Expedition Cruise Diary

adamorc

Stowaway Medias exclusive Expedition Cruise Diary

March 2019

expedition

CRUISE DIARY

2019 | 2020 | 2021

StowawayMedia.com


THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

CELEBRITY NEWS

EVOLUTION

MEETS

REVOLUTION.

DESIGNED FOR THE MODERN EXPLORER

Celebrity Flora SM is the first ever ship of its kind to be designed and

built specifically with the destination in mind – in this case, the

stunning Galapagos islands. Aboard Celebrity Flora, your guests will

be indulged with a seamlessly intuitive service and every creature

comfort possible.

• All-inclusive 7 night cruises sailing the inner and outer loops

• Once-in-a-lifetime glamping experience on the top deck allowing

guests to dine, drink, and even sleep under one of the most

spectacular night skies in the world

• Expert lecturers and naturalist guides, onboard and ashore

LAUNCHING MAY 2019

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT

CELEBRITYCENTRAL.CO.UK

Above left: our Darwin Cabanas, for our oncein-a-lifetime

glamping experience

Left: Machu Picchu shore excursion

Above: Sky Suite with Infinite Balcony


THE NEXT GENERATION

OF EXPEDITION CRUISING

IT PAYS TO LEARN

Expedition cruising has grown beyond expectations, with more

cruise lines entering the sector, record numbers of expedition

ships on order and exciting new itineraries launching to parts of

the world only a privileged few ever see.

Recognising the importance of the sector, Clia UK & Ireland

has not only formed a new expedition working group but

organised its first-ever forum dedicated to expedition cruising.

In October it will also be hosting Luxury and Expedition Cruise

Showcases in Belfast, Manchester and Norwich.

It all adds up to one thing: A sector of the cruise industry that

agents ignore at their peril. There is a lot to learn but with lead

prices in their thousands of pounds, the rewards are high.

This year’s Expedition Cruise Diary is packed with information

about the cruise lines in this sector, their ships and the

destinations they visit, giving agents the tools to help them

inspire customers to get off the beaten track.

CONTENTS

Keith Ellis,

Publisher, Stowaway Media

WHERE 6-STAR LUXURY

MEETS DISCOVERY

2019 is the year luxury travel is taken to

extraordinary new levels. With Scenic Eclipse

making her maiden voyage in August, the next

generation of ocean cruising is on the horizon.

Setting new standards in exploration, discovery

and truly all-inclusive luxury.

Scenic Eclipse is built for adventure. From the

two on board helicopters, submarine and fleet

of zodiacs and kayaks, to the exclusive Scenic

Discovery excursions expertly curated by our

Discovery Leaders, this ground-breaking Mega

Yacht will take your customers to parts of the

world that, until now, have been inaccessible to the

ordinary traveller.

Our Journey Designers have hand-crafted each

itinerary for adventure-seekers looking for new

and unique experiences in some of the world’s

most awe-inspiring locations. Whether it’s the

breathtakingly beautiful Polar regions or the

paradise charms of the Caribbean, Scenic Eclipse

will transport your customers in unrivalled 6-star

luxury to incredible locations, where they can

venture across land, over water and even under

the ocean. For a travel experience like no other.

Luxury suites

Submarine excursions

TRULY ALL-INCLUSIVE LUXURY

Return flights from UK airports

Pre/post-cruise hotel stay

Spacious all-verandah suite accommodation

Butler service for every guest

An almost 1:1 staff-to-guest ratio

Choice of 10 on board dining experiences

Unlimited complimentary beverages *

Extensive choice of all-inclusive shore

excursions

Helicopter expeditions

All-inclusive dining and beverages

Scenic Enrich unique experiences

Expert Discovery Team and local experts

Zodiac, kayak, snorkel and snow-shoe

adventures

The freedom of our e-bikes

Spa Sanctuary, gym, yoga and Pilates studio

Indoor and outdoor swimming pools

All tipping, transfers and taxes, on board

and onshore

BOOK THE ULTIMATE IN LUXURY, CALL 0808 115 0463

Get in touch with your local Sales Manager at agencysales@scenic.co.uk

CONTENTS

Expedition cruising................................................................................... 6

The Kimberley...........................................................................................13

Antarctica...................................................................................................15

The Arctic...................................................................................................30

The Galapagos........................................................................................35

The Russian Far East..............................................................................38

Brochure rack............................................................................................40

PROFILES

Silversea Expeditions.............................................................................17

Scenic...........................................................................................................32

Published by ..........................................Keith Ellis, Stowaway Media

10 Tadorne Road, Tadworth KT20 5TD Surrey

+44 (0)1737 81 2411, kmellis@btinternet.com

Written and Edited by: ...................................................... Jane Archer

Janearc@aol.com

Creative...........................................Andrew Reeves, Oddsock Design

Andrew@oddsockdesign.com

Front cover image courtesy of Celebrity Cruises

StowawayMedia.com

Terms and Conditions: *All drinks on board are included except for a very small number of rare, fine and vintage wines, champagnes and spirits. ^Helicopter and submarine activities are weather

permitting, may incur additional costs and are subject to availability. Full terms and conditions can be found at scenic.co.uk. Scenic Tours Pty trading as Scenic. Registered: 05770868

Stowaway Media | 5


EXPEDITION CRUISING

EXPEDITION CRUISING

DISCOVER:

EXPEDITION CRUISING

Expedition cruising has been on the sidelines of the industry, considered

something for a small band of adventurous travellers prepared to rough it

in return for visiting out-of-the-way places, but things are changing fast as

more cruise lines enter the market with luxurious new ships.

An unprecedented 30 or more expedition ships are

being built over the next four years, offering grand

suites, butlers and upscale restaurants for those

venturing off the beaten path.

It doesn’t mean that expedition cruising is a

mainstream holiday choice yet – most people still

see a cruise as a time to relax in the sun rather than

be challenged by new experiences - but it has put

the sector under the spotlight as never before.

It means agents who want to grab a share

of the market need to get to grips with a whole

new style of cruising and destinations.

SMALL SHIPS

Expedition ships are small, holding anything

from 200 to 500 passengers. That is important

as it means they can navigate into little bays

and convey passengers ashore by tender quickly

and efficiently (there are no ports in many of the

places these ships visit).

Size is even more important in the polar regions.

In Antarctica, only ships with 500 passengers or

fewer are allowed to offer landings and then only

100 can be ashore at one time. Many cruise lines

limit passenger numbers to 200 and allow just an

hour ashore, ensuring a smooth landing operation

with the minimum waiting time.

In the Galapagos, ships are not allowed to

carry any more than 100 people and itineraries

are carefully planned so there is only ever one

vessel at each of the landing sites to ensure the

wildlife is not disturbed. »

6 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 7


EXPEDITION CRUISING

WHEN TO GO

• Antarctica cruises run in the austral summer, between

November and March, when much of the sea ice has

melted. In November the continent is at its most

pristine (but it will likely also be much colder); December

and January is the time to see the most plentiful

wildlife; mid-February to early March is the best time

to spot whales.

Cruises to the Arctic (that’s Spitsbergen, Greenland, the

Northwest and Northeast Passage) run between June

and September. In June and July, the days are long as

the sun never sets.

• Galapagos cruises operate year-round. The hottest

weather is January to May, when it is most likely to rain.

June to December is dry and a bit cooler.

• The Amazon is warm and humid year-round (between

21˚C and 31˚C). High water season is December to May,

low water from June to November, but this is rainforest

so clients should expect precipitation anytime. Oceangoing

cruise ships are there in winter between December

and March.

Cruise lines sail in the Kimberley in the dry season, April

to October, when temperatures average 30˚C. During the

wet, November to March, temperatures top 40˚C and

roads become impassable due to flooding.

A DIFFERENT WAY TO CRUISE

Expedition cruising is about as different to a traditional holiday at sea as is

possible.

For one thing, rather than cathedrals, museums and water parks, outings

mean visits to glaciers and waterfalls, fishing for piranha fish, tiptoeing

through basking iguanas, learning about penguins and whales or watching

out (literally) for polar bears.

For another, life on board is casual. Dress codes are almost unheard of

(jeans and t-shirts are more appropriate than dinner jackets and cocktail

dresses) and rather than production shows, there are lectures about the

environment and wildlife that passengers will encounter from teams of

biologists, geologists, historians, marine scientists and other experts.

There might be talks about whales and penguins on a cruise to

Antarctica, for instance, or about polar bears in Spitsbergen. In the Amazon

it’s all about rainforests, wildlife and birds.

These expedition teams also guide trips ashore (these are included in

the price, although there might be a charge for special activities such as

kayaking or camping in Antarctica) and host zodiac cruises up close to

glaciers, rainforests and wildlife.

None of this comes cheap. Cruises start at about £6,000 per person for a

week away excluding the air fare, which is another hefty expense as flights

are long haul to out of the way places. For the right client, it will be a small

price to pay for a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

SELLING POINTS

With such high rewards at stake, agents must spend time learning about

the expedition sector and how to sell it.

As with everything it is vital to do plenty of research because the more

they know about the ships and itineraries, the more confident they will be

suggesting an expedition cruise to clients.

It will also help them conjure up the image of a truly memorable

experience, creating a feeling of awe for the customer, who hopefully won’t

be able to say no.

The type of client who might like an expedition cruise is wide, from

seasoned cruisers ready for something more daring than a well-scripted

two weeks sailing around the Med to clients who have never set foot on a

ship but are looking for the best way to see Antarctica and the Galapagos.

Customers who have previously been on an African safari or soft

adventure holiday are also likely candidates for an expedition cruise. It is

a fact that whereas on safari you may or may not see much wildlife, on a

cruise in Antarctica and Galapagos you just cannot miss seeing penguins,

birds and other animals.

Above all, it is important not to apologise for the price. Instead, sell the

value and the unique experiences that await on expedition cruises. »

AWE-INSPIRING ADVENTURES

FROM SHIP TO SHORE

Sustainable travel to the ends of the Earth on the G Expedition

With over 130 years of cumulative experience on the G Expedition, we’re passionate

about helping travellers experience the beauty of our natural world. And as caretakers

of the planet, we aim to have no more than a minor or transitory impact on the places

we visit. That’s why we use environmentally-safe practices everywhere we go, and work

with partners like the Albatross Task Force, Clean Seas, and the Ocean Health Fund.

To learn more, visit planeterra.org/oceans or speak to your G Adventures Global

Purpose Specialist.

8 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

0344 272 2190

gadventures.co.uk/expedition

ABTA No. Y6125

1 0 8 0 8


EXPEDITION CRUISING

EXPEDITION CRUISING

WHAT TO PACK

POLAR REGIONS

• Wellington boots and waterproof trousers are a must for

Antarctica as you invariably have to step into the sea to get from

the landing craft to the beach. Most cruise lines have boots for

hire, either for free or a small charge.

Cruise ships might be in Antarctica in summer but it is still very

cold so passengers will also need warm jumpers, woolly hats,

scarves and gloves.

• The Arctic isn’t as chilly but it is still cold so warm clothes are

needed, as well as stout walking shoes and waterproof trousers for

trips ashore.

• Most cruise lines provide complimentary parkas for passengers

sailing in the polar regions.

THE MERGUI ARCHIPELAGO

The Mergui (pronounced mer-gwee) Archipelago is a scattering of

800 islands, many of them deserted, covered in dense rainforest and

ringed by sandy beaches, off the southern coast of Myanmar in the

Andaman Sea. Pandaw alone has seven and 10-night cruises here, on

the 24-passenger Andaman Explorer. Clients can expect to see monkeys

and tropical birds ashore, and whales and dolphins at sea. Pandaw’s

itinerary visits the nomadic Mokken people who live on the sea and

make a living catching fish and pearl diving.

GALAPAGOS AND KIMBERLEY

• These areas are tropical so light clothing, hats and sunscreen are

needed. Waterproof sandals are useful for wading ashore from

the Zodiacs.

WHERE TO GO?

Antarctica is top of the list for adventure cruises. It’s a long way to travel

but visitors are rewarded with icebergs the size of houses, hundreds of

whales and millions of penguins. And of course they’ll have the privilege of

being among the few people who ever get the chance to set foot on the

most inhospitable continent in the world.

Once Antarctica is done, it’s time to swap penguins for polar bears

on a cruise to the Arctic. There’s lots of choice here, with cruises around

Spitsbergen, the nearest most vessels can get to the North Pole, and

voyages along the coast of Greenland and through the Northwest Passage,

the icy waterway between Greenland and Canada. A new must-do

itinerary, the Northeast Passage, takes passengers across the top of Russia

on a journey from Alaska to Norway.

Those who prefer warmer climes can get close to wildlife in the

Galapagos, where the animals have no fear of humans, and see gushing

waterfalls, coral reefs and crocodiles in the Kimberley.

There are tropical birds, piranha fish and jungle to explore on cruises

along the Amazon River in Brazil. On cruises through the Mergui

Archipelago off the west coast of Myanmar, passengers enter the realm of

the sea gypsies, with kayaking through mangroves and swimming in the

Andaman Sea.

Travellers on all these cruises need an adventurous spirit as itineraries

are often more like guidelines, especially in the polar regions. Captains will

aim to visit all the places on the schedule but the actual route depends on

weather and wildlife. Wind, ice and fog will scupper landings in Antarctica;

in the Arctic, a prowling polar bear will halt plans for a walk ashore.

IS EXPEDITION CRUISING FOR ME?

✔ Perfect for those with a sense of adventure keen to see places away from the tourist haunts.

WHAT’S NEW

More than 13 new

expedition ships are slated to

launch this year and next.

Aurora Expeditions, Scenic,

Crystal Cruises, Hapag-Lloyd

and Hurtigruten are all

building expedition ships

with ice-strengthened hulls

that can sail in polar regions.

Details can be found in the Antarctica and Arctic pages.

All offer levels of luxury previously unheard of on expedition ships but

Scenic and Crystal are going beyond lavish with yachts that offer butler

service for all and have helicopters and submarines to whisk passengers off

on adventures above and below the ocean.

Seabourn is launching its first-ever expedition vessels. Built to PC6

Polar Class standards, they will accommodate 264 passengers and carry

a 26-strong expedition team, two submarines, kayaks and Zodiacs. The

first ship, launching June 2021, will sail a short season in the Arctic before

relocating to Antarctica. The second vessel will be delivered May 2022.

French cruise line Ponant launched two warm-water explorer vessels in

2018 and has another four on the way. Le Bougainville and Le Dumontd’Urville

enter service in April and August this year, with Le Bellot and Le

Jacques Cartier following in 2020. All accommodate 184 passengers and

have a Blue Eye lounge in the hull from which passengers can peek out

into the ocean.

✔ Ideal for those who have cruised the Med, Caribbean and Baltic and want to do something different but not miss out on a few weeks at sea.

✔ A ball for baby boomers who missed out on a gap year and fancy some soft adventure without having to rough it.

✔ Spot on for those interested in seeing and learning about wildlife, nature and the environment.

✔ Brilliant for teenagers who do not need constant entertaining. It’s not a cheap holiday, but an experience they will never forget.

✖ The new generation of expedition ships might be more suitable for disabled passengers than the older vessels still in operation but getting

ashore will always be a problem. Ask the cruise line for advice before booking.

THE AMAZON

The Amazon rises in the Andes

Mountains and flows 4,000 miles

through nine countries in South

America before emptying into the

Atlantic. The river is so big that

ocean-going ships can sail nearly

650 miles upriver from the Atlantic

to Manaus, taking passengers on a

real getaway-from-it-all adventure.

They’ll trek through jungle that’s

home to sloths, howler monkeys and

colourful parrots, meet indigenous

people, maybe kayak along narrow

tributaries, and see piranha fish and

caiman (like an alligator) up close.

10 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 11


EXPEDITION CRUISING

KIMBERLEY

TOP FIVE HIGHLIGHTS

• Watching the Montgomery Reef rise out of the water.

It’s an illusion of course. What’s really happening

is the tide is falling. Zodiacs get close to the water

cascading off it and green turtles hugging the base.

• A helicopter ride to the Mitchell Falls, where water

tumbles over four tiers some 80 metres high.

• A fast boat ride over the Horizontal Falls in Talbot Bay.

The phenomenon is created by a break in the cliffs

through which millions of gallons of sea powers in and

out as the tide ebbs and flows.

• A boat ride down the Hunter River on the look out for

fearsome ‘salties’ – the Australian nickname for the

saltwater crocodiles that lurk in the mangroves.

• Discovering Aboriginal rock art depicting human

figures that is believed to be 50,000 years old.

DISCOVER:

THE KIMBERLEY

The Kimberley is a remote area in Northern Australia that’s the size of

England but with a population of just over 40,000 people and a couple of

roads that become almost impassable in the wet, between November and

April, when up to 50 inches of rain falls.

WHO GOES WHERE

CRUISE LINE

Antarctica

South Georgia

Falkland Islands

Spitsbergen

Greenland

Northwest Passage

Northeast Passage

Galapagos

Kimberley

Russian Far East

Mergui Archipelago

WEBSITE

Aurora Expeditions ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ auroraexpeditions.com.au

Celebrity Cruises ✔ celebritycruises.co.uk

Crystal Cruises ✔ ✔ ✔ crystalcruises.co.uk

G Adventures ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ gadventures.co.uk

SELLING TIPS

• Read up on the cruise itineraries so you

can paint such an exciting picture of what

awaits that clients can’t resist booking.

• Don’t just offer this to your cruise

customers. A Kimberley cruise is perfect

for everyone seeking a holiday packed

with excitement and adventure.

• Australia is a long way to go for 10 nights

so package the cruise around a longer

stay. Some beach time in Broome, a few

days in Cairns to visit the Great Barrier

Reef and a couple of nights in Sydney

would be great additions.

• Break the price into a daily cost to show

what great value it is for such a once-ina-lifetime

experience.

Only a handful of cruise lines sail here, which is

a shame because it is a thrilling holiday offering

different and unique experiences every day that

travellers with a sense of adventure will love.

Many are a result of the region’s huge tidal

range (up to 12 metres, one of the largest on

the planet), which creates gushing rapids and

the bizarre phenomenon of a coral reef rising

out of the water. The aggressive saltwater

crocodiles that lurk beneath the waves, curtailing

swimming and meaning trips ashore are limited,

add to the excitement.

And then there is the fact that ships have

to anchor quite a way out from land in several

spots because much of the coast is still not fully

charted. The Kimberley is remote indeed, even by

Australian standards.

Over the course of a week your clients will take

Zodiac cruises through a stunning sandstone gorge

that leads to the tumbling twin King George Falls,

see ancient Aboriginal rock art and take a fast

boat over the Horizontal Falls. A couple of lines

include flights over the Bungle Bungles - a range of

beehive-shaped sandstone structures some 250

metres high in the Purnululu National Park, a vast

wilderness almost the size of Luxembourg.

Cruises operate between Broome in Western

Australia, a town built up on the pearling industry

but these days most famous for its long sandy

Cable Beach, and the city of Darwin, which was

named after the British evolutionist although he

never actually went there.

Clients with time in the city at the start or end

of their cruise can visit the Kakadu National Park,

dive into the local street culture at Mindil Beach

Sunset Market (Thursday and Sunday evenings)

or visit an exhibition at the Museum and Art

Gallery of the Northern Territory that recreates the

night of Christmas Eve 1974 when the city was hit

by a devastating cyclone.

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ hl-cruises.com

Pandaw ✔ fredrivercruises.co.uk

Ponant ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ponant.com

Scenic ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ scenic.co.uk

Seabourn ✔ ✔ ✔ seabourn.com

Silversea Expeditions ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ silversea.com

WHO GOES THERE

Silversea Expeditions

Ship: Silver Discoverer – 5,218 tons, 116 passengers.

Itineraries: Ten-day cruises between Broome and

Darwin or vice-versa from April to June 2019 include a

flight over the Bungle Bungles and a Zodiac cruise to

the King George Falls.

Sample: From £7,600 per person for a 10-night cruise

from Darwin to Broome departing June 4 2019.

Excludes flights.

Ponant

Ships: Le Lapérouse – 9,900 tons, 184 passengers.

Itineraries: Eleven-day cruises between Darwin and

Broome that visit the Lacepede Islands, home to colonies

of brown boobies, Australian penguins and countless

other birdlife, and Collier Bay to see the Montgomery Reef.

Sample: From €8,440 per person for a 10-night Iconic

Kimberley cruise from Darwin to Broome departing May 8

2020. Excludes flights.

Aurora Expeditions

Ships: Coral Expeditions I – 730 tons, 42 passengers.

Itineraries: Eleven-day voyages between Broome

and Darwin that include treks through the bush, a

Zodiac cruise through the Horizontal Falls and seek out

crocodiles in Prince Regent Nature Reserve.

Sample: From Aus$8,690 per person for an 11-day

Broome to Darwin cruise departing June 10 2019.

Excludes flights.

12 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 13


ANTARCTICA

DISCOVER:

ANTARCTICA

Antarctica is the coldest, windiest and most remote place on earth; a

frozen world almost 60 times the size of Britain during the austral summer

(our winter) that spends half the year in total darkness and is cut off from

civilisation by the Drake Passage - 1,000km of one of the most feared sea

crossings in the world.

Scenic ad

But it’s also one of the most majestic places

on the planet, an other-worldly land that is

all the more captivating because its pristine

environment is one that man has always tried

but never quite managed to conquer, even with

the backing of 21st-century technology.

This is nature in the raw, where snow-capped

mountains give way to deep ice fjords, icebergs

are the size of six-storey buildings and so much

of the sea freezes in winter, creating a layer up to

two metres thick, that the continent effectively

doubles in size. »

Stowaway Media | 15


ANTARCTICA

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SILVERSEA EXPEDITIONS

ANTARCTICA HIGHLIGHTS

• Half-Moon Island. Only 2km long, but it has dramatic

rock formations, multi-coloured lichens and a large

population of chinstrap penguins. Whales are often

spotted patrolling the shores.

• Lemaire Channel. This narrow passage – just 1,600

metres at its widest point - is nicknamed Kodak Gap

because the scenery is stunning. Think steep cliffs,

mountain peaks, icebergs and a hangout for minke or

humpback whales.

• Petermann Island. Accessed through the Lemaire

Channel, this is the home of gentoo and Adélie

penguin rookeries.

• Paradise Harbour. An aptly-named bay surrounded by

glaciated mountains and ice cliffs that’s home to a

rookery of gentoo penguins.

• Gerlache Strait. Get cameras at the ready because this

is a likely spot to see humpback and minke whales,

chinstrap penguins and leopard seals.

• Elephant Island. The crew from Sir Ernest Shackleton’s

failed expedition to cross Antarctica via the South Pole

arrived here in 1916 and 21 of them then waited four

months while their leader went to South Georgia for help.

They lived under an upturned boat and survived on seal

blubber. It is named for its colony of elephant seals.

• Port Lockroy. The former British base at Port Lockroy

is now curated by the UK Antarctica Heritage Trust.

Visitors can look around huts preserved as they were in

the 1940s and there is a shop for souvenir hunters.

DISCOVER

A WORLD LESS VISITED

FACTFILE

Climate: Antarctica is in the southern

hemisphere, which means its seasons

are the opposite of those in the UK. Our

winter is summer in Antarctica, while our

summer is winter at the South Pole.

When to go: Cruises operate from

November to March, when there is less

sea ice. Summer temperatures in the

Antarctic Peninsula average 2˚C.

Ice: When the sea ice freezes in winter,

Antarctica doubles in size, covering

13,829,800 square kilometres.

Cold: The lowest temperature recorded

in Antarctica was minus 129˚C, at Vostok

Station on July 21 1983.

Highest mountain: Mount Vinson,

some 4,892 metres above sea level.

Number of tourists: 51,707

(International Association of Antarctica

Tour Operators, winter 2017/18).

But Antarctica is not just about scenery. Some

45 species of birds live here, including albatrosses,

petrels, skuas, gulls and, of course, penguins. Visitors

quickly become experts in identifying the Adélies,

chinstraps, gentoos and macaronis. Seeing them

waddle awkwardly on land and then dive gracefully

into the icy water is just magical.

There are seals, fish and whales, including

humpbacks and orcas. Plants can’t survive the cold,

but lichens, mosses and algae have adapted to

live in the freezing conditions. It’s tough out there

for them though, so visitors are asked to avoid

stepping on plant life when they go ashore.

There was a time when only intrepid explorers,

seal hunters and whalers went to Antarctica; now

the hunters are banned and instead it is home to

scientists from all over the world and a bucket-list

destination for travellers keen to be among the few

thousand people who set foot on the continent

each year.

A few big ships have sightseeing sailings in

Antarctica, and it is possible to fly there and skip

the Drake Passage crossing, but for the ultimate

once-in-a-lifetime experience nothing beats an

expedition cruise, braving the Drake (it’s not always

rough!) and walking through colonies of penguins,

going kayaking amid the growlers, cruising close

to icebergs in inflatable Zodiacs, maybe even

camping ashore. This is the stuff of adventurers,

the place to come if clients want excitement, fun

and to be at one with nature.

Under the rules of the Antarctic Treaty, only ships

with 500 or fewer passengers can offer landings

and only 100 people are allowed on land at a time.

Once ashore, they must stay in marked areas, try

to walk in tracks made by the expedition team and

keep 15 feet away from the penguins. Collecting

stones or other souvenirs is strictly forbidden, as is

dropping litter.

Most Antarctic cruises operate round-trip from

Ushuaia, the town on the southern-most tip of

Argentina; a few alternatively depart from Punta

Arenas in Chile. Itineraries are anything from

10-night jaunts to the Antarctic Peninsula to 23-

day voyages or longer that combine Antarctica with

South Georgia and the Falkland Islands. » p25

16 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 17


PROFILE

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SILVERSEA EXPEDITIONS

Antarctica, South Georgia, the Falkland Islands,

Svalbard, Greenland, the Kimberley, the Galapagos

Islands, the South Pacific, the Russian Far East, a

spectacular wilderness closed to westerners for

decades, where volcanoes smoulder, brown bears

roam and numerous seabirds swarm.

And still Silversea Expeditions keeps exploring,

‘Silversea is the

acknowledged

leader in luxury and

expedition cruising’

Richard Fain,

Chairman and CEO,

Royal Caribbean Cruises

What an amazing few months it has been for Silversea Expeditions.

On June 3 2018, 10 years to the day after stake in Silversea, dubbed a ‘crown jewel

Silversea’s first expedition ship set sail and acknowledged leader in luxury and

on its maiden voyage from London’s expedition cruising’ by Royal Caribbean

Tower Bridge to Svalbard in the Arctic, Chairman and CEO Richard Fain.

the company celebrated a decade of Within six weeks the deal was done

exploring the world in all-inclusive and just three months later, Silversea

luxury with a gala voyage from Tower signed a contract with Dutch shipyard

Bridge to Dublin.

De Hoop to build a new luxury

In a neat piece of symmetry, the gala expedition ship, Silver Origin, to cruise

was on Silver Cloud, Silversea’s first the Galapagos Islands.

luxury ship when the company was

Exciting doesn’t even get close

founded in 1994 and the newest addition to describing Silversea Expeditions’

to the expedition fleet, which it joined in itineraries, which visit the very ends

2017 after a $40 million refit.

of the earth, taking intrepid travellers

Just two weeks later, Royal Caribbean to bucket-list destinations and remote

Cruises announced it was acquiring a 67% islands that few will even have heard of.

much to the delight of past and new customers

seeking excitement and adventure off the grid.

New this year, an epic 25-day voyage through the

Northeast Passage from Nome in Alaska to Tromso

in Norway on Silver Explorer was snapped up so

fast when it went on sale that it is being repeated in

August 2020.

This is a journey beyond thrilling, taking guests

across the top of Russia, sailing through glistening ice

and calling into islands where wildlife is king and few

humans have ever set foot.

With the help of an expert expedition team, they’ll

be on the lookout for all manner of seabirds including

cormorants, murres, kittiwakes, puffins and guillemots,

as well as walruses, polar bears and reindeer. There’ll

be intriguing stories of explorers who passed through

these lands in centuries past, of the geology and

history of this harsh terrain. And of course plenty of

treasured memories to take home.


‘We will continue

to bring innovation

to the world of

expedition cruising’

Silversea Chairman

Manfredi Lefebvre d’Ovidio

In summer 2020, Silver Origin will start

sailing in the Galapagos Islands. Here’s what

we know so far about the new ship.

• Silver Origin is designed specifically to cruise the

Galapagos. It is being built by Dutch shipyard De

Hoop, is due to be delivered in Rotterdam in March

2020 and will start cruising around the islands in

summer 2020.

• She will hold 100 guests – the maximum allowed in

the Galapagos – and have 84 crew members as well as

an expedition team to host talks on board and guide

walks ashore.

• She will have six inflatable Zodiacs for wet landings

onto beaches and rocks, and also carry kayaks and

snorkelling gear that can be borrowed for free.

• She will have spacious all-suite, all-balcony

accommodation and every guest will enjoy Silversea’s

signature butler service.

• She will have a new Stargazing Lounge, two

restaurants, a plunge pool, and small spa, hairdresser

and fitness centre.

WHY SILVERSEA EXPEDITIONS?

ALL THIS IS INCLUDED

CONTACT

• All suites are oceanview and 80% have a

private balcony

• Butler service in every suite

• Personalised service guaranteed with nearly

one crew member for every guest

• Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open

seating dining

Cruises led by a highly-qualified expedition

team of experts (marine biologists, ornithologists,

historians and more)

• Enrichment lectures on related topics enhance

guests’ knowledge

• Exclusive partnership with The Royal

Geographical Society

• Unlimited Wi-Fi for all guests

• Alcoholic and soft drinks in suites and throughout

the ship, including champagne, wines and spirits

• Room service

• On-board gratuities

• Excursions and activities, with Zodiac cruising,

hiking and kayaking on selected voyages

• Silversea Expeditions Parka

Due to local regulations, some services and selections are limited or not available on Silver Galapagos.

0207 340 0700

silversea.com,

silverseaacademy.com or

salesuk@silversea.com

18 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019 Stowaway Media | 19


PROFILE

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SILVERSEA EXPEDITIONS

INTRODUCING

ANTARCTICA

INTRODUCING

THE GALAPAGOS

IT IS…

…a frozen continent surrounded by oceans with the South

Pole at its centre.

…the coldest, driest and windiest continent on earth.

…in the southern hemisphere, which means its seasons are the

opposite to those in the UK. Our winter is summer so that’s

when the cruise ships visit.

…rarely much above 2C, and that is in summer. In winter

temperatures drop below -49C (as a guide, home freezers

are about -15C).

…covered in the world’s biggest and thickest ice sheet – it

blankets 98% of the continent; the mean thickness is 2.16km.

…home to 17 species of birds including albatrosses, petrels,

skuas, shags and penguins.

…home to 235 species of marine mammals including

elephant, fur and leopard seals, baleen whales, toothed

whales and orcas.

IT IS…

…an archipelago of volcanic islands some 600 miles off the

coast of Ecuador in South America.

…made up of 19 main islands and more than 215 rocks and

islets.

…famous as the place where visitors can get close to wildlife

because the animals have no fear of humans.

…credited with having inspired Charles Darwin’s book The

Origin of Species when he visited in 1835.

…the only place in the northern hemisphere where penguins

live in their natural habitat.

…home to the only lizards in the world that swim (marine

iguanas) and the only cormorants that can’t fly.

…on the equator, which means there is an equal 12 hours of

daylight and 12 hours of night all year.

…always good to go. December to May is warmer (highs of

32˚C) and wetter. June to November is cooler (highs of

26˚C) and dry.

IN A NUTSHELL

MAIN ISLANDS:

Isabela, Fernandina, Santiago, Santa

Cruz, San Cristobal, Espanola, Floreana

LOOK OUT FOR:

Giant tortoises, marine iguanas, land

iguanas, booby birds, pelicans, sea lions,

penguins, albatrosses, frigate birds,

flamingos

SILVERSEA IN ANTARCTICA

SILVER CLOUD

Guest capacity: 240

Crew capacity: 212

Last refurbishment: 2017

Total Expedition team members: Up to 28

Number of Zodiacs: 18

Kayak programme:

Yes

SILVER EXPLORER

Guest capacity: 144

Crew capacity: 118

Last refurbishment: 2017

Total Expedition team members: 12

Number of Zodiacs: 12

Kayak programme:

No

SILVERSEA IN THE GALAPAGOS

SILVER GALAPAGOS

Guest capacity: 100

Crew capacity: 75

Last refurbishment: 2017

Total Expedition team members: 8

Number of Zodiacs: 7

Kayak programme:

Yes

SILVER ORIGIN

Replaces Silver Galapagos: 2020

Guest capacity: 100

Crew capacity: 84

Expedition team members: TBC

Number of Zodiacs: 6

Kayak programme:

Yes

20 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019 Stowaway Media | 21


Svalbard Northern Region

PROFILE

Dynjandi

Latrabjarg Cliffs

Reykjavik

Cruise Along

Hornbjarg Cliffs

Vigur Island

Cruise Surtsey

Akureyri

St Kilda

Iona

Jan Mayen

Vestmannaey Island

Fort William

Tromsø

SECTOR 9

Svalbard Southern Region

Cruise Bear Island

Skarsvåg

Gverstappen

Islands

Cruising Along

North Cape

SECTOR 10

LISBON TO REYKJAVIK

18 days | June 16-July 3

Voyage though Iberia, France,

the UK and Iceland

REYKJAVIK TO TROMSO

14 days | July 3-16

Voyage through Iceland,

Svalbard and Norway

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SILVERSEA EXPEDITIONS

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Pembroke

Tresco

St Mary's

St Peter Port

La Coruña

Oporto (Leixões)

Lisbon

Portimao

Sevilla

London

Honfleur

Saint Malo

Cagliari

Bejaia

EUROPE

Sousse

Porto Empedocle

PIRAEUS (ATHENS) TO LISBON AFRICA

Nafpaktos Itea

Ksamil Athens (Piraeus)

Trapani

Monemvasia

Folegandros

15 days | June 2-16

Voyage through the Mediterranean

Naxos

Symi

Rhodes

SECTOR 8

Suez Canal Transit

Luxor (Safaga)

SECTOR 7

Muscat

Sur

Salalah

Cochin

INDIAN OCEAN

Colombo

Mormugao

SINGAPORE TO COCHIN

17 days | April 28-May 14

Voyage through Indonesia

and the Indian Ocean

COCHIN TO PIRAEUS (ATHENS)

20 days | May

ASIA14-June 2

Voyage though the Middle East,

Suez Canal and Greece

Galle

Belawan

Bawemataluwo

Padang

Anak Krakatoa

Ujung Kulon

National Park

SECTOR 6

Anano

Island

Garove Island

Singapore Bau-Bau

Palopo, Pulau Tellang

Sulawesi

Rabaul

Madang

Samarang (Java)

Hunter River Region

Buccaneer

Archipelago

Region

SECTOR 5

CAIRNS TO SINGAPORE

23 days | April 6-28

Voyage through the

Kimberley and Indonesia

Kupang

Broome

Kalabahi

Thursday

Island

Darwin

Cairns

King George

River Region

AUSTRALIA

Santa

Ana

Tami Islands

Samarai

and Kwato

Champagne

Beach

Fergusson Island

Dobu Island

Nendo Island

Pentecost

Island

Lautoka

LAUTOKA TO CAIRNS

15 days | March 23-April 6

Voyage through Vanuatu, the Solomon

Islands and Papua New Guinea

SECTOR 3

Palmerston

Island

Somosono (Taveuni)

Apia

Aitutaki

Rarotonga

SECTOR 4

PAPEETE TO LAUTOKA

13 days | March 11-23

Voyage through the Cook

Islands, Samoa and Fiji

Moorea

Bora Bora

Rangiroa

Atuona

Fakarava

Papeete

Fatu Hiva

PACIFIC OCEAN

Adamstown

SECTOR 2

NORTH AMERICA

Easter Island

VALPARAISO TO PAPEETE

23 days | Feb 17 to March 11

Voyage through Chile and

French Polynesia

Alexander Selkirk Island

Robinson Crusoe Island

Puerto Montt

Castro

Tortel

Cruise English Narrows

Niebla

Cruise Chilean Fjords

Valparaiso

Ushuaia

USHUAIA TO VALPARAISO

19 days | Jan 30-Feb 17

Voyage to Antarctica and

through the Chilean fjords

SECTOR 1

Antarctic Peninsula

South Shetland Islands

Antarctic Sound

SILVERSEA’S UNCHARTED WORLD TOUR IN NUMBERS

167

THE LENGTH

OF THE CRUISE

IN DAYS

30

THE NUMBER

OF COUNTRIES

VISITED

107

THE NUMBER

OF PORT CALLS

10

THE NUMBER

OF SHORTER

SECTORS

INTRODUCING

THE ARCTIC

IT IS…

…an area enclosed by a notional circle with the

North Pole at its centre that crosses seven

countries (Norway, Greenland, Russia, Canada,

Alaska, Finland, Sweden) and passes through

the Icelandic Island of Grimsby.

…the place to cruise the Northwest Passage,

the Arctic route between North America and

Greenland discovered in 1906 by Norwegian

explorer Roald Amundsen.

…an average 3-12˚C in summer, falling to an

average -34˚C in winter.

…home to about four million people.

…the place to spot polar bears. It’s also home to millions of

seabirds, Arctic foxes and Svalbard Reindeer and walruses.

…home to four species of whales and six species

of seals.

…blanketed by so much ice that if it were all to melt the sea

levels would rise 23.6 feet.

SILVERSEA IN THE ARCTIC

SILVER CLOUD

Guest capacity: 240

Crew capacity: 212

Last refurbishment: 2017

Expedition team members: Up to 28

Number of Zodiacs: 18

Kayak programme:

Yes

SILVER EXPLORER

Guest capacity: 144

Crew capacity: 118

Last refurbishment: 2017

Expedition team members: 12

Number of Zodiacs: 12

Kayak programme:

No

THE FIRST EVER

EXPEDITION WORLD CRUISE

A world cruise is always an adventure

but imagine how amazing it would be

to find one that veers away from the

path well trod and instead calls into

spectacular places where very few

people ever set foot.

Impossible? Not for Silversea

Expeditions, which has launched the

first-ever expedition world cruise.

The 167-day Uncharted World Tour,

on Silversea’s expedition ship Silver

Cloud, sets sail on January 30 2021,

and will take guests on a spectacular

journey from Ushuaia in Argentina

to Tromso in Norway by way of

Antarctica, the Chilean fjords, the

South Pacific, Papua New Guinea,

Indonesia, the Mediterranean and

Norwegian fjords. Ten shorter sectors are planned

to go on sale nearer to the departure date.

The list of calls en route reads like a who’s who

of expedition favourites, but with more than a few

exciting-sounding places that most people will

likely never even have heard of.

Weather permitting there’ll be a landing in

the South Shetland Islands, a day to explore

Chile’s colourful island capital of Castro, and an

overnight stay in remote Easter Island, to see the

extraordinary monumental statues carved more

than 700 years ago by the Rapa Nui people.

Guests will be island-hopping through Vanuatu

and the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific, visit

volcanic Rabaul in Papua New Guinea and seek out

saltwater crocodiles as they cruise the Kimberley

in Australia. They’ll see orang-utans in the wild in

Indonesia, glaciers and polar bears in Svalbard and

a myriad of seabirds in Norway’s Gjesvaerstappan

Islands.

They’ll be accompanied along the way by a

brilliant line-up of guest speakers who are experts

in everything from anthropology and archaeology

to geology, garden design and history. They include

Jo Ruxton, who produced the documentary A

Plastic Ocean, Egyptologist Chris Naunton, and

explorer Felicity Aton, the first and only woman to

ski across Antarctica alone.

22 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019 Stowaway Media | 23


ANTARCTICA

THE FALKLAND ISLANDS

Many people had never heard of these islands until the

Argentineans invaded in 1982. Now it is a popular add on to longer

cruises to Antarctica.

The main port and capital is Stanley, a small town where pubs and

corner shops are the mainstay of the community. The island itself is

like the Devon moors, wild and windswept but with penguins instead

of ponies and signs that warn of minefields.

Excursions visit colonies of gentoo and king penguin rookeries

in Bluff Cove, and rockhoppers in Berkeley Sound. There are also

battlefield tours and trips to working farms to learn about farming in

this harsh terrain.

GET POLARISED

EXPEDITIONS

LET US TAKE YOU CLOSER

TO THE AUTHENTIC BEAUTY OF THE

ANTARCTIC PENINSULA.

Your clients can explore the unspoiled landscapes of

Antarctica on an extraordinary voyage with all the comforts

they love. Aided by a team of world-class experts,

our ultra-luxury, all-inclusive ships are modern gems

of design, excelling in both fine living and exploration.

For more information or for reservations

please call 0207 340 0700, visit silversea.com

or email salesuk@silversea.com.

SELLING TIPS

• Antarctica cruises aren’t cheap but this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience that is worth that

one big splurge.

• Clients wanting to set foot on Antarctica must choose a ship with no more than 500

passengers and preferably just 100-200 to avoid long delays getting ashore.

• If time allows, cruises that combine Antarctica, South Georgia and the Falklands offer the

ultimate in expedition cruising.

• Advise customers to expect the unexpected. This is a big adventure in a hostile climate and

itineraries are wholly dependent on the weather.

Stowaway Media | 25


ANTARCTICA

WHO GOES THERE

ANTARCTICA

SOUTH GEORGIA

South Georgia, famous as the place where the explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton found help to

rescue his failed mission to reach the South Pole in 1916, is some 800 miles south-east of the

Falkland Islands and a popular stop for longer expedition cruises through the Southern Ocean.

Just 100 miles long and 20 miles wide, the island was discovered by James Cook in 1775

and for the next 200 years was the scene of mass slaughter as first the sealing and then the

whaling industries moved in and wiped out entire populations of fur seals and cetaceans.

These days cruise passengers come with far more peaceful intent – namely to see Shackleton’s

grave in the small settlement of Grytviken, admire the picturesque Alps-like scenery and marvel

at the abundance of wildlife.

That includes huge populations of fur and elephant seals, which have returned to the island

in the 50 years since the sealers and whalers left, millions of penguins and sea birds, and

thousands of albatrosses.

Aurora Expeditions

Ships: Greg Mortimer (from November 2019) – 7,400 tons; 160 passengers (120 in

the polar regions).

Itineraries: Antarctica sailings operate round-trip from Ushuaia in Argentina and

include 13-day voyages to the Antarctic Peninsula and longer trips that take in

Antarctica, South Georgia and the Falkland Islands.

Sample: From US$10,500 per person for the maiden 12-day Spirit of Antarctica

voyage round-trip from Ushuaia departing October 30 2019. Excludes flights.

Silversea Expeditions

Ship: Silver Cloud - 16,800 tons, 240 passengers; Silver Explorer - 6,072 tons, 144

passengers.

Itineraries: Sailings operate round-trip from Ushuaia in Argentina and range from

10-day cruises to the Antarctic Peninsula to 15 and 18-day voyages combining

Antarctica with the Falklands and/or South Georgia.

Sample: From £11,970 per person for a 10-day cruise to the Antarctic Peninsula on

Silver Cloud departing December 10 2019. Excludes flights.

Ponant

Ships: Le Lyrial - 10,992 tons, 244 passengers; Le Boréal, L’Austral, Le Soléal –

10,944 tons, 264 passengers.

Itineraries: Sailings round-trip from Ushuaia in Argentina range from 10-night

cruises to the Antarctic Peninsula to 21-day voyages combining the Falklands with

South Georgia, the South Orkney Islands and Antarctica.

Sample: From €10,550 per person for a 10-night Emblematic Antarctica cruise on

Le Soléal departing February 19 2020. Excludes flights.

WHAT’S NEW

• Australia’s Aurora Expeditions is launching new ship Greg

Mortimer in November. Named after the company’s founder, the

vessel has a revolutionary X-Bow, which pierces the waves instead

of rising up and down on them, resulting in a more comfortable

ride. The majority of cabins have a balcony, almost two-thirds

can accommodate three people and it has two outdoor hydraulic

viewing platforms from where passengers can get closer to the

wildlife and landscape.

• Crystal Cruises’ new discovery yacht Crystal Endeavor is visiting

Antarctica for the first time in 2021, but venturing to the

eastern side of the continent, where few cruise ships go. The

200-passenger vessel is built for luxury exploration. It will have

all-suite, all-balcony accommodation serviced by butlers and

six restaurants, including Nobu Matsuhisa’s Umi Uma, Italian

Prego and the Waterside main dining room. The vessel will have

a large spa, a two-storey solarium and carry two helicopters

and a submarine.

• Hapag-Lloyd Cruises is launching new expedition ship Hanseatic

Inspiration in October. The vessel will have three restaurants, a

Grand Suite with a shower that transforms into a steam room,

and glass viewing platforms that fold out of the ship’s hull and

hover 15 metres above the ocean. This is an international ship

with all cruises conducted in German and English.

• Hurtigruten is launching the world’s first hybrid cruise ship in May.

Called Roald Amundsen, it will operate mainly on Liquefied Natural

Gas but be able to switch to electric power for short periods. The

vessel, which makes its Antarctic debut in winter 2019/20, has an

on-board science centre where passengers can interact with the

expedition team and learn more about the places they are visiting.

Sister ship Fridtjof Nansen launches in 2020.

• Scenic’s discovery ship Scenic Eclipse is launching in August an makes

its Antarctica debut in winter 2019/20. The vessel will have all-balcony

suites, butler service for all, 10 places to eat and carry a helicopter and

seven-man sub for exploring above and below the waves.

Scenic

Ships: Scenic Eclipse (launches August 2019) – 17,085 tons, 228 passengers (200

in polar regions).

Itineraries: Packages range from 16 to 23 days and pair cruises round-trip from

Ushuaia with pre and post-cruise overnights in Buenos Aires. Voyages visit the

Antarctic Peninsula and combine Antarctica, South Georgia and the Falkland Islands.

Sample: From £12,705 per person for a 16-day Antarctica in Depth voyage

departing March 5 2020. Includes flights

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises

Ships: Hanseatic Inspiration (launches October 2019) – 15,650 tons, 230

passengers (max 199 in Antarctica).

Itineraries: Cruises of from 12 to 18 days operate round-trip from Ushuaia to the

Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia and the Falkland Islands.

Sample: From £11,723 per person for a 16-day voyage departing December 1

2020. Excludes flights.

G Adventures

Ship: G Expedition – 6,334 tons, 134 passengers.

Itineraries: Cruises are from 11 to 22 days round-trip from Ushuaia to the Antarctic

Peninsula, South Georgia and the Falkland Islands.

Sample: From £5,099 per person for a 13-day Antarctica Classic in Depth cruise

departing November 11 2019, based on a triple-share cabin. Excludes flights.

Seabourn

Ship: Seabourn Quest – 32,000 tons, 458 passengers (max 430 in Antarctica).

Itineraries: Offers 21-day cruises between Buenos Aires and San Antonio in Chile

that include six days exploring the Antarctic Peninsula. Longer 24-day voyages add

the Falklands and South Georgia.

Sample: From £8,499 per person for a 21-day Ultimate Antarctica and Patagonia cruise

from San Antonio to Buenos Aires departing November 28 2019. Excludes flights.

Crystal Cruises

Ship: Crystal Endeavor – 20,000 tons, 200 passengers.

Itineraries: Two 22-day voyages from Tasmania and New Zealand in January 2021

spend eight days exploring Antarctica’s Ross Sea with visits to Adélie and Emperor

penguin rookeries, and an ice-free desert.

Sample: From £28,113 per person for a 22-day Antarctic Splendor cruise from

Hobart to Christchurch departing January 6 2021. Excludes flights.

26 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 27


GALAPAGOS

CRYSTAL ENDEAVOR

WHERE L UXU R Y RO AMS FREELY

TM

INAUGURAL SEASON | AUGUST 2020–JANUA RY 2021

THE WORLD’S PREMIER LUXURY

EXPEDITION YACHT

From the World’s Most Awarded Luxury Cruise Line comes the

world’s largest and most spacious luxury expedition yacht,

Crystal Endeavor. With a sleek design built to PC6 Polar Class

specifications and anchor-free dynamic positioning technology,

she is set to explore the farthest reaches of Earth, from the

Russian Far East to the Antarctic and exotic, far-away lands in

between.

Debuting in 2020, we present 12 remarkable journeys comprising

her inaugural season. In all-inclusive luxury hosted by an

eminently experienced Expedition Team of 25, curated voyages

of 12 to 22 nights explore the wilds of the Russian Far East, the

coastal wonders of Japan, and the intriguing biodiversity of the

Philippines, Borneo and Indonesia. There are offshore

Adventures in Australia and underwater explorations of the Great

Barrier Reef, immersive explorations of Tasmania and the fjords

of New Zealand, and expeditions to the Great White Continent.

Chart a course for inspired discovery and join Crystal Endeavor

for an adventure of a lifetime.

CONTACT: 020 7399 7603

www.crystalexpeditioncruises.co.uk

ALL-INCLUSIVE SIGNATURE HALLMARKS

Expansive all-suite accommodations, among the largest in expedition cruising, with

spacious bathrooms, walk-in wardrobes and high-tech in-suite amenities.

Award-winning, Michelin-inspired cuisine served in multiple open-seating venues,

including Nobu Matsuhisa’s only sea-going restaurants.

Crystal’s acclaimed six-star service, with an industry-leading 1 to 1 staff per guest ratio.

All gratuities and unlimited fine wines, champagnes and premium spirits.

Expedition Team of 25 aboard every voyage to provide expert insight and host

small-group explorations.

Curated collection of Crystal Expedition Adventures ashore, including cultural and active

experiences, exploration and landings by Zodiac, and Crystal Unexpected Adventures to

capitalise on wildlife and wilderness opportunities.

Complimentary water toys* including kayaks, snorkelling gear, stand-up paddle boards

and more.

Dedicated fitness facility with state-of-the-art equipment and instructor-led spinning

classes, yoga, mat Pilates and more.

* Use of optional submersible and complimentary marina equipment is based on each destination’s local rules and regulations

and the discretion of the Captain due to weather, dockage / anchorage, location and sea conditions. Please ask for details.


ARCTIC

ARCTIC

DISCOVER:

THE ARCTIC

The Arctic and Antarctica tend to be seen as one but are literally poles

apart. Where Antarctica is a vast uninhabited continent at the bottom of

the world, the Arctic is a notional area defined by an imaginary circle in the

Northern Hemisphere with the North Pole at its centre.

WHAT’S NEW

• A Norwegian fine-dining restaurant

called Lindstrøm and a Science Centre

are to be added to Hurtigruten’s

expedition ship Fram during a major

renovation in 2020. During the

refurbishment, the cabins, suites and

observation lounge will be refurbished.

The ship launched in 2007.

• Aurora Expeditions has launched a

new voyage exploring West Greenland.

The 11-day cruise, on new ship Greg

Mortimer, departs May 2020, and

sails round-trip from Nuuk. Highlights

include a day in Ilulissat, to see giant

icebergs that have broken off the

icecap, and a Zodiac cruise to the Eqip

Sermia glacier. New 15 and 16-day

cruises in July 2020 and 2021 take

passengers to Franz Josef Land in

search of polar bears, walruses, whales

and seals.

• Ponant has laid the keel for its first

ice-breaker, Le Commandant Charcot.

Launching in 2021, the vessel will hold

270 passengers and operate mainly

on Liquefied Natural Gas but be able

to switch to electric propulsion for

short periods. It will carry two

helicopters and be capable of

reaching the true North Pole.

Radiating out, it encompasses Greenland,

Svalbard, Norway, Russia and Canada, and

numerous islands in the Labrador Sea, and is

home to Inuit, Norwegians, Russians, Canadians

and a host of other nationalities.

It is less remote and hostile than the South Pole,

allowing traditional cruise ships to visit Greenland

and Spitsbergen and take passengers ashore. But

for a real adventure in these frozen lands only an

expedition ship with a hull that’s strong enough to

break through ice will do.

Although cruises depart in the summer months,

when much of the ice has melted, ships heading to

the northern reaches of the Arctic often have to sail

through chunks of floating ice, which can damage

the hulls of vessels not built to sail in frozen waters.

Cruisers can take their pick from four different

adventures in this frozen wasteland – either sail the

coast of Greenland, circumnavigate Spitsbergen,

or embark on a voyage through the legendary

Northwest Passage, a sea route between Arctic

Canada and Greenland that was only properly

discovered in 1903 and 1906, or through the

Northeast Passage across the top of Russia.

GREENLAND

Legend has it that some 1,000 years ago Icelander

Erik the Red was banished from his homeland

for murder and happened upon a place that he

then called Greenland in the hope it would attract

other settlers to join him. He probably also wanted

revenge on his fellow Icelanders, whose island

sounded very inhospitable in comparison.

These days Greenland is an autonomous

country within the Kingdom of Denmark and

not just the largest island in the world, but also

one of the most inappropriately-named ones as

about 80% of its land mass is covered by the only

permanent ice sheet outside Antarctica.

Expedition cruises sail up the west coast,

venturing into Disko Bay, and calling at

places with tongue-twisting names such as

Qeqartarsuaq, Uummannaq, Sisimiut and

Ilulissat, where small boat tours visit the mouth

of the icefjord to see giant icebergs that have

broken off the Jakobshaven Glacier and jostle to

get into the open water.

SPITSBERGEN

Some 2,313km from Oslo but owned by Norway,

Spitsbergen is the largest island in the Svalbard

archipelago and the nearest most expedition

ships can get to the North Pole, which is 1,338km

away (currently only the Russian nuclear icebreaker

50 Years of Victory, sold by Quark Expeditions, can

get there).

Spitsbergen cruises generally start in

Longyearbyen and then attempt to circumnavigate

the island, stopping at random places en route so

passengers can go for walks ashore once the area

has been scouted for prowling polar bears.

The bears are the main attraction, but there

is plenty of other wildlife to look out for including

walruses, seals and whales.

Trips ashore are hosted by armed teams of

naturalists and geologists (polar bears are among

the most dangerous animals on the planet) who

also give talks about the wildlife, geography,

climate and ice during sailing time.

NORTHWEST PASSAGE

In 1845, British explorer Sir John Franklin set out

from Greenhithe in Kent to find the sea route

between Greenland and Arctic Canada. One year

later, after a last known stop on Beechey Island, he

and all his men just vanished.

We’ll probably never know exactly what

happened to them, but a few years ago

underwater vehicles operated by Akademik Sergey

Vavilov, a ship used by Canadian expedition cruise

line One Ocean Expeditions, located the wreck of

Erebus, one of the two Franklin vessels. Two years

later, the second ship, Terror, was located.

It took another 65 years after the Franklin

expedition before Norwegian explorer Roald

Amundsen became the first man to navigate the

entire Northwest Passage, which

these days is a route high on the

must-do list for those in search of the

ultimate adventure.

There is no one route through the myriad of

channels and islands that dot the passage – some

cruises go from Greenland to Canada, others to

Nome in Alaska - but the best itineraries spend time

exploring the icy landscapes.

Many also call into Beechey Island, where, in

1850, a rescue expedition found the graves of

three of Franklin’s crew (it is thought they died from

a combination of pneumonia, tuberculosis and

lead poisoning from the cans their food was carried

in), adding a glimpse of exploration history to the

excitement of spotting whales, seals and polar

bears, and getting up close to icebergs and into

deep fjords.

NORTHEAST PASSAGE

This is the latest buzz in Arctic cruising – a voyage

from Alaska to Norway that takes passengers on an

epic journey across the top of Russia, visiting frozen

lands and islands that seabirds, polar bears and

sea lions call home, and navigating waters where

whales are known to linger.

This is one for truly intrepid travellers keen to

touch base with places where few have gone

before, such as Cape Dezhnev, the eastern-most

part of the Eurasian continent, Severnaya Zemlya,

an ice-bound archipelago that was only charted

100 years ago, and Wrangel Island, made a

Unesco World Heritage Site thanks to its rich seam

of mammals, birds and flora.

As with all Arctic cruises, the actual route taken

will depend on the sea ice and weather but if all

goes to plan, passengers can expect plenty of trips

ashore and Zodiac cruises, as well as instructive

talks by the expedition experts

during sailing time. » p34

30 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 31


PROFILE

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SCENIC

10 DINING EXPERIENCES

• Elements: A favourite for Italian dishes,

steaks and seafood.

• Chef’s Table: Private dégustation dining for

just eight guests.

• Koko’s: Enjoy Asian fusion dishes with a

taste of Sake.

• Sushi @ Koko’s: Casual dining Japanese

style.

• Teppanyaki @ Koko’s: Take a seat at the grill

and enjoy the theatre as Scenic Eclipse’s

chefs create dinner before your very eyes.

• Lumière: Be our guest for the best French

fine dining at sea.

• Azure Bar & Café: Need to refuel. This is the

place for all-day grazing.

• Epicure: A hands-on cooking school where

guests can hone their cooking skills.

• Yacht Club: A poolside grill for al-fresco

dining.

• In-suite dining: A 24-hour menu is available

for those who want some time out.

SIX-STAR VOYAGES OF DISCOVERY WITH

SCENIC ECLIPSE

There are just five months to go until the world’s first

discovery yacht enters service, changing the face of

expedition cruising forever.

Scenic Eclipse is being built in Croatia by Scenic, the company that brought all-inclusive

luxury to the rivers of Europe and Asia. Now they are bringing that same luxury to the

oceans. The ship is so popular, even though it hasn’t launched yet, that a sister vessel is

already on order and there is talk of more to come.

Scenic Eclipse promises to exceed its high expectations. Holding just 228 guests (a

maximum 200 in polar regions) in spacious all-suite and all-balcony accommodation,

everyone gets a butler and a magnificent choice of places to eat, ranging from Asian

cuisine at Koko’s to French fine dining in Lumière.

And with all dining included in the price, along with alcoholic and soft drinks, gratuities,

shore excursions and Wi-Fi, not to mention flights and transfers, guests can afford to enjoy

everything this magnificent vessel offers.

The Spa Sanctuary is superb, a huge zen-like space where guests can retreat after

an exciting day ashore. The indoor and outdoor pools, Jacuzzis and oceanview

sauna are all just made for relaxing, while a team of highly trained masseurs is on

hand to pamper and spoil.

Keen to keep in shape while exploring the ends of the earth? The gym has the latest

state-of-the-art keep fit equipment, and there are free yoga and Pilates classes in a

dedicated studio.

Scenic Eclipse will carry 12 inflatable Zodiacs for landings in the polar regions, as well

as two helicopters and a seven-man sub so guests can explore above and below the

waves. They can even go kayaking amidst the icebergs.

A dedicated expedition team with experts in everything from marine biology to

history will be on hand to lead trips ashore and also share their in-depth knowledge

about the places being visited during on-board talks.

ACCESS ALL AREAS

Whether guests choose to go penguin-spotting in Antarctica or in search of polar bears

beyond the Arctic Circle, they will be cruising in frozen regions once inaccessible to all

but the most intrepid travellers.

That’s where Scenic Eclipse’s discovery credentials kick in. She is being built

to comply with the highest ice-class specification available, PC6 Polar Class, and

makes use of all the latest technology to ensure the environment is cared for as well

as her guests are.

GPS dynamic positioning means she doesn’t have to anchor so there is no risk of

damage to the ocean bed, while zero speed stabiliser fins, which also work when the

ship is stationary, will vastly improve stability when she is sailing.

It’s six-star luxury meets discovery as only Scenic knows how.

CRUISING OFF THE GRID

Spitsbergen, Greenland, the elusive Northwest

Passage, Antarctica, South Georgia, the Falkland

Islands. You name it, Scenic Eclipse is going

there, taking guests to spectacular places that

once were inaccessible to the ordinary traveller.

Here is just a taste of what’s on offer.

CHILEAN FJORDS AND CAPE HORN

The scenery is the star on this cruise through

the Chilean fjords. There are snow-capped

mountains, deep valleys, a cruise close to the Pio

XI Glacier, which is almost as big as the city of

Santiago, and maybe even a chance to set foot

on Cape Horn.

22 days departing November 7 2019.

From £12,065pp all-inclusive

ANTARCTICA IN DEPTH

Six days discovering the Antarctic Peninsula,

following a course dictated by ice and weather

conditions, awaits on this cruise. There will be

landings, Zodiac cruises, a chance to kayak

around icebergs and plenty of penguin and

whale sightings.

16 days departing March 5 2020, including pre

and post-cruise nights in Buenos Aires. From

£12,705pp all-inclusive.

ANTARCTICA, SOUTH GEORGIA

AND FALKLAND ISLANDS

A wondrous wildlife line-up including penguins,

whales, elephant seals and seabirds awaits on

this three-in-one cruise, which explores the

Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia and the

Falkland Islands.

23 days departing March 16 2020, including pre

and post-cruise nights in Buenos Aires. From

£19,385pp all-inclusive.

CONTACT

Reservations: 0808 115 0463

www.scenic.co.uk

ICELAND & GREENLAND EXPLORER

Discover the world’s largest island on an

adventure cruise from Reykjavik in Iceland to

Kangerlussuaq in Greenland that promises

icebergs, deep fjords, whales, glaciers and

Zodiac cruises, as well as kayaking amid the ice

and hiking ashore.

14 days departing August 3 2020. From

£9,765pp all-inclusive.

32 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 33


ARCTIC

WHO GOES THERE

GALAPAGOS

SELLING TIPS

Cruises depart in the summer months,

when the ice has melted enough for

ships to navigate around Spitsbergen.

• Look out for cruise lines that offer

kayaking from the ship – it’s great fun

to paddle through the small icebergs,

known as growlers.

• Seals, whales, polar bears and the story

of the ill-fated Franklin Expedition are

among highlights for those cruising the

Northwest Passage.

• Put the price of a once-in-a-lifetime

adventure against the actual cost of

the cruise to show what value your

clients are getting.

Silversea Expeditions

Ship: Silver Cloud - 16,800 tons, 240 passengers; Silver Explorer - 6,072 tons, 144

passengers.

Itineraries: Nine to 14-day cruises pair Spitsbergen with Tromso in Norway and/

or Iceland, while 16-day Greenland voyages sail round-trip from Kangerlussuaq. A

sold-out Northeast Passage cruise in August 2019 will be repeated in 2020.

Sample: From £6,210 per person for a nine-day voyage from Longyearbyen in

Spitsbergen to Tromso in Norway departing June 21 2020. Excludes flights

Scenic

Ships: Scenic Eclipse (launching August 2019) – 17,085 tons, 228 passengers

(200 in polar regions).

Itineraries: Voyages of between 11 and 24 nights explore the islands of

Spitsbergen, Greenland and Iceland. A 24-night voyage from Copenhagen in

Denmark to Nome in Alaska crosses the Northwest Passage.

Sample: From £11,695 per person for a 15-day Arctic Islands cruise from Oslo in

Norway to Reykjavik in Iceland departing July 12 2020. Includes flights.

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises

Ships: Hanseatic Inspiration (launching October 2019) – 15,650 tons, 230

passengers.

Itineraries: Cruises ranging from 13 to 20 days take passengers through the

Canadian Arctic, Baffin Bay and along the west coast of Greenland.

Sample: From £12,075 per person for a 17-day Greenland expedition round-trip

from Kangerlussuaq departing August 21 2020. Excludes flights.

G Adventures

Ship: G Expedition – 6,334 tons, 134 passengers.

Itineraries: Three eight to 15-day itineraries either circumnavigate Spitsbergen

from Longyearbyen or focus on its west coast. A 15-night cruise in September

2019 pairs Spitsbergen with Greenland and Iceland.

Sample: From £4,349 per person for an eight-day Realm of the Polar Bear cruise

round-trip from Longyearbyen departing July 24 2019. Excludes flights.

DISCOVER:

THE GALAPAGOS

Crystal Cruises

Ship: Crystal Endeavor – 20,000 tons, 200 passengers.

Itineraries: A 28-day voyage through the Northeast Passage links Anadyr in

Russia with Tromso in Norway.

Sample: From £36,731 per person for 28 days departing August 17 2021.

Excludes flights.

Aurora Expeditions

Ship: Polar Pioneer – 1,753 tons, 54 passengers; Greg Mortimer (launching

November 2019) – 7,400 tons, 160 passengers (limited to 120 in polar regions).

Itineraries: Voyages range from 11 to 25 days and explore Svalbard, Greenland

and Franz Josef Land. A 25-day Arctic Complete voyage in August 2021 ticks off

Spitsbergen, Greenland and Iceland.

Sample: From £4,800 per person for an 11-day Iceland, Jan Mayen and

Svalbard voyage from Reykjavik to Longyearbyen departing June 12 2020.

Excludes flights.

Ponant

Ships: Le Boréal, L’Austral, Le Soléal – 10,944 tons, 264 passengers.

Itineraries: A range of seven to 16-night cruises in 2020 explore Greenland and

Spitsbergen. A 22-night voyage in August 2020 takes passengers through the

Northwest Passage from Kangerlussuaq to Nome in Alaska.

Sample: From €6,580 per person for a seven-night Disco Bay and Inuit Villages

cruise round-trip from Kangerlussuaq departing July 19 2020. Excludes flights.

WHAT TO PACK

• Walking shoes and waterproof trousers

• Warm jumpers, woolly hats, scarves and gloves

• A rain and wind-proof coat

• Cameras, iPhones, chargers and plenty of storage space for pictures

Cruising the Galapagos Islands

is one of the most amazing

experiences imaginable – a way to

combine a sea adventure with closeup

encounters with some of the

tamest and most fascinating wildlife

on the planet.

The islands, part of Ecuador but some 600 miles

off the coast of South America, shot to fame in

the 1850s, when Charles Darwin published his

book The Origin of Species based on theories he

developed on a visit to the Galapagos in 1835.

He was on a five-year expedition to chart the

southern half of South America’s coastline and

went ashore hoping to find volcanoes. Instead he

observed animals and birds that had adapted to

the different island environments in which they

lived. There were lizards that swam, cormorants

that could not fly, finches with beaks that had

evolved into different shapes depending whether

their main food stuffs were fruits, seeds or insects,

and giant tortoises with shells shaped to suit the

vegetation they had to eat.

Some 25,000 people live in the islands, attracted

there by tourism, which is creeping up even though

it is supposed to be limited to help preserve the

fragile ecosystem.

Many stay in hotels, and that is one way to visit

the Galapagos, taking boat trips out to different

islands each day. But a cruise that visits a couple of

islands, beaches or bays every day is not only a far

easier way to travel as you just get on board and

unpack once, but far more rewarding.

Ships of all sizes and quality sail around the

archipelago, from small yachts to luxury craft,

but none is allowed to hold more than 100

passengers. Most will visit two islands a day

during a seven-night cruise, each time taking folk

ashore in small tenders or inflatable Zodiacs to

see the wonderful wildlife (think dancing booby

birds, playful sea lions and rather stately giant

tortoises) which has no predators and therefore

no fear of humans.

Some days there might instead be a Zodiac

cruise around a bay teeming with wildlife. Several

times there will be a chance to swim or snorkel with

the animals. Scuba diving can also be arranged but

at an extra cost.

There are several rules to know before a first trip

ashore. Visitors can only set foot on the islands

with a guide (all ships carry teams of Ecuadorian

guides who have an intimate knowledge of the

islands’ flora and fauna and are registered by the

Galapagos National Park). Puerto Ayora in Santa

Cruz is an exception. This is the biggest town in

the islands and passengers are free to explore the

souvenir shops after a trip to the Charles Darwin

Research Centre.

Visitors must also keep a distance from the

animals, certainly never try to touch them,

and move carefully and quietly so as not to

scare them (on some landings they will find

themselves tip-toeing over marine iguanas).

Those who go snorkelling are not to touch plants

or animals in the water. »

34 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 35


GALAPAGOS

GALAPAGOS

TOP SIX HIGHLIGHTS

• A trip into the highlands on Santa Cruz to get up close to giant

tortoises. These were almost wiped out in the 1800s as passing

sailors took them to eat but numbers are increasing thanks to

painstaking breeding programmes.

• Zodiac boat rides around small bays and through dense

mangroves to get a glimpse of penguins, pelicans and flightless

cormorants.

• The fish stall in Puerto Ayora, the capital, where sea lions and

pelicans sit at the feet of the sellers, hoping a tasty morsel might

come their way.

• Selected cruises either circumnavigate Kicker Rock, aka Roca Leon

Dormino (sleeping lion), or get close on Zodiacs so passengers can

get a good view of all the birdlife that lives here.

• A wooden barrel on Floreana Island that has served as a mail box

since 1793, where passengers on passing ships leave postcards for

others to collect and deliver.

• The finches that are said to have inspired Charles Darwin because

they have developed different-shaped beaks depending on their

primary foodstuff.

GOOD TO KNOW

• As there are no ports in the Galapagos, the only way on and off ships – even

on embarkation and disembarkation day – is by inflatable Zodiac, often

landing onto sand or rocks, so your clients need a good degree of mobility.

• There is time to go snorkelling with sea turtles, penguins and sea lions on

most days. Snorkels, masks and flippers can usually be borrowed for free.

• Ships come in all sizes from tiny yachts that hold just 16 passengers to

luxury vessels that accommodate 100 people in suites with balconies.

• Clients can charter the small yachts that sail here for a milestone birthday or

anniversary. It’s certainly unique and guaranteed to be a holiday they will

never forget.

WHAT’S NEW

• Celebrity Cruises is launching new ship Celebrity Flora in the Galapagos

in May. The vessel, which has been specially-designed to sail around the

islands, will hold 100 passengers in all-suite accommodation and have

stylish lounges with floor-to-ceiling windows from which to enjoy the views.

Technically, it will have dynamic positioning, which allows the vessel to hold

its position without using an anchor.

• Silversea is building a new expedition ship to cruise the Galapagos. Silver

Origin will hold 100 passengers in all-suite all-balcony accommodation. It

will carry fleets of Zodiacs and kayaks and enter service in summer 2020.

• Avalon Waterways is offering two 16-day holidays pairing a five-day cruise

in the Galapagos with a tour taking in Lima, Machu Picchu and Quito. The

cruise is on the 16-passenger Treasure of the Galapagos. Departures are July

21 and November 10, with prices from £7,628 per person including flights.

FACTFILE

Location: In the Pacific Ocean, 600 miles off the west coast of Ecuador

in South America.

Number of islands: 20 islands and 42 islets.

Capital: Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on San Cristóbal Island. Puerto Ayora

on Santa Cruz Island is the biggest town.

When to go: The islands are on the Equator so there is always 12 hours

of daylight and 12 hours of night. The temperature averages from 26C

to 31C. The hottest weather is January to May, when it is also most

likely to rain. June to December is dry and a bit cooler. Cruises operate

year-round.

Getting there: Flights operate from Quito in Ecuador and stop at

Guayaquil to pick up passengers before continuing to the islands.

Planes land either at Baltra or San Cristóbal islands. Flight time is just

over two hours.

Wildlife specials: The only lizards that swim, cormorants that can’t fly,

the only penguins in the Northern Hemisphere in their natural habitat,

the only colony of red-footed booby birds in the world.

WHO GOES THERE

Silversea Expeditions

Ship: Silver Galapagos – 4,077 tons, 100 passengers.

Itineraries: Seven-night cruises operate from Baltra

to San Cristóbal and vice-versa, calling at a couple

of islands and bays most days. Among highlights,

passengers can climb to th e top of volcanic Bartolomé

for views across the islands, join Zodiac cruises around

small bays and see flamingos at Punta Cormorant on

Floreana.

Sample: From £5,400 per person for a sevennight

cruise from Baltra to San Cristóbal departing

September 7 2019. Includes domestic flights from

Ecuador to the Galapagos. International flights extra.

Celebrity Cruises

Ships: Celebrity Flora – 5,739 tons, 100 passengers

(launching May 2019); Celebrity Xpedition – 2,842

tons, 100 passengers.

Itineraries: Seven-night cruises operate round-trip

from Baltra and visit two islands or coves each day

where passengers can either go ashore or swim and

snorkel. Exceptionally, they stay a day anchored off

Puerto Ayora so passengers can see the giant tortoises

in the wild and shop.

Sample: From £8,289 for a 10-night holiday pairing

three nights in Quito with a seven-night cruise on

Celebrity Flora departing September 22 2019. Includes

international and domestic flights.

G Adventures

Ships: Monserrat - 20 passengers; Yolita, Estrella del

Mar, Xavier III, Eden - 16 passengers.

Itineraries: Cruises range from seven and 14 nights

and loop around favourite islands including Santa Cruz,

Floreana, Isabela, Fernandina, Espanola and Santiago.

Sample: From £5,319 per person for a 17-night

Complete Galapagos holiday departing June 13

2020 that pairs a 14-night cruise from Baltra with two

nights in Quito. Price includes flights from Quito to the

Galapagos. International flights extra.

36 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

Stowaway Media | 37


RUSSIAN FAR EAST

Join the

#NEXTGENERATION

CONFERENCE 2019

of Cruise

DISCOVER:

THE RUSSIAN FAR EAST

Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula lies some 4,200

miles due east of Moscow – that’s more than

eight hours by air – and is so remote that even

today there are no roads or railways in or out

so the only way to visit is by ship or air.

SELLING TIPS

• It’s likely most clients will know

nothing about the Russian Far East.

Take time to learn where in the world

it is and the attractions so you can sell

with confidence.

• Don’t worry about the price. Your

clients would not be asking if they could

not afford to go.

• Sell the Kamchatka Peninsula and its

neighbouring islands to clients with

a sense of adventure and interest in

seeing nature and wildlife in the raw.

Cruise ships navigating these remote

shores will mostly anchor off the coast

and take passengers ashore by Zodiac

so your clients need to be able to climb

in and out of the boats.

The peninsula is 780 miles long, spends most

of the year covered in snow and ice, and is one

of the highlights of an expedition voyage to the

Russian Far East. It is home to 160 volcanoes,

29 of which are still active, thousands of brown

bears, spotted seals and half the world’s Steller

sea eagle population.

The surrounding islands, also part of Russia,

are teeming with seabirds including puffins,

kittiwakes, cormorants and gulls, as well as

seals, sea lions and otters, while the surrounding

waters are a favourite hangout for whales.

All in all, it’s no wonder expedition cruise lines

have come exploring this region of late.

Danish explorer Vitus Bering helped map the

region during the 1700s, naming Petropavlovsk,

the only major city, after his two ships, St Peter

and St Paul.

After the Second World War, the Soviets

declared it a military zone and closed the

region to both foreigners and Russians, and

it stayed that way until the Soviet Union

collapsed in 1990.

An unintended but happy consequence

of the ban was that the scenery and wildlife

were protected, making this a fabulous port of

call for cruisers looking for a seriously exciting

once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

WHO GOES THERE

Crystal Cruises

Ship: Crystal Endeavor – 20,000 tons, 200

passengers.

Itineraries: A voyage from Otaru in Japan to Seward

in Alaska visits the Kamchatka Peninsula, and takes

passengers on a wildlife quest through the Russian Far

East and America’s Aleutian Islands.

Sample: From $17,449 per person for 19 nights

departing June 12 2021. Excludes flights.

Silversea Expeditions

Ship: Silver Explorer – 6,072 tons, 144 passengers.

Itineraries: Voyages ranging from 12 to 18 days will

be exploring the Kamchatka Peninsula and islands in

the Russian Far East in 2020.

Sample: From £11,700 per person for an 18-day

Russian Far East cruise round-trip from Otaru in Japan

departing June 18 2020. Excludes flights.

Ponant

Ships: Le Soléal – 10,944 tons, 264 passengers.

Itineraries: Two options are available in summer

2020 - a 15-day voyage from Otaru in Japan to

Petropavlovsk and a 13-day sailing from Petropavlovsk

to Juneau in Alaska. Both cruises are in partnership

with National Geographic Expeditions.

Sample: From €9,450 per person for a 15-day Sea of

Okhotsk voyage from Otaru to Petropavlovsk departing

June 26 2020.

I’M A

CRUISE EXPERT

CLIA brings together cruise lines, travel agents and associated travel partners,

and is dedicated to the growth of ocean and river cruise holidays.

Join the Cruise Community at a CLIA event near you.

Book now at cruiseexperts.org

38 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

@CLIAUK CLIAEurope CLIAEuro CLIAEurope


WHERE LUXURY ROAMS FREELY

INAUGURAL SEASON | AUGUST 2020–JANUARY 2021

INCLUDES

2-FOR-1 FARES

BOOK NOW SAVINGS

OPEN BARS & LOUNGES

with Complimentary

Fine Wines, Champagnes,

Spirits & Specialty Coffees

MICHELIN-INSPIRED CUISINE

SPECIALTY DINING

IN-SUITE DINING

ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS

NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT

UNLIMITED WI-FI

PRE-PAID GRATUITIES

BROCHURE RACK

Expedition brochures available from your agent.

Silversea Expeditions

Ponant

G Adventures

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises

Celebrity Cruises

Scenic

CRYSTAL ENDEAVOR

EXTRAORDINARY

WORLDS

The All-Inclusive

CRYSTAL

EXPERIENCE ®

2019 / 2020

CRUISE COLLECTION

Crystal Cruises

Aurora Expeditions

Seabourn

40 | Expedition Cruise Diary | March 2019

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines