCE

BEHIND DECISION-

MAKING TELLS

US THAT OUR

‘GUT’ PLAYS A

HUGE PART IN

OUR SELECTIONS.

SOMETIMES A

CHOICE “JUST

FEELS RIGHT”,

DOESN’T IT?

INTUITIVE REASONING

How do we know the real value of

something if there are no items or options

for comparison?

The science behind decision-making tells

us that our ‘gut’ plays a huge part in our

selections. Sometimes a choice “just feels

right”, doesn’t it?

The other component of decision-making

is in our ‘head’, the rational part of our brain

with its headquarters in the prefrontal

cortex. Once this area is fed enough

information, it tends to dominate the gut –

logic kicks in and a decision is made.

For years, decision-making has relied

on fact-driven, logical data collection;

however, strong leadership today relies on

both the head and the gut, especially in

this ‘connection economy’ or what some

call the ‘imagination era’. Here’s why:

• If we rely wholly and solely on our gut,

we are prone to being too emotional

Having a purpose or outcome in mind

also contributes to decision-making, as it

becomes another data point.

Finally, for us to make an informed decision,

we need those ‘gut feeling’ comparisons to

help us assign value to each option.

So why did I have so much difficulty

choosing between the carrot cake and the

friand? As it turns out, my decision was not

which type of cake to buy, but whether to

buy a cake at all.

I chose not to purchase and it was a

purposeful and informed decision.

Both literally and figuratively, it really was

a gut decision! i

BERNADETTE

MCCLELLAND is a keynote

speaker, executive sales

coach, and published author.

3redfolders.com

38 Jeweller June 2019


MARKETING & PR

WHY BAD FEEDBACK IS THE BEST FEEDBACK

WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR BUSINESS, SOME OPINIONS CAN BE VERY HARD TO HEAR – BUT JEANNIE WALTERS EXPLAINS WHY

IT’S ACTUALLY BEST TO BITE THE BULLET AND ACCEPT ALL FEEDBACK, NO MATTER HOW BAD IT SOUNDS AT FIRST.

Employers need to provide oodles of

feedback to employees to ensure they know

what they’re doing, what they’re supposed

to be doing, what they’re doing well and

what they could be doing better.

Good feedback is great for reinforcing

confidence and building morale and,

surprisingly, negative feedback can be just

as useful, if not more so.

This is because negative feedback, whether

from employees or customers, provides

a way to prevent little annoyances from

becoming reasons for good customers to

leave and good workers to quit.

Bad feedback tells you what you need

to change and shows you what’s really

important to the most important people

in your business – your customers and

your staff.

FEEDBACK IS BIG

The hardest part of my job is collecting

and then reporting bad feedback to

clients about behaviours and aspects of

their business that harm their customers’

experiences. Here are some of the truly

horrific things I’ve had to utter to clients:

Your website or app stinks – Customers

have asked for the same website or app

improvements over and over again. They

don’t understand why it’s not a priority,

especially when your competitor is

delivering on it now! In fact, your sales

team goes out of its way to avoid showing

it to prospects.

Your customer communication is self-serving

or non-existent – Customers have reported

giving up on your business simply because

you’re not communicating effectively with

them. They need to hear from you about

things that matter to them, and not just

when you have a new marketing newsletter.

Your social media is stagnant – Customers

are offering you vital feedback and you’re

providing them with no response, which

NEGATIVE

FEEDBACK,

WHETHER FROM

EMPLOYEES OR

CUSTOMERS,

PROVIDES A WAY

TO PREVENT LITTLE

ANNOYANCES

FROM BECOMING

REASONS FOR

GOOD CUSTOMERS

TO LEAVE AND

GOOD WORKERS

TO QUIT

DON’T SHY AWAY FROM NEGATIVE FEEDBACK

soon becomes a reason not to interact any

further with your brand.

Your social channels are a two-way street.

They are there to keep you in the front

of your customers’ minds, update them

on any changes and provide important

information about your business. They

are also there to give customers a place to

ask questions. Don’t neglect them.

Your sales and marketing teams are at war

– The key teams in your business are, in

essence, working against each other and

the customers are paying for it when their

expectations aren’t met.

Your staff hate their jobs – Your workers feel

useless and frustrated. They reported not

getting enough direction or feedback to do

their jobs – or even to care about keeping

those jobs.

Your internal communications are cold

and numbing – Your messages to staff do

nothing but scold and make demands of

your employees. It’s important to keep staff

members informed but shaming them for

the way they do their jobs or demanding

they attend training simply for training’s

sake doesn’t serve anyone.

You’ve hired the wrong people – While you’ve

chosen people who have the right set of

skills, you haven’t hired people who truly

want to do right by your customers.

Some people get the job done with a focus

on process and policy, not with a focus on

the customer experience. These staff won’t

go above and beyond for your customers.

This is just a sample of items that can go

wrong in a business and the list is limitless.

CAN YOU TAKE IT?

I won’t lie; it’s not easy to listen to negative

feedback. I actually had one CEO downright

refuse to hear it. In fact, he said I must have

spoken to the ‘wrong’ customers!

I had another business leader who got so

excited about hearing my feedback that

she asked me to get her people on board

and up to speed by training them on

customer-centric attitudes. Guess which

company fared better?

Yes, difficult feedback is hard to take. We’ve

all had that sinking feeling that something

you know in your heart to be true is laid out

there for the world to see.

It’s easier to ignore, deflect and defend, to

put that head in the sand and carry on with

the status quo.

I’m asking you to be brave. Put your

defences aside and understand that

feedback, in all its ugly glory, allows you

to improve proactively instead of waiting

passively for the inevitable decline.

There are always organisations and leaders

out there who are ignoring the feedback

that could help them soar. Don’t be one

of them. Take a good look at what your

staff and customers are saying about your

business before it’s too late. i

JEANNIE WALTERS is

the founder and CEO of

Experience Investigators

By 360Connext.

experienceinvestigators.com

June 2019 Jeweller 39


LOGGED ON

IS IT TIME FOR US ALL TO RETHINK FACEBOOK?

IN LIGHT OF THE SOCIAL-MEDIA GIANT’S BUSINESS PRACTICES, DATA SECURITY BREACHES AND FALLING USER NUMBERS, MANDY

EDWARDS ASKS IF IT’S REALLY SERVING CLIENTS’ NEEDS – AND IF DIGITAL MARKETING NEEDS TO EVOLVE BEYOND FACEBOOK.

I probably shouldn’t confess this in public,

much less put it in writing, but I hate

Facebook. Frankly, if I didn’t have my

business, I wouldn’t be on it.

Despite the fact everyone is on it and

businesses can benefit from that, Facebook

is a place full of fake news, people

portraying lives they do not live, ridiculous

fluff posts and oversharing that goes

beyond the boundaries of TMI (too

much information).

So why did I build a business around it, you

may ask? Well, Facebook is still a wonderful

tool for businesses, helping them to reach

their target audience directly, and that’s

what I enjoy most about it – connecting

businesses with people.

However, I began to rethink the whole

premise of this in the wake of the

Cambridge Analytica privacy breach.

This was all over the news so I won’t

rehash all the details here but, in a nutshell,

an analytics company got their hands

on the personal data of over 50 million

Facebook users, without their knowledge or

permission, and used it to create highlytargeted

ads. These ads helped influence

the 2016 US election as well as the UK’s

Brexit vote.

This is your information, my information,

your mother’s information and your

children’s information, used to influence

significant public decisions... and

unfortunately, this wasn’t the end of

the matter.

Earlier this year another massive data

breach was discovered, this time

compromising the personal data –

including passwords, comments, check-ins

and photos – of 540 million users.

It turned out Facebook had allowed

third-party app developers to access user

data and store it in plain sight on a cloud

computing service!

In the past few years Facebook has also

been overrun by fake news. Russian trolls

have allegedly run millions of dollars of

ads to influence politics, people have been

allowed to target advertising specifically to

racist groups and now there have been two

huge data breaches.

As a marketer, we naturally encourage

Facebook because that’s where the

people are but is it time for us to rethink

that and use a strategy that does not

involve Facebook?

Blasphemous, I know; however, Facebook

use is down for the first time ever and, in

my honest opinion, it’s about time. In light

of the data breach, can you really trust a

company that allows that to happen? Any

company so focused on making money will

always have a real internal struggle.

Sandy Paralikas, a former Facebook

employee who worked there enforcing

privacy and other rules, was quoted in

the New York Times as saying, “The people

whose job is to protect the user always

are fighting an uphill battle against the

people whose job it is to make money for

the company.”

Making money is more important than

protecting information. Internally, Facebook

is a hot mess. My friend and mentor, socialmedia

marketing expert Mark Schaefer, had

a great suggestion on how they can clean it

up: go private.

Everything that has ever gone wrong with

Facebook all started when they began

trading as a publicly-listed company and

had shareholders to appease. As much as

I do not like Facebook, I think this may be

the smart move. They need to right the ship

or they will sink and sink fast.

Personal feelings aside, when working with

businesses, Facebook is always the first

platform we consider. Why? It’s the biggest,

but not only that, it’s also where the most

data is available to run highly-targeted ads.

FACEBOOK IS A DIGITAL MARKETER’S DREAM – AND A USER’S NIGHTMARE

MAKING

MONEY IS MORE

IMPORTANT THAN

PROTECTING

INFORMATION.

INTERNALLY,

FACEBOOK IS A

HOT MESS – THEY

NEED TO RIGHT

THE SHIP OR THEY

WILL SINK AND

SINK FAST

Why is that? Think about it for a minute.

Think about all the information you put

on your profile, all the pages you like, all

the meaningless quizzes you take. All of

those activities record data about you and

that data goes back to Facebook to allow

marketers to create those targeted ads.

It’s scary on the personal side, amazing on

the business side – that’s how I describe

it – and because I put the best interests of

my clients first, and because it’s in their best

interest to market on Facebook, then that’s

what I do.

Still, the day may be coming when

everyone may have to branch out and

move away from Facebook and we need

to be ready. In the meantime, if you are

not already diversifying your social-media

marketing strategy and using other

platforms, this is the time to start. Look at

other platforms where your target audience

gathers and increase your presence there.

All in all, retailers should never solely rely on

just one platform. i

MANDY EDWARDS is

founder of ME Marketing

Services, a social media and

management consultancy.

memarketingservices.com

40 Jeweller June 2019


MY STORE

JESSICA DE LOTZ

JEWELLERY

LOCATION: London, UK

NAME: Jessica de Lotz

POSITION: Owner and

jewellery designer

When was the space completed? In 2016.

I didn’t waste any time; within a month

and a half of starting refurbishments,

I opened up. I wanted to launch on

Valentine’s Day, which speaks volumes

about my brand: romantic and nostalgic.

Who is the target market and how did

they influence the store design? My

audience is very broad, but I also have

loyal families that come back to me

for every celebration. My jewellery has

a big heart and, I like to think, a soul! I

really wanted that spirit to be felt upon

entering the shop – not like some other

jewellery stores, which can be slightly

intimidating with everything underneath

glass. I have lots of the pieces resting on

the cabinet and I encourage people to

pick them up and try them on. I want

the environment to be friendly and my

collection of antique displays make you

reflect on the past.

With the relationship between store

ambience and consumer purchasing

in mind, which features in the store

encourage sales? I have a wish list/love

letter wall, for which I have printed tiny

vintage telegram notes. I encourage my

customers to write a little message noting

an item they have their eye on, important

dates coming up, and whom they may

like to give a gift to. I then send an email

to that person suggesting some pieces

based on their note. On my website this

service is called ‘Drop A Hint’.

What is the store design’s ‘wow factor’?

I have a partition wall with an adorable

‘peep hole’ which is surrounded by my

fob-shaped logo and behind it is my

workshop. Visitors really enjoy seeing ‘my

world’ and asking questions. I also have

some pretty bizarre display items, like

giant enamel 1930s glasses that suspend

from the wall! They make people smile

and add a flurry of colour. They’re the best

thing I ever brought home from Canada,

other than my husband! i

June 2019 Jeweller 41


10 YEARS AGO

WHAT WAS MAKING NEWS 10 YEARS AGO?

A SNAPSHOT OF THE INDUSTRY EVENTS THAT MADE NEWS HEADLINES IN THE JUNE 2009 ISSUE OF JEWELLER.

Terminology dominates at CIBJO congress

The story: The nomenclature surrounding gemquality

synthetic diamonds was discussed at length

at CIBJO’s 2009 congress, held in May. Diamond

Commission president Udi Sheintal proposed the

creation of an industry-wide working group that

will confer with members from all areas of the

jewellery trade to arrive at a consensus.

Meanwhile, CIBJO affirmed its position that the

term “synthetic” is the most appropriate descriptor

for non-natural diamonds.

Also on the agenda was the disclosure of a new

treatment applied during the growth process

Westfield jewellery

sales stable

The story: Jewellery retailers in Westfield

Group shopping centres across Australia are

doing well in the downturn, according to the

shopping-centre giant’s quarterly report.

The sector was up by 5.3 per cent over the 12

months to March 31, 2009, and up by 9.8 per

cent in the three months to March 31.

According to the Westfield website, there

are more than 450 stores selling jewellery

throughout Westfield’s 44 shopping centres

across Australia – though they’re not all

jewellery-specific retailers.

of Akoya cultured pearls, where metal fluids are

injected into the pearl’s sac to induce colour. The

technique had been used in Japan.

Pearl Commission president Martin Coeroli reported

that the body resolved to disclose such treated

gems as “colour-induced cultured pearls”.

GIA REFRESHES WEBSITE

The story: The Gemological Institute

of America (GIA) has unveiled a new

website that aims to make it easier for

visitors to access its information and

online services.

GIA president and CEO, Donna Baker,

said, “The goal is to make the GIA

website the destination of choice

for anyone seeking up-to-date

gemmological information.”

The site’s home page (www.gia.edu)

is organised to deliver visitors to

GIA’s most requested information

in one click. This includes in-depth

descriptions of the Four Cs, a video

on how the GIA grades diamonds,

a colour-stone buying tutorial,

and GIA’s online report verification

service, “Report Check.”

In addition, the home page provides

links to educational programmes,

laboratory services and updates on

research activities.

”The redesign has been a massive

project, but it’s only the beginning of

GIA’s new online presence,” Baker said.

“Our goal is to make GIA increasingly

accessible to people around the

world, with greater ability to get

them the information and services

they want instantly.”

Ole Lyngaard designs for Queen

The story: The head designer of Denmark-based

jewellery brand Ole Lynggaard, Charlotte Lynggaard,

has created a tiara for the Queen of Denmark.

Entitled ‘Midnight Tiara’, the piece took almost 300

hours to make, and is valued at around $AU360,190. It

features rose and white gold, diamonds, moonstone

and black silver, and was part of an exhibition at the

museum within Amalienborg Palace in Copenhagen.

“The most exclusive piece of jewellery a woman

can wear is undoubtedly a tiara. No other piece

represents so much power, rank and wealth,” Ole

Lynggaard sales representative Vibeke Weinreich

Mignard said.

She added, “The piece has been shown to the

Queen at the exclusive opening of the exhibition at

Amalienborg. She was very impressed and loved it!”

42 Jeweller June 2019


EVENTS

JEWELLERY AND WATCH CALENDAR

A GUIDE TO THE LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY AND WATCH EVENTS SCHEDULED TO TAKE PLACE IN THE YEAR AHEAD.

JUNE 2019

AUGUST 2019

w

HONG KONG WATCH

& CLOCK FAIR

OCTOBER 2019

JUBINALE INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY AND WATCHES

TRADE FAIR

Krakow, Poland

June 13 – 15

jubinale.com/en

HONG KONG JEWELLERY

& GEM FAIR

Hong Kong, China

June 20 – 23

exhibitions.jewellerynet.com

JULY 2019

WINTON OPAL TRADESHOW

Winton, Australia

July 12 – 13

qboa.com.au

LIGHTNING RIDGE OPAL

& GEM FESTIVAL

Lightning Ridge, Australia

July 24 – 27

lightningridgeopalfestival.com.au

AUSTRALIAN OPAL

EXHIBITION

Gold Coast, QLD

August 1 – 2

austopalexpo.com.au

INDIA INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY SHOW

Mumbai, India

August 9 – 12

iijs.org

INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY FAIR

Sydney, Australia

August 24 – 26

jewelleryfair.com.au

JAPAN JEWELLERY FAIR

Tokyo, Japan

August 28 – 30

japanjewelleryfair.com/en

SEPTEMBER 2019

INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY

LONDON

London, UK

September 1 – 3

jewellerylondon.com

Hong Kong, China

September 3 – 7

m.hktdc.com/fair/hkwatchfair-en/

BIJORHCA PARIS

Paris, France

September 6 – 9

bijorhca.com

VICENZAORO

Vicenza, Italy

September 7 – 11

vicenzaoro.com/en

PALAKISS VICENZA

SUMMER SHOW

Vicenza, Italy

September 7 – 11

palakisstore.com

BANGKOK GEMS

& JEWELRY FAIR

Bangkok, Thailand

September 10 – 12

bkkgems.com

SHENZHEN

INTERNATIONAL

JEWELLERY FAIR

Shenzhen, China

September 12 – 16

newayfairs.com/EN

BHARAT DIAMOND WEEK

Mumbai, India

October 14 – 16

bharatdiamondweek.com

INTERNATIONAL JEWELLERY

TOKYO AUTUMN

Yokohama, Japan

October 23 – 25

ijt-aki.jp

NOVEMBER 2019

CHINA INTERNATIONAL

GOLD, JEWELLERY & GEM

FAIR SHANGHAI

Shanghai, China

November 28 – December 1

HONG KONG JEWELLERY &

GEM FAIR

Hong Kong, China

September 16 – 29

exhibitions.jewellerynet.com

June 2019 Jeweller 43


MY BENCH

Alan Linney

WORKS AT:

Linneys, Perth

AGE: 68

YEARS IN TRADE: 53

TRAINING: Six-year

apprenticeship and a year of

gemmological studies.

FIRST JOB: Ron Brown, a

manufacturing jeweller.

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS:

Gardening!

Favourite gemstone:

Pink diamonds because

they are a West Australian

precious natural resource,

are extremely rare, and the

intensity of the colour mixes

well with other diamonds.

Favourite metal: 18-carat

yellow gold. I create the

most interesting and

detailed jewellery with it.

You can see it in our recent

collection, Butterfly Lovers.

Favourite tool: I still have

my pliers from the 1970s.

The other jewellers in our

workshop always ask to

borrow them!

Best new tool discovery:

Laser welder.

Best part of job: Exceeding

expectations on challenging

designs. Also, building a

relationship with our loyal

customers over the years.

Worst part of job: I never

find it difficult being at work!

I really enjoy every aspect.

Best tip from a jeweller:

Communication is key.

Best tip to a jeweller:

Follow all instructions.

Biggest health concern on

the bench: Look after

your hands and fingers

as they are your most

important resource.

Love jewellery because:

You can start the day with a

few raw materials and at the

end of it you have a piece

of wearable art that can be

passed on for generations.


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®


SOAPBOX

TIME TO EMBRACE AND

PARTICIPATE IN OUR INDUSTRY

The decision by two of the major

buying groups to cancel their respective

buying days and encourage their

members to attend the three days of

the International Jewellery & Watch Fair

(IJWF) is a very positive move for the

greater industry.

As an exhibitor of the Sydney trade fair

in every year of its existence bar one,

Paterson Fine Jewellery is more excited

about this year’s event than at any time in

recent memory.

Instead of the usual dread about weeklong

accommodation costs and arguments

about how to fill the last day, the thought is

now if three days will even be enough time

to catch up with customers.

This is an opportunity to hear all about

what’s working, what has slowed down,

and where we can step in and help, as

well as explain our new concepts and

ranges that we have been working on

since the last Fair.

It’s brave and magnanimous of Showcase

and Leading Edge to follow the lead of

Nationwide and keep all their members

together at the one location.

From a supplier’s point of view, condensing

what has been a week-long event into

three or four days will save time and

money and bring more people together

in a positive reflection of what our industry

should be.

Previously, a supplier who was lucky

enough to be invited to participate in

these buying group days committed to

a conference in August. It started with

getting to Sydney with all your stock

and displays for the week ahead, before

attending Group A’s buying day, at a

random venue.

That rolled into Group B’s buying day

at another venue, which rolled into the

set-up day of the Fair, where the supplier

would need to make sure their booth

at the Convention Centre was ready

and decorated.

Then there were the three days of the main

Fair, followed by packing up and bringing

all stock and displays back to the office. It

was a fun week, but tiring and challenging.

It was a challenging time for members

of the buying groups too. They wanted

to support their group and take advantage

of the camaraderie at the dinners, the

marketing training, and the supplier

offers and products.

But they might also have wanted to see

what was new and exciting at the Fair,

and there was the added concern of being

away from their store for a full week.

Now, for the first time in a long time,

manufacturers, wholesalers, jewellery

and watch brands are coming together

for one event.

Suppliers can expect more numbers in

the one location and be able to focus

their time and attention on delivering a

more attractive booth, consolidating their

stock in one location, and having better

offers for all visitors.

And most importantly, they can still

RELATIONSHIPS

ARE AT THE HEART

OF EVERYTHING

WE DO. OUR

RELATIONSHIPS

WITH CUSTOMERS,

SUPPLIERS,

AGENTS AND

REPS – EVEN OUR

RELATIONSHIPS

WITH OUR

COMPETITORS –

DEFINE WHO WE

ARE AS A BUSINESS

catch up with friends and colleagues

that they don’t get to see as often as

they might like, and hopefully form

relationships with people new to

the industry.

Relationships are at the heart of

everything we do. Our relationships

with customers, suppliers, agents and

reps – even our relationships with our

competitors – define who we are as a

business and how we are perceived,

and hopefully valued.

That is why a united jewellery fair is so

critical to our industry and why it is so

important that it is not dismissed with

the usual excuses: “It’s too far”, “I can’t be

away from the shop”, or “I’m not buying

at the moment”.

Every person who has used one of these

excuses changed their mind once they

committed to attending, had a great time,

and found it very useful in their business.

Big or small retailer, group member,

independent, buyer, seller, on the bench, or

on the road – all will be under the one roof

for three action-packed days (and nights).

So book your flights. Choose a hotel.

Organise your staff roster. Let’s all get

together to celebrate the best of what our

industry has to offer: its people. i

Name: David Paterson

Business: Paterson Fine Jewellery

Position: Managing director

Location: Moorabbin, VIC and Bangkok, Thailand

Years in the industry: 23

46 Jeweller June 2019


Where passion meets creativity

Immerse yourself in a world of spectacular, original jewellery at the 2019 International Jewellery & Watch Fair.

Be inspired by excellence in creativity of the latest designs and the passion in workmanship. See the latest global trends,

seek new business opportunities and gain knowledge from industry insights. Talk with the experts and select from

thousands of stunning pieces, just right for your business. Register to attend today at www.jewelleryfair.com.au.

INTERNATIONAL

J E W ELLERY & WATCH FAIR

August 24 > 26, 2019

ICC Sydney > Exhibition Centre > Darling Harbour

Organised by

WWW.JEWELLERYFAIR.COM.AU


AUSTRALIAN NATURAL

PINK DIAMONDS FROM ARGYLE

Blush Pink Diamond jewellery is crafted from 18ct gold with an

exquisite blend of fine white diamonds and natural Australian pink

diamonds from the Argyle Diamond Mine, located in the East

Kimberley region of Western Australia. These pink diamonds are

the rarest and most precious diamonds in the world.

PinkKimberley.com.au

E pink@samsgroup.com.au W samsgroup.com.au P 02 9290 2199

SAMS GROUP

AUSTRALIA

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