Dirt & Trail July 2019

RobRidefast

OVER 300,000 HAPPY READERS LAST MONTH!

www.dirtandtrailmag.com

JULY 2019

9 771815 337001

19007

JULY 2019 RSA R35.00

ROCKIN' IT!

JARVIS WINS

FIFTH ERZBERG TITLE

W O R L D L A U N C H T E S T

YAMAHA 2020 STARTS NOW

TENERE 700

A FIRST LOOK AT THE NEW 2020 MX & ENDURO

MODELS FROM HUSQVARNA, KTM AND OTHERS.

PLUS: KYMCO SXS TEST / KTM 790 VS 990 / NATIONAL RACING ROUNDUP


“The Kymco

SIDE X SIDE is a

real workhorse,

it’s the ultimate

tool for setting

up and running

the GXCC event”

Louwrens

Mahoney

KYMCO

R169 950

UXV 700i EPS LE 4x4

• Upgraded CVT-Drive System

• High-Clearance Curved Front A-arms

• Redesigned Sport Steering Wheel and NEW Graphics

• Re-Designed Sport Inspired Roll Cage for Increased Headroom

• NEW Ultra High-Back Bucket Seats with Driver Seat Adjustability

• Kaifa gas-reservoir shocks with adjustable pre-load, compression and rebound

• Upgraded seat belts with integrated elastic shock reduction shoulder harness and safety interlock switch

KYMCO KYMCO KYMCO KYMCO KYMCO

MXU 150

MXU 250 MXU 450i 4X4 MXU 700i 4X4 UXV 450i 4X4

R49 950 R64 950 R104 950 R149 950 R149 950

NOW AVAILABLE IN DEALERS NATIONWIDE

Western Cape Droomers 021 948 0871

KwaZulu Natal Ekerold 033 345 3503

Port Elizabeth Xtreme 041 581 0030

Randburg, GP Linex 011 251 4000

Pretoria, GP Linex 083 522 2966

Nelspruit Rudamans 013 753 3631

Windhoek Windoek +26461253692

@KymcoAfrica

@kymco_southafrica

Tel: +2711 259 7600

www.kymco.co.za

Colours displayed may vary to the actual models in stock. E&OE.


CONQUER THE

BIGGEST

ADVENTURES

-

Torque your way out of any situation with the most powerful offroad adventure bike

on the market. The KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R is where Dakar-winning DNA

meets the ultimate in power and technology, delivering a limit-crushing ride that

enables you to charge off further than ever before.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost. Photo: F. Lackner


EDITOR: ROLEY FOLEY

Little Sandra is sitting on her grandfather’s

lap who is an old dirtbiker and studying

the wrinkles on his old face.

She gets up the nerve to rub her fi ngers

over the wrinkles.

Then she touches her own face and

looks more puzzled. Finally, Sandra asks,

“Grandpa, did the Lord make you?”

“He sure did sweetheart, very long time

ago,” replies her grandfather.

“Well, did the Lord make me?” asks

Sandra.

“Yes, He did, and that wasn’t too long

ago,” answers her grandfather.

“Boy,” says Sandra, “He’s sure doing a lot

better job these days isn’t He?”

Have a great riding month everyone!

CONTENTS: JULY 2019

THE TEAM:

EDITOR:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

DESIGN:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sinead Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

Sean Hendley

dirtandtrail.ridefastsales@

gmail.com

ACCOUNTS &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Office no (011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

CONTRIBUTORS:

Kurt Beine

Richard Sutherland

Zygmund Brodalka

Byron Rudman

Kyle Lawrenson

Tristan Foley

Mike Wessels

18: COVER STORY: 2019 ERZBERG 24: WORLD LAUNCH: YAMAHA TENERE 700

32: TESTED: KYMCO 700 44: FIRST LOOK: BIKES COMING IN 2020

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Digital or hard copy.

64: FEATURE: KTM 990 VS 790 74: NATIONAL RACING: MX & OFFROAD

2 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Piston and Gasket Sets

Cranks, Conrods and Camshafts

Cylinder Kits, Rebores, Main Bearings and Clutch Plates

VALVES,STEM SEALS AND SPRINGS

Email:G124@mweb.co.za

EMAIL:

no 4 Fifth avenue

Northmead

Benoni

011 425 1081/4


ought to you by

South Africa’s most fun

off-road event kicks off

in September: Raising

funds for the Quadpara

association of South Africa.

Quads 4 Quads 2019 – 21st September.

This 17 year old event has raised more

than 8 million rand for the QuadPara

Association of SA.

All the way from Carnival City on the East Rand,

through 3 provinces to Richards Bay over four

spectacular days. Off road enthusiasts of all shapes

and sizes on all kinds of off road machines are

welcome.

Last year, organisers threw a curveball with a new

route and lots of more technical terrain… this year

they promise to keep it all but they will include easier

routes for the riders that just want to have a chilled

ride. Always a total blast!

www.adventurecompany.co.za

(011) 979-5035

RAD KTM 790 R

raffle lucky draw:

So, over the last few months you may have noticed

an advert for a raffle by RAD KTM on a brand new

790R where you could simply scan a QR code to

enter. www.facebook.com/Amateur2Dakar/ , getting

Robert Gibbon to Dakar this year... RAD Moto KTM

held a big shindig with full catering to the highest

order at their premises just off Rivonia Rd next to the

N1. With about 400 odd hopefuls, including yours

truly, in attendance the lucky draw was held after a l’il

speech by Rob Gibbon and some grand standing by

local celebrity Altus Thiart.

The lucky winner was of the brand new KTM

790 R was Warren Barwell, who announced his

excitement with a big decibel shrill squeal that had

all the neighbourhood hounds howling at the moon

for hours. The draw was done live on Facebook

streaming for those from far away who couldn’t make

the event, and that is how one Johan van Zyl found

out that he had won the 2nd prize of a brand new

KTM 50cc SX. After all the excitement died down

some cool consolation prize winner were drawn and

then the party got started in earnest.

What a cool prize for a mid-year treat.

RAD: (011) 234-5007.

Rob has a chat about Dakar...

Spinning the entries

Happiness is...

distributed by

4 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


ought to you by

Motul SA Finds

A New Home

Motul SA is pleased to announce that

as of June 1st, 2019, Motul motorcycle

products will be distributed throughout

South Africa by Bikewise. “We’re excited

to have this opportunity to partner with

Motul SA and make their quality products

more accessible to more South African

motorcycle owners,” commented Chris

Speight – Managing Director of KMSA, the

holding company for Bikewise.

Mercia Jansen, Motul SA Area Manager

for Southern and Eastern Africa, echoed

these sentiments, saying that “In

Bikewise, Motul has found a motorcycle

distribution partner who shares our values

and commitment to quality in all areas.

They have a 26-year legacy of outstanding

service in the market and we have no

doubt they will deliver the service and

support our customers expect.”

Motul supplies lubricants for – well just

about anything. It’s great to have a brand

like this in South Africa that is so involved

in sponsorship and rider development.

Dealer enquiries (011) 566-0333

Honda Wing Centurions

Jacques is sales

manager of the year.

Our very good customer and great friend Jacques

Robilliard, sales manager at Honda Wing Centurion was

recently awarded Honda Sales Manager of the Year at

Honda SA’s recent prize giving acknowledging excellence

within their dealer network. Jacques runs a tight ship,

but remains humble and friendly and has increased sales

significantly during his time at Honda Wing Centurion. Pop

in for a chat at the dealership on the corner of Lenchen

South & Heuwel road, Centurion, Gauteng or give him a call

on 012 663 8718.

Beat The Cold Or Make A

Withdrawal At The Bank

With Oxfords Balaclava…

Oxford has introduced a comprehensive range of under

garments for the new season one of which includes a Deluxe

Micro Fibre Balaclava.

This Balaclava which is made with Micro Fibre material to allow

the comfort without cold or perspiration on the body also has

flat lock seams and a four directional stretch to ensure perfect

fit. The design of the balaclava incorporates a long sculpted

pattern at the front and rear and has extra ventilation pockets

for the nose and mouth. Priced at around R225 RRP we think it

will be a good choice for riders and pillions. At dealers all over,,,

distributed by


ought to you by

World of Motorcycles

Grand Opening

Last month we brought you all the info about the

new Ducati importer. We went along to the grand

launch of the very impressive store in Centurion.

Wow! Amazing! This was sent through to us:

Ducati has a new distributor in South Africa and

has moved in brand new and huge premises in

Centurion in the same complex as Bavarian BMW

and KTM Centurion. The new premises are called

The World of Motorcycles. It is a multi-level temple

to motorcycling housing Ducati SA on the main

floor and then Kawasaki Centurion, SYM Centurion

and Sherco Centurion as well as a bevy of very

clean pre-owned bikes on the upper levels.

Included on the main floor is a wondrous selection

of Ducati accessories, suits, clothing, boots,

helmets, gloves and a dedicated ‘Scrambler”

section. Moving up to the second and third floors

you will find all the top brand names of helmets,

gloves, suits, clothing and accessories, along with

a very friendly coffee shop out on the balcony. They

tell us that customer service and experience is at

the very heart of World of Motorcycles.

Jos Matthysen and Theunis de Bruin, the two men

behind the store really pushed the boat out for the

opening and all the big industry players stopped

in to congratulate them and marvel at their new

venture. We thank them for investing so boldly in

the motorcycle industry, it bodes well for the future.

Get down to Centurion Office Park, Akkerboom

Steet &, John Vorster Dr, Zwartkop, Centurion to

experience the World of Motorcycles for yourself.

Or give them a shout on 012 765 0600.

Herewith their official press release:

Any uncertainty that might have been felt with

the announcement that Ducati was once again

changing hands was firmly dispelled at the

beginning of June as Ducati South Africa’s new

showroom in Centurion opened in fine style. New

owner Jos Matthysen was there to introduce guests

to the new-look Ducati SA premises and impressed

everyone with his enthusiasm and commitment

to the iconic Italian brand. No less impressive are

the new showrooms at the World Of Motorcycles,

conveniently situated in Centurion, right next to the

John Vorster off-ramp on the N1. A brand such as

Ducati deserves something special and it now has

it. Spread over four levels, it is a self-contained hub

for everything Ducati; the full range of 2019 Ducati

models as well as a select choice of used models

and, for the first time, there will also be the full range

of Ducati apparel on sale, as well as apparel and

accessories from other major brands. The service

department is also fully operational and, with a full

inventory of spares, able to deal with any eventuality

on any model. In the off-chance that a spare isn’t

held in stock, it can be ordered and shipped within

three days. A brand is only as good as the people

that work there and Ducati SA has been fortunate

to retain all the key players from the previous

ownership. Sales are handled by Roy and Bruce

and the whole entity is kept running smoothly by

Bonitha. The workshop performs its surgery under

the watchful and skilled eye of Zoki, overseeing

a team of fully qualified Ducati technicians. Jos

is keen to make World of Motorcycles more than

just the home of Ducati SA; visiting must be an

experience and, to help that, there is Outlaws Pub

and Grub, serving excellent food and drink. A liquor

licence has been applied for, meaning that you

never actually have to leave the place from dawn to

dusk, if you don’t want to! World of Motorcycles will

happily look at any motorcycle as part exchange for

a new or used Ducati and will have a section of the

showroom devoted to the sales of these trade-ins.

But whether you’ll be able to look past the gleaming

Ducatis on offer is another matter. Should you wish

to try before you buy, there are demo rides available

for potential customers. Current demo units include

Panigale V4S, 950 Multistrada, Scrambler 1100,

Scrambler 800 Icon, Monster 797 and Monster 821

and there will be more demo models available in the

coming months. Tel: 012 765 0600

3 levels of motorcycle pleasure...

New home for Ducati SA

Sherco dirtbikes just waiting for new owners.

distributed by

8 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


GS TROPHY

SOUTH AFRICA 2019.

5-8 SEPTEMBER, DULLSTROOM, MPUMALANGA.

#SpiritofGS.

Visit gstrophy.co.za to find out more!


ought to you by

Wild West Enduro Track

revamped – and doing

boot repairs on site

The ever friendly Francois has recently spent

a good deal of cash and time on tarting up the

famous Wild West endure venue on the road out

to Harties. He has built new shade structures,

ablutions and laid a whole lot of new lawn under

the trees.

He recently hosted a bunch of people and live

streamed the Erzburg Enduro onto 3 brand new

TV’s in the new lapa - what a great initiative.

Most biker oriented pubs will air the SBK and

Moto GP races, but nobody that we are aware

will stream the big off-road races for their

customers, so -for next big event, we know

where we will be watching… come join us, the

refreshments are cold, the food fresh and hot

and it’s all ridiculously well priced.

Then Francois has another interesting initiative.

They now repair off road boots on site and say

that almost any boot in any condition can be

repaired at a reasonable price. Just leave your old

boots with them on your next visit and when you

go back again they will have been professionally

repaired and ready for you to wear again.

They also stock a wide variety of top branded

off road tyres, brake pads, mousse’s, tubes, fork

seals, oils, chains and sprockets and various

other bits and pieces with an onsite fitment

centre, so you can rock up fit new tyres, brake

pads, repair a puncture or etc and then head out

on your ride and when you get back you can run

your mount through their bike wash while having

a bite to eat and something to wet your whistle

to end your day in style.

Wild West: 084-773-0080

distributed by

McDonald the boot man in action...

10 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


BIG BOY’S ALL-NEW 2019

ROAMER 180F- NOW HERE!

Designed as a ‘mixed-use’ ATV, the Roamer is suited to both sport and utility riding,

although like other Big Boy and GoMoto ATVs in our

range, it’s not intended for MX-style racing.

R29,999.00

The Roamer features a fuel-efficient

including VAT

4-stroke motor with automatic CVT gearbox

(with reverse) and provides a smooth,

comfortable ride for riders 16 years and

older, whether on the track or trail.

Front and rear luggage racks are

standard for added carrying convenience

as well as twin headlights for after-dark

ATV action.

FARM BOSS 2, 1000cc R179,999.00

(2 & 4WD, HIGH & LOW RANGE, DIFF LOCK, TIPPING LOAD BIN)

UTILITY ATV 250

R52,999.00

(WITH TIPPING LOAD BIN)

GOMOTO ATV 150 R24,499.00, 250 R29,999.00

CRX110 R15,999.00

PUMA 110 R11,999.00

For the full scooter, motorcycle, ATV and commercial range visit: www.samotorcycles.co.za

IMPORTED AND DISTRIBUTED BY

Join Big Boy on

Prices include VAT and pre-delivery inspection only. Prices exclude licence, registration and any service costs unless specified. Prices are correct at the time of going to print and may

change without notice due to currency fluctuations or at dealers who are located in outer-lying areas. All advertised models are available at the time of going to print unless specified.


ought to you by

Laying down Rubber:

Bike Tyre Warehouse

wins both Pirelli and

Metzeler dealer awards.

Bike Tyre Warehouse, one of the largest motorcycle

tyre traders in Africa has won not one, but two

Dealer of the Year 2018 awards. The first from

KMSA for the Pirelli tyre brand and the second from

TI- Auto, importers of the Metzeler tyre brand. The

awards are given to the dealer that sells the most of

each brand.

To add a cherry to this cake, Bike Tyre Warehouse

also took the Runner Up Dealer of the Year 2018 for

SBS Brake pads, that is interesting because they

are more about tyres than brakes. Other notable

achievement is that Bike Tyre Warehouse was

also made the first Preferred Pirelli Partner Store in

Africa as well as Pirelli Test Division Italy’s Preferred

Technical Support South African Partner.

This is not surprising as Bike Tyre Warehouse

stocks as many as 3000 tyres on their premises at

any time, and very often moves more than 1000

tyres a month.

Bike Tyre Warehouse Group Holdings MD Bruce

de Kock commented on this success story: “It

was only achieved by consistently adhering to the

company’s mantra of #bestadvice #bestservice

#bestprice for every customer that has ridden a

motorcycle into the Bike Tyre Warehouse fitment

centre or a dealer/tyre trader purchasing bulk

product from BTW’s Trade Division.” More than

achieving success from various tyre brands, Bike

Tyre Warehouse also stocks their own Batt brand

that has been producing tyres for the ATV, off-road

and motocross market for years, plus has recently

added a range of road going tyres and slicks. De

Kock continues: “I would personally like to thank

each and every BTW loyalist for their support &

my professional team without them winning these

awards would not have been possible.”

Bike Tyre Warehouse Tel: 011 205 0216

Cell: 073 777 9269

Jacobs Annual Vision

Run: Fund raiser for the

guide dogs association.

Jacob’s annual vision run is here again and we are excited to

give you a brief overview of what this exciting day will hold!

This year’s event will be held on the 27th July 2019 at Plot

no 29 Hazel Rd, Benoni Agricultural Holdings. The gates

will open at 09:00 and a minimum donation of R50.00 per

person over the age of 13 will be required at the entrance

which will include a cloth badge and entrance into the

lucky draw.

We would like to invite you, the community and all our

generous sponsors to join in what is to be a day filled with

good spirit and an exhilarating journ

ey into the real understanding of Jacob’s Vision.

Jacob Kruger was in an accident 13 years ago, leaving

him 100% blind but, Jacob being Jacob, decided to

work around his blindness and show all visually impaired

people, the less fortunate and most of all any people who

do not understand, that “There are no limits other than

those which you apply to yourself”.

Jacob, an ambassador for the blind, thought, what

better way to demonstrate this vision than by getting on

a track bike at Redstar Raceway last year July 2018. He

Completed 5 laps around the track, with the help of his

all-seeing guide dog, Ian Howard who helped guide Jacob

on the basis of trust and sensory abilities ensuring Jacob’s

safety at all time.

This year, we are adding a slight twist to the events, always

keeping to Jacob’s dream of educating and enabling all

communities, through technology, human interaction and

positive awareness that anything is achievable if you are

equipped with the drive and knowledge on how to achieve

a goal. That means we will also be setting up a few different

kinds of challenges, where we will allow people to try

understand various forms of adaptation. Our “Biker Re-

Activation Programme”, works at helping some of our biker

brothers and sisters re-equip themselves with protective

gear, etc. when it can help them get “back in the saddle”.

There will be plenty of food stalls, novelty shops and large

amount of entertainment for adults and kids to interact with

Jacob. There will also be a fully equipped cash bar and

generous prizes will be handed out on the day.

Please join Jacob on his journey by donating and raising funds

for the event to be legendary yet again. All proceeds raised on

the day will go toward Guide Dogs SA & Jacob’s Vision.

Let’s understand what it means to see without sight and to

keep our community growing in the full positivity of dreams!

Please contact the Jacob’s Vision team should you have

any queries on 064 072 2007.

distributed by

12 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


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ought to you by

The 9th Annual de Wildt

Funduro 20th July:

Raising funds for the

Vissershoek Laerskool.

The Vissershoek Funduro originated nine years ago

out of very humble beginnings as part of a fund

raising project initiated by concerned parents. The

objective of the project was then and is still is; to

generate funds for additional projects to ensure

the smooth operations of the school. Originally the

project was purely focused on the welfare of the

school; the project however grew to also include

the welfare and development of the surrounding De

Wildt Communities.

Our community is situated at the foothills of the

well-known Magaliesberg mountain range, where

it forms the infamous Magalies mountain valley, of

which de Wildt forms the heart of the area. Just say

“de Wildt” to any Petrol Head and you have their

attention! It makes perfect sense to host an off road

event for bikes in these beautiful surroundings.

February 2011 saw the birth of the Vissershoek

Funduro. It started with two dads having a cold

drink, after the ward athletics hosted at our school.

They bounced the idea of some other dad’s and

soon a team was formed that would host the

Vissershoek Funduro for the school.

The hosting of the 1st De Wildt Funduro enabled

the organising committee to give much needed

attention to the boys and girls bathrooms at the

local school.

Fast forward to 2018

2018 saw us reaching even greater heights , with

527 riders! The Enduro cross section made the best

footage.

We are proud and thankful for the support

and sponsorships of well-known entities who

contributed generously towards our course. Every

year the De Wildt Funduro give back to charity and

the community so every year a different charity is

nominated for this.

From humble beginnings our community grew a

fundraising effort to a national event on the national

biking calendar.

quarries, with short sections of old farming roads

and ploughed fields to get some carbon out of the

system!

On the track there will be sections where riders will

be separated. The latter being the mild “Lemon and

Herb “route.

The Peri-Peri route. We are not sure why some

cry along the route, why others use foul language

and some arrange a meet and greet with Mother

Earth on this particular day. Jip some guys even

leave their lungs on the mountain . This route is for

the guys and girls that have guts of steel and the

willpower to be amongst the few that can say, “I

conquered the Peri- Peri in de Wildt“. The survivors

are rewarded with an annual finisher’s decal.

As We are using Race control for the time keeping

as well, you can use your race control tag. If you do

not have a race control tag, they will be available to

rent for the day.

Dirt And Trail Magazine will be there. Queries: Anton

du Plessis 082 574 0543

DE WILDT FUNDURO 2019

Going forward we are now ready to host the 9th de

Wildt Funduro!

We have changed the track for the 2019 event, to

make it even more technical and took it back to a

distance of +-57 kilometres, on a combined loop .

The track will have a gutsy mix of river beds,

mountain streams, rocky hills and some unused

distributed by

14 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


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W O R L D E N D U R O S U P E R S E R I E S

Husqvarna’s Jarvis claims

fifth Erzbergrodeo Red Bull

Hare Scramble victory

Britain’s Graham Jarvis claimed his fifth

victory at the Erzbergrodeo Red Bull Hare

Scramble on his 2020 Husky to boost his

World Enduro Super Series title chances.

Here is all you need to know:

- Delivering a clinical performance at

the 25th edition of the infamous Hard

Enduro race, the veteran Rockstar Energy

Husqvarna Factory Racing star showed the

lighties some new tricks as he led home

Germany’s Manuel Lettenbichler (KTM) by

just over two minutes and Sherco Factory

Racing’s Mario Roman of Spain.

- The world’s best Enduro riders were

among 1702 competitors (49 women) from

43 nations at the mining town of Eisenerz for

the four-day dirt bike festival.

- After two days of Blakläder Iron Road

Prologue, Josep Garcia (KTM) proved the

fastest of the 500 qualifiers for Sunday’s

Erzbergrodeo Red Bull Hare Scramble.

- From the depths of the Europe’s largest

iron ore quarry, competitors blasted off the

start for the 35km race with four hours to

complete the 27 checkpoints.

- Lettenbichler set the early pace, taking

over from Garcia and Briton Jonny Walker

(KTM), but the 21-year-old was soon joined

by the 44-year-old legend Jarvis.

- Jarvis broke clear to lead at the notorious

Carls Dinner section, while the Sherco

pairing of Roman and South African Wade

Young were locked in a battle for third.

- Lettenbichler, chasing his debut win, drew

level at Green Hell with four checkpoints to

go but Jarvis found another gear to secure a

record-equaling fifth victory.

18 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


- Sixteen competitors from seven nations

completed the Erzbergrodeo Red Bull

Hare Scramble, however Spain’s Laia Sanz

was not one of them despite a gutsy ride.

She stated that her goal was to be the

first woman to make it all the way to Karl’s

Dinner’s checkpoint. She accomplished

that, becoming the most successful female

competitor in the event..

- Jarvis said: “This feels amazing. I think

this could be the most important Erzberg

victory of my career. A lot of people were

talking about my age and, at 44, I did have

some doubts about my fitness for the full

race but I just kept my focus and kept

pushing.”

- Lettenbichler added: “I’m super happy to

finish second. When Graham passed me, I

did all I could to stay with him and got right

onto his rear wheel in Green Hell. If I’d have

got ahead of him there, well, who knows

what might have happened. From there to

the finish I gave everything, but I couldn’t

catch Graham.”

- Roman, 29, revealed: “So many riders

crashed in front of me on the first climb

after the start, so I just tried to be calm and

not make any crazy mistakes. After that I

started to find my rhythm, passing riders

one-by-one. To finish third is a great result.”

The FM18C will fit Dunlop

Motorcycle tyres 120/80 and all

90 and 100 series tyres.

• Designed exclusively for off-road competition,

the mousse insert replaces the inner tube

• Made up of a honeycomb structure

• Designed to prevent tyre deflation in case of

puncture caused by perforation, shock or pinching

GEOMAX MX-33 MX TYRE

• Soft terrain tyre, with an unusually wide scope

of application

• Optimized performance combined with improved

durability when used on intermediate terrain

• Enhanced traction/slide control through pattern

optimizing and new compound

• Better control and shock absorption thanks to a

redesigned casing construction

Jarvis and Lettenbichler

locked in battle...

GEOMAX AT81 CROSS COUNTRY

• AT81 rear tread block shape and distribution plus

DIRTuitive Grip Design (DGD) tread blocks help

the tyre penetrate down through the surface dirt

for extra traction across a broad range of off-road

applications

• Newly formulated high-wear-resistant rear tyre

compound offers enhanced chipping, tearing and

wear appearance

• Geomax AT81 RC (Reinforced Construction) rear

tyre carcass features four nylon plies

• Lateral grooves on the shoulder tread blocks

provide additional biting edges and also allow the

tread blocks to be more flexible

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 19


SOUTH AFRICANS

VS THE IRON

GIANT

By Laren Vd Westhuisen who was

at the event this year.

Too cool!

South Africans are used to extreme

challenges. Faced with the constant

adversity that seems to go with living

in Africa, taking on the huge Eisenerz

quarry is just like any other obstacle in

the path to moving forward.

As formidable as it is, and it really is,

South Africans have a great record

when it comes to facing off against

the Iron Giant. Starting as far back

as 1995, the mountain was first

conquered by a South African, Alfie

Cox. Since then, although no other

South African has won it, many South

Africans have managed to finish. You

might find it strange for me to refer to

finishing as a great success, however,

when you consider than only a

handful of the 500 starters make it

through all the checkpoints, crossing

the finish line is no small feat.

The 2019 edition was a really special

occasion. It is the 25th running

of the race that has now come to

define extreme enduro. In fact,

manufacturers have concentrated

entire sections of their development

around this crazy race. But, what

makes it so special?

If you have never had the opportunity

to witness the spectacle that is now

better known as the REDBULL

HARESCAMBLE, it is difficult to put

into words. The race itself is only four

Just dont look down...

Give us a hand... Blasuziak

and Walker.

Laia Sanz

Jarivs and his Husqvarna

team...

20 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Wade Young

Taddy.

AT81EX GUMMY REAR ENDURO

Ever wonder how EnduroCross riders manage

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with the all-new Geomax AT81 EX that features

even greater grip and performance.

The AT81 already has a championship-winning

record, scoring numerous titles in AMA National

Enduro competition, Grand National Cross

Country, and other series. The new AT81 EX was

built on the same winning tread pattern and

construction as the AT81, but adds ultra grippy

compounds to the equation.

Available in 110/100-18 rear size, the AT81 EX is

made for a wide variety of extreme conditions—

not just EnduroCross—and was developed with

the help of Cody Webb and Destry Abbott.

Webb, who used the new AT81 EX en route to

winning the 2017 EnduroCross title, had this to

say about the new tyre. “The AT81 EX has been

amazing and I was shocked how much better it

made my rear shock feel going over obstacles and

absorbing them. It’s great for trail riding and any

type of extreme terrain.”

“I can honestly say the AT81 EX is the best

advantage you could have to help you win races,”

said multi-time off-road champion Destry Abbott.

“I’m able to go up things I couldn’t with a regular

tyre, especially in rocky, slippery conditions. I’ve

been using it for EnduroCross racing and extreme

rides and it has helped me with my confidence too.”

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DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 21


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DUNLOP TYRES – PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY HENDERSON RACING PRODUCTS

W O R L D E N D U R O S U P E R S E R I E S

hours long, of which, unless you are lucky

enough to be in the race helicopter, you see

very little of. It is about the whole event. The

Rocket ride up the 60° slopes of the quarry,

the 6th gear pinned prologue that would

scare even the hardest TT racers, the crazy

campers and the even crazier parties.

Thousands of dirt bike fanatics cram into

one tiny town called Eisenerz. The spirit of

dirt biking unleashed in such a confined

area of Austria, makes for an energy-filled

experience 2nd to none.

The event kicks off with the ‘Raid on

Eisenerz’. This is where everyone who

entered the event, as well as all the officials,

medics and media, take to the streets of

the sleepy hollow that lies at the base of the

quarry. It is somewhat of a battle call, much

like the Kiwis doing the Haka. It wakes up

the Giant and makes him really angry and

he shows his displeasure by breaking riders

and bikes in the battle that follows.

Stepping away from fairy tales and back

to reality, the course for this year’s 25th

edition was longer and more hardcore than

previous versions.

26 checkpoints and over 20km long.

Notorious sections like Karl’s dinner and the

Green Hell were once again main features,

but many other new sections were thrown

in to catch the unsuspecting out. The proof

of its difficulty was in the results. While

23 finished in 2018, only 16 of the 500

starters made it across the line in 2019. This

included 2 South Africans, Wade Young and

Travis Teasdale. Not far behind them and

only 2 checkpoints from the end, were Blake

Gutzeit and Kyle Flanagan.

There were several other SA riders who

featured well, like Lloyd Kirk, Will Slater and

Barend Erasmus, supporting the fact that

riders from Africa have the metal to take on

this extreme race.

By now, you’ve all had a chance to scan

the results, so let’s continue the story of

why South Africans do so well. Well, you

have to be there in person to understand

the magnitude of this event and what I

witnessed, helped me to understand the

unusual success rate for our riders. I saw

a community that stuck together despite

their rivalry out on the trail. I saw a focus

and commitment that was missing from

many others who were only there for the

glitz of the prestigious event. I saw ‘alienlike’

determination in the sections that broke

many other riders. I saw two arch rivals,

Blake Gutzeit and Kyle Flanagan, helping

each other up the Green Hell. I saw riders

that believe in their ability, because they

have learnt from riders like Alfie Cox and

Darryl Curtis, who have done it all before. I

saw riders who understand what extreme

enduro is all about, thanks to the epic terrain

they race through in the Roof of Africa. I

Teasdale up Carls Diner

Blake Gutzeid

Proudly South African.

22 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


saw South African supporters scattered

across the mountain, screaming, pouring

water and encouraging our riders to push

on. But, most of all, I saw riders that have

had to sacrifice more than most to get

there. Riders who have emptied savings

accounts, begged and borrowed just

to get to the start line. When you have

given so much, strained relationships,

businesses, you only have one option and

that is to also throw in your soul.

It was the dogged, stubborn resilience

of riders who knew that they only have

one shot to impress. That’s what stood

out for me. That’s why South Africans

are so respected by the knowledgeable

spectators and media in Europe. That’s

why the colourful South African flag

features in the results of the toughest races

in the world.

No doubt, I will come across many more

South African riders throughout the WESS

series and am sure I will witness the same

spirit, yielding the same results. Now

that so many riders have paved the way

for others, their expectations will always

remain high. They will sit on the start line

with nothing less than the intent to finish

and to finish strong. And, if you have

passed your extreme riding days, make

every effort to get to one these events as

a spectator, and be one of the many that

take to the hills to ensure our boys feel the

African spirit wherever they go.

2019 Erzbergrodeo results:

2019 ERZBERG

1. Graham Jarvis (Hus)

2. Manuel Lettenbichler (KTM)

3. Mario Roman (Sherco)

4. Alfredo Gomez (Hus)

5. Wade Young (Sherco)

6. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM)

7. Billy Bolt (Hus)

8. Jonny Walker (KTM)

9. Pol Tarres (KTM)

10. Travis Teasdale (KTM)

World Enduro Super Series after round 3 of 8

1. Manuel Lettenbichler (KTM – GER) 1960 pts

2. Mario Roman (Sherco – ESP) 1770 pts

3. Graham Jarvis (Husqvarna – GBR) 1690 pts

4. Josep Garcia (KTM – ESP) 1665 pts

5. Jonny Walker (KTM – GBR) 1520 pts

6. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna – GBR) 1465 pts

7. Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna – ESP) 1464 pts

8. Wade Young (Sherco – RSA) 1460 pts

9. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM – POL) 1370 pts

10. Nathan Watson (KTM – GBR) 1271 pts

Lloyd Kirk

A very tired Pongola

Boytjie Barend Erasmus.

Flanagan gets some

love...

The FM18C will fit Dunlop

Motorcycle tyres 120/80 and all

90 and 100 series tyres.

• Designed exclusively for off-road competition,

the mousse insert replaces the inner tube

• Made up of a honeycomb structure

• Designed to prevent tyre deflation in case of

puncture caused by perforation, shock or pinching

GEOMAX MX-33 MX TYRE

• Soft terrain tyre, with an unusually wide scope

of application

• Optimized performance combined with improved

durability when used on intermediate terrain

• Enhanced traction/slide control through pattern

optimizing and new compound

• Better control and shock absorption thanks to a

redesigned casing construction

GEOMAX AT81 CROSS COUNTRY

• AT81 rear tread block shape and distribution plus

DIRTuitive Grip Design (DGD) tread blocks help

the tyre penetrate down through the surface dirt

for extra traction across a broad range of off-road

applications

• Newly formulated high-wear-resistant rear tyre

compound offers enhanced chipping, tearing and

wear appearance

• Geomax AT81 RC (Reinforced Construction) rear

tyre carcass features four nylon plies

• Lateral grooves on the shoulder tread blocks

provide additional biting edges and also allow the

tread blocks to be more flexible

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 23


WORLD LAUNCH TEST: YAMAHA TÉNÉRÉ 700

24 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


The Euro-Spec Adventure Motorcycle.

Yamaha’s T7 has been launched abroad to quite a lot of praise. Jess Mckinley send

us some thoughts. It will be great to finally see this bike in SA… Hopefully soon.

Photography by Jonathan Godin and Francesc Montero

Three years after we first salivated

over spy photos of the blacked-out T7

prototype, Jess got to ride the all-new 2020

Yamaha Ténéré 700—the first Japanese

manufacturer to join the middleweight

adventure bike fray. For the last few years,

the options for purchasing a modern midsized

adventure motorcycle were somewhat

limited to the Triumph Tiger 800 XCa and

the BMW F 850 GS, augmented only

recently by the KTM 790 Adventure and

Adventure R.

The battle for supremacy in the mid-size

adventure motorcycle segment is heating

up, and for a good reason. The sporty

middleweight bikes are proving themselves

to be the go-to choice for riders who

want to tackle more challenging off-road

conditions and still have the ability to burn

up the tarmac.

We tested the European-spec Ténéré

700 which is the bike that you guys will

receive in South Africa.

I’ll keep things quite simple - after more

than 300 miles of dusty gravel roads,

two-track forest trails, and windy mountain

passes in Spain’s Catalan countryside, I’ve

put together 30 Fast Facts that you need

to know about the all-new 2020 Yamaha

Ténéré 700.

1. The 2020 Yamaha 700 Ténéré is not a

downsized Super Ténéré, but an entirely

new mid-sized adventure platform designed

for off-road capability. Yamaha wiped the

slate clean and leaned heavily on its rally

racing experience to develop a svelte

39-pound high-tensile-steel frame that

balances rigidity and flex.

2. Yamaha in Europe doesn’t

characterize the Ténéré 700 as an

adventure bike. Instead, it uses the term

“Rally-bred Dual Sport” to define the Ténéré

700 and hypes the focus towards purity,

toughness, and the bare essentials.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 25


3. Yamaha utilized its design team in Italy to craft the

Ténéré 700, incorporating feedback from rally raid racers.

The European-spec motorcycle is built in France, while the

North American model will be manufactured in Japan. This

Euro-centric design approach and split manufacturing may

explain the year-long lag between the European version’s

debut and the North American edition.

4. Rally-inspired design aesthetic and styling leaves

no doubt to the intended purpose. With four piercing LED

headlights, an up-front minimalist fly screen, and a lowslung

raspy exhaust system, the Ténéré 700 is a striking

departure from the adventure styling of its rivals.

5. Back to the future—Yamaha takes a “no gimmicks”

approach to electronic rider aids. The 2020 Yamaha

Ténéré 700 sets itself apart from its rivals in the space

by eschewing ride modes, traction control, and even

cruise control, in favor of simplicity and go-anywhere

maintainability. However, it does have ABS.

6. The vertically mounted LCD instrument cluster

allows the rider to scan information at a glance without

looking down. The dash is not TFT, though meters all

of the essentials, including trip information and current

and average fuel consumption. Just as cool is the

accessory bar above the LCD panel designed to mount

a smartphone, GPS, or a rally roadbook. A standard 12v

socket is conveniently located to power it all—you will

need an adapter if your component uses USB.

7. The 689cc Crossplane twin (CP2) is an absolute

treat. On paper, 72 horsepower at 9000 rpm and 50 ft/

lbs of torque at 6500 rpm are not necessarily mindblowing.

However, in the saddle, the CP2 engine is a

bona fide smile-maker. With plenty of wheel-lofting power

in first through third gears, plus a robust linear pull with

outstanding over-rev, the CP2 engine is a standout feature

of the 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700.

8. The CP2 engine of the Yamaha MT-07 and the

Ténéré 700 are identical. The Yamaha Ténéré engineers

created different fuel injection mappings, aspiration,

exhaust, cooling systems, and final drive ratio to

optimize torque and throttle response for off-road

use. Mechanically, the engine and transmission are

interchangeable.

9. Yamaha claims the CP2 engine to be the most

reliable motorcycle engine on the market. These are big

words, and Yamaha doesn’t just point to its own statistics.

Instead, Yamaha claims third-party published data in

Germany puts the CP2 power plant of the Yamaha MT-07

at the top of the reliability list.

10. The Ténéré 700 integrates rubber anti-vibration

inserts into the foot pegs, but you won’t need them.

The CP2 engine is free-revving and virtually vibration

free, lessening road and trail fatigue and increasing rider

comfort. Of course, you can always reinsert the rubber

dampers if you like a squishier ride. No tools are necessary

for removal or installation.

26 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


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11. Initial off-idle roll-on of the throttle can be a bit

grabby. A combination of fueling and drivetrain lash makes

the initial crack of the throttle a little jerky. It is especially

noticeable on the tarmac when tooling around town—

rolling off and then reapplying the throttle results in a small

but abrupt jerk. It’s not a big issue, but I found myself using

a light finger on the clutch to smooth things out.

12. The syncopated thump of the 270-degree crossplane

crankshaft is complete auditory bliss. Not only does

the 270-/450-degree firing order reduce inertial torque for

a smooth and tractable power delivery, but the low rpm

growl is formidable. It grows to a howling scream as the

revs near the limit — a fitting soundtrack to any adventure

or personal rally raid.

13. The 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700’s six-speed gearbox

shifts nicely and has no noticeable gaps. This is critical for a

motorcycle designed to chug over nasty terrain in first gear

and then later expected to pass traffic on the open highway.

Credit certainly goes to the pulling power of the CP2 engine,

as it persists regardless of what gear it’s in. I could easily

use second gear for a low-speed dirt switchback, and sixth

gear was the perfect high-speed overdrive.

14. Surprisingly, it uses the MT-07’s street-going internal

ratios—only the final drive ratio was changed. The MT-07

uses a 16/43 sprocket combo, and the Ténéré 700 lowers

that using a 15/46 set—about nine percent lower.

15. Handling is quick, and it is easy to flick the 2020

Yamaha Ténéré 700 side-to-side on twisty tarmac, yet it

remains stable at speed. 21-inch front wheels are celebrated

for their off-road capabilities, but are notorious for having a

slow turn-in feel while railing the tarmac. That is not the case

with the Ténéré 700. The short length of the CP2 engine,

thanks to a vertically stacked gearbox, reduces the overall

wheelbase and centralizes mass, allowing for quick and

precise handling. As a result, the motorcycle responds to

peg-pressure inputs from the rider’s feet, with performance

increasing as the fuel load decreases.

16. Fully adjustable KYB suspension is featured on

the 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700. The 43mm open-cartridge

fork accommodates over eight inches of travel. The fork

includes bleeder valves on the endcaps to relieve pressure

built up from use and changes in altitude. The shock

is also fully adjustable, providing nearly eight inches of

travel, and has a handy knob for quick spring-preload

adjustments. A flat-blade screwdriver is all that is needed

to adjust compression and rebound damping.

17. The suspension feel is best characterized as

Adventure firm and Rally soft. The suspension soaks up

trail chop and road undulations comfortably, and the overall

action is consistent and balanced front-to-rear. It is ideal for

your typical adventure ride and spirited off-road riding.

18. A balanced feel makes jumping embedded rocks

and water bars on the Ténéré 700 a fun experience. The

engineers designed a 48-/52-percent front/rear weight

bias measured with a full fuel tank, to facilitate lofting the

front end over off-road obstacles. Bear in mind though

that with the stock springs and suspension settings, any

28 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


20 July 2019


sliding down the road or trail on its side.

At every new off-road capable motorcycle

launch, several bikes are inevitably

wadded up. I witnessed some marks in

the pavement and the resulting aftermath.

The Ténéré 700 is one tough customer.

A few scratches and perhaps a broken

lever—maybe even forks that need to be

realigned in the triple clamps—but nothing

that’s going to halt the adventure.

air over a foot or two will result in using

up all of the available suspension stroke.

That conveniently allows the rider to selfregulate

off-road speed and not get too

throttle happy.

19. The cable-actuated clutch has a

light pull. I always covered the clutch to

smooth the off-idle hit and control any

rear wheel slide when railing the engine

on twisty tarmac. I was impressed with

the feedback and feel of the clutch, and I

never noticed any fading.

20. The stock Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR

rubber has a large block design that is a

good compromise between road and dirt,

though it lacks the off-road performance

of a full knobby tyre. Nothing works

better in the dirt and gravel than a full

knobby tyre. The extra bite of a knobby

is appreciated in low-grip situations,

especially in the absence of electronic

off-road ABS or traction control systems.

These tyres are great!

21. Lightweight Brembo brake calipers

matched to 282mm wave rotors provide

adequate street braking performance up

front. Yamaha designed the front brake

system to have a soft engagement. On the

dirt, the slow initial bite is very forgiving, so

I never really feltl like I was going to tuck

the front in corners while on the brakes.

I prefer strong brakes with a nice initial

grasp, so I was a bit disappointed at the

amount of front brake lever pull I need for

fast-paced tarmac riding.

22. The nearly-binary action of the

245mm rear brake and Brembo caliper

worked well for steering with the back

end, but not necessarily for slowing

the bike down. Applying the rear brake

while setting up for a turn in low-grip dirt

conditions instantly initiates a slide from

the blocky Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR rear

tyre, without necessarily slowing down

the bike. This aids in getting the back

end around the turn, but it also requires

modulating the throttle and front brake to

complete the slide and power through the

apex. With a full knobby tyre mounted up,

this would likely be less of an issue. ABS

helps mask the problem on tar.

23. The Ténéré 700 has switchable

ABS, a first for a production Yamaha. The

rider can switch ABS off or on, but only

while stopped with the engine running.

Turning off the engine with the key or kill

switch re-engages the ABS the next time

the motor is started. An easy workaround

to avoid all the button pressing on the trail

is to purposefully stall the bike when you

want to stop for a bit, keeping the ABS

defeated.

24. With a 16 litre fuel tank, range is

somewhere around 320 KM.

25. The standard seat is 34.6 inches

high, which is not too much for my 30-inch

inseam. The stock seat is fairly narrow in

the front, facilitating access to the ground

and providing a very comfortable knee

angle while seated. A lower seat and

suspension link are available to reduce

the seat height to 33 inches. A taller seat

option is available, as well.

26. With a claimed curb weight of 205

KG’s, the 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700 may

be the lightest bike in its class. We would

have to weigh each bike ourselves to

prove this out, but suffice it to say that

the “no gimmicks” ethos of the Yamaha

engineers has produced a lightweight

motorcycle designed to go the distance.

27. The 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700

holds up exceptionally well, even when

28. Servicing the Ténéré 700 is a

convenient, yet infrequent, exercise.

Engine valves should be checked every

40000 KM’s while the oil should be

changed every 10000KM’s. With the

removal of the aluminum skidplate, the oil

drain plug and filter are easily accessible.

Likewise, the paper air filter element

is located under the seat and can be

swapped on the trail using the onboard

hex key. If you ride off-road much, you will

want to source a washable and reusable

oil-foam filter.

29. I rode the Competition White version

in the test. Power Black and Ceramic Ice

are available in Europe, as well.

30. The 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700 is

a unique motorcycle in its class. Given

Yamaha’s push to place it in the rally raid

category, the Ténéré 700 has no direct

competitors. In the meantime, we will put

it in the ADV category out of convenience,

and we suspect that our comparisons

to competing sub-liter ADV machines

will be about placing each motorcycle

in the market, rather than picking

absolute winners. However, on its own

the 2020 Yamaha Ténéré 700 certainly is

impressive.

C’mon Yamaha, get them here, we

want to ride em!!

www.yamaha.co.za

30 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Adventure Company ride updates for the rest of 2019.

Come and join the fun! Dirtbikes, Quads and SXS all welcome!

Come and see beautiful South Africa.

Very social, no racing just Lekker Lekker!

“Thanks to you and the whole Adventure Company team for a really

lekker weekend. It was the both the toughest but also the most enjoyable

days riding my boy and I have had to date.

The hotel was really great with very friendly staff, food was terrific

and of course the riding was fantastic. The special attention you give to

everyone is really very special. The main reason we got involved in dirt

biking is because of you and your company.”

Looking forward to riding with you guys again in the near future.

Regards, and thanks again.

Brad & Noah Mace (6 Days KTM & Husky)

Great year so far! Whats on the menu for the balance?

13th July: We’ll host a day ride out Cullinan side. Always lekker, lots of

mountains, rivers quarries... lekker day out and the facilities are great!

8th August: Long weekend: Black mountain in Thaba N’chu.

Been a long time suince we did this one - awesome hotel, and two days

of great riding. Mountains on day 1. Riverbeds on day 2. Too cool. All

welcome.

August 24th: Day Ride out Nigel side. Always lekker!

21st September: Jhb 2 Richards bay in the dirt. Riding for a cause!

Kicks off 21st September: Lands in Richards Bay on the 24th.

Four days of amazing riding, such a cool adventure raising funds for QASA.

Technical sections: Last year we made the ride quite a bit tougher. The

tough sections stay - BUT:

For 2019, we have found a route that avoids the technical section at the

halfway mark - so this year - technical riders you are in for a treat -

chilled riders, you’ll have an alternative - all marked.

Bookings and the event proposal for any fund raising all available please

drop us an email. All Welcome!

26th October: Donga dash day ride in Greylingstad. We should avoid

flooding and we have extra farms to ride in the mountains.

It’s going to be GR8!

In November we’ll host a day ride Details for that go out soon.

Then it’s time for the Sunfields Ride – we’ll send details on that as soon

as it’s all confirmed and sorted.

Any queries please get in touch!

foleyg@mweb.co.za, anette.acc@mweb.co.za

083 314 2203 / 072 177 0621 / 082 870 6134

www.adventurecompany.co.za


FIRST RIDE: KYMCO UXV 700I EPS 4X4

32 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


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LOADED

THE NEW KYMCO UXV 700I EPS 4X4

We’ve been threatening to get our hands onto this

Side By Side for the last few issues – and at long

last we managed to get it right. We spent a full

weekend on it and put the newcomer through its

paces – not just like you do at a launch, but in real

world situations… We are impressed. Read on.

We collected the bikes from the new Linex dealership in Lynwood Road,

Pretoria East. If you are a Yamaha or Kymco fan, you need to get down there

to have a looksee. Dirtbikes, Quads, Side by sides, watercraft, Adventure

machines, boats, jet-ski’s and a range of accessories that will make your

eyeballs wobble.

We loaded the Kymco onto our trailer – it is pretty big, but not quite as big

as some of the American brands out there. You will need a fairly large trailer

– or if, like us, you own a Hyundai H100, it fits snugly on the back.

Sean has covered all the launch features, so this was the first time that

the rest of us got to actually check the product out properly. The impression

is one of quality, from the hand stitched seats to the welds on the roll bars

and the silver plastics –very neat and comparable with any high end unit on

the market.

It’s been a while since we had a side by at the offices, so the kids were

soon clamoring for us to take it out on the trails – in between studying

for exams, so mom had a lot of say in terms of when we could go riding.

The moment she gave the go-ahead, cameras were grabbed, helmets

popped on and we trundled out of the gates to the petrol station to much

amusement from the pomp Tjokkie. R200 gave us an almost full tank as

displayed on the digital odometer and it was out into the farmlands for a bit

of fun…

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 33


Cool mag wheels shod in high end Kenda Rubber.

Simple gear selection.

Well appointed, spacious cockpit with asfety

nets for your feet.

long travel suspension all round. Check the need

boot under the bonnet.

The dash is neat and easily legible.

Power, Performance, Handling:

Tick all of the boxes, the 700 is a wellproduced

machine. We have such a lekker

mixup of terrain right here where we can

put a machine like this properly through

its paces, and there was nowhere that we

thought we might come unstuck. Power

on the open roads is great with flawless

acceleration up to a top speed at the 85kph

mark. But that is only a small part of the

whole. We have a couple of giant hills where

we test the climbing abilities. Stop, engage

low range, 4wd and creep. That 700 mill

makes big power without spinning all over

the place – and the high end Kenda tyres

seek every bit of traction. Ground clearance

is spot-on we did not manage to graunch

her on anything along our route.

We’ve also got a tight motocrossy type

quarry just down the road, lots of twists

and turns, small jumps and whoops and

we nailed it through that. The wide stance

of the Kymco combined with excellent

independent suspension on all four corners

kept things very stable and offered the

passengers a really comfortable ride.

Speaking of occupants, the cab is really

well appointed. The sporty seats are roomy

and comfortable holding you tight on the

odd occasion that you do get airborne or off

camber. The passenger gets complimentary

oh Sh…. Handles to cling to when things

get exciting – and safety nets are a standard

feature. The steering wheel is small and

sporty, with very light feedback and controls

are all simply actuated by the driver.

Don’t tell anyone – but both kids had a

go and the simple operation makes this a

very safe vehicle to practice in before dad

lets them drive the family panelvan.

Short legs? No problem, the drivers seat

is adjustable, so if mom is little, she can

34 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Official

YAMAHA

Dealer

LINEX LYNNWOOD

2019 YZ250F

JUST ARRIVED!

NOW

OPEN!

2019 YAMAHA YZ250F

For 2019 season Yamaha introduce the all-new YZ250F, the most sophisticated model in its class. Featuring

a newly designed high-performance electric start engine and an agile new chassis, this state of the art 250cc

4-stroke opens up a new era in wireless connectivity and trackside tuneability with its Yamaha Power Tuner

smartphone app.

Come visit our MASSIVE new Dealership in Pretoria East featuring:

//VR46 shop //Plenty of accessories //Yamaha bike stock //Yamaha marine

New 2019 models now available at LINEX

10 hours of race prep plus a Linex riding jersey free with every new motocross and enduro bike

Terms and conditions apply.

2019 Yamaha YZ85

NEW MODEL

2019 Yamaha YZ250F

NEW MODEL

WE ALSO STOCK THE FULL RANGE OF

KYMCO SCOOTERS, SXS’S & QUADS.

2019 Yamaha YZ450F

NEW MODEL

UXV 700i EPS 4x4

Tel: 012 501 0120 / Email: gerhardm@linex.co.za or paulk@linex.co.za

www.linex.co.za Address: 220 The · +27 Highway 11 251 st, 4000 cnr Simon · Facebook: Vermooten Linex & Yamaha Lynwood · Instagram: roads, die Wilgers, @linex_yamaha Pretoria East, 0184

Address: Cnr Malibongwe Dr & Tungsten Rd, Strijdom Park, Randburg

LINEX LYNNWOOD


easily pop down to the barn to feed the animals on that

chilly winters morning.

From a utility point of view, this is one of the best

designs we’ve seen yet. The big bak at the back, along

with the cubby crannies up front are all pretty standard

features on any utility. The loadbed opens and tips and all

that, but Kymco has very cleverly used the space under

the front bonnet to give you a huge utility box that accepts

big stuff like helmets. You can also mount a towbar and

this one is rated to pull 550KG’s.

Nice! Good thinking.

Conclusions

The overall feeling about this brand is one of quality that is

comparable with any of the more mainline brands on the

market. The 700 is powerful, nippy, fun to drive and also

incredibly versatile. It is fast enough to get you from one

side of your farm to the other much quicker than you can

get there in your bakkie – because you can take lots of

shortcuts and let the suspension do all the hard work.

If you are in the market for a utility Side By side, it’s well

worth your consideration…

R169950.00

This one from Linex Lifestyle Centre in Lynwood (012)

501-0120

www.kymco.co.za

The Kymco is also a perfect workhorse

In 4wd, low range, she climbs beautifully.

36 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Come and join the fun!

JHB 2 Richards Bay in the dirt.

Dirtbikes, quads and Side By Sides all welcome!

4 days of fantastic fun for a great cause.

Kicks off 21st September 2019

Raising funds for the QuadPara

Association of SA (QASA).

Courier Services

www.wandersheim.co.za

BOOK NOW!

www.adventurecompany.co.za

083 314 2203 / 072 177 0621 / 082 870 6134


Pull out

Valid from 1st July to 31st August 2019

The HJC RPHA 11 builds upon the hugely successful RPHA 10, creating an even more

finely tuned helmet for sport and track-day enthusiasts. • Optimized shell design for

outstanding air flow ventilation system. • RapidFire Shield Replacement System:

Simple and secure shield ratchet system provides ultra-quick, tool-less removal

and installation for efficient operations. • Aerodynamic shell structure for extreme

performance at maximum speeds. • Emergency Kit (Cheek Pads) for safe and quick

rescue in emergency situation.

RPHA-11

CRUTCHLOW

REPLICA

RPHA-11

IANNONE

REPLICA

PRODUCTS DISPLAYED MAY VARY. E&OE

RPHA-11

SCONA

ARRIVING

JULY 2019. CALL YOUR NEAREST DEALER FOR PRICING & AVAILABILITY.


i-50

PRICE

R2995

each

i-50

FURY

i-50

ARGOS

i-50

PRICE

R2995

each

i-50

TONA

PRICE

R2995

The new HJC i50 features an advanced Polycarbonate shell : Lightweight, Superior fit and comfort using advanced CAD technology. Extended eyeport

provides maximum visibility and enhanced safety. A perfect goggle fit shell design: dual positions for goggle band to provide comfort and perfect

goggle fitment. Superior ventilation: 9 intakes, 4 exhaust ventilation channels to keep head cool and comfortable. Spacious chin area enables rider to

breathe comfortably. Especially relevant is the SLID (Sliding Layer Impact Distribution) Softens impact effectively and manages multi-directional shock.

i-50

each

PRODUCTS DISPLAYED MAY VARY. E&OE

CS-MX II

PRICE

R1795

each

CL-XY

PRICE

R1795

each

CL-XY II

PRICE

R1795

each

CS-MX II

MADAX

CS-MX II

PRICE

R1795

each

CS-MX II

DAKOTA

CL-XY

ARGOS

CL-XY II

BATOR

IS-MAX II

PRICE

R3495

each

CL-SP

PRICE

R3199

each

IS-MAX II

CORMI

IS-MAX II

PRICE

R3195

each

IS-MAX II

MATT BLACK & WHITE

3xl & 4xl

sizes

CL-SP

SOLID BLACK

CS-15

For riders who

prioritise comfort

and high performance

features as well as

for those who seek

design and a good

quality-price ratio.

CS-15

PRICE

R1795

each

CS-15 REBEL

CS-15

PRICE

R1795

each

CS-15 RAFU

CS-15

PRICE

R1795

each

FAREN

CS-15 FAREN

CS-15 TRION

CS-15

PRICE

R1795

each

CS-15

CS-15

PRICE

R1995

each

ELIAS REPLICA


SPARES & ACCESSORIES

TOP

BOXES

VARIOUS

STYLES

FROM

R999.00

BAR ENDS

VARIOUS COLOURS

FROM R79.00

GRIPS

MOTORCYCLE GRIPS

FROM R60.00

HANDGUARDS

VARIOUS COLOURS

ALLOY & PLASTIC

FROM R479.00

HANDLE BARS

VARIOUS STYLES AVAILABLE

FROM R255.00

THROTTLES

VARIOUS STYLES AVAILABLE

FROM R219.00

PRODUCTS DISPLAYED MAY VARY. E&OE

LEVERS

KTM HUSQVARNA

HONDA/SUZUKI/YAMAHA

REPLACMENT LEVERS

FROM R59.00

MIRRORS

VARIOUS STYLES AVAILABLE

FROM R139.00

INDICATORS

VARIOUS STYLES AVAILABLE

FROM R99.00

LICENCE

HOLDERS

VARIOUS COLOURS

FROM R169.00

TIE DOWNS

VARIOUS COLOURS

FROM R179.00

AIR FILTERS

SIZES FROM 28MM TO 60MM

FROM R129.00

FUEL

FILTERS

IN LINE FUEL FILTERS

FROM R20.00

TYRE

VALVES

VARIOUS ALUMINIUM

FROM R42.00

SMART BATTERY

CHARGES

FROM R899.00

260PSI

MINI AIR

COMPRESSOR

ONLY R179.00


K&N Style Filters

Available sizes 28, 35, 39, 42, 48,

52, 54 and 60mm R125.00

8000Ma

Jump Starter & Power Bank R1299.00

18L / min

RAC610 Inflator R449.00 RTG5 Gauge R249.00

SPARES & ACCESSORIES

DESCRIPTION PART NO. SRP Inc. Vat

SMART CHARGER 1 AMP DFC150 R599.00

SMART CHARGER 3.5 AMP DFC530 R899.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSA004 R999.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSA008 R1349.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSD004 R1199.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSD008 R1499.00

RAIN SUIT

AVAILABLE IN

S TO XXL

ONLY R999.00

R110.00 R465.00

Tubeless Puncture Kits

License Disc Holders

R168.00

Bar Ends

R100.00

Bike and ATV Covers

Available sizes S - XL

From R270.00

RING 12V AIR

COMPRESSOR

Hand Guards

Various Colours available

ABS Plastic R470.00

Alloy R990.00

Scooter V Belts

From R110.00

ONLY R495.00

Ring Globes

H7 150% Power R330.00

H4 150% Power R290.00

Rim Locks Front and Rear

From R48.00

JERRY CAN

FROM R599.00

VARIOUS ALUMINIUM JT

OFF-ROAD SPROCKETS

KTM / HUSQVARNA Tyre Levers / YAMAHA

ONLY R649.00

From R95.00

Jerry Cans

From R450.00

Fork Boots

from R120.00

PBA DEALER LISTING

PBA DEALER LISTING

RING TYRE

PRESSURE

GAUGE

ONLY R299.00

EMGO Top Box

R990.00

RING XENON

GLOBES

150% PLUS POWER

FROM R288.00

PART NO. DESCRIPTION PRICE

50081406/L SCOOTER CARB CLEANER 400ML BELTS 50.00

50201414/L FROM TERMINAL PROTECT R114.00 RED 50.00

50201415/L TERMINAL PROTECT BLUE 50.00

50320400/L BRK,CLTCH,CHAIN CLEANER 44.00

50500192/L CHAIN LUBE 150ML 34.00

50500193/L CHAIN LUBE 400ML 69.00

50510403/L CHAIN WAX 400ML 71.00

50510404/L CHAIN WAX 150ML 34.00

51528262/L PETROL INJECTOR CLEANER 10.00

53203200/L AIR FILTER SPRAY 55.00

53203500/L AIR FILTER OIL 500ML 55.00

53204005/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 5l 325.00

53204400/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 400ML 47.00

53780300/L SPARK 300ML 44.00

55000314/L TYRE FIX 200ML 45.00

56000001/L FORK OIL SYN 5W 125.00

56000002/L FORK OIL SYN 10W 125.00

56000003/L FORK OIL SYN 2.5W 135.00

56000400/L MOUSSE LUBRICANT 100.00

PRODUCTS DISPLAYED MAY VARY. E&OE

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS GAUTENG MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ZEEMANS ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES 012 011 435 342 7177 7474

FAST BIKING KTM ACCESSORIES 011 012 867 342 0092 7474

GAME FAST KTM MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 867 7000 0092

MOTO-MATE GAME MOTOR RIVONIA SERVICES 011 234 849 5275 7000

MOTO-MATE EDENVALE RIVONIA 011 234 027 5275 0545

MOTO-MATE KCR MOTORCYCLE EDENVALE FANATIX 011 975 027 5405 0545

PRIMROSE JUST BIKING MOTORCYCLES 011 016 828 421 9091 1153

RANDBURG KCR MOTORCYCLE MOTORCYCLES FANATIX 011 792 975 6829 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

MPUMALANGA

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES

BIKE CITY

011 792 6829

013 244 2143

MPUMALANGA

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143

NORTHWEST

BIKERS NORTHWEST PARADISE 018 297 4700

INSANE BIKERS PARADISE BIKERS 014 018 594 297 2111 4700

MOTOS INSANE @ BIKERS KLERKSDORP 018 014 468 594 1800 2111

WATER MOTOS RITE @ KLERKSDORP MOTORCYCLES 018 771 468 5050 1800

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES LIMPOPO

015 297 3291

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

PERRY’S M/CYCLES BALITO 031 110 0056

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

RIDE PERRY HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA GLEN ANIL 035 031 789 566 1851 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

CAPE PERRY’S PROVINCE M/CYCLES HILLCREST

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT

031 765 2560

021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC CAPE PROVINCE BELVILLE 021 945 3724

TRAC-MAC CRAIGS M/CYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND FITMENT 021 510 939 2258 8944

TRAC-MAC WYNBURG

BELVILLE 021 761 945 4220 3724

NEVES TRAC-MAC MOTORCYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND WORLD CC 021 930 510 5917 2258

WICKED TRAC-MAC CYCLES WYNBURG 021 510 761 2968 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES FREESTATE MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC

SALLEYS YAMAHA

FREESTATE

021 930 5917

051 430 3326

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326


2020 HONDA

CRF450 RWE


What’s happening in 2020?

A look at some of the new models we can expect… It’s going to be a FANTASTIC year!

Being in the tail end of the world, we kinda tend to get some of the models a bit later

than other parts of the globe… so we have lots to look forward to!

Watch this space as the bikes start arriving…

2020 YAMAHA OFF-ROAD YZ125X, YZ250X, YZ250FX, YZ450FX,

THE T7 HAS BEEN LAUNCHED IN EUROPE –

AND… IS THERE A 500 TWO-STROKE IN THE PIPELINE?

2020 YAMAHA CROSS-COUNTRY MODELS

Here is the lineup of 2020 cross-country Yamaha

motorcycles specially designed for Hare

Scrambles and Grand National Cross-Country

(GNCC) races, including the newly redesigned

YZ250FX.

“Yamaha’s cross-country lineup builds on the

unmatched success of our motocross designs,

using industry leading technology to provide

uncompromised performance for the tight,

technical terrain of Hare Scramble and GNCC

racing,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s motorsports

marketing manager. “With the YZ125X and newly

redesigned YZ250FX, Yamaha offers more variety

to meet the demands of cross- country racers and

enthusiasts alike.”

Also returning to Yamaha’s 2020 cross-country

lineup is the two-stroke YZ250X, and four-stroke

YZ450FX, translating Yamaha’s YZ450F flagship

motocross performance to the woods with crosscountry

enhancements.

The 2020 YZ125X

This one is designed to be the perfect step

up to a full-size cross-country machine.

The Yamaha YZ125X is optimized for the

unique demands of Hare Scrambles and

GNCC racing. It sports Yamaha’s Power

Valve System-equipped (YPVS) 125cc,

liquid-cooled, two-stroke, reed-valveinducted

engine, combined with a six-speed

transmission tuned for smooth, wide, and

controllable power character across the

rev range. This backwoods racer is built

on a lightweight aluminum frame carefully

engineered for the balance of rigidity and flex.

Cross-country performance of the YZ125X

is optimized with model specific digital CDI

ignition settings, new power valve shape,

open timing, open duration, as well as a

new cylinder head combustion chamber

shape, all of which are focused on creating

broad power delivery that suits off-road

terrain and a wide range of rider skill levels.

The suspension components are KYB

speed-sensitive spring-type.

The 2020 YZ125X is further equipped

to endure the punishing terrain of crosscountry

racing with durability and comfortenhancing

features including a sealed

O-ring chain, a standard side stand, and

fuel tank petcock with reserve position. The

fully adjustable KYB speed-sensitive springtype

suspension has been tested and tuned

for the needs of cross-country racers.

Enduro-specific Dunlop Geomax AT81

tires with an 18-inch rear are ready to

head straight to the races thanks to

taller sidewalls for improved comfort and

reduced pinch flats. A large 270mm front

disc brake coupled with high-performance

pad material offers outstanding machine

control and performance, with exceptional

stopping power and controllability for tight

wooded trails.

44 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


2020 YAMAHA YZ250FX (UPDATED)

This cross-country racer includes the smartphone power tuner app

that adjusts the bikes settings to your style and the track.

Based on the 2019 YZ250F, it features Yamaha’s front-intake, rearexhaust,

liquid-cooled, DOHC four-stroke power plant with an added

sixth gear, wide ratio transmission, and a range of cross-country

upgrades. Yamaha’s latest generation, aluminum bilateral beam

frame delivers strength, lightness and durability for the tight, technical

terrain of cross-country racing while still providing optimum stability

in fast sections. The bike also features improved electronics including

a compact, center mounted electric start system powered by an

ultra-lightweight, four-cell, lithium-ion battery to minimize restart

delays mid-race and add convenience everywhere else.

All-new bodywork on the YZ250FX is slimmer than ever, giving the

bike a compact, nimble feel and easing rider movement across

the machine in tough terrain. Fully adjustable, KYB suspension is

specifically tuned for off-road racing and combined with Dunlop

MX3S tyres with 18-inch rear to deliver excellent comfort and

durability in harsh conditions. Additionally, the YZ250FX is equipped

with performance and convenience including four-position rubbermounted

handlebar clamps, a side-stand, wireless connectivity with

the Yamaha Power Tuner App.

New for 2020 is a handlebar-mounted map switch to adjust

preselected engine maps on the fly.

2020 YAMAHA YZ450FX

The YZ450FX doesn’t receive any major updates for 2020.

Built for cross-country with electric start and smartphone power

tuner app that adjusts the bike’s settings for various rider styles and

track conditions.

The 2020 YZ450FX uses Yamaha’s distinct reward-slanted cylinder,

449cc, liquid-cooled, four-stroke engine design, complete with rear

exhaust and forward-mounted intake system all working together to

deliver power and controllability for cross-country racing. Its bilateral

beam frame and engine mounting position optimizes the machine’s

rigidity balance, resulting in improved cornering ability and traction,

while KYB suspension is specifically tuned to provide comfort and

performance in the toughest of off-road conditions.

Rider convenience is also a priority in the YZ450FX with

enhancements including Yamaha’s ultra-lightweight electric start

system for restarts under pressure, wireless connectivity with the

Yamaha Power Tuner app for precision tunability directly from a

smart phone and a handlebar-mounted map switch to choose

between user defined engine maps on the fly.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 45


2020 YAMAHA YZ250X TWO-STROKE

Yamaha’s 2020 YZ250X delivers classic twostroke

performance to cross-country racing.

Its lightweight aluminum frame together with

specifically tuned KYB spring type forks and

rear shock provide performance and comfort

in GNCC style conditions.

The 249cc, reed-valve inducted engine,

mated with a wide- ratio 5-speed

transmission is race-ready. Based on the

YZ250 motocross model, the YZ250X

features a revised compression ratio, exhaust

port, power valve timing, and model specific

CDI unit for improved trail performance. All

these features are focused on creating a

wide, controllable power character along with

light, nimble, and precise handling ideal for

cross-country racing.

Motocross:

2020 YAMAHA YZ450F (ALL-NEW) &

YZ250F

For 2020 Yamaha newly redesigned the

YZ450F, featuring a new engine, frame and

host of other features to deliver a lighter, more

powerful, and better handling motocross

experience.

“The 2020 Yamaha YZ450F features design

changes which resulted in a lighter, faster,

and more nimble handling machine that will

once again raise the bar in the 450 class,”

said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s motorsports

marketing manager. “Yamaha’s 2020 lineup

of four-stroke motocross bikes boasts the

most advanced, race-ready machines of their

respective classes.”

The new 2020 Yamaha YZ450F has been

redesigned to provide a lighter, more

powerful, and better handling motocross

experience. The new 449cc, liquid-cooled,

four-stroke, electric start engine features

an all-new compact cylinder head with

redesigned combustion chamber shape,

steeper valve angles and more aggressive

cam profiles. The reward-slanted cylinder

houses a higher compression piston with

low friction rings attached to a longer

connecting rod. The transmission has been

refined to provide smoother shifting, and a

more efficient crank breather system has

been adopted to decrease pumping losses.

In all, the lighter, more compact engine

produces increased power across the entire

RPM range for stronger and more linear

pulling power.

The new engine is housed in the latest

evolution of Yamaha’s lightweight aluminum

bilateral beam frame, which has been

redesigned with all-new flex characteristics

and provides improved cornering

performance, traction and bump reaction

to give the rider more confidence to push

harder. Other chassis components such

as engine mounts, top triple clamp and

front axle, as well as the class-leading KYB

suspension with enhanced compression and

rebound characteristics were carefully refined

to reduce weight while improving handling

and performance. To bring the new package

to a stop, the 2020 YZ450F features a newly

designed front brake caliper, brake pads and

front and rear disc. The overall changes of the

2020 YZ450F deliver increased power output

with more controllable linear acceleration

and lightweight handling characteristics that

mimic a YZ250F.

The new 2020 YZ450F has been updated

to give racers the edge right out of the gate.

Standard equipment includes electric start,

a lightweight lithium battery, advanced fuel

injection, and a wrap around rear-positioned

exhaust that delivers powerful performance

while balancing weight for excellent masscentralization.

Included is Yamaha’s Launch Control

System and riders can adjust their on-track

performance using wireless connectivity

through the Yamaha Power Tuner App right

from their phone, and now choose between

two user defined ECU maps on the fly

through the handlebar mounted dual-mode

engine map switch.

46 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


The YZ250F

The Yamaha YZ250F was all-new in 2019.

For 2020, Yamaha didn’t touch a thing, save

for the graphics.

Last year, the 2019 YZ250F introduced an

all-new engine, frame, and bodywork designs

with features never-before seen on a 250cc

class motorcycle to deliver more mid-range

and top-end power, and class-leading engine

performance. Yamaha’s design returns with

the 2020 YZ250F.

Sporting an electric start, 250cc, liquidcooled,

four-stroke engine housed in

an aluminum bilateral beam frame, and

suspended by industry leading KYB spring

type forks and KYB rear shock, the 2020

YZ250F provides the ultimate balance of

race-winning performance, rideability and

comfort. The motorcycle also continues

to feature Yamaha’s advanced racing

technology including dual-mode switchable

engine mapping and wireless connectivity for

the Yamaha Power Tuner App.

2020 Limited Edition YZ500…

Could it be true?

Imagine! We are told that Yamaha wants

to remember the good old days when

the YZ490 was the biggest baddest big

capacity machine that attracted the most

interest and carried the biggest price tag.

So rumour has it that the Yamaha Factory

has decided to bring back the dreams

of many and is producing the Yamaha

YZ500 in a limited amount of bikes.

We Reckon its’ a pipe dream, but who

knows?

A little history about the YZ490.

The Yamaha YZ490 was a rip your arms

out, single cylinder, two-stroke.

The Yamaha YZ490 was produced

by Yamaha from 1982 to 1990,

horsepower was 53.77 HP (40.1 KW) @

7000 RPM.

For 2020 Yamaha YZ500, featuring a new

engine, frame and host of other features

to deliver a lighter, more powerful, and

better handling motocross experience.

Is it true? Will it come here? Umm we

doubt it, but just imagine!

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 47


2020 Honda:

2020 Honda CRF450R, CRF450RWE, and

CRF450RX First Look…

With the Honda CRF450R motocrosser, CRF450RW

Works Edition motocrosser, and CRF450RX off-road

racer sharing the same platform, all three enjoy most

of the same upgrades for 2020.

So, let’s see what is in store for the 2020 Honda

CRF450R, CRF450RWE, and CRF450RX off-road

competition motorcycles. These updates do not

apply to the 2020 Honda CRF450X and CRF450L.

1. Traction control comes to the 2020 Honda

CRF450 off-road line. Going by the name Honda

Selectable Torque Control, the system watches for

wheelspin by monitoring how quickly the motor gains

engine speed. When that happens, torque is reduced

in an effort to regain traction. There are three levels of

intrusion that are selected via a handlebar switch.

2. Engine mapping has been changed for the riding

modes. Riders can choose between Smooth,

Standard, and Aggressive riding modes. Honda

hasn’t revealed in what way the mapping has been

altered.

3. There are new standard settings for the fork and

shock on the 2020 Honda CRF450R, CRF450RWE,

and CRF450RX motorcycles.

Again, Honda isn’t saying what those changes are,

but they say the new setting will result in “improved

chassis balance and overall handling.”

4. Honda has lowered the battery mounting location

by 1.1 inches.

We all know why Honda did that—lower the center of

gravity for better handling.

5. The rear brake pad material on the three

motorcycles has been updated.

Honda tells us that it is “for improved performance

and increased durability.”

6. Say goodbye to the lower rotor-guard on the rear

wheel.

Honda has tossed it to increase cooling of the rotor,

and to reduce weight on the 2020 Honda CRF450R,

CRF450RWE, and CRF450RX.

7. Exclusive to the 2020 Honda CRF450RWE is a

new titanium Yoshimura header pipe. Honda says

the new header pipe is lighter and produces more

power.

8. The 2020 Honda CRF450RWE also gets dual

compound Renthal Kevlar grips. The CRF450R and

CRF450RX do not enjoy the grip update.

9. All three motorcycles get new graphics of varying

boldness.

The 2020 Honda CRF450R and CRF450RX get

new graphics, while the 2020 Honda CRF450RWE’s

graphics are updated by Throttle Jockey to replicate

what you will see on the Team Honda HRC racebikes

used by Ken Roczen and Cole Seely.

10. Side panel updates to the 2020 CRF450RWE

give it even more of a factory look.

The CRF450RWE’s side-panel pieces are smaller—

Honda claims increased durability—and they are in

line with the Team Honda HRC racing motorcycles.

Plus, the plastic number plates are red to match the

factory racers.

48 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


2020 Honda CRF250R and CRF250RX

More torque…

The 2020 Honda CRF250R and CRF250RX

get most of the changes made to the

CRF450 racing lineup, along with many much

more significant 250-only updates. Let’s

go over all the updates to the 2020 Honda

CRF250R motocrosser and 2020 Honda

CRF250RX off-road racing motorcycle.

The 2020 Honda CRF250R and CRF250RX

get a new cam profile for the DOHC motor.

To increase torque and horsepower on the

top end—6000 to 10,000 rpm—the exhaust

valves will be opening later for reduced

valve overlap.

2. The combustion chamber has been

reshaped. According to Honda, this means it

is “optimized.”

3. The EFI system gets a gear-position

sensor. That means that each cog of the

transmission on the 2020 Honda CRF250R

and CRF250RX can have dedicated

ignition maps.

4. Honda has picked 8000 rpm as the point of

“optimized” ignition timing. Honda says this

means “improved torque and power.”

5. G’bye to the header pipe resonator.

Honda is pulling it from the 2020 CRF250R

and CRF250RX. Honda claims that having

it gone “improved power character when

shifting from 2nd to 3rd gear.”

6. With more power on top, Honda has

altered the silencer for more torque from midrange

on down.

7. More air is part of more power, so the

air-filter element has been upsized by 10

percent.

8. Both the motocrossing CRF250R and the

off-road racing CRF250RX get a new second

gear ratio. Honda has decided to open up the

gap between 1st and 2nd gears with a higher

2nd gear ratio.

9. There is a new WPC surface treatment

applied to 2nd and 3rd gears. Honda has

done this to reduce friction and increase

durability.

10. With more power on tap, the leftside

radiator is larger on the 2020 Honda

CRF250R and CRF250RX. That means

increased cooling.

11. The clutch on the CRF250R and

CRF250RX has an 18 percent higher

capacity. That comes from a higher spring

rate in the clutch, so the pull is likely

increased.

12. The perimeter frame on the 2020 Honda

CRF250R and CRF250RX is lighter this year.

However, Honda isn’t telling us how much

weight has been shaved.

13. The swingarm and the new frame have

increased yaw-angle stiffness. Lateral and

torsional stiffness is unchanged.

14. Suspension settings on the Showa units

have been changed, with Honda claiming

better “tracking, turning and traction.” To

get there, the fork has increased low-speed

damping, and the shock has increased lowspeed

compression damping along with less

high-speed compression damping.

15. Honda has dropped the battery position

by 1.1 inches. This will lower the center of

gravity a bit.

16. The 2020 Honda CRF250R and

CRF250FRX get new footpegs. The footrests

are 20 percent lighter and designed to

prevent mud buildup. Honda says the new

pegs give the rider “great feel and confidence

in all riding conditions.”

17. There are several changes to the rear

braking system. The brake pedal is longer,

yet lighter. The hose to the caliper has been

shortened. To save a bit of weight and help

cool the 240mm disc, the guard has been

removed—even on the off-road racing

CRF250RX. Also, there is a new braking

pad material that Honda says will provide

“improved power and better durability in

muddy conditions.”

Full feature when the bikes get here!!

50 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Honda

Africa Twin

Set to evolve for 2020?

More Fireblade than ever?

Rumours emanating from

Japan suggest that Honda are

planning a raft of incremental

changes for the popular Honda

Africa Twin, with a new Euro5

version set to arrive for 2020

boasting a bigger engine, more

power, and more tech.

The battle for sales in the adventure bike

market has never been more ferocious,

while the division lines between

rivals are getting increasingly

blurred as traditional capacity

boundaries evaporate, and

the battle for tech-laden

supremacy hots up.

While Honda has officially

denied that there’s a new

model under development

– as you would expect

them to – the level of detail

leaking out of Japan about

the changes has a sincere

whiff of credibility, and ties

in rather neatly with the

areas of criticism Honda

have faced over the Africa

Twin’s skill set.

They also logically

address the challenges

that all manufacturers

are facing with creeping

legislative controls over

emissions – which is forcing

development to keep

upping engine capacity

to combat the power

losses of enforced cleaner

combustion.

Power play

The current Africa Twin packs

94bhp into its 998cc paralleltwin,

which delivers pleasing

road performance and more than

enough for most off-road

forays, but when fully loaded

with luggage and/or a

pillion its performance

suffers a tangible dip.

As the even tighter

Euro5 regs

arrive, Honda

will have to

increase

capacity to

net the same

output, while

they realistically

need to give riders

a little more mumbo to

add some sparkle to its

delivery.

To that end, the

rumoured increase to

1080cc, with a 6.7bhp (5kW)

resultant boost in power

seems entirely believable, both

in terms of what’s achievable and

52 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


Honda’s typically incremental development of

existing models. There’s a suggestion that

the fuel tank will grow by a litre, to just

shy of 20, at the same time.

Whether this is to combat increased

fuel consumption, or simply to give

riders a little more range than current, is

unclear. There’s no hint of how the torque

curve will be affected, but there’s likely to

be a similar boost at peak torque.

Whether such a small boost

will be felt from the rider’s seat is

debatable, and with no suggestion

that the manual gearbox ratios will

be fettled we’d suggest it’s unlikely

to feel like a revolution when you

open the throttle.

DCT makes the changes:

There is, however, rumored to be an update

to evolve the clever Dual Clutch Transmission

(DCT) version. No details have emerged about

the nature or goal of the changes, but we would

hope Honda are chasing better pick-up from

standstill (it’s quite aggressive in stop/start

situations), smoother transitions under load, and

more intuitive gear changes that support the

rider like a manual gearbox would. For casual

touring the current system works well.

Tech catch-up:

Adventure bikes are as much at the cutting edge

of tech progress as superbikes, and Honda

have been slow to pick up

on this with the Africa Twin.

This looks set to be rectified

with the 2020 model, which will

apparently gain keyless

ignition – hopefully with a

keyless fuel cap, like BMW – and a new full TFT

dash tower to replace the current LCD unit.

To drag the AT into the current battle, it’ll have

to boast Bluetooth connectivity for multimedia

support, support at least turn-by-turn navigation,

and multiple device connections – and a suite of

rider modes and aids. Wouldn’t it be great if they

simply dragged the Gold Wing’s Apple CarPlay

functionality across?

What about the Adventure Sports?

The only specific hint of change for the bigtanked,

more off-road-ready Adventure Sports

version is the addition of a new rear rack, but

we’d obviously expect all of the stock model

changes to percolate through to the AS version,

not least because Euro5 will demand the

powertrain updates, and customers will demand

the tech advances.

When’s it coming then?

Honda rarely steps out of their routine for

favouring the big pre-season EICMA show in

Milan as their world unveil for new and revised

models, which means we’re unlikely to see

anything official until November 2019, with the

bike, perhaps arriving as a 2020 model.

If true, these changes will certainly boost the

appeal of the Africa Twin, but it seems unlikely

that they’ll materially change the character of

this great adventure middleweight

– and with good deals on the

current model only likely to

continue, there could be

just as much wise money

being spent now as in

2020…

Watch this space!

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 5 3


2020 SHERCO OFF-ROAD BIKES, FIRST RIDE

The 2020 Sherco off-road

bikes and trials bikes were

launched last month in

Italy. We did not crack the

nod, but Ron Lawson went

along – and he sent us his

impressions: By Ron Lawson

Sherco MY2020 model changes in a nutshell:

• All enduro models have reduced friction in

the suspension linkage and improved build

quality to increase servicing.

• Two stroke 250/300 model air intake funnel

is adjusted to improve low and mid-range

power and suit extreme riding better.

• 250/300 2T engines 15mm shorter intake

pipe from carb to cylinder to improve low

speed response. It is now also one part

instead of two saving weight.

• 250/300 models have a modified reed valve

to improve sealing, increase air flow and

performance. New construction is plastic

charged with fibreglass/carbon/viton.

• Following on from that the central engine

casting is modified to increase flow and

boost mid-range plus widen the powerband.

• Lighter clutch hub on 250/300 2T engines

to reduce inertia and lever weight for

extreme riding.

• Reduced size master cylinder piston and

clutch cylinder piston also reduce lever effort.

• Clutch lubrication flow is increased.

• 250/300 models have easier access fuel tap

and now 1.5litres when you switch to reserve.

• Blue frame protectors on the Factory models.

• Factory and XC models run the 48mm

KYB forks and a new 50mm KYB shock to

increase stability at high speeds and improve

bump absorption.

• New drilled front final drive sprocket/gear.

• The SC models are basically the Factory

model without lights or a racing wiring

harness and with stiffer suspension settings.

• Factory and XC models get an AFAM steel

rear sprocket.

• All Racing models get a 150g lighter plastic

muffler end cap.

• 250/300 four stroke bikes have a lighter

starter system sprocket assembly to improve

starting – improves performance for dead

engine race starts.

• 250/300 4T improved gear selector for a

claimed 60% improved accuracy.

• Bigger 450/500 4T engines are 600g

lighter thanks to lighter crank, clutch disc

material, clutch hub, primary transmission,

balancing shaft, freewheel sprocket, oil

pump sprockets.

• 450 4T has a new cam chain for reduced

friction and noise to meet Euro4 engien

noise regulations.

• The 125 two-stroke has an adjustable

height power valve giving more options for

settings.

• New piston profile on the 125 2T to improve

the wear uniformity and stability.

• New engine map on the 125 for improved

high-speed performance.

We got the opportunity to ride every bike in

the line. That was a lot of riding. The Sherco

line-up is big. The enduro line includes 125

two-strokes, 250 two-strokes, 300 twostrokes,

250 four-strokes, 300 four-strokes

and 450 four-strokes. Each of those will

be offered in three different configurations.

The “Racing” line is set up for eastern-style

riding and the bikes have WP suspension,

headlights, taillights and instrumentation.

The “Factory” line has KYB suspension and

upgrades, including a Akrapovic exhaust on

the four-stroke models. The “Cross County”

line is specifically aimed at western style

riding like we have in the U.S., and has stiffer

KYB components and no lighting.

54 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


SHERCO 125 TWO-STROKES

The 125 was a new model that was built from

the ground up last year. It’s an electric-start

two-stroke with a six-speed gearbox. The

motor has a Keihin carburetor, just like all the

other Sherco two-strokes. Right now, the

company sees no advantage in moving to

fuel-injection. They were, if you remember,

one of the first companies to work on that,

and they still don’t see any benefit beyond

emissions. Riding the 125 is a blast. It’s fast!

The bike is easily in the same league as a

YZ125 motocross bike.

For 2020, the 125 motor has a new

piston and an adjustable powervalve. The

powervalve is electronic and a new system

allows a mechanic to adjust how far the valve

will open. On the SE version, the WP fork

now has adjustable preload, among other

changes. There are quite a few reliability

oriented changes including a better seal on

the rear linkage. The KYB fork and shock on

the Factory and Cross-Country models is

more competition ready.

SHERCO 250 & 300 TWO-STROKES

The 250 and 300 two-strokes are almost

identical, aside from bore size. They still have

an electronic powervalve and a six-speed

gearbox. Most of the changes are hard to see

from the outside. The most important ones

deal with the intake, starting with a reshaped

air boot. A reconfigured intake manifold is

shorter and the reed cage itself is redesigned.

The clutch also

was the focus of a

number of changes

aimed at a lighter

pull. When you ride

the bike, it’s clear that those efforts paid off.

The 300, in particular, had a reputation as

a hard bike to manage in some situations

because it was powerful and hit very hard.

Now, the transition into the meat of the power

is smoother. Sherco still employs a map

switch that’s every effective at mellowing

out the powerband. The 300 is still more of

an expert-oriented bike, whereas the 250 is

much more controllable and easy to ride. Of

the three models (Racing, Factory and Cross

Country) the sweetest suspension settings

were on the Factory versions with KYB

components. The Cross Country models

were a little too stiff for the tight trails in Italy.

SHERCO 250 & 300 FOUR-STROKES

The 300, in particular, fills a gap for riders

who don’t want to deal with the anger of a

full-size off-road bike. Even the 350s offered

by KTM and Husky are becoming more and

more 450-like with each year. The 300 is still

easy to ride and forgiving, but goes much

faster than any of the 250 four-stroke off-road

bikes available. It, too, has a map switch that

alters the power output dramatically, allowing

a switch from race bike to trail puppy on the

fly. The 250 is a trail racer like a KTM 250XCF

in aggressive mode, but becomes something

more akin to a Yamaha WR250 when you flip

the switch. The most significant changes for

the 250 and 300 four-strokes include updates

in the starter system for less spinning weight.

SHERCO 450 FOUR-STROKES:

There is also a 500 version of this motorcycle,

but it wasn’t available during the introduction.

The big bikes in the Sherco line are the basis

for the TVS Sherco team’s rally effort. At the

Dakar Rally this year, Michael Metge won

a stage, which is unheard-of for a such a

small team with a fraction of the budget of

KTM, Husky or Honda. The 450 probably

got the most mechanical changes of all the

2020 models. The cam chain, crankshaft,

primary drive and a long list of other pieces

were lightened to reduce spinning inertia. It

resulted in a dramatic improvement. When

we rode the newly presented 2019 models

one year ago in France, the 450 was a beast

that was too intimidating for narrow trails.

I didn’t feel that way at all this year. It’s

fascinating how reductions in rotating

mass can make such a huge difference in

manageability.

More on these bikes when they hit South

African shores.

www.shercosouthafrica.co.za

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 55


2020 KTM NEWS

The Motocrossers:

With an all new bike launched just

last year for all of the SX and XC

models, changes are minimal for

2020 albeit with one exception —

new two-strokes!

The two-stroke XC lineup is now fuel injected

with KTM’s proprietary TPI (Transfer Port

Injection) system similar to what the XC-W

lineup has been running over the years.

Additionally, the kickstarter has been

removed, but the cases will still accept a

kickstarter if you desire one. Less weight and

less moving parts has been KTM’s MO for

the last several years and this fits right in with

that ideology.

This serves as the first racing oriented

two-stroke model range to receive the

innovative design, which will likely lead to

the SX lineup receiving the changes in the

next few years. In addition, KTM introduced

a big wheel (19”/16”) 85cc to its lineup. The

bike is modeled after its current small wheel

(17”/14”) version with just the bigger wheels

to aid taller riders.

“To be the consistent performer at any level

of racing, you have to continue to progress in

development. The work never

stops – whether that’s here

in Mattighofen, or with our

engineers in the USA. The

KTM SX range model year

2020 has received

a number of updates to complement last

year’s groundbreaking new generation

models, and we can see that our

continued efforts in development are paying

off – our athletes both in Supercross

and Motocross have enjoyed some

fantastic results so far this season.

Utilizing the same R&D team

as their bigger brothers, the

KTM sportminicycle models

remain at the very forefront

of junior racing competition

with detailed refinements for

MY2020. In addition, we are

excited for the highly anticipated

launch of the all-new KTM SX-E

5 electric minicycle, which will arrive

this summer,” said KTM´s Senior

Product Manager Offroad, Joachim

Sauer.

All bikes from the mini’s to the big bikes

received new graphics to update the look

for the new model year. Additionally, all

bikes are now outfitted with WP’s XACT

fork and shock. The new components don

a new name, but retain the same design as

the previous AER 48 air fork and coil-spring

shock. Updated settings front and rear and

a new piston in the fork handle a majority of

the updates for the non-TPi bikes. The SX-F

lineup consists of the standard 450cc, 350cc,

and 250cc offerings while the SX lineup

hasn’t departed from the 250cc, 150cc, and

125cc two-stroke options.

The 450 SX-F added a

tooth to the rear,

bumping up

to a 49T

sprocket.

Additionally, both the

150 SX and

the 125 SX feature a screw and diaphragm

spring to hold the countershaft sprocket in

place rather than the circlip method used

on the other models. Additionally, the reeds

are updated to seal better against the case

and offer better performance. Finally, a new

kickstart intermediate gear boasts better

durability.

The XC-F lineup is piloted by the big 450

XC-F which features a new piston design

for better performance and reliability. The

new TPi two-strokes also boasts an updated

air pressure sensor for better acclimation

in altitude changes. The exhaust now has

a unique corrugated design that’s claimed

to offer better durability and performance

while saving some weight. The XC-F lineup

features 450cc, 350cc, and 250cc models

in the four-stroke department while the XC

lineup consists of the 300 TPI and 250 TPI.

In the minicycle ranks, the small wheel 85 SX

and big wheel 85SX have new silencers with

altered packing for a 40g weight savings. The

65 SX now comes with an extra alternative

needle for more tuning with jetting specs and

a change in the ignition curve. The 50 SX also

boats a new aluminum swingarm to improve

stability and offer easier chain adjustment.

The smallest 50 SX Mini is the final bike in the

lineup and doesn’t receive any changes other

than some new graphics.

The minicycle range consists of the 85cc big

wheel, 85cc small wheel, 65cc, 50 SX, and

50 SX Mini.

Phone: 011 234 5007 Email: info@radmoto.co.za

56 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


YOUR “MEGA” KTM DEALERSHIP

Electric Tech:

The KTM SX-E 5 will join the sportminicycles

as another competitive option for junior

riders. Based on the KTM 50 SX with its

high-end chassis, but powered by an electric

motor, the KTM SX-E 5 is easy to ride, has

zero emissions, low noise and requires

minimal maintenance – giving riders more

options for places to ride, whilst being

easy to use.

The height of the bike is also completely

adjustable, and it is aimed at riders aged

from 4 to 10 years old, making it another

great option in the KTM line-up.

The KTM SX-E 5 will be launched soon.

We are not sure whether it will make its

way to our shores….

Enduro:

KTM launches the 2020 EXC

Enduro range with updates to

the big four stroke engines, a

new fuel injected 150cc TPI and a

Limited Edition, Erzbergrodeo 300 EXC

TPI as the highlights.

KTM’s 2020 EXC range has a refined look to

it. The 2020 Enduro range arrives on the back

of KTM’s MX models upgrades in 2019.

Seven model Enduro line-up for 2020

The biggest news at the outset is the 2020

line-up will include the new KTM 150 EXC TPI,

which is homologated for Euro 4.

The 150 joins the 250 EXC TPI and 300

EXC TPI two-strokes, as well as the 250

EXC-F, 350 EXC-F, 450 EXC-F and KTM

500 EXC-F four strokes to complete the

KTM enduro range.

The 2020 EXC range extends again to the

SIX DAYS models along with a new, limitededition,

KTM 300 EXC TPI Erzbergrodeo

edition with a production run of 500 units and

with a premium list of PowerParts fitted.

Cool Huh!

2020 KTM EXC model updates details at a

glance:

• More efficient, high-performing two-stroke

engines including a new ambient air pressure

sensor enabling the ECU to adapt the

injection parameters to air pressure

• 250/300 EXC 2T engines pivoted by one

degree for improved front-end feel

• New frame design for more torsional

stiffness

• Big capacity four stroke engines upgraded

for power, efficiency and re-positioned centre

of gravity

• New, mid-valve piston in the WP forks to

improve damping, plus new upper fork caps

with new clicker adjusters

• New bodywork and graphics including redesigned,

40mm longer rear subframe

• New seat design

• New air filter box

• New shape fuel tanks

• Reworked TPI oil tank with more flexible

mountings for enhanced durability

• Improved cooling system including 12mm

lower radiators

• four stroke engines no longer have kickstart

or option to fit one as the mechanism is

completely removed

• All-new exhaust systems, notably the TPI

expansion chambers for improved power,

strength and reduced noise

• Four stroke exhaust header pipes slimmer

design because of removed kickstart

provision

• Fans as standard on 450 and 500 EXC-F

models

What’s new on the 2020 EXC models – all the

details that matter:

There’s plenty to chew over this year across

the entire EXC Enduro range. Here are all

the major detail changes from 150 to 500cc

models…

TPI two-stroke engine changes:

MY2020, the cylinders are upgraded with

fully machined exhaust port windows for

improved timing precision. At the same time,

a reworked exhaust control valve drive and

adjuster produce more precise adjustment

and increased efficiency.

A reworked idle system allows more precise

idle speed setting via the bypass screw. An

enhanced cold start system supplies an

increased amount of extra air when opening

the bypass.

Oil supplied by the electronically controlled oil

Corner Rivonia and Witkoppen Road, Witkoppen Rd, Sandton, 2157

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 57


pump via an oil intake tube is mixed with the

incoming air to lubricate moving engine parts.

TPI Engine management system:

An updated version of the digital engine

maps improves performance and power

delivery of the 2020 TPI engines and works

with new cylinder head and air-intakes.

A new and additional ambient air pressure

sensor enables the ECU to adapt the

injection parameters to fast changes in

altitude.

Four stroke engine changes:

Updates to the 4T engines help deliver

improved torque and power across the entire

rev-range.

Revving up to a claimed 12,800rpm the

MY2020 250 EXC-F remains the baby of the

bunch weighing in at 27.9kg, including the

e-starter.

The new 250 4T engine features a new

cylinder with a 78mm bore carried over from

the successful KTM 250 SX-F motocross

engine, which, in conjunction with a new

cylinder head gasket, raises the compression

ratio from 12.8:1 to 13.8:1.

The 350 EXC-F engine has a reworked

cylinder head design, saving 200g. New,

flow-optimized ports and two overhead

camshafts are tuned for enduro specific

torque characteristics.

The new head comes with a new cylinder

head cover and gasket, a new spark plug

and spark plug connector.

The 350’s short cylinder with a bore of

88mm features a reworked cooling system

and houses a new, forged bridged box-type

piston. Its piston crown geometry is matched

to the high-compression combustion

chamber with a compression ratio raised

from 12.3 to 13.5 for increased power.

A reworked oil feed for MY2020 brings

enhanced engine durability, with long

crankshaft service intervals to save time,

effort and cost.

KTM has also updated the camshaft

timings for improved performance, while a

re-designed exhaust flange connects the

header pipe more securely.

Big capacity four stroke engines:

The 2020 KTM 450 and 500 EXC-F engines

are fitted with a new, more compact SOHC,

15mm lower and 500g lighter cylinder head.

Re-designed ports are controlled by a new

overhead camshaft which is now closer to

the centre of gravity to improve handling. An

improved axial mount for the decompressor

shaft means more reliable starting and a new,

more efficient integrated

engine breather system

reduces oil losses.

New, 40mm titanium

intake valves and 33mm

steel exhaust valves are

shorter and matched to the

new head design. They are

activated via rocker arms

that have a more rigid design

with reduced inertia, guaranteeing

more consistent performance across the

power range.

A shorter timing chain and new chain guides

contribute to a reduction in weight and low

friction, while a new spark plug increases

combustion efficiency.

The short cylinder with a 95mm bore

houses a new, lightweight box-in-box type

piston made by König that, in conjunction

with a 10% lighter piston pin, improves

performance, lowers vibrations and engine

speed strength. The compression ratio is

also increased from 11.7:1 to 12.75:1.

2020 frame changes:

All KTM EXC frames for model year 2020

feature the same geometries as before

but are re-designed in several key areas

to improve stiffness and provide better

feedback to the rider.

Connecting the cylinder head to the frame,

the lateral engine headstays of all models are

now made of aluminum, enhancing cornering

precision while reducing vibrations KTM

says.

Newly designed lateral frame guards feature

a non-slip surface texture and the one on the

right-hand side also provides heat protection

against the silencer.

In the 250/300 EXC frames, the engine is

rotated downwards by one degree

around the swingarm pivot for

improved front wheel traction.

The subframe is made of

strong, especially lightweight

profiles and now weighs less than

900g. To increase rear fender stability, it

has been lengthened by 40mm.

Exhaust systems get heavy attention:

The KTM engineers put a lot of effort into

developing completely reworked exhaust

systems for all 2020 EXC models. KTM

says the new components are key factors

behind the enhanced power delivery and

performance of the new bikes, while

providing slimmer ergonomics and

reliable compliance with racing noise limits.

The 250 and 300cc models feature new

heavy duty exhaust pipes made by KTM

using an innovative 3D stamping process

that makes it

possible to

provide the outer

shells with a

corrugated surface.

This renders the pipe a lot

more rigid and resistant

against rock

and debris

impacts,

while

significantly

reducing

noise KTM

claims. At the same

time, the exhaust pipes have an oval cross

section for increased ground clearance and

reduced width.

The two-stroke silencers with their new

profile and new end cap have an increased

volume as well as reworked internals

developed individually for each model.

The previous polymer mount for the muffler

has also been replaced with lightweight,

welded aluminum brackets.

New perforated inner tubes and a new,

lighter damping wool combine to provide

more efficient noise damping and enhanced

durability at approximately 200g less weight

(on 250/300cc models).

The four stroke models now feature twopiece

header pipes for a more user-friendly

dismantling, while providing better access to

the shock absorber.

A new, slightly wider aluminum sleeve and

end cap result in more compact and shorter

main silencers, bringing the weight closer

to the center of gravity for increased mass

centralization.

Phone: 011 234 5007 Email: info@radmoto.co.za

58 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


YOUR “MEGA” KTM DEALERSHIP

New radiator position:

All the new KTM EXC models feature redesigned

radiators mounted 12mm lower

than before, which lowers the center of

gravity. At the same time, a new radiator

shape and new spoilers combine to enhance

the ergonomics. Improved coolant circulation

and air flow to the engine increases the

cooling efficiency.

The 450 EXC-F and 500 EXC-F

models are fitted with an electric

radiator fan as standard.

Fresh airbox:

The new air-filter box has been completely

reworked in terms of gas dynamics, which

KTM says enhances intake airflow for

improved performance and throttle response.

In addition, the new design offers improved

protection of the air filter against clogging.

The large Twin Air filter element is mounted

on a rigid cage, which at the same time forms

the air filter box mount.

All two-stroke models feature new intake

funnels adapted to the new engine and

engine position, accommodating also a new

intake air temperature sensor.

Re-designed fuel tank:

All models of the new EXC range are fitted

with re-designed, lightweight polyethylene

fuel tanks, improving the ergonomics,

while holding slightly more fuel than their

predecessors. All tanks are fitted with a fuel

pump and a fuel level sensor.

Re-designed TPI oil tank:

The KTM EXC TPI models are fitted with a

newly designed oil tank featuring reworked,

more flexible mountings for enhanced

durability. In addition, the outlet is fitted with

a cleanable mesh filter in order to protect the

oil pump from dirt.

New wiring harness:

A reworked wiring harness and packaging

concentrate most of the electrical

components in a single area below the seat.

This makes them more easily accessible,

while increasing the reliability of the electrics

even further.

New shape bodywork:

KTM’s Enduro Factory Racing Team were

involved in shaping the bodywork of the

latest EXC model generation, together with

specialists from KTM R&D and Kiska Design.

Their common goal KTM says, was to

“achieve complete harmony between rider

and bike”.

This results in all-new polymer components .

The I-beam design of the front and rear

fenders creates stability with the least

possible amount of material through a wellthought-out

structure and mounting.

New seat design:

The new shaped seat has more foam

padding, it is secured with a single lateral

screw now also, helping you remove the seat

quickly and easily.

New WP XPLOR forks:

All EXC models are fitted with the WP XPLOR

48 upside-down fork as previous. The split

fork design has springs on both sides, but

with separate damping circuits, with the lefthand

fork leg damping only the compression

stage and the right hand one only the

rebound.

For 2020 the fork receives a new, mid-valve

piston to provide more consistent damping,

as well as new upper fork caps with new

clicker adjusters for easier adjustment, in

addition to a new color/graphic design.

New settings keep the front end higher

for enhanced rider feedback and improve

bottoming out resistance.

Standard on the SIX DAYS models and

optional on the standard models, the threestage

spring preload adjuster are been

reworked for easier operation without tools.

WP PDS shock absorber:

The WP XPLOR PDS (Progressive Damping

System) shock absorber is directly linked to

the swingarm without a linkage system.

For MY2020, an ‘optimised’ second piston

and cup with a reworked shape and seal

increase resistance against bottoming out

without diminishing the ride.

The new XPLOR PDS shock has improved

damping characteristics and better “hold-up”

matching the new frame and reworked frontend

set-up KTM claims.

The new 150cc EXC TPI:

In a nutshell, it is a completely new engine

in a chassis with all the updates you’ve

read about above. The 150 takes onboard

all the attributes of its larger capacity, 2T

model siblings: transfer port technology,

electronically controlled ignition timing and

fuel injection using sensor data from intake

air pressure, throttle position and coolant

temperature. A new (for 2020 EXC twostrokes)

ambient air pressure sensor enables

the ECU to adapt the injection parameters to

fast changes in altitude.

In short it is a light and lively two-stroke

with all the reduced weight benefits that

brings in comparison to the 250 four stroke

machine. At the same time also has the lowmaintenance

benefits of the two-stroke and,

the proven reliability of the TPI models.

2020 is going to be awesome!

Watch this space…

Corner Rivonia and Witkoppen Road, Witkoppen Rd, Sandton, 2157


2020 HUSQVARNA

Jarvis and the new My20 300 i wins at

Erzberg. What a way to launch a bike!

Add to the fact that locally, Husqvarna is

having an amazing year at the races:

Red Plates: Kenny Gilbert, OR1 on his

FX450.

Maddy Malan, MX1 on his FC450

Neil Vd Vyver 65 championship on his

TC65

William Ooshuizen E1 on his FE250

That’s quite a lineup!

Husqvarna Motorcycles have

launched the MY20 TE and FE

Enduro models.

The revamped line-up for 2020 has

key chassis, suspension and engine

developments for two and four stroke models

and an all-new 150i fuel injected two-stroke.

The 2020 Husqvarna range combines a new

look to the bodywork and graphics plus

performance upgrades in engine and chassis

departments to improve handling, rider

comfort and take a step forward in how the

bikes work out on the track or trail.

The 2020 range includes a new 150i, fuel

injected two-stroke model plus the 250i and

300i TE two-strokes and the four-strong, four

stroke FE range of 250, 350, 450 and 501

capacities.

The details for 2020 include a new

more rigid frame, sub-frame, improved

shock linkage lowering seat height,

updated fork and shock settings, better

ergonomics for rider feel on the bike

and Husqvarna’s premium components

as standard across the entire Husqvarna

Motorcycles enduro range.

Husqvarna MY20 models in a nutshell:

• New frame on all models with increased

longitudinal and torsional rigidity

• New TE 150i with electronic fuel injection

and electric start

• Two-stroke 250 and 300i models have a

secondary ambient air sensor

• New 250g lighter two-piece subframe

across the model range

• Updated WP XPLOR fork with new midvalve

piston and setting

• Updated WP XACT shock with new main

piston and setting

• New shock linkage dimension providing

reduced seat height and added control

• All-new exhaust systems across all

models for improved performance and

durability

• New seat 10mm lower to the ground

• Improved cooling circuit with radiators

placed 12mm lower

• Progressive new bodywork design with

improved ergonomics

• New fuel tank design

• Updated four stroke engines offering

improved performance and rideability

• 1° lower mounting on T 250i/300i engines

for improved front end traction

• Updated TE 250i/300i cylinder for improved

two-stroke performance

Chassis upgrades

Husqvarna’s new generation of enduro

models feature new blue powder-coated

frame with increased longitudinal and

torsional rigidity, which Husqvarna says

brings improved precision of steering, feel

and stability.

A new, lighter composite carbon fibre

subframe improves handling also they say by

improving stability and rider feedback.

A significant part of the new handling

character are the updated,

now aluminium cylinder

head mountings (metal

stays connecting engine

to frame basically inside your knees).

Equally important are the 12mm lower

radiators which reduces the centre of

gravity and helps rider feel for the

front of the bikes and improves

the ergonomics for the rider.

That’s not all – the 250 and

300 two-strokes engines

have been rotated forwards

by one degree, again, to

improve front end feel.

New WP suspension on all

models

Updated 48mm WP

XPLOR front forks and WP

XACT shocks arrive with more

consistent damping and better


Gautengs Premier Husqvarna dealership

P A R T S . W O R K S H O P . B I K E S . A C C E S S O R I E S

the two part header pipes now removable

without removing the rear shock.

resistance to bottoming. Using the same

linkage progression found in the Husqvarna

Motocross range, the rear-end now sits

lower, improving control and comfort in

extreme enduro conditions.

Additionally, by using a softer spring rate and

increased hydraulic damping, Husqvarna says

the rear shock is more comfortable, sensitive

and has improved feel. The new linkage

system reduces seat height by 10mm, helping

rider control over technical terrain.

New engines and exhausts

As we’ve already spotted this season,

particularly the two-strokes, the 2020

Husqvarna enduro models have revised

exhausts across the range. Each is tailor

made to the specific model and for 2020

are lighter and stronger on the two-strokes

thanks to new mufflers and header pipes.

The four strokes are redesigned with

More precision from two-stroke

engines and improved cold start

The big change in the two-stroke line-up is

the all-new TE 150i which makes

three models with the TE 250i

and TE 300i. Benefitting

from an electric starter as

standard, the TE 150i, TE

250i and TE 300i arrive with

new engine mapping settings

and new wiring looms.

A significant update for the

MY20 fuel injected models

includes a new ambient pressure sensor and

39mm throttle body working together with

the power valve, a reworked idle system

supplying more air (and improving cold

starts), a redesigned air intake funnel and

heavily worked new engine maps that deliver

a more precise power delivery.

Four strokes with more thump

The entire four stroke range features

extensive engine upgrades to reduce

weight and increased performance

and rideability. Highlights includes the

FE 450 and FE 501 getting new, lighter

cylinder heads (-500g), new

camshaft timings

and increased

compression ratios

(also on FE 250

and 350).

Husqvarna’s MY20

enduro range

features new graphics and bodywork

which is slimmed down to help easier

movement on the bike and confidence

inspiring riding.

That includes a new nose shape in the

upper fairing cowling deflects dirt

better and guides the front brake

hose more smoothly.

New shape fuel tanks sit in

a revised position between

your legs and house a new

throttle cable routing which

will please some owners.

The new Husqvarna

MY20 enduro range

will be available soon at

all authorised Husqvarna

Motorcycles Dealers.

Gautengs Premier Husqvarna dealership

P A R T S . W O R K S H O P . B I K E S . A C C E S S O R I E S


Motocross:

Husqvarna’s ever-growing line-up see’s

nine premium MX machines that feature

carefully considered developments,

targeted at further improving the pioneering

European manufacturer’s cutting-edge

motocross bike range.

Husqvarna has delivered functional

improvements. The entire motocross range

yet again offers state-of-the-art technologies

with premium, high-end componentry.

Continuing to develop motorcycles the 2020

range sees upgrades to the FC250, FC350,

FC450 four-strokes and TC125 and TC250

two-stroke machines, as well as to the TC50.

Notably, the entire motocross range features

cool new graphics that offer a modern-day

salute to the brand’s rich racing history.

The cross-country range, based on the

advanced two-stroke and four-stroke

motocross motorcycles, has been equally

equipped for 2020 and sees the continued

development of two-stroke technology by

proudly introducing the 2020 TX300i, now

with electronic fuel injection. This exciting

new machine rounds out the line-up, which

includes the four-stroke FX350 and FX450.

The list of 2020 technical highlights includes:

• A new additional interchangeable airbox

cover for optimized airflow on all FC fourstroke

models. Progressive bodywork for

optimized ergonomics

• Chromoly steel frames and Husqvarna

Motorcycles’ innovative two-piece composite

subframe.

• WP XACT suspension

• AER front fork technology.

• CNC machined triple clamps on all full-size

models.

• Magura hydraulic clutch system, Pro Taper

handlebars, Brembo brake calipers and highperformance

discs as standard.

All four-stroke models are equipped with

electric start as well as traction and launch

control.

Featuring much of the same technology

found in the successful full-size motocross

models, Husqvarna Motorcycles’ minicycle

range offers up-and-coming youngsters of all

skill levels some great bikes.

• New graphics, for 2020

• The TC50, gets a new lightweight, cast

aluminum swing arm.

The bikes are here soon! Chat to your dealer.

www.husqvarna-motorcycles.co.za

Gautengs Premier Husqvarna dealership

P A R T S . W O R K S H O P . B I K E S . A C C E S S O R I E S


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Automotive Distributed by

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Call 011 792 7691 for your

nearest dealer


COMPARISON TEST: KTM 790 VS 990

THE BATTLE FOR OFF-ROAD

SUPREMACY BEGINS

KTM 790 Adventure R vs KTM 990 Adventure R

Story: Donovan Fourie Pics: Meghan McCabe and Andrew Buntain

64 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


KTM’s motto is their illustrious “Ready to

Race”, words they have certainly lived by in

everything they have ever built. Think about

it – anything bearing those famous letters

has clearly been designed by someone

who is in touch with their inner 13-year-old,

telling them to turn it up a notch when the

marketing research team calls for calmness

and sensibility.

This is prevalent in their adventure

range, a class where the words “rideability”,

“comfort” and “economical” are ubiquitous

in marketing blurbs, where manufacturers

build motorcycles for sensible adults

wanting a loyal companion for their journey

into the unknown.

When KTM joined the adventure

chase, it seemed that someone shunned

everything the researchers put forward

about sensibility, and simply took a

motocross bike and shoved a big engine

in it. The first was the 640 Adventure in

1998, and then the 950 Adventure in 2003,

followed by the 990 Adventure in 2006.

These were angry, hardy, brutish machines

that growled down gravel roads throughout

the world, popping wheelies and blasting

along whatever harshness the terrain could

throw at it.

They developed a cult following, and

the entire motorcycling community gave

the rider of any of these machines a

respectful nod every time they pulled into

the scene. They were rally racers with

headlights, and some of their pilots were

perceived as riding heros.

Then, in 2013, KTM released the 1190

Super Adventure, followed by the 1290

Super Adventure and the smaller 1050 and

1090 Adventures. These boasted massive

performance, sophisticated technology

and laudable attitude. They were praised,

respected and revelled by everyone who

gazed upon their glory.

Well, nearly everyone.

A good chunk of the 990 brethren

took a look at these new fire-breathing

hulks and saw more soft-touring rather

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 65


than jumped-up motocross bikes. For their power and

technology, they had lost their core dirt spirit, and so you

still see stalwart 990 owners lovingly caring for their ageing

990 Adventures, sending them to the top mechanics and

sourcing specialist parts.

They have no intention of replacing these machines

because, so far, nothing has shown the hardcore

ruggedness of the 990.

Until...

Earlier this year, the 790 Adventure arrived, and even

the 990 stalwarts lifted an eyebrow. KTM dubbed it as “a

dirt bike for the streets”, and a mad-capped launch ride

through some of the old Dakar Rally hunting grounds in

Morocco proved them to be correct.

So the 790 has the off-road gusto, but has it got the

guts to take on the 990? Should the stoic 990 crew finally

look at trading in? We took a 790 Adventure R from

the demo fleet of KTM South Africa, snuck out a 990

Adventure R from the floor of Fire It Up and headed to Dirt

Bronco to find out...

We start with a quick head-to-toe.

KTM 790 vs 990 at a glance

The 990 does look the part – it is a Dakar rally bike with

a giant V-twin engine shoved between its legs. This Fire

It Up bike had a set of FMF aftermarket cans turning

that already sonorous exhaust note into a spine-shaking,

primordial growl. It has a presence, it has a soul and it

gives you the feeling that it would devour your soul should

you displease it.

The 790, on the other hand, looks a bit calmer, sporting

disjointed lines, a swelling belly and a bobblehead. Then

it has a parallel-twin motor, adjusted slightly from that in

the 790 Duke. Nowadays, parallel-twins are all the rage –

engineers say they are more compact, more economical,

66 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


VOTED SA’S

BEST

MOTORCYCLE

MAGAZINE

*INDEPENDENT REVIEW DONE BY RACERZONE


cheaper to produce, offer better weight distribution

and, with an irregular firing order, can replicate the feel

of a V-twin. This all sounds promising, but much like a

computer can never generate music with the soul of Led

Zeppelin, a parallel-twin will never have the same beating

heart of a V-twin. With the Euro restrictions, any tiger growl

from the 790 has been severely muzzled, leaving a muffled

reminder of when motorised transport was great.

Beyond this, the 790 makes a noteworthy comeback.

The seat is a wholesome mixture of off-road flatness with

a touch of shaped comfort, while the 990 is all off-road.

This looks cool, but 14 hours into the ride, you might start

contemplating homicide.

The TFT dash on the 790 is a triumph of both

technology and style accompanying electronic wizardry

that includes a Rally Mode for all your serious off-roading

needs. The old-school dash on the 990, in comparison,

looks like it came out of a 1980s Casio catalogue, and

beyond some fuel-injection and the odd spark plug, it

is utterly bereft of any electrickery. Some people remain

adamant that this is better until they try some gadgetry

and then wonder how they ever managed without it.

That’s the superficial out of the way, we now begin the

proper duel for the off-road monarchy, and we start with

the golden standard of adventure tests.

KTM 790 vs 990 at a lift

Whenever we post about any large adventure machine, we

are immediately rebuked by old-school riders asking the

tired, aged question – if that thing falls over in the middle of

nowhere, how are you going to pick it up by yourself? The

answer we give is always – we have friends.

Nonetheless, the question persists, and we would never

attempt to discount other people’s feelings, so we dutifully

crashed both bikes (on soft grass, slowly and with some

help from a camera crew who gently lowered them) and

attempted to pick them both up again.

The 790 was the first to take a lie-down, and I was

tasked with putting it upright again on my lonesome. It

has a dry weight of 189kg that, by modern adventure

standards, means it is in danger of being blown away

by a light breeze. More so, the 20 litres of fuel is kept in

dual tanks that bulge out around the sides of the engine

in much the same way as on the KTM Dakar Rally bikes.

This means that not only is the bike light, but the meagre

weight is kept very low.

More so, the bulging tanks mean the bike doesn’t

entirely lie down, and even my squishy arm muscles made

quite light work of getting it vertical.

My The Bike Show colleague, Harry Fisher, is an oldschool

990-ist, and thus stood beside the horizontal body

of the 990 Adventure R, tasked with the job of raising it

from the dead. Even without the Euro5 nonsense (that is

rumoured to add up to 40kg to a motorcycle), it weighs

20kg more than the 790. Also, with a seat towering at

895mm high, and dual tanks that sit above the motor

means that the extra 20kg translates into something that

feels more like 500kg.

In the end, the same camera crew that helped lower the

990 were recruited to help pick it back up again.

This puts the 990 one down on the 790, but next, we

get on to a roll-on drag race. Surely it would win that?

68 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


KTM 790 vs 990 at a drag:

This is how making a film for The Bike Show works – we

get our bikes together, we figure out a theme, and then we

write a script. Once this is done, filming can be planned

and commenced. The idea behind this shoot was that the

990 would win the superficial argument, the 790 would win

the “pick-up your bike because you don’t have friends”

test and then the 990 would most certainly win a roll-on

drag race. This mixes things up a bit.

We say “the 990 would most certainly win a roll-on drag

race” because the 990 has pistons that are 200cc more

than the 790, and even with the new kid’s modern tech

and design, its 94hp and 88Nm of torque cannot hold a

candle to the 990’s 116hp and 100Nm. To further assure

the 990 wins, the crew decided that I should ride the 790

while stick-figure Harry would pilot the 990.

It was easy – we pull off in first gear, ride slowly

together up until the start line, then open the throttle and

the 990 will–

– the 790 buggers off into the distance.

“Hey?” Said everyone, me included.

Obviously, I must’ve jumped the start slightly, and Harry

was a bit lax at opening the throttle, so we did it again –

pull off in first gear, ride together until the start line and–

–Bugger! The 790 is gone again. How can this be?

We raced a few more times, running until the road

ended at which stage we were in fourth gear doing

speeds the constabulary would rather we didn’t, and still

the 790 cleared off every time. The problem here is that

we paid attention to the maximum power and torque

outputs, ignoring the fact that there are all sorts of outputs

before then. The 990 power and torque curves follow the

traditional, right-leaning hill look, while the 790 looks more

like a straight line, pushing power throughout the rev range.

We are confident that, given a long enough stretch of

road, the 990 would eventually catch up but, everywhere

else, the 790 will clean up.

With our script and planning now in tatters, we moved

on to the last test, one we were sure the 790 would win.

KTM 790 vs 990 at a jump

This is all about off-roading prowess, and we were at a

motocross track, so instead of wasting time – and budget

– trekking out to faraway lands to seek out different offroad

terrain, we instead recruited a motocross rider and

set both bikes off on a timed lap of the circuit.

The rider was MX veteran, stunt rider and rider coach,

Dylan Smith, and he lined up first on the 990. On paper,

things didn’t look so bad for the big boy. Suspension sits

at a giddy 248mm through WP USD forks and a PDS rear

shock. The front wheel in a motocrossy 21-inch with 18

inches at the rear and the sump gaps the ground by a

massive 296mm.

Dylan set off and growled his way around the track,

railing berms, wheelie-ing whoops and clearing tabletops,

while Harry and I stood with our mouths open knowing full

well that our attempts at such feats would most definitely

end in an ambulance. Eventually, he barked his way back

over the line in 1min 26.63sec.

Next, he climbed aboard the noticeably smaller 790.

This machine didn’t boast the same ground clearance –

263mm apposed to the 990’s 296mm – but featured much

the same travel at 245mm, although this is handled by

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 69


WP’s Xplor suspension, the same model

of suspension used by the enduro racers.

Also, 20kg less weight, a much lower centre

of gravity and better power on the pick-up

should mean this is a walkover.

Dylan shot off from the line again with far

less bark because the European Parliament

is no fun, but also cleared all jumps, corners

and whoops and crossed the line in…

…1min 27.71sec. More than a second

slower!

How can this be? It makes no sense. We

were relieved, however, because at least

our script now looked more appealing.

Dylan returned to the pits and did some

explaining – yes, the 990 was quicker on

that lap because its softer power delivery on

the tight, hard-packed circuit meant better

drive and a better lap. What he did also say,

though, was that he was not prepared to

do that lap on the 990 again: “The front on

that 990 is so heavy that it keeps pushing

through the corners. It was hard work.

I don’t think I could keep it up. And the

damping on the landings was not great.”

The 790 told a very different tale: “The

suspension is so good, and it feels so light

that I could ride it like that all day. The 990

was quicker over one lap, but in a ten-lap

moto, the 790 would win by miles!”

Compelling stuff. So what can we

conclude from all this?

KTM 790 vs 990 at the end of the day

We set off to find out whether 990 owners,

who have not seen the benefit of moving

to the newer, more soft-tourer adventure

machines, can finally trade in on something

that will outdo their old faithful. Our

objective opinion is yes, the KTM 790

Adventure R is better than the 990 on an

off-road adventure in every single way. If

you want to go on a trip into the wilderness

with only your wits and your machine, the

790 will undoubtedly be better.

You will miss your 990, though. There

is something, as we mentioned before,

about the 990 that speaks to your soul,

that makes your heart beat a little faster.

The 790, for all its talents, doesn’t quite tick

these emotional boxes.

So should people stick to the 990 or

move to the 790? It’s a tough one, but

we have a solution – have both. The 790

Adventure R, in standard trim, will set you

back R185,999 while this 990, on the Fire

It Up showroom, is R99,000. Together,

they are R284,999, roughly the same price

as some of the new big cc adventure

machines out there.

Wouldn’t you rather have these two

instead of just one motorcycle?

Contacts:

KTM – www.ktm.com

Fire It Up – 011 467 0737

70 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


READERS RIDE: BOTSWANA RIDE

Botswana

Solo through

Not a huge variety of pics but a great read for anyone with a bit of wanderlust.

A trip report by Martin Malec, Adventurer of note.

Day 2 - Molopo lodge

The Plan for the day was to get petrol

in Askham early in the morning, cross

the border at Bokspits as soon as they

open at 7:30 and then hit the dunes this

time starting near Bokspits and making

it through Khawa all the way to Tsabong

about 250 km away.

It didn’t work out. I didn’t manage to

sleep much because of that headache and

- worse - because of swarms of mosquitos

in the chalet. In my minimalistic packing I

forgot to take the insect repellent stick and

the buzzing around my head ensured that I

got at max 3 hours of sleep. In the morning

I felt pretty raw and decided that I wasn’t in

the shape to take on 250 km of lion infested

sand. So a rest day it was - at the end of

the day I was right at the source of the high

quality meat and cold drinks.

I managed at least to go to Askham and

fill up so that next day I would be ready to

hit the road right away.

Day 3 - Molopo lodge to Khawa to

Middelputs (291km, 5 km tar, 35 km dirt

road, rest sand)

This time I wised-up, got Tabbard insect

spray at reception and the used almost all

of it to spray my chalet inside out before

I went to bed. It worked and I slept like a

baby through the night. In the morning I

settled, packed up and set-off. I have made

it to the border post at Bokspits about 4

km away just as they opened for business

at 7:30 and as the only customer made it

through without a glitch.

The plan for the day was to hit the dunes

just north of Bokspits, free-ride over the

dunes north east to Khawa about 130 km

away and from there continue east for the

sleepover in Tsabong. The first bit to Khawa

I felt confident about, but I wasn’t sure

whether I will be able to make it to Tsabong,

as I was told that there are few ranches

somewhere west of Tsabong, with fences,

so I didn’t know if I will be able to find my

way around those (I didn’t have a clue

where those ranches are).

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019 7 1


I was particularly keen on the initial dune

section starting just above Bokspits as I

knew from satellite images, that this is the

home of the big rolling red dunes. Further

east the dunes recede gradually a bit and

became lighter in color. Further west and

north the real red dune sea starts, but that

is unfortunately on private land in SA or in

Kgalagadi NP. So this was as good as it

was going to get.

I was worried a bit about the weather as

the forecast expected storms around the

area and indeed there were clouds covering

the sky for most of the day. But that turned

out to be a blessing in disguise as it kept

temperature in check (actually riding in

T-shirt, body armor and Leatt jacket, I was

quite cold for most of the day and drank

again probably less than litre of water, and

yet didn’t suffer any heatstroke/dehydration

symptoms), and the rain ahead of me

compacted the sand nicely which made for

great and easy progress over the dunes.

The coulds and sand made also for

some stunning scenery and I have way

too many pictures for this day. Yes, I have

selected the best ones, but there are still

too many so you will have to deal with it .

Here we go: from Bokspits I have taken

dirt road north heading to Two Rivers on

Bots side of the border. The landscape

looked very promising:

After 15 km I came upon turn off to a

track that I plotted at home. There was

actually an end of fenced off area, but no

track to be seen. So I just turned East and

followed roughly the fence free riding (rather

sailing) across the undulating deep red

sand sea of dunes. The dunes were running

mostly in the north-south direction so I was

hitting the mostly straight on as any sailor

worth his salt would.

The fenced area eventually ended after

few km and I just continued free-style east.

The track I have plotted seemed to be

long gone. Almost each valley though had

track following the valley in the north-south

direction, so should I get into trouble it

would be easy just to turn south and make

it to the tar road running to the south along

Molopo River from Bokspits to Middleputs

and Tsabong. But there was no need. I was

flying and this was the best riding I had

done in a very long time.

I was free-riding in whatever direction the

vegetation opened up best without a care in

the world, except for this one:

And onwards East I flew:

I made it up all the dunes without a

glitch, until this one, where I had to dodge

and grass knoll and didn’t make it all the

way. But nothing that another try wouldn’t

sort out.

After about 20 km of this pure nirvana, I

have came upon the track I wanted to join

heading up one of the dune valleys and

turned north:

Soon after I turned north, the scenery

changed once again. It was still heaps of

sand, but this time of much more orangy

hue. No idea why there are so many

different varieties/colors of sand in this

relatively small area, but they make for very

scenic riding for sure.

There were lots of horses running

around. Initially I thought that I’d bumped

into one of the last herds of wild mustangs,

but no - they were just early sign of a

nearby cattle post:

After km or two I came upon quite

sizeable post - it even has a name in T4A -

Drieboom. I marked it on GPS as another

source of water and then rode up to the

huts with about 10 locals sitting around for

a bit of chit chat. Surprisingly most of them

spoke very good English and I enquired

about the track to Khawa and such. After

short exchange I bode my farewell and was

on my way again:

After another dozen or so km I came

upon yet another unique set of dunes and

stopped for few pics. The colorful sand in

combination with low clouds provided for

some delicious scenery (yes I know, I’m

repeating myself - get used to it, it’s going

to get worse):

After that the track turned more north

east and I was yet again going mostly

across the dunes, instead of following the

valleys:

The rain - or rather the electric storm

- ahead made me a bit nervous, but it

seemed to be moving away so I pushed

on keeping an eye on it. It was actually

blessing, as the rain was keeping the sand

wet and heavy, making for much easier

progress:

This path took me to yet another set of

spectacular dunes:

At these dunes I re-connected the the

main east-west path running from Khawa

to Two Rivers/Stuizedam, which I have rode

yesterday in the oposite direction. I turned

east and pushed on towards Khawa:

After another couple of dozen km I

arrived at the cattle post where I have

connected to this trail two days ago, that

time coming from Middelputs in the south

east:

This cattle post is probably the prettiest

of them all, sitting at the bottom of the

impressive dune. I don’t quite understand

why there are these islands of just sand,

while just few hundred meters away there is

plenty of vegetation growing on seemingly

the same sand. Also there invariably seems

to be water available at these sand islands:

I checked the living quarters, but unlike

two days ago, there was nobody home.

And onwards, east, I rode heading for

Khawa, still about 50 km away:

Tracks often crossed the dunes where

they often disappeared completely and it

took quite a bit of guess work and riding

around to find them again on the other side:

There really isn’t much anywhere in

Southern Africa that can match beauty of

this track. Hoanib river between Amspoort

and Sesfontein, upper Huarusib north of

Puros in Kaokoland and Valley of Desolation

in Damaraland. That is probably it.

And this still wasn’t the end - I still had

at least 30 km to cover just to Khawa (and

from there another probably 140 km to

Tsabong). Not that I was complaining, this

was the best day of riding I had for a very

very long time, and this is after coming off

2 years of sabbatical which I mostly spent

riding the best destinations within 3000 km

of Joburg.

72 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


And another kraal - last one before

Khawa, which was still about 15 km away:

With only about 15 km to Khawa to go,

I somehow managed to lose the track after

that last cattle post. As said, the tracks

often disappeared in the sandy islands the

posts were usually located at, or there were

too many disappearing in many directions.

I didn’t spent too long looking for the track,

but rather picked the easterly direction and

drifted over the dunes free style for few km

until I bumped into the track by luck again.

The scenery was more or less the same all

the way to Khawa:

Eventually after 130 km of the most

spectacular dunes one can wish for, I

arrived at Khawa and stopped at the first

house that had car parked next to it. I asked

if I can get petrol anywhere in Khawa, but

got the negative answer. Tried once more at

anothe house with car, but the owners just

confirmed that there is no petrol to be had

in the village. I had a bit of a dilema. I was

keen to try for Tsabong through the bush,

but it was at least 140 km away - if I don’t

run into any fences, which was unlikely

as those ranches were sitting between

me and Tsabong somewhere. Or I could

just ride down to Middelputs about 70 km

away, fill up from the jerry cans in my car,

sleep over somewhere in the bush (there is

no accommodation in Middelputs) and try

again next day.

The problem was that I didn’t have a

clue how much petrol I actually had. The 19

liter tank I have is transculent, so one can

see level of petrol, but the problem is that

the tank is pretty uneven in its volume with

majority sitting up above the engine and

only smaller portion sitting in the narrow

side pockets. So just looking at the level

is quite misleading, as while the tank may

look half full from outside, by that stage it is

probably already way past that mark. I was

a bit pissed off that I didn’t mark the levels

for different volume on the tank as Justin

(JustBendIt) did on his - would come handy

now. I still had 2 liter Coke bottle of petrol

so I poured that one in and it looked like I

may be about half full, so I decided to give

Tsabong a bash.

Here is the shebeen in Khawa which

I didn’t have good memories about since

my last visit, when I lay there in the shade

badly heat stroked, while being pestered

by drunken local bushmen. This time, there

was no such a problem as unlike last time I

was in a top form ready to take on anybody,

but alas it wasn’t necessary. The drunks

were nowhere to be seen (strange as it was

weekend) and I used up only about 1 liter of

my water, so there was no need for refill, so

this time I gave this upmarket establishment

a miss.

From Khawa I took the main dirt road

heading south-east to Middelputs. After

about 15 km I came to an suitably good

looking turn-off heading more or less in

my desired easterly direction and jumped

on. The landscape changes past Khawa.

It is still sand underneath with small rolling

dunes for many km, but this time overgrown

with vegetation and looking much more

Serengeti-ish/savanah-ish.

One can almost feel the lions staring at

you from the tall grass.

Unfortunatelly I had no luck in flushing

any cats out, but I did run into plenty of

game - mostly ostriches and variety of big

boks, such as oryxes and sabre antelopes (I

think). I didn’t score almost any presentable

photos of them as they tended to duck fast

and by the time I got my camera out they

were too far.

So you will have to just believe me...

After about 70 km from Khawa I came

upon the dreaded fence. By now it was

getting late with sun slowly setting in

the west and looking at my petrol level I

realized that I don’t have enough margin

to go looking for a track around the ranch,

as I didn’t have a clue how big it was. So

I run out of the options, turned south and

headed for Middelputs about 70 km partly

off-piste and partly on one of the numerous

tracks I randomly came about. The setting

sun make for some stunning colors and

surfing the winding tracks trough the bush

was yet again out of this world - sadly I

was in a hurry to outrun the setting sun

so didn’t manage the really good photos

underpinned by deep red sand background.

On the positive note - I could focus fully on

the riding and really savoured every second

of it.

I arrived at Middelputs just past the

sunset at about 18:00. It was completely

dark by then. I made it to the police station

and told the police lady at duty that I will be

taking my car. There is no accommodation

(and more importantly steak) in Middelputs.

So I decided to pack the car and head for

overnight at Tsabong about 100 km away,

where I knew a guesthouse with restaurant

(kind of). It would also position me better for

exploration next day, when I wanted to try

to find connection from Tsabong side to the

point where I had to turn around today - i.e.

the route around the ranches. Plus the base

would be closer to Joburg for the return leg

home.

Driving in dark in Botswana is never

great option, but admittedly much easier in

bakkie than on bike (that is plain stupid with

all the animals milling around). I made it to

Tsabong at about 7:30, got room and was

even able as the only customer to score

pork ribs (the ‘restaurant’ has basically one

course for night offer - no menu).

I’m repeating myself, but this was one

of the best days of riding have done in a

long time, probably ever. The combination

of freedom of big open space, magnificent

dunes, smooth wet sand and spectacular

cloud cover made for a very very

memorable experience.

PS: Off Road Cycles does all the

preparations on my bike, they also supplied

all the accessories fitted to the bike and

fitted everything.

Big up to them, great job!.


NATIONAL MX Pics by Zygs Brodalka.

HOT RACING IN

BLOEM!

Round 3 of the 2019 TRP

Distributors South African National

Motocross Championship took place at

the Bloemfontein Offroad Club (BORC)

over the weekend and delivered a day of

spectacular racing.

With a win in Moto1 and 2nd in Moto2,

Tristan Purdon went on to take the overall

for the day in the MX1 Class. Lloyd

Vercueil crashed in the first race and

managed to fight back to a respectable

4th, then went on to win the second race

to finish in 2nd for the day. Maddy Malan

ended in 3rd for the day with his 2-4

finish, and retains the points lead. David

Goosen looked to be on form battling it

out at the front of the pack to take a 3-3

finish for 4th overall.

It was a perfect day for Joshua Mlimi as

things clicked into place and he went on to

win both Moto’s to take his first MX2 Class

victory. Anthony Raynard battled with his

starts but salvaged a 2-2 finish for 2nd

overall while Kerim Fitz-Gerald’s 4-4 finish

saw him secure 3rd place.

In the MX3 Class Ian Topliss and Tyson

Engelbrecht shared out the 1st’s and 2nd’s

but it was Topliss who took the overall with

the second Moto win. Craig Kruger closed

off the podium in 3rd place.

Kayla Raaff continued her unbeaten

run in the Ladies Class with another two

wins to take the day. Leah Heygate and

Natasha Rugani rounded off the podium in

2nd and 3rd respectively.

Dalton Venter and Cameron Durow

shared wins and 2nd places in the two

Moto’s of the 125 High-School Class with

Venter taking the overall and Durow having

to settle for 2nd. Arnu Saaiman finished in

3rd place.

Leonard du Toit made no mistakes to

take the day with a double win in the 85cc

Pro Mini Class ahead of Blake Young in

2nd and Nate Mc Clellan in 3rd.

Emmanuel Bako took another

dominant win in the 85cc Junior Class

with Deegan Bloomfield taking 2nd and

Joshua Fletcher 3rd.

Jordan van Wyk took both moto wins in

the 65cc Class to end Neil van der Vyver‘s

unbeaten run. Trey Cox took home 2nd,

while Neil van der Vyver finished in 3rd.

Ethan Williamson finished 1-2 for the

overall in the 50cc Class. Jake van Schoor

took 2nd with Christian Berrington in 3rd.

50cc Start with Ethan Williamson (171)

125 cc High School start with Ethan Hoffman (783) Dalton Venter (151) and Calvin Jean-Jacques (75)

Cameron Durow MX 2

Anthony Raynard MX2

Blake Young Pro Mini

Jake van Schoor 50cc

Lloyd Vercuil MX1


SA Motocross Nationals

BORC MX Results

MX1

1st Tristan Purdon

2nd Lloyd Vercueil

3rd Maddy Malan

4th David Goosen

5th Marco de Vrye

MX2 Start with JoshuaMlini (259) and Cameron Durow (58)

MX2

1st Josh Mlimi

2nd Anthony Raynard

3rd Kerim Fitz-Gerald

4th Bradley Cox

5th Jesse Wright

MX3

1st Ian Topliss

2nd Tyson Engelbrecht

3rd Craig Kruger

MX1 Start With Lloyd Vercuil (777) and Tristan Purdon (41)

Ladies

1st Kayla Raaff

2nd Leah Heygate

3rd Natasha Rugani

125 Highschool

1st Dalton Venter

2nd Cameron Durow

3rd Arnu Saaiman

Dalton Venter 125cc High School

Emmanuel Bako 85 Junior

85cc Pro Mini

1st Leonard du Toit

2nd Blake Young

3rd Nate Mc Clellan

Matthew Malan MX1

85cc Junior

1st Emmanuel Bako

2nd Deegan Bloomfield

3rd Joshua Fletcher

Jordan van Wyk 65cc

65cc

1st Jordan van Wyk

2nd Trey Cox

3rd Neil van der Vyver

50cc

1st Ethan Williamson

2nd Jake van Schoor

3rd Christian Berrington

Neil van der Vyver 65cc

Joshua Mlini MX2


HOW TO RECOVER

FASTER WHEN RIDING

By Mandy Thomas, BASE FIT: The Specialists in Fitness For Dirt Bike Riding

If you are left gasping for air,

and having to stop regularly

to recover when your riding,

then you need to read this!

You put a ton of effort into your bike

rides. You get up early to load your bike

with all your kit. Then meet the lads on

route, after which you drive a fair distance

to get the best terrain. Once your bike is

offloaded, you kit up and off you go……..

For the first hour you feel fine. But then

it hits. Exhaustion! Those hill climbs are

killers! You feel weak, out of breath and

even nauseous. And it sucks!!

You stop and to take a good 10-minute

rest, re group with the lads, then off you

go again. Only to find yourself in the same

shattered position again as soon as the next

hill climb says ‘hello’.

Those guys passing you on the hills,

who only stopped for a quick 2 minute rest,

if at all – are so annoying! But how do they

keep riding at that intensity and pace?

If you can relate to the above then you

are in the same position as Paul was 3

months ago. He was the typical weekend

warrior, didn’t race much, but of course

had the dream to finish Roof of Africa. He

quickly realized that hitting the weight

section of the gym 3 three times a week,

with two ad-hock cardio sessions squeezed

in (on a good week) was not going to cut it

for improved recovery when riding. Not a

chance!!

So he changed the way he trained to be

more specific to dirt bike riding, (rather than

the beach body type strength training most

guys typically do) … and wah-lah! Not only

did his recovery rate improve while riding

but he is now able to ride for longer and he

lost 7kg of fat without even trying! Bonus!!

So what changed? Paul’s new dirt-bike

fitness routine that dramatically improved

his recovery times is as follows:

Super-set a strength exercise with an

explosive exercise:

Combining these two types of exercises

as opposed to doing them separately, will

rapidly get your heart pounding through

your chest – which is what need to happen

to be better conditioned for riding.

For example: Do 10 push ups then

immediately afterwards do 10 squat jumps. Do

not rest for more than 20 seconds, then repeat.

Keep going for 4 minutes, then change your

exercises. Train like this twice a week.

Dedicate one weekly session to core

training:

A strong core gives you improved balance,

which saves you energy when riding, so

it’s super important to dig deep into your

core training, not leave it as an afterthought.

Include exercises that require you to rotate

(russian twists), hold a position isometrically

(the plank), extend (roll outs with a wheel

or barbell) and contract (sit ups). Combine

76 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2019


your core exercises with intervals of cardio

for example 2 minutes of skipping.

Include lots of balance work:

Do as many exercises as possible on one

leg at a time. This not only strengthens your

stabilizers but forces your core work harder

to hold your position still. Remember, you

are not riding a stable object.

Limited rest during sessions:

All gym sessions have very limited rest,

from only 20 seconds to a maximum of 1

minute (only if you are really sucking gas).

Start the next set of your program before

you feel ready to Fast-track your fitness like

a hole-shot start on an MX track!

2 rest days in the week:

Yes, that’s right. Because of the change

in intensity in the above training tips, rest

days are as important as training days so

your body can efficiently recover, prevent

exhaustion and thereby provide you with

more energy on riding days.

Why does the above help improve riding

recovery times?

1. When your balance is on point, you will

save energy by not continuously having to

counter correct yourself.

2. When your core is powerful, you will

be able to generate energy as opposed to

relying on brute muscular strength which

will eventually fail you.

3. When you are fitter, you are

conditioned to riding though fatigue,

thereby rest periods become shorter.

Being physically able to max out on your

riding is exactly what you want to justify the

cost and the time you put into your sport.

You don’t need fancy equipment you just

need to train correctly.

If you need help getting your fitness

for riding to the next level or you just don’t

know where to start, then get hold of us at

Base Fit. All coaches are trained to get you

the maximal results for your riding fitness.

Please also send your questions to

mandy@basefit.co.za and I will address

them. If you found this article helpful please

follow us on Instagram #basefitsportfitness

and https://web.facebook.com/

basefitsportfitness/

Lodewyk Jansen van

Vuuren, head of the Base

Fit Riding Academy

and owner of Base Fit

Centurion as well as

the soon to be opening

Base Fit Pretoria East.

Lodewyk demonstrates

the correlation between

explosive power and

quickness of ‘thruster

jumps’ practiced in the

gym, which gives him more

height and greater distance

when jumping with the bike.

Since 1994

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Photo by: Chantelle Melzer Photography


NATIONAL OFFROAD

Husqvarna

tightens title grip

A few of our mates were racing – and

the event was on our doorstep, so we

popped down to watch some of the

action on a very dusty sunny Highveld

morning. It was awesome to see the

teams out in force – but a bit sad to see

so few Japanese motorcycle contenders

in the national series. The series really

is dominated by two Austrian brands

who go all out to make it a success. If

you have never been to watch these

guys and girls race – you need to get

there some time. These are some of the

fastest riders on the planet!!

This time we decided to try and

include all the pics from the pits.

Pepson Plastics Husqvarna star Kenny Gilbert

took a back-to-back SA national Cross Country Moto

victory over KTM duo Ross Branch and Louwrens

Mahoney at the Gauteng 400 near Brakpan. KTM

trio Ian Rall, Gareth Cole and Jarryd Coetzee topped

OR2, while another KTM trio Bradley Cox, Haydn Cole

and Stefan Van Deventer (Husqvarna) led OR3, Davin

Cocker (KTM) took High School, Juan Van Rooyen

(KTM) Senior and Wayne Farmer Masters honours.

Gilbert laid the foundation for his successful

weekend with a strong time trial performance before

controlling the race from the front in spite of extreme

pressure from arch rival, KTM’s Ross Branch to open

his OR1 title advantage up to 14 points. “I worked hard

for this one!” Kenny admitted. “We had a great time trial

and while Ross was really quick this morning, my team

prepared me a great Husqvarna and I was able to keep

ahead to win — now to keep this momentum rolling!”

Readers Race;

We got one of our friends, Hannes Rootman who

took part to share his thoughts:

Arriving in the dark we saw that the pits were quite

empty. The track and pits were changed last minute as

there was an issue between farmers and the National off

road cars from the previous weekend. Fortunately Kyle

Enslin marked a new loop on short notice. It must be

said that he did a great job ensuring everyone’s safety.

The route was marked as a 52 km loop with long

flat out stretches, small wooded section, water and dirt

roads next to railway lines. Fun was to be had.


Time trials were first on the program.

The log leaders were first with a minute in between.

Followed by the rest of us with 30 second intervals.

Dust was not a real issue as there was a slight wind

blowing and clearing it away.

The battle was very tight up front as the top guys

were only seconds apart.

The race itself was great. Hard work, concentrating

not to make mistakes as that happens easily at higher

speeds.

Training at the Basefit Centurion’s program really

helped for stamina and endurance.

After 2 laps we had a compulsory decomp stop.

After the 15 minute rest the next 2 laps felt a lot like

the first half of the race.

The Race was completed successfully.

Some of the pro riders were changing tyres after

every 2 laps, the hard pack ripped them to shreds.

Fortunately, we amateurs don’t have that problem.

It’s really sad to see the Nationals not having its

glamour from a couple of years ago. Entries seemed

quite low and not everybody even pitched for the race.

They need to advertise a bit more maybe - very little

spectator numbers.

Mostly support crews in the pits.

Hopefully something can be done to resolve these

issues so that novices like myself can carry on to rub

shoulders with the big boys on the race tracks.

The next National Off-road race is 27th July

Bloemfontein.

More info: Ferdi 073-284-8155

Hannes Rootman

and his crew...


Sherco. At every race.

Some dusty Branch’s...

Team Shimwells with Dart...

The guys from team MCA Holeshot Husqvarna

Taki and Kenny...

The Perry family.

Yamaha riders seem to gt the prettiest brolly dollies.


Raceworx hosts Red Bull

athlete and European

Stunt Riding champion

Aras Gibieza

So, last week Friday we’re out

testing bikes for RideFast around

the Magalies Mountains west of JHB

when we heard that Raceworx KTM

would be hosting Red Bull athlete

European Stunt Riding champion and

Lithuanian sensation Aras Gibieza.

Aras was in SA, courtesy of the guys

from Red Bull – taking bikes to the

masses around South Africa.

Everybody concurred; we had to go

watch his show. Aras is a mere 30 years

young and can ride a motorcycle like

nobody you have ever seen. He got his

first motorcycle helmet when he was just 3

years old and since then has accumulated a

list of accolades and stunt riding champions

longer than our national sports teams

defeats. For his SA tour he was

riding a unique – first in the world KTM

790 Duke prepared by the world famous,

Proudly South African “Reconstructed”

customising shop in Centurion. A loud - fire

and smoke breathing monster growling as

Aras hurled it at the scenery sitting on the

handle bars and smoking the tyres while

facing the wrong way at mind numbing

speeds. All in courtyard in front of the

beautiful Raceworx KTM and Husqvarna

West dealership.

This show was very last minute.com, but

it was too cool! An amazing spectacle to

behold, but don’t take our word for it check

out the pics.

Raceworx (011) 027-9922

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