NZPhotographer Issue 20, June 2019

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

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ISSUE 20, June 2019

INTERVIEW WITH

GRANT BEEDIE

HOW NATURE NURTURED

MY PHOTOGRAPHY

BY DANIEL WINSTEAD

HIKING THE NINA VALLEY

BY BRENDON GILCHRIST

FRESH SHOOTS:

SUMMER PEOPLE’S CHOICE

AWARD WINNER

HOW TO CAPTURE:

FROZEN LANDSCAPES

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

June 2019

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WELCOME TO ISSUE 20 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

This month, and next month, the

focus is on nature and wildlife

photography – A favourite

subject for many of you,

including myself.

We have interviewed Grant

Beedie who is a macro

photographer whose work is

sure to get you outside peering

closely at flowers and bugs

through your lens. We learn

more about Marina de Wit's

photography journey and find

out about her upcoming trip

to London to show her rose

images at RHS. Brendon takes us

tramping through the Nina Valley

and Richard has us thinking

ahead to the colder weather

with tips on capturing frozen

landscapes.

We also learn about two

photographers with a

connection to Hawai'i, the first is the winner of the People's Choice Fresh

Shoots Summer competition and the second, a graduate whose passion

for photography flourished at VUW.

Ana writes a thought-provoking piece about the Butterfly Effect and how

our photos impact people and indeed the environment and next month

she'll share how one of her own butterfly photos had a ripple effect.

Until then, enjoy all the beautiful and inspiring nature shots in Reader's

Submissions and if you missed out on showing your shots, get ahead for

the July edition by submitting your wildlife/nature shots now.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 20

June 2019

Cover Photo

Grant Beedie

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email hello@excio.io

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REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He is an avid tramper

who treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio, Ana's

photography journey

started many years ago

with one of the first Kodak

film cameras. She loves

exploring the unseen

macro world and capturing

genuine people's emotions.

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer who

teaches photography

workshops and runs

photography tours. He

is the founder of New

Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2019 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

June 2019

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CONTENTS

17

6

BEHIND

THE SHOT

WITH VICKI FINLAY

6

8

12

17

27

34

38

40

44

47

INTERVIEW WITH MACRO PHOTOGRAPHER

GRANT BEEDIE

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Vicki Finlay

HOW NATURE NURTURED MY PHOTOGRAPHY

by Daniel Winstead

FRESH SHOOTS:

SUMMER PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD WINNER

INTERVIEW WITH MACRO PHOTOGRAPHER

Grant Beedie

GETTING TO KNOW MARINA DE WIT

HIKING THE NINA VALLEY

by Brendon Gilchrist

IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

MIND GAMES: THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT

by Ana Lyubich

HOW TO CAPTURE: FROZEN LANDSCAPES

by Richard Young

WILDLIFE PORTFOLIO - BEST READERS'

SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

HIKING THE NINA VALLEY

BY BRENDON GILCHRIST

8

HOW NATURE NURTURED MY PHOTOGRAPHY

BY DANIEL WINSTEAD

34


BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH VICKI FINLAY

IT'S ALL IN THE FRAME

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F6.3, 1/640s, ISO800, 400mm


VICKI, TELL US WHO YOU ARE AND HOW YOU

GOT INTO THE WORLD OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Where do I start? I am a mum to 2 adult boys and a wife

to a very patient and understanding husband.

5 years ago, I found myself at a loose end. I was seeking work/

life balance and I needed something to literally save my

sanity. I had a Nikon Coolpix P100 that I had no idea how to

use. So, putting myself way out of my comfort zone, I enrolled

in a local community class for photography. I also enrolled

in a meditation and mindfulness class at the same time.

Both decisions changed my life forever. Since then I have

had several passionate and patient key people who have

provided support, encouragement, and mentorship. Under

their guidance, I have discovered the world through the eye

of the lens.

HOW HAVE YOU WORKED ON IMPROVING YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY?

If I don’t like how an image turns out, then I keep going

back to it and try again and again until I get what I

want. This is after getting out with my camera, even

when I feel like it’s the last thing I want to do!

I have watched plenty of YouTube videos about

photography, I also enrolled in an online course which

took me 2 years to complete! I also joined a couple of

photographic communities on Facebook. Looking at

other people’s images, sharing thoughts, and getting

feedback has been simply fabulous. There are so many

talented photographers out there.

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU HAVE?

My kit is pretty basic but functional and well used. I

have a very well-worn Nikon D7100, which I have had

for 4 years with a standard kit 18-55mm lens that is so

underrated - I use it a lot! For my bird photos, I have

a Tamron 150-600mm and 2 years ago I purchased a

Tamron 100-400mm. I love flowers and macro so I have a

Tokina 100mm 2.8 macro.

I also have a sturdy Manfrotto tripod that has taught me

more about wrestling than photography; a monopod

for the beast 150 - 600mm (to try and counteract my

dreadful camera shake) and last year, I purchased a

Fuji XT20 to take overseas on another newly discovered

passion - overseas travel! I have the 18-55mm 2.8 and

the 55-200mm 3.5.

I have saved enough for another camera, to replace

the D7100, along with a couple of nice lenses, but I can’t

decide what to get!

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY STYLE?

Hmmmm. Less is more and the keep it simple

methodology seems to work for me. I don’t know that

I have a particular “style”, but I tend to look at parts

rather than a whole. I am continually changing and

playing with different aspects, looking for an image that

“speaks” to me, exploring different genres. My main

focus is about enjoying and developing my photography

and finding a style I am happy with. I still have so much

to learn.

BEHIND THE SHOT IS PROUDLY

SUPPORTED BY

TELL US ABOUT YOUR SILVER EYE SHOT

I took this photo around 4.00pm last September. I was

outside taking photos in the backyard and started to

think about what I could try that was different. Birds at a

feeder or on a branch weren’t quite doing it for me.

I went to the garden shed and grabbed a spade and stuck

it in the ground under the feeder in the hope that I might be

lucky enough to get a bird to perch on it. I checked where I

wanted to take the photo from and then the background to

ensure that there were no major distractions and the depth of

field would be nicely blurred.

It was an incredibly lucky shot, I was still getting myself

sorted when I turned around and the Silver Eye was already

sitting inside the handle. I was preparing for a session of an

hour or so, just to see what happened. So essentially, I was

done and dusted in less than 5 minutes!

IS THERE ANYTHING YOU WOULD DO

DIFFERENTLY GIVEN A 2ND CHANCE?

I am my own harshest critic. I wished that I had more of

the shaft of the spade, as there is quite a lot of space

at the top of the image. I also wish it was a lot sharper,

camera shake and all. However, I like the yellow shaft

of the spade and how it complements the colour of the

bird. Overall, I am happy with the image. It makes me

smile and this is what is most important to me.

WHAT WAS HAPPENING BEHIND THE CAMERA

THAT WE CAN’T SEE?

Literally a slightly overweight middle-aged lady with

bad knees rolling around on a bright blue ground sheet

trying to manhandle the camera off that pesky tripod so

I could at least try and get a half decent shot! Luckily the

Silver Eye sat there for a minute, so I did manage several

shots before it flew off.

ANY FINAL TIPS OR THOUGHTS?

Bird photography has definitely taught me resilience and

patience. Good things come to those that wait!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.facebook.com/VickiFinz

www.instagram.com/vickifinz

albums.excio.io/profile/VickiFinz


HOW NATURE

NURTURED MY

PHOTOGRAPHY

I

have been enthralled with photography ever

since I went bird watching with my dad. Some

of his friends brought along cameras that I

thought were the most complicated looking

things I had ever seen. Learning photography

always seemed like such a daunting task.

However, after using my father’s camera, I used

one of my first paychecks to buy a used Canon

off of eBay. I got hooked on photography and

started going on more adventures. I would

constantly be exploring around my hometown

to try to find the most birds to photograph, but

didn’t quite have an artistic direction.

My love for photography was nurtured at

Victoria University of Wellington, during a

trimester study abroad. I chose to study in

New Zealand because I saw that VUW offered

courses that would allow me to transfer credit

back to my home university, The Pennsylvania

State University.

I’d always heard of New Zealand’s beauty so I

figured it would be a good match. Up until that

by Daniel Winstead

point, I didn’t have any training in photography

and was learning on my own.

The photography class at VUW, was exactly

the excuse that I needed to practice more. I

was given so much constructive feedback and

direction from my professor Mizuho Nishioka.

She encouraged me to incorporate my own

interests into my projects instead of just trying to

be “artsy.” So, being a biology major, I chose to

focus on endangered species.

My initial inspiration came from Joel Sartore’s

“The Photo Ark.” though I didn’t have the

money, time, reputation, or equipment to

set up personal encounters with some of the

worlds most protected and exclusive animals. In

response, I decided to find them in either their

natural habitat or a natural enclosure. To do

this, I went to eco-sanctuaries and zoos within

New Zealand to take portraits of threatened

and endangered species with natural

backgrounds and natural lighting. My Excio

account gives a small glimpse into the portraits I

take of animals.

I later extended this project to macro

photography of threatened plants native to

New Zealand. For that project, I was given

access to the nursery at Otari-Wilton’s Bush in

Wellington, home to some of the rarest and

most threatened plants of New Zealand. I used

the same principles of close up portraits with

soft lighting to give the appearance of a “head

shot” for some of the plants.

I learned quickly that seeking to photograph a

specific moment takes hard work and planning.

This is especially true with animals, who rarely

cooperate with you as a photographer. In

this time, I also learned that the way you get

better at being a photographer is by getting

constructive feedback from those who are

experienced.

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After my trimester abroad, I moved back to

Penn State to finish my last year of an honors

baccalaureate degree in biology. Presently, I have

just graduated from Penn State with an honors degree

and minors in marine science, and wildlife & fisheries

science.

I have been using my love for photography to

accompany my studies in any way that I can. For

example, I have just completed a three-year research

project about the symbiosis between jellyfish and a

particular family of algae. Although some of the DNA

analysis was tediously grueling, I most enjoyed the

microscopy part of the project. I always strived to get

the most artistic or interesting shot of the baby jellyfish,

to highlight their form and the algae that live within

them. Although the lens changed from a telephoto

lens to a large microscope, the same principles of

light and artistic composition applied. Using those

same principles from my animal portraits and plant

portraits, it was possible to even get some nice “headshot”

portraits of the microscopic world with the right

composition.

I will now begin pursuing a master’s degree in

Biological Oceanography at the University of Hawai’i

starting this August. I will be working on a National

Geographic funded project studying deep-sea fish

ecology. Photography will inevitably be a part of my

project, as I will incorporate it in my studies and free

time.

Wherever I go, or whatever I see, now all I can think is

“how can I photograph that differently than anyone

else?” If the whole science thing doesn’t work out,

wildlife photography has never once bored me!

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June 2019

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FRESH SHOOTS:

SUMMER PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD WI

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NNER

‘SOFT’

F7.1, 1/250s, ISO 400

Jayden Tumbaga

June 2019 13


GETTING TO KNOW JAYDEN TUMBAGA

HI JAYDEN, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF!

I am a native Hawaiian and Filipino originally from

Hawaii living in Denver, Colorado in the US.

I graduated this year from Regis University School of

Pharmacy with a Doctorate of Pharmacy Degree.

I spent the last year performing eight different

pharmacy rotations at multiple sites for my pharmacy

program which gave me the opportunity to visit

New Zealand for a six-week research rotation at the

University of Otago Wellington.

WHEN DID YOUR JOURNEY WITH

PHOTOGRAPHY START?

I am an amateur photographer just beginning on my

photography journey as a passion and hobby.

I picked up my first DSLR camera (a Nikon D340)

recently in August 2018 knowing that I would be

travelling to New Zealand six months after. I had

always wanted one since becoming a fan of

astrophotography photos (the work of Mark Gee

has played a big role in inspiring me to take up

photography) and eventually developed a passion

strong enough to research and buy a camera that

I could afford while still being able to shoot the stars.

Once I got my camera, I began shooting as much

as I could in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to

practice both nature shots and astrophotography

in order to obtain as much experience as possible

before heading to New Zealand, where I knew the

stars would be waiting.

Taking up a hobby as complicated as photography

proved difficult, especially while in pharmacy school,

but was very rewarding as there is so much to learn

after every single shot.

I am still on my first camera and exploring as many

styles of photography as I can in order to see what

I like the most. So far I am determined to try my hand

at astrophotography and landscape photography

since I love to see mountains across a sky but am

excited to discover more as I continue shooting.

TELL US ABOUT THE DAY YOU TOOK THE

PEOPLE’S CHOICE WINNING SHOT…

I had been waiting for a day with decent weather

to visit the Wellington Botanical Gardens. I knew it

would be a great opportunity to get some shots in for

practice with my camera but it had been raining the

days before so the visit was postponed multiple times.

My three classmates and I spent a somewhat-sunny

evening at the gardens… I had been walking ahead

of the group in order to get nature-only shots. I recall

taking this shot and immediately calling my friends

over to look at my photo and being particularly proud

at how attractive it was to me, with all the vibrant

colours that were captured, the soft glow of the sun

on its petals, the rugged contrast of the ground and

rocks, and the overall plant array.

Although I took this shot during the beginning of our

visit, I somehow knew that this would be the photo

that I would be submitting to the competition.

HOW DID YOU FIND OUT ABOUT THE

COMPETITION AND WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO

ENTER?

I stumbled upon the competition on the WellingtonNZ

website while researching things to do and found the

Wellington Botanical Gardens. After discovering it

would be free to enter the competition and open to

anyone I was excited to be able to submit something

to my first amateur contest and see how I might

do. Since it was my first, I had no idea at what level

I would be at but was simply happy to be able to

showcase a photo of mine.

HAS WINNING THE COMPETITION INSPIRED

YOU TO TAKE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY FURTHER?

Winning has definitely given me the confidence to go

out and shoot more. I feel like I can trust my eye for

shots a lot more and would love any opportunity to

enter into more competitions.

I have been wanting to take a workshop as there is so

much more to learn still but I am constantly debating

purchases between workshops, more lenses, and a

better post-editing setup!

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO

OTHERS WHO ARE JUST STARTING OUT WITH

PHOTOGRAPHY?

So far, the advice that has helped me the most at

these beginner stages is simply to go out and shoot as

much as you can!

The more time you spend with your camera the more

familiar it will be and shooting will come easier.

Don’t spend too much time judging each photo after

you’ve taken it but when you have a photo that you

took and that you really like, try to figure out what it is

exactly that you like about it.

14 NZPhotographer


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June 2019

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Interview

with Macro

Photographer

Grant Beedie

GRANT, PLEASE TELL US WHO YOU ARE

AND WHAT YOU DO!

I’m a 39 year old Scottish guy who moved to

Christchurch, New Zealand in 2004. Photography

is mainly a hobby for me (I’m a factory CNC

machinist by day) although I’ve started to run

workshops throughout the warmer months in

Christchurch Botanic Gardens.

I would describe my photography as being Dark,

Moody and Dreamy Macro Photography that is

100% handheld shot in natural light conditions.

I have loved nature from an early age and used

to do a lot of fly fishing back home in Scotland.

Today I enjoy spending time outdoors with my

camera in Christchurch Botanic Gardens. I love

being out in the gardens on an early summers

day as I find it so peaceful so the inspiration for

taking photos is always there.

WHEN DID YOU GET STARTED IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I bought myself an entry level DSLR with 2 kit

lenses back in 2012. Within a few weeks, I realised

that I loved shooting things up close, especially

insects in my garden. My 18–55mm kit lens just

wouldn’t get me close enough, so that’s when

I realised I needed a macro lens. I experimented

for many months and taught myself the basics.

WHAT CAMERA EQUIPMENT DO YOU HAVE?

Currently, I use a Nikon D7100 with a Nikon

105mm Macro Lens

HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH YOUR

BRAND NAME MACROPHY?

I thought about calling myself ‘Grant Beedie

Photography’, but I felt that it could be a bit

more interesting, so I spent 1 evening writing

down ideas back in 2016. I wrote down Macro

and Photography and realised it sounded cool

when the two words were joined together!

HOW DO YOU MAKE MONEY FROM

PHOTOGRAPHY?

Mostly, it’s from my workshops that I run during

the Summer months. Early 2018 was when

I decided to start running my macro workshops.

I had 1 or 2 people ask me if I could take them

out to show them some tips, which I did for free,

then I realised I could maybe start running actual

workshops.

I think in order to make the jump to teaching you

have to be very confident that your work is of a

standard that people look up to and that you can

really make a difference to their photography. The

last thing one would want is for paying customers

to do a workshop and to leave feeling like they

haven’t learned much so I was extra keen to

share as much of my knowledge as possible so my

customers would leave feeling really happy about

what they had learned. I think having a friendly

approach and have a huge passion for what you

do is extra important as a teacher.

I have never really had the time or money to

push my photography in other areas, but maybe

in the future I will be able to approach galleries,

art shows, etc.

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WHAT WERE YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGES

/ LEARNING CURVES AND HOW HAS YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY IMPROVED OVER TIME?

I think the biggest challenge was and still is,

getting the subject in focus. All my work is

handheld in natural light so that can always

present challenges such as wind, low light, etc –

I’ve had to learn how to control my camera in

manual mode to suit the conditions.

To begin with I would take several hundred

shots in a couple of hours, and be lucky if I had

2 to keep. My averages are better now through

practise, but a macro photographer who only

shoots handheld like me will always have lots of

shots to delete, that’s just the nature of what we

do.

I think my two main improvements over time have

been, focus – managing to get that precise part of

the subject in focus more often, and also learning

not to over edit photos. I used to think that my

work needed lots of editing, but these days

I keep it simple and effective with Photoshop. My

Photoshop skills are limited so I tend to stick to

what I know, basically using a couple of layers to

highlight or darken specific areas and removing

noise.

CAN YOU CHOOSE A FAVOURITE PHOTO?

I think my favourite is probably my most well known

dahlia flower image which was recently published

in a book called ‘I am New Zealand’ by Penguin

Publishing / Nikon New Zealand. It just ticks all the

boxes for me and represents my style.

The book was a collaboration between Nikon NZ,

Penguin publishing and Mental Health NZ with profits

from the book donated to Mental Health NZ.

Penguin publishing emailed me about using one of my

dahlia photographs and I was over the moon to have

a shot of mine featured in a book that’s on the shelves

in The Warehouse, Whitvoulls, Paper Plus etc.

WHAT’S 1 PIECE OF ADVICE YOU CAN GIVE

OTHERS?

Work hard to have a few great images, rather than

lots of average ones. Set your bar high, always!

WHAT MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS CAN YOU

GIVE OUR READERS?

Your focus point is critical so take many shots, hold

your breath while you shoot and move forwards

and backwards very slightly to fine tune your focus.

Practice lots and be prepared to delete many

hundreds of images before you get some really good

shots.

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HOW DO YOU PROMOTE

YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

I’m on Excio, Facebook,

Instagram, and Picfair. There are

so many sites out there, so I like to

stick to the most simple, effective

and well known platforms that

don’t cost too much.

I discovered Excio through

Facebook and decided to sign

up as I liked the idea of my work

appearing on peoples screens.

WHAT ARE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY DREAMS/

AMBITIONS FOR THE FUTURE?

I’d love to be able to have my

work displayed in art galleries for

sale to the public. And I’d also

like to start teaching high school

kids about macro photography as

well.

WHAT ELSE SHOULD WE

KNOW ABOUT YOU?

Throughout 2018 I was a guest

speaker at various Camera

Clubs in Christchurch. I basically

selected around 75 of my best

shots and ran through them on

on a big screen talking about my

camera settings, my techniques

to achieve the shot, including my

post processing on Photoshop.

The audience would ask me

questions throughout the talk

and it was great fun answering

all their queries about my work.

There are quite a few other clubs

in Canterbury so I’d be more

than happy to do more talks this

year! It’s great to meet other

photographers and to talk about

our work.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU

ONLINE?

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26 NZPhotographer


GETTING TO

KNOW MARINA

DE WIT

MARINA, YOU’RE A BIT OF A LOCAL

CELEBRITY BUT PLEASE REMIND PEOPLE WHO

YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU DO.

Goodness not sure what to say, thank you! I am a

Fine Art Flower Photographer from Auckland. We

immigrated to NZ from South Africa in 2005 and

I have been a photographer since 2015.

I work full time as Administration Manager and

travel between the North Shore and Pukekohe most

weekdays. I am a mom and wife and always on the

go, but I believe if something is meant to be you will

find a way and if not you will find an excuse.

My motto in life “Ask and you shall receive, seek

and you shall find”. Therefore, my weekends are

generally spent in and around various Auckland

gardens and I always try to spend at least 1 hour

editing and 1 hour doing “photography admin” in

the week.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO PHOTOGRAPHY

AND HOW HAVE YOU DEVELOPED YOUR

NICHE?

I firmly believe my photography was meant to

be… I discovered that I loved being outside taking

snapshots with my phone, this led to me purchasing

my first DSLR camera in 2015.

I’ve always had a creative streak but am a self

taught photographer having had no formal art or

photography training. I do use a variety of online

sources to educate myself though – Most of my

training has been done via Youtube, Creative Live,

Udemy and my favourite Photoshop go to guru;

Unmesh Dinda.

I’m inspired by the artworks of Claude Monet,

Vincent Van Gogh, and artists from the Dutch

golden age. The following photographers also

inspire me – Bas Meeuws, Gemmy Woudbinnendijk

and the floral photographer from Maine US,

Kathleen Clemmons. I recall watching Kathleen’s

Creative Live presentation where she became

pretty emotional describing her work and I knew at

that stage that that was what I was searching for as

an artist, that connection to my work.

The first couple of years I focused on spending as

much time learning and developing my style. Last

year was the first year where I ventured out into

the big wide world of printing my work and selling

at markets. This is the first year I will be officially

exhibiting my work and I am so excited to share my

work and see it hanging on gallery walls in NZ and

potentially all over the world.

HOW DO YOU PROMOTE YOUR WORK?

I love social media and take every opportunity

to tag my work on Instagram, NZP being a local

favourite! I also upload my work to local and

international sites to ensure I get as much exposure

as possible as no one will make things happen

for you, you have just got to get out there and

promote yourself and your work.

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TELL US MORE ABOUT YOUR WORK…

WHAT GOES INTO CREATING A FINISHED

IMAGE?

My image of a single white rose (previous

page) was taken at Eden Gardens in 2018 and

was probably the image that made me realize

that I had found my favourite subject, signature

style, and mood.

I love the painterly look and always envision

a painting when I edit so I love when people

comment that my work looks like a painting

instead of a photograph or reminds them of a

painting.

I mostly shoot outdoors, preferring early

morning or afternoon light and am at my

happiest on a cloudy day out in a garden, this

is where I can breathe and totally be me, doing

exactly what I love as I am a bit of a loner, an

introvert, a creative at heart! In my camera

bag you will find a Nikon D7200 and a Nikon

105mm micro lens. I shoot handheld, I don’t like

tripods unless I am doing a still shot at home.

Post processing is my yoga! I love nothing more

that coming home to edit after a crazy day in

the office. A lot of what I do at this stage is trial

and error so from capturing my image to a final

print can take me either an hour or days!

So many people have asked for tutorials but

I am a shocking teacher and follow no rules

and seldom have an exact idea of what I want

my final result to look like. I do however love

textures and my go to are Kathleen Clemmons

textures, I hope to create my own someday.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR ROSE IMAGES

LEADING YOU TO LONDON...

The 6 images that you see here are part

of a portfolio of 6 Roses submitted to RHS

(Royal Horticultural Society) Botanical Art &

Photography show that takes place in London

in July 2019. It’s an open and international

exhibition and is the longest running and top

juried botanical art show in the world plus the

largest juried international art show in London.

I had confirmation in March that I have been

shortlisted to present my work at the

RHS Horticultural Halls in July this year. I honestly

did not think that I would be selected and I am

so grateful for this opportunity to take my work

to London and potentially receive a medal for

my efforts, I can’t think of a higher honour for

someone who started a couple of years ago

with nothing but a dream.

I have started a Give a Little page to support

me with printing and shipping my work to the

UK.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE,

BEYOND LONDON?

The dream is to be an artist full time. I can’t

think of anything I would rather do than spend

time in gardens! I have so many New Zealand

gardens to explore (and capture) then I hope

to do the same overseas.

WHAT WORDS OF INSPIRATION CAN YOU

GIVE TO OTHERS?

I am so grateful for every single opportunity

that has come my way the last couple of years,

every no, every yes, every single person that

I have met on this journey have made me more

determined to succeed and be the best I can

be.

So often I think back to what if I said no

because I didn’t have the right equipment

or no when I felt scared or overwhelmed or

no when I felt vulnerable or no I wasn’t good

enough to enter the London art show… so

my words of wisdom are ‘just do it’! Find your

unique style and develop that as each one

of us has a different story to tell. I talk to so

many photographers, especially woman, who

compare their work to others so I say trust in

your journey, work hard, and love what you do

and do what you love.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

instagram.com/mdewitphotography

facebook.com/marinadewitphotography

marinadewit.smugmug.com

albums.excio.io/profile/MarinadeWit

June 2019

33


Hiking The Nina Valley

by Brendon Gilchrist

34 NZPhotographer


F9, 1/125s, ISO100, 14mm

June 2019

35


F11, 1/3s, ISO100, 14mm

The Nina Valley is one of the most popular walks

in the Lewis Pass Scenic Reserve which has many

different varieties of walks from the valleys below

to the mountain tops with tarns (small mountain

lakes). Whether you’re an advanced hiker or a very

beginner, this is a place where nature rules and

humans come to enjoy, rewind and admire the great

outdoors.

The reason I walked up this valley was to find a

campsite for the night, I was in the area and on the

map, a campsite is listed about half way from the

hut to the road. It didn’t look far on the map and the

track looked mostly flat so I thought let’s go, let’s see

what I can find to photograph whilst having a perfect

campsite.

Camping in the wild is a little different to an official

campsite as you don’t know what to expect – You’re

not sure if there will be any flat land to pitch a tent

or if the ground will be soft enough to put the pegs

in although generally in NZ mountains it is. Or, most

importantly to me, will the view be any good?!

Leaving the car behind and crossing the road, it is not

long until you get to the first swing bridge that crosses

the Lewis River. It’s a classic old style, a type that

I haven’t crossed in years, mostly because the parks

I usually walk in have had the old bridges wash away

in floods so have stopped rebuilding them in that style.

As the track climbs above the Lewis River you are

soon greeted by a swampy forest with short trees, it

makes you think this might be where the goblins live

and is a place where you can lose the track quite

easily. The Department of Conservation (DOC) have

placed orange triangles on trees to help you navigate

so if you’ve walked a while and haven’t passed an

orange triangle you’re either off the track or didn’t

spot the triangle hiding behind another tree but with

experience you won’t need to follow the triangles so

much as you’ll follow the footprints of others.

From the viewpoint of the Nina River, there are

beautiful deep blue pools of water that look so pure

you just want to jump in and swim. I was looking for

ways down to photograph these parts but I couldn’t

see much that would give me a good composition as

the water was so deep and the river bank steep and

slippery.

There is one stream you need to cross enroute to

the campsite, you can either get wet boots or take

your time to cross using rocks but be careful you

don’t slip. These small side streams are some of the

best to explore and photograph, some better than

others, so I recommend spending some time here

with your camera, taking the time to come up with

good compositions and having a go at long exposure

photography so that you can blur the water to make

it look like silk.

The stream is not far from the campsite, maybe 10

minutes. I reached it in good time and thought I would

keep going to see if I could find somewhere better to

spend the night. I walked to the next swing bridge but

nothing came up, I walked along the true left on the

36 NZPhotographer


Lucretia Route but still nothing. I had that feeling when

I left the campsite that this was the best spot and

I sure wasn’t wrong as that is where I walked back

to – I was fortunate enough to have the campsite to

myself despite 16 people having walked up to the hut

which is only a 10 bunk.

Before sunset (the usual bedtime for trampers unless

they’re doing astrophotography) I had scouted the

area for photo locations in the morning. Sunrises in

valleys are quite difficult as the sun takes a long time

to come over the hills. I was fortunate enough that

there was a perfect pool of water with nice leading

lines heading down the river, I stood there for at least

30 minutes drinking the water and taking a mental

picture of what I wanted to capture the next day.

The morning came and it was a damp start to the

day, the ground had lots of moisture and the tent was

wet, a normal kind of morning for this time of year as

the valleys do get very cold with very little sun the

whole day.

I knew what I wanted to shoot, the river leading

downstream with the forest on each side, but I had

made a mistake – I’d left my camera on the ground

overnight. I usually have it in my sleeping bag to keep

it warm so it doesn’t get condensation on it so I found

out halfway through my time lapse that the back

element was fogging up which was disappointing

although I did manage to get all the other shots

I wanted. My mistake is a good excuse to go back

and re-shoot though as the place is stunning.

By the time I had photographed everything I wanted,

the sun had come up over the mountains to dry a bit

of the tent off before packing up and taking in the

view one more time. I always find walking out hard,

I love being around nature as it’s so beautiful but I also

know that I need to return to civilization and tell these

stories and share how beautiful and almost unreal

these places are.

3 TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHY WHEN TRAMPING

• Allow enough time to get to your destination as it

gets darker in the bush an hour before sunset. This

also allows you enough time to scout around your

hut or tent to find something to photograph the

next morning.

• It might be awkward to sleep with your camera

but if it is a damp night, it’s a wise move so as to

keep the elements warm.

• When shooting streams, if you have an ultra wide

angle lens, you can make the smaller cascades

look bigger then they are in real life and therefore

more eye-catching in your photos.

F16, 6s, ISO100, 14mm

June 2019

37


Improving Your Photography

Photo Review Session

by Excio

Macro Droplets by Zhenya Philip

REVIEW BY: KORRY BENNETH

INITIAL THOUGHTS

What wonderful flowers you’ve got there. Let’s start

with all the good things about this photo...

The colours are absolutely amazing, you managed

to preserve so many shades of nature - green, blue,

purple - well done on that.

The lighting in the photo is also very nice, you did a

great job with exposure, preserving all the shadows

without burning the extremely light parts. The flowers

are perfectly focused and the DOF is really nice too,

revealing just as much as it should while blurring the

background just enough for it to not to stand out.

Another lovely touch is the water drops on the petals,

a great detail and I love how they’re crystal clear (see

image top right) though since you decided to include

the hand in the photo, I would have loved to see

some water drops on the skin too.

38 NZPhotographer


The square crop you’ve

chosen is quite interesting,

not many artists go for square

format (unless forced to when

uploading to Instagram), mostly

because square formats are far

more challenging.

With the square format, the

photographer has to think hard

about composition, rule of thirds

can hardly be applied and not

all subjects will look good in the

center. It’s also much harder to

make the photo interesting and

powerful.

With your subject, you had

basically only two possible

composition - filling the frame

with flowers or centering them.

Since you decided to go for

handheld flowers, centering the

subject was the right decision.

MAKING THIS PHOTO BETTER

While the technical details are

well done, there is one thing that

could be improved in this photo

and that’s the way you’ve

captured your subject.

The fingers holding the flowers

are too zoomed in to have a

story to tell yet not zoomed

in enough to be a part of the

background.

If you (or your model) held the

flowers a bit lower they would

pop out more and the hand

would become part of the

background.

This shot without the fingers in

focus holding the flowers, or

maybe by adding some water

droplets to the hand this photo

would take it to the next level.

Since this is something you can

control, next time try something

more original, like placing the

flowers on top of the hand,

zoom out a bit or even going full

macro while holding the flowers

a bit lower so the fingers don’t

stand out so much.

June 2019

39


Mind Games: The Butterfly Effect

With both this issue and the July edition focusing

on wildlife and nature photography I decided

that butterflies are more than an appropriate

subject for my column.

No, I’m not talking about how to photograph

butterflies, nor about “Butterfly lighting” and it’s not

even a name for a new Lightroom preset. I’m sure

you have heard about the butterfly effect before -

a theory where, in simple terms, it’s believed that a

butterfly flapping its wings can cause a typhoon on

the other side of the world. More scientifically, it’s

a series of dependencies where a small unnoticed

action may cause a major change or event in the

future.

How does this apply to photography? The most

popular example that jumps to mind is Instagram.

With it being a popularity-driven platform it creates

something much bigger than a “butterfly”. Say you

have a few hundred followers on Instagram (or any

other social media platform). You take a photo, post

it, and immediately it is out there on the world wide

web, affecting the people who see it.

Someone may try and repeat the same technique

as you – this has resulted in what I call a “massproduction”

of photographs and a generation of

“copycat” photographers. Feet outside the tent, a

head torch pointing at the Milky Way, and people

with vintage cameras, all of these ‘genres’ are familiar

to you I’m sure. There is even an Instagram account

called Insta Repeat and the article Proof That No Idea

Is Original summarizes the point.

Just imagine that your photo is the original that inspires

everyone after you to try and take/recreate the same

shot – You take your camera on a walk during lunch

time, take a photo that you really like and post it

online with hashtags. For whatever reason, it becomes

popular and causes people to feel inspired to create

the same image; effectively it creates a typhoon in

the lives of many people.

You probably don’t think twice about adding

hashtags but consider what happens when you add

the location where you took the shot. It’s becoming

a serious problem with more known cases of damage

to the environment and injuries or even deaths where

people tried to replicate a random popular photo.

by Ana Lyubich

Imagine the same circumstances as described above

– just another day, you take your camera with you

to work and during your lunch break you take a shot

on the street or in the park that appears to be that

“lucky shot” and results in you getting hundreds of likes

on Instagram, this time you add the location when

adding hashtags.

Someone from your followers loves your shot and

goes to the exact same place the next day, without

you knowing it, to try and get exactly the same light

and… what happens next? Maybe the other person

sees someone doing fundraising and helps with a

small donation that then goes a long way helping

other people? Maybe they fall and break their leg,

ending up hospital which is where they meet their

future spouse? You may not know it but it all started

from you choosing to take your camera out that day

and posting that one picture online. What if you had

changed your plans or got stuck in traffic so were late

and missed the light that made the photo so good?

Just thinking about all possible “what ifs” can drive

you nuts!

This is just a very small and light-hearted example but

we all know the stories of the Wanaka Tree here in

NZ and you may have heard the story of the Broccoli

Tree in Sweden (watch this video if not!). There are

many, many other stories where people have lost lives

or damaged (whether intentionally or unintentionally)

the environment by trying to replicate or create

their own shots at a location they saw online, visited

themselves, and that soon became well known

around the world.

I don’t want to end this article on a negative note,

but do want all of us photographers to keep in mind

that if a flap of a butterfly wing can create a typhoon,

the powerful tool of photography can also make a

difference and affect the lives of thousands if not

millions of people both positively and negatively.

Always remember that no matter your skill level, your

photos have the ability to change someone’s life.

Carefully and cautiously select what you share and

where, and think strategically about your end goal

- do you want your photo to set an example, share

a story, or make a difference? It can all start from a

photo of a butterfly…

40 NZPhotographer


June 2019

41


It's not about your

professionalism or

honours, it's you and

your photography

What do you like most

about Excio?

Karen Mitchell, Excio Member

that matters.

New generation photography community.

42 NZPhotographer

www.excio.io


FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

We’re inviting photographers to highlight all the wonderful things that make the Wellington

Botanic Garden much more than a garden, while encouraging photographers to focus on

the garden season by season.

For prizes and full Terms & Conditions see: www.excio.io/freshshoots

The competition is split into quarterly competitions based on each of the seasons:

Summer Autumn Winter

15 December -

22 March 2019

23 March -

21 June 2019

22 June -

20 September 2019

CATEGORIES

NATURE

PEOPLE &

EVENTS

CREATIVE

PARTNERS

June 2019

43


HOW TO CAPTURE: FROZEN LANDSCAPES

As winter arrives, it is time to start thinking about capturing

some stunning frozen landscapes, get ready for a day out

shooting in the snow with these tips by Richard Young.

Tongariro Crossing in Winter

ADD SOME DRAMA:

Often, days with mixed weather and light breaking

through the clouds lead to the best photographs of

snow-covered landscapes, so seek out clouds rather

than postcard clear blue sky days. If you have the sun

in your photo, it can be great to try and capture it as a

starburst for some extra drama. To get the best starburst

effect, select the smallest aperture (f22) and point the

camera directly into the low sun. Be careful looking

through the viewfinder (work in ‘live view’ if you can) as

the sun will be magnified looking through your camera

lens.

WATCH THE FORECAST:

While there is often snow on high peaks for most of the

winter, it is not every day that you get snow at lower

altitudes. Watch the weather forecast and lookout for a

southerly front with low temperatures for those perfect

shots of snow covered landscapes. Conditions like this

can create a high alpine feel at much lower altitudes,

reducing the need to get deep into the mountains to

capture frozen landscapes

F11, 250s, ISO100

CAPTURE THE SNOW:

The weather plays an import part in how the snow

looks in any winter landscape. Snow which is in

the shade will often render with a blue cast in your

photographs, this cool blue can add a nice cold

feeling to a winter photograph. While overcast

conditions can work well for photographing the

snow, the sun can add an extra sparkle to a winter

landscape. When shooting snow in strong sun, be

sure to increase your exposure by shooting in manual

mode, or using the exposure compensation (‘+/-’

button) to make the snow a crisp white.

INCLUDE SOME PEOPLE:

Try to include something in your shot to show a sense

of scale, otherwise, the grandeur epic snow-covered

peaks or vast snow-covered landscapes can easily

be lost. This could be a person or any recognizable

object such as a tree or a fence line, this will also add

foreground interest to the photograph and give it

some more depth.

IMPROVE YOUR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY THIS WINTER ON A WORKSHOP IN TONGARIRO NATIONAL

PARK OR AT MT COOK WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


IMAGINE

AUCKLAND

PHOTO COMPETITION

1 May 2019 - 10 July 2019

June 2019

45


PHOTO COMPETITION

WILD

NEIGHBOURS

1 June - 20 June 2019

Learn more at:

www.excio.io/wildneighbours


THE GALLERY IS PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY

PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


MRS RED LEGS

F13, 1/200s, ISO200, 100mm

MARSDEN VALLEY, NELSON

I found this orbweaver spider in the bush on a recent macrophotography

trip. From a distance they often look drab but lit from above the spiders true

colours - and red legs - really shine through. I used a diffused off camera

flash from above to capture this.

Andrew MacDonald


MONARCH BUTTERFLY

F7.1, 1/50s, ISO400

KAPITI COAST, WELLINGTON

A newly hatched monarch butterfly drying

its wings in the warm summer sun.

Kelly Pettitt


LEAF BEETLE

BARISAL, BANGLADESH

Ankan Das

50 NZPhotographer


June 2019

51


DESERT EAGLE OWL

F8, 1/8000s, IS03200

Desert Eagle Owl in Dubai Desert, as part of

a birds of prey experience.

Bridget Sloane

52 NZPhotographer


June 2019

53


KAKA FLEDGLING IN FLIGHT

F2.8 1/4000s, IS03200

A Kaka Fledgling leaving the feeding station at Zealandia.

Bridget Sloane

54 NZPhotographer


June 2019

55


POST FIGHT SULK

F5, 1/250s, ISO400, 200mm

ORANA WILDLIFE PARK, CHRISTCHURCH

This young gorilla had a tiff with the alpha male and lost. Hence the

sulky face!! A troop of three, they are New Zealand's only gorillas.

Clint Thambi

56 NZPhotographer


June 2019

57


58 NZPhotographer


AFTERNOON STROLL

F4, 1/200s, ISO800, 200mm

ORANA WILDLIFE PARK

The majestic tiger at Orana Wildlife Park takes a stroll

around the enclosure after its heavy afternoon meal.

Clint Thambi

June 2019

59


60 NZPhotographer


SPOT THE SPOTS

F13, 1/200s, ISO200, 100mm

Watching the feisty and fastest land mammal

the Cheetah at Orana Wildlife Park.

Clint Thambi

June 2019

61


62 NZPhotographer


TAYLORS MISTAKE

F14, 1/2s,12mm

TAYLORS MISTAKE, CHRISTCHURCH

Worth getting up early to capture the beautiful

early morning colour at Taylors Mistake.

Dominic Stove

June 2019

63


64 NZPhotographer


TASTY MEAL

F11, 1/160s ISO400, 100mm

A Praying Mantis stalked then caught this

fly and is now devouring it.

Eric Pollock

June 2019

65


66 NZPhotographer


NYMPH KATYDID

F14, 1/125s, ISO640, 100mm

Nymph Katydid browsing on a rose

bush in late afternoon sun

Eric Pollock

June 2019

67


WATCHING THE WATCHERS

F8, 1/250s, ISO200

CUBA MALL, WELLINGTON

An oil soaked Pigeon warily watches the passers-by.

Greg Arnold

68 NZPhotographer


LEOPARD

F10, 1/50s, ISO400

KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH AFRICA

A Leopard peeping through the trees, watching us

watching him.

Gary Reid

June 2019

69


NEW DAWN, NEW HORIZON

F8, 1/1250s, ISO200,105mm

Fisherman on Pauanui beach. We caught the sunrise

and I caught this image, not a fish in sight.

Stephen Chang

70 NZPhotographer


LAVENDER BEE

F5.6, 1/1000s, IS0640

FOXTON, MANAWATU-WHANGANUI

One of many bumble bees enjoying the abundant lavender

flowers during summer.

Kelly Pettitt

June 2019

71


72 NZPhotographer


ORBWEB SPIDER

F16, 1/160s, IS0500

KAPITI COAST, WELLINGTON

Fondly nicknamed 'Fluffy', this orbweb spider

shared our home for a time and started a family.

Kelly Pettitt

June 2019

73


74 NZPhotographer


AFRICAN DAISY

F10, 1/160s, IS0125

Also known as the 'blue eyed daisy', a simple flower that

reveals its complexity when viewed up close.

Kelly Pettitt

June 2019

75


76 NZPhotographer


KING PENGUIN COLONY

F8, 1/1000s, ISO800, 354mm

VOLUNTEER POINT, FALKLAND ISLANDS

A relatively small colony of king penguins on the

Falkland Islands in January 2019.

Rob Weir

June 2019

77


WEIR SUNRISE

F10,1/250s, ISO400, 70mm

ST ANDREW'S BAY, SOUTH GEORGIA ISLAND

A typical morning on South Georgia Island with a mixing

of King Penguins and an Elephant Seal.

Rob Weir

78 NZPhotographer


June 2019

79


RED FOX ON THE PROWL

F5.6, 1/1000s, ISO1000, 400mm

KATMAI PENINSULA, ALASKA

Captured in Alaska in 2018 this red fox was very

playful, trotting round the beach.

Rob Weir

80 NZPhotographer


June 2019

81


SUMMER FLOWER

CHURTON PARK, WELLINGTON

Summer garden "Macro" session using an old

Takumar-A lens, 28- 80mm, modified with PK-EOS

Adapter, using Viltrox Macro Extension Tube.

Shane Petterd

82 NZPhotographer


June 2019

83


84 NZPhotographer


MT COOK MOUNTAIN AND LILYS

F8, 1/403s, ISO100, 32mm

When I visited Mt Cook, I pictured one of the photos I

wanted to take and this photo was exactly what I wanted, with the

Mt Cook lilys in the foreground and the Mt Cook mountain in the

background with a shallow depth of field.

Tanya Rowe

June 2019

85


86 NZPhotographer


FANTAIL

F6.3, 1/100s, ISO800,150mm

WELLINGTON

Photographing Fantails for me is a mixture of frustration and

satisfaction. I was almost going to give up with this Fantail, until it paused for

a brief moment and the sun came out from under the clouds giving me an

opportunity to snap this photo.

Tanya Rowe

June 2019

87


YELLOW EYED PENGUIN

F5.6, 1/125s, IS0400, 175mm

OTAGO PENINSULA

I took this photo at Penguin Place on the Otago Peninsula where there is a

maze of trenches to allow the viewing of the penguins as they return to the

land near the end of the day.

Tanya Rowe

88 NZPhotographer


June 2019

89


"SOMETIMES YOU FIND YOURSELF

IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE, AND

SOMETIMES IN THE MIDDLE OF

NOWHERE, YOU FIND YOURSELF"

UNKNOWN

90 NZPhotographer

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