Impact report master 2019 digital single

createuk

IMPACT REPORT 2018/19

The UK’s leading charity empowering lives

through the creative arts

CHARITY OF THE YEAR


CHAIRMAN Eddie Donaldson OBE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE Nicky Goulder

PATRONS Sir Matthew Bourne OBE,

Esther Freud, Dame Evelyn Glennie,

Howard Goodall CBE, Ken Howard OBE RA,

Erwin James, Shobana Jeyasingh MBE,

Tim Marlow, Nicholas McCarthy,

Lord Moynihan, Susannah Simons

AMBASSADOR Alistair DK Johnston CMG

TRUSTEES John Broadis,

Eddie Donaldson OBE, Tim Jones,

Marit Meyer-Bell, Vanessa Sharp,

Paul Thimont, Carol Topolski

Cover image: Banner made by young carers during a project culminating in the Lord Mayor’s Show

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CONTENTS

Foreword

Our vision and achievements

Awards, our impact

Longer-term impact

Our artists

Feedback

Ken Howard OBE RA

Who we work with

Disabled and non-disabled people

Young patients

Adult carers

Young carers

Vulnerable older people

Schoolchildren in areas of deprivation

Young and adult prisoners

Marginalised adults

Create the Difference

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FOREWORD

My reasons for supporting Create come from my own

personal experiences. My mother died when I was young,

so I went to a boarding school, which became a strong

foundation in the development of who I am today.

Having enjoyed a healthy career, it became clear to me

that it’s imperative to create opportunities for others. A

close friend introduced me to Create and I struck up a

relationship with the charity because it enables people

who come from disadvantaged backgrounds to get the

best from themselves. That really resonates with me.

In November I presided over the Lord Mayor’s Show, in

which Create had a walking float with 20 young carers

and the incredible mobile sculptures and banners that

they had created during a Create project. I was lucky

enough to have a fantastic view of the float, and the

excitement and pride on the young carers’ faces as they

waved to the crowds and displayed their creations was

moving to see.

That experience made me even more certain that we

need to shift our curriculum so that it’s not just about

pumping in knowledge. We all know that we should read

and write. We should also all have exposure to creative

activity. Once you build a basic level of knowledge, it’s

developing the ability to think critically and take initiative

that’s important. All those skills come out of creative

learning, whether that’s through music, visual art or other

artforms.

Creativity also allows you to experiment, and there

aren’t many things in life like that. We often see things

in a black-and-white way and are focused on 100%

perfection, but we’re not suited to that as humans. We’re

not perfect, so we need to recognise that it’s good to

take risks and for things not to work out, because you

learn from it.

Another essential life skill that Create’s projects

encourage is the ability to work with others. I see the

importance of this in the City of London, where our

finance and our creativity are in a square mile, bringing

people together and creating huge energy. People work

best when they’re interacting with one another, and this is

exactly what Create does with its vulnerable participants

– it enables them to access their full creative potential

through collaboration and connection.

It’s essential that we create opportunities for everyone

to experiment and to develop, and these are the

opportunities that Create brings to vulnerable people

across the UK. From those in prison to young patients,

homeless people to carers, Create gives people the

chance to access their creative potential.

I’m proud to support this essential work and encourage

you to do so too.

Peter Estlin at the Lord Mayor’s Show

Peter Estlin, Lord Mayor of the City of London

Impact Report 2018/19 1


OUR VISION AND

ACHIEVEMENTS

Sixteen years ago, Create breathed

its first breath at my dining room

table. In starting the charity, my vision

was to bring the joy, stimulation and

inspiration of the creative arts to the

most disadvantaged and vulnerable children and adults

across the UK, enabling them to feel empowered, upskilled

and connected.

At a time of political and social upheaval, funding cuts,

increasing inequality, and reduced arts provision in schools,

fulfilling that vision has never been more important.

Creativity impacts wellbeing, emotional and mental health;

it builds skills, brings joy and reduces isolation; and it levels

the playing field for people from many different walks of life.

Indeed, the World Economic Forum has identified creativity

as the third most important skill for business by 2020.

Our vision for the future is to increase our engagement with

those in our society who need it most, providing them with

free access to the educational, social and health benefits of

the creative arts.

But we cannot do this alone. Please help us to create the

difference for many more participants. With your support,

we can continue to make our society fairer, more caring

and more inclusive for all.

OUR AIMS

1 To give free access to the

creative arts for society’s

most disadvantaged and

vulnerable people.

2 To engage participants in

inspiring programmes led

by professional artists in

areas where provision is poor

and engagement is low.

3 To develop creativity,

learning, social skills and

self-esteem.

4 To enhance wellbeing.

5 To create a society that

is fairer, more caring and more

inclusive.

Nicky Goulder

Co-Founder and Chief Executive

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AWARDS

• 17 Koestler Awards

• Shortlisted ~ Charity Times

Charity of the Year (with an income of

less than £1m)

• Shortlisted ~ Children and Young

People Now Young Carers Award

OUR IMPACT

48 projects across the UK

850 creative arts workshops

1,672 disadvantaged and

vulnerable participants

18,634 contact hours

£779,473 income

62 professional artists

150 volunteers donated 970

hours

CREATE IS A SMALL

CHARITY WITH A

BIG HEART AND

FIERCE AMBITION TO

SUPPORT, TOUCH AND

CHANGE THE LIVES

OF THOUSANDS OF

VULNERABLE PEOPLE

THROUGH THE POWER

OF THE CREATIVE

ARTS. AND IT DOES

THIS BRILLIANTLY.

Nicola Brentnall MVO, Director, The Queen’s Trust

Impact Report 2018/19 3


LONGER-TERM

IMPACT

MAKING IT MATTER

We are committed to open, honest

and rigorous evaluation of our work.

Alongside our evaluation of each

project, we revisit two projects

each year, 6-24 months after their

completion. We call this initiative

Making it Matter.

Our consultant conducts in-depth

focus groups with participants and

detailed interviews with staff. The

results of which are compiled into a

report assessing impact.

DID YOU KNOW?

We have been running Making it

Matter since 2010, ensuring that we

evaluate the longer-term impact

of our work on our participants.

Nineteen appraisals have been

completed. We use the feedback

to improve our processes and

programmes to the benefit of those

who take part.

“Create’s impact measurement is

about as good as it gets.”

Cass Business School

CONNECT:CREATE

Making it Matter found that creative

activities had a lasting impact

on the participants. The project

enabled children with autism to

gain a sense of SELF-ESTEEM and

grow in CONFIDENCE. The staff

commented that it also helped

INSPIRE OTHERS.

CREATIVITY:REVEALED

CREATIVE:ENGAGEMENT

Making it Matter found that the creative

Making it Matter found that the

opportunity for vulnerable older

people to SOCIALISE and build

NEW RELATIONSHIPS with others

was of great LASTING IMPACT.

It has encouraged staff to think

more CREATIVELY about potential

experiences for the service users.

workshops left the participants with LASTING

MEMORIES of their experience. Participants

described REKINDLED CREATIVITY and

INCREASED CONFIDENCE. The final sharing

of work allowed family members to witness

their loved ones’ efforts and fostered a

deeper SENSE OF COMMUNITY and purpose

within the group.

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SINCE 2003 ...

OUR ARTISTS

37,622

participants

Our programmes are delivered by exceptional artists

who share our commitment to empowering lives. All

are professionals in their specialist field (eg musicians,

photographers, sculptors) who have outstanding

communication skills and a wealth of experience in

leading creative arts projects in community settings.

They act as facilitators, encouraging and motivating our

participants to explore their creativity, develop existing

and new life skills, become more confident and have

fun. All participants’ contributions are encouraged

and valued: their ideas and the development of their

creativity are at the heart of every project.

9,319

workshops

287,774

hours of contact

NURTURING TALENT

126

professional artists

Create’s Nurturing Talent programme gives

emerging artists the opportunity to work as

supporting artists on a range of Create projects,

attend professional development training days and

design and deliver their own Create workshop in a

community setting. Each artist receives a bursary

and commits to around 25 days across the year.

Nurturing Talent artist

£7,471,647

income raised

IT HAS BEEN LIFE-CHANGING

FOR ME AND HAS HELPED ME

TO SEE MYSELF AS A WRITER

AND WORKSHOP LEADER.

Impact Report 2018/19 5


FEEDBACK

We use ongoing feedback to improve the

work that we do. Each workshop ends with

a feedback circle allowing participants to

share how they feel; and at the conclusion

of each project we ask all participants,

staff, volunteers and artists to complete

a short questionnaire. We use a blend of

qualitative and quantitative data to create

an evaluation report. Below is a snapshot of

the year’s results.

Participant skill development/overall project rating

100%

90 87

99

78

94

79

97

87 95 78

97

86 97 97 98

50%

CREATIVITY COMMUNICATION TEAMWORK ARTFORM SKILLS CONFIDENCE SOCIAL

INTERACTION

Participant rating

Community partner rating

PROJECT OVERALL

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WORKSHOPS WITH

CREATE ALLOW

HOMELESS PEOPLE

WHO ARE TAKING PART

IN PRET’S RISING

STARS EMPLOYMENT

PROGRAMME TO ENGAGE

WITH CREATIVITY,

ENRICHING THEIR

EXPERIENCE WITH US

AND HELPING THEM

BUILD THE TEAMWORK

SKILLS THAT ARE

ESSENTIAL IN THE

WORKPLACE.

CREATE’S

PROGRAMMES

PLAY A VITAL ROLE

IN DEVELOPING

KEY SKILLS, LIKE

CREATIVITY, SO

THOSE MOST IN NEED

IMPROVE THEIR LIFE

CHANCES.

CORPORATE

PARTNERSHIPS

WE SHOULD ALL HAVE

SOME EXPOSURE TO

CREATIVE ACTIVITY.

SUPPORTING

ORGANISATIONS LIKE

CREATE IN HELPING

TO GET THE BEST OUT

OF PEOPLE IS A WAY

OF DOING THAT.

Peter Estlin, Lord Mayor of the City of London

Ashurst LLP volunteer

THERE IS PLENTY OF

MAGIC HAPPENING,

NOT ONLY ABOUT THE

ARTFORM, BUT ALL

THE LITTLE THINGS

HAPPENING IN THE

ROOM, CONVERSATIONS,

INTERACTIONS, KNOWING

DIFFERENT PEOPLE,

DIFFERENT AGES.

Impact Report 2018/19 7


KEN HOWARD

ROYAL ACADEMICIAN

Create Patron, artist Ken Howard OBE RA, has been

celebrated over his 60-year career for his paintings

of London, Cornwall and Venice. Below, he talks

about starting out as a painter and how art helps

people see.

One of my earliest memories of being creative is

when I was painting in north London on a railway

siding. This old fellow came along and looked at my

painting and he said “Sonny, I’ve walked across this

railway yard for 30 years and this morning I can see

that it’s beautiful.”

I think that’s the important thing in painting, to help

people see. Painting is about three things: it’s about

revelation, which means showing people something

which they’ve seen every day but never really

appreciated; it’s about celebration, which can be a

celebration of a gasworks or a railway siding just as

much as a beautiful woman or a flower; and it’s about

communication, which is reaching out to people and

speaking to people. I think it’s very important that

painting is accessible to people and isn’t so difficult

that they say “That’s all very well but I don’t really

know what it’s about.”

I remember I used to go into the City on Sundays in

my old clapped-out car with paintings strapped on

the roof and this man came along. He looked at my

painting and he said, “I like your painting, but you’ve

painted two churches and there’s only one there”.

So I said, “What about the reflection of the church?”

His eyes opened up and he said, “I’ve walked down

this road for thirty years and I’ll never see it the same

again”. Because I’d shown him a way of seeing it, and

a marble wall with a reflection of the church in it

made it look as if there were two churches.

One of the reasons I gave up teaching in ’73 was that

it was moving much more towards people having

academic qualifications and not being creative. We

had youngsters who wanted to go to art school but

couldn’t because they didn’t have the stipulated

number of O-levels and A-levels. Which is nonsense

really, because I remember I was in the staff room

and we decided that as members of staff none of us

would have got to art school under those conditions,

when all that mattered really was whether you had

talent for the arts. Without painting I think I would

have been termed now as someone who didn’t

have opportunities in life. Create gives everyone

opportunities to be creative – adults as well as

youngsters, people in prison, all ages.

“WITHOUT PAINTING I WOULD

HAVE BEEN TERMED AS

SOMEONE WHO DIDN’T HAVE

OPPORTUNITIES IN LIFE.”

It was quite difficult to make a living as an artist to

begin with – my dad worked in a factory and my

parents didn’t have any money. People see art as

a luxury, whereas I think art is a necessity. We’re

here for a very short time, and I think in that short

time anything that makes our time here richer is

worthwhile. And art does make our time here richer.

When Create approached me to become a Patron I

thought it was a very good idea, because it gave me

the opportunity to reach out to people through the

arts. You constantly meet people who say, “I would

have loved to have painted, I saw a sunrise the other

morning”. I think if you react to things like that then

you should do something about it, and the thing

that you do about it is that you make art. So I think

for people who Create works with, the actual act of

making art is important. I think there’s a lot of talent

out there which has never been dipped into.

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PEOPLE SEE ART AS A

LUXURY, WHEREAS I THINK

ART IS A NECESSITY.

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Impact Report 2018/19 9


WHO WE WORK WITH

Image taken with a young carer from our art:space

Impact 10 Report 2018/19 Southwark project during a dance workshop

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YOUNG PATIENTS

DISABLED CHILDREN AND ADULTS

YOUNG AND ADULT CARERS

VULNERABLE OLDER PEOPLE

YOUNG AND ADULT PRISONERS

SCHOOLCHILDREN IN AREAS OF

DEPRIVATION

MARGINALISED CHILDREN AND ADULTS

(INCLUDING HOMELESS PEOPLE, VICTIMS OF

DOMESTIC ABUSE, LGBTQ+ YOUNG PEOPLE

AND SEX WORKERS)

Our passion for having a positive impact on the lives of

society’s most disadvantaged and vulnerable people is the

driving force behind everything we do. We design and deliver

projects that enable people who are excluded through disability,

disadvantage, ill-health, imprisonment, poverty or social isolation

to take part in high quality creative arts experiences.

To ensure we reach the most disadvantaged and vulnerable

participants in areas of greatest need, we prioritise partner

organisations that receive little or no provision from other

arts providers, and select these using indices of deprivation

alongside data including: disability; entitlement to free school

meals; and use of English as an additional language.

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Impact Report 2018/19

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BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

BETWEEN DISABLED AND

NON-DISABLED PEOPLE

13.9 million people are considered to

be disabled in the UK.

Disabled people remain significantly

less likely to participate in cultural,

leisure and sporting activities than nondisabled

people.

Two-thirds of the British public feel

uncomfortable talking to disabled

people.

Participant

IT WAS REALLY FUN

WORKING WITH THE

PUPILS FROM THE

SCHOOL BECAUSE

EVEN THOUGH THEY

HAVE A DIFFERENT

LIFE, THEY CAN

STILL DO THE SAME

AS US, IT’S JUST

THAT THEY’VE GOT

A DISABILITY. THEY

DON’T GIVE UP.

WHAT WE DID

creative:connection enabled 153

disabled and non-disabled young

people to collaborate creatively,

allowing them to develop new

skills and shared understanding.

The process of making art, music,

film and animation together helped

break down the stereotypes,

misconceptions and anxieties that

reinforce social barriers.

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MAKING HOSPITALS AND

HOSPICES WELCOMING FOR

YOUNG PATIENTS

WHAT WE DID

ArtsAdventures used music, storytelling, art and dance

in Berkshire, Hampshire, London and Oxfordshire to

enhance the quality of life of 270 young patients - and

family members - suffering from a range of illnesses,

injuries and disabilities.

Hospital staff member

THE WORKSHOP

HELPS THE

CHILDREN TO

FORGET THEIR

ILLNESSES FOR A

SHORT WHILE.

40% of children in hospital

complained that there were no

activities or opportunities to play.

A high frequency of engagement

with arts and culture is generally

associated with a higher level of

subjective wellbeing.

Creative arts have been shown to

alleviate anxiety, depression and

stress while increasing resilience and

wellbeing, shortening the length of a

hospital stay.

Impact Report 2018/19 13


PROVIDING A SOCIAL, CREATIVE

OUTLET FOR ADULT CARERS

The economic value of carers’

contribution in the UK is £132 billion

per year.

1 in 8 adults in the UK are carers.

35% of unpaid adult carers say they are

often or always lonely which is 7 times

more than the general population.

ROSE’S STORY

Our creative:voices project in Lewisham enabled

carers to explore their creativity through collage,

whilst taking a break from their caring responsibilities,

building trusting relationships with their peers and

developing communication skills and confidence.

Rose told us about taking part:

“Working with the rest of the group is good. Everyone

is different. They bring their own ways and everyone

can learn from each other. It’s a very friendly

environment. It’s very good bonding and I made new

friends.

“Collage was a new thing for me, but I found that I’m

creative! If I didn’t come to the collage workshops,

I wouldn’t know that I can do that. Until you try

something you don’t know how good you are, how

creative you are. It’s definitely important to have

the chance to do something creative. It’s a good

thing as a carer, coming out of the house and doing

something good for you.

“I care for a family member with a chronic mental

health problem. I’ve been caring for 26 years. It’s

up and down, but how you keep your mind positive

is to come out of the house. This project is a good

opportunity to come out and do things and enjoy

yourself. And then you can care better with a peaceful

mind.”

BEING CREATIVE

HAS MADE ME

FEEL A LOT BETTER

BECAUSE I’M

ACTUALLY DOING

SOMETHING FOR

ME FOR A CHANGE.

GETTING BETTER

AT PHOTOGRAPHY

HAS GIVEN

ME A LOT OF

CONFIDENCE.

Carer

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ENABLING YOUNG CARERS TO

TAKE TIME OFF AND BE CREATIVE

There are an estimated 700,000 young

carers in the UK.

45% of young adult carers reported

that they have mental health problems.

School holiday periods are

particularly challenging for many

young carers due to an increase in

caring responsibilities and reduced

opportunities to engage in other

activities.

WHAT WE DID

We provided 548 young carers

from

Aylesbury, Bath,

Birmingham, Brighton,

Camden, Harrow, High

Wycombe, Islington,

Kingston, Lambeth,

Merton, Nottingham,

Richmond, Southwark,

Sutton, Swindon,

Westminster, Winchester

and Uxbridge

with a creative and social

outlet away from their caring

responsibilities.

OWEN’S STORY

art:space, our partnership with British Land, is our

multi-artform project with young carers.

Owen, 16, cares for his mother, who suffers from

depression and chronic pain, as well as his older

brother, who is blind. He told us about his experience

of taking part in Create’s filmmaking and music

workshops in Bath:

“My mum developed a back problem when I was about

twelve years old. It progressed until a doctor told her

she couldn’t work anymore and she now suffers from

depression and constant pain. But like everything, my

home life has its ups and downs. You have to make the

best of what you’ve got.

“I like to be creative but I don’t often get creative

opportunities like this. I can draw at home but I

wouldn’t have the equipment to go out and make a

film. And although I had tried filmmaking before, I didn’t

have the opportunity to look at different camera shots

or experiment with new techniques like I have done

here.

“Creativity helps me to think positively; just getting on

with music and doing something I like doing improves

my mindset.”

Impact Report 2018/19 15


KEEPING VULNERABLE OLDER

PEOPLE ACTIVE

Music reduces agitation and need

for medication in 67% of people with

dementia.

1 in 10 people aged 65 feel chronically

lonely all or most of the time.

2 in 5 older people say TV is their main

companion.

WHAT WE DID

We worked with 68 older

people from 4 London

boroughs to prevent

loneliness and social isolation.

Collaborative workshops

exploring film, photography,

visual art, creative writing,

dance and music enabled the

participants to build social

networks, express themselves

creatively and learn new skills.

PAULINE’S STORY

Pauline is a resident at the Selig Court independent

living Jewish Care campus. She took part in our

creativity:revealed project, which brought together

older people who attend three different Jewish Care

services for collaborative creative workshops.

She told us why she enjoyed the project:

“I have been involved in the filmmaking, art, music and

spoken word workshops. I have in particular enjoyed

music but art as well. At the start of the art workshop

I thought ‘I can’t draw or paint’ but yet we managed

to do all that. What the artists enabled us to do was

amazing. I loved everything about the music - how we

made up the words from nothing, how we put it all

together was great.

“I look forward to the sharing and also to the

workshops next year. I’ve loved every Wednesday;

having a go, trying things out, it’s marvellous. I would

definitely love to do this all again!”

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GIVING SCHOOLCHILDREN IN

POVERTY ACCESS TO THE ARTS

A lack of financial literacy is now

considered a major factor in lowincome

families.

The wealthiest, best educated and

least ethnically diverse 8% of society

make up nearly half of live music

audiences and a third of theatregoers

and gallery visitors.

Students from low-income families

who take part in arts activities at school

are three times more likely to get a

degree than children from low-income

families who do not.

THE WORKSHOP

HAS HIGHLIGHTED

A WHOLE

NEW WAY TO

ORGANISE

A CLASS TO

ENSURE THAT

EVERYONE

CONTRIBUTES.

Class teacher

WHAT WE DID

On our A Wealth of Stages programme 101 young

people in London developed their financial literacy

through drama workshops.

They took part in group games, role playing scenarios,

script writing and performance to explore spending,

saving, responsible and ethical use of money, and

needs versus wants. A day trip to the Bank of England

Museum provided further information and context.

Impact Report 2018/19 17


HELPING PRISONERS CONNECT

WITH THEIR CHILDREN

Re-offending costs the UK £13

billion each year.

Young offenders who participate in

the arts are almost 20% less likely to

reoffend.

Cultural learning has been linked

to improvements in attainment,

cognitive abilities and increased

employability.

82,305 men in prison in the UK are

fathers to an estimated 200,000

children.

DEAR CREATE

I was given your email by the visits team at the

prison as I wanted to say thank you so much for

the wonderful work your team do.

My daughter and I attended a workshop at the

prison where her father had written a story

accompanied by music and it was performed

to us in the Chapel. She also got the chance to

play musical instruments and create a collage

afterwards.

Kyra’s father is dyslexic and has special

educational needs. There was barely any help

available when he was a child (we were at school

together). I retrained a few years ago as a primary

teacher and greatly encouraged him to enrol in

adult education to help him get a job (before he

was put on remand), however on his first day he

was made fun of by another student at the centre

(because under pressure he has a stutter, which

he also has not had help with). He then refused

to return. He has not ever been able to find a job

due to his poor literacy skills and reluctance to

participate in any education as he does not like to

look silly.

I was therefore completely stunned at what he

has managed to achieve. All thanks to your team!

I cannot believe he was brave enough to be in

front of a small group performing music for a

story for his daughter. (I struggled not to cry!). It is

wonderful that you have managed to change his

opinion on education and that he has enjoyed his

sessions. I hope there will be more opportunities

available for him as I feel it will quite possibly

change his outlook on life.

I shall most definitely be sending in donations

when I can!

Thank you

Heather

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INCREASING THE WELLBEING

OF PEOPLE WHO ARE HOMELESS

OR MARGINALISED

WHAT WE DID

We worked in Deptford with 17 adults who are

vulnerable through homelessness, mental ill-health,

loneliness, social exclusion or severe poverty. Through

film, creative writing and music, they explored personal

and community identity, whilst building self-esteem and

peer-support networks.

The number of rough sleepers each

night in 2017 was 4,751, a 15% rise on

the previous year.

There are 13.5 million people living

in poverty in the UK, 21% of the

population.

86% of homeless people have reported

having mental health difficulties.

SAM

Sam, who is supported by the team at Deptford

Reach, shared a piece of his creative writing

devised during a Create workshop.

I return a different person. I’m not the man

I was before. People need to understand

this. When people see I’ve changed, I’ll be

appreciated. I can settle, have a family. But it

will take time, I know.

I have to watch out for those who won’t

accept me. Watch my back. Because this

is a risk. I know it’s a risk, but when they

started coming in my shop for the first day,

it was like I was dreaming. As time goes on it

looks like nothing ever happened. So things

change around me. So I can start a new life

again. Get a wife, have kids, make some new

friends, meet some of the old ones.

THIS HAS

OPENED MY

MIND TO THE

POTENTIAL OF

BRINGING JOY

TO OTHERS

THROUGH

MUSIC.

Participant

Impact Report 2018/19 19


WHEN YOU’RE BEING

CREATIVE YOU’RE

INVOLVED IN LIFE.

YOU AREN’T JUST

A SPECTATOR,

YOU AREN’T JUST

A NUMBER OR A

VICTIM.

CENTRE IMAGE: Primary school pupils

performing 20 at the Design Museum Image in London taken by a young carer during our inspired:arts project


CREATE THE DIFFERENCE

If you believe in the power of

the creative arts to increase

acceptance, promote

inclusion, enhance wellbeing

and empower lives, join us

and see the difference you

can make.

BE THE DIFFERENCE ~ BECOME A MEMBER

Business Members are vital partners, enabling us to

create a society that is fairer, more caring and more

inclusive. Create the Difference by joining Create as a

Pioneer, Innovator or Collaborator.

Individual Members Create the Difference for our

participants by joining as a Champion, Catalyst,

Curator or Community member from as little as £10

per month.

Create would like to thank:

Business Members

Innovators: Just So, White Cube

Collaborators: Adam Blanshay Productions, Michael

O’Mara Books, Split Music, Stephenson Harwood LLP,

Uncommon London

Individual Members

Champions: Alistair DK Johnston CMG, Tim & Claire

Jones

Catalysts: Anne Baldock, Eddie Donaldson OBE

Curators: Gareth Davies, Philip Emery, Alan Paul, Colin

Sheaf, Mark Sismey-Durrant

Community: John Broadis, Nicky Goulder, Dr RC

Hooker, Edmond Kamara, Michael Llewelyn-Jones,

Marit Meyer-Bell, Richard Schrieber, Vanessa Sharp,

Emily Stubbs, Carol Topolski, Michael Topolski

CELEBRATE THE DIFFERENCE ~ ATTEND AN

EVENT

HAVE FUN&RAISE THE DIFFERENCE!

You can fundraise with your friends or club, at school

or work, or through an organised event. Every penny

you raise helps us empower disadvantaged and

vulnerable children and adults. We have a wealth of

creative ideas and tools for fundraising activities - along

with a growing number of challenge events to sign up

to - and we’ll help you maximise publicity and reach

your target whether you bake, run, paint, swap, cycle,

dress up, quiz, dine or auction to fundraise for Create!

BESPOKE DIFFERENCE ~ TAILORED

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY PACKAGES

Corporate Partners can sponsor a bespoke

programme, fulfil Corporate Responsibility objectives,

engage employees and demonstrate purpose. As a

national charity, we can tailor a sponsorship package

to inspire joy in young carers through time away from

their caring responsibilities, help young fathers in prison

write and illustrate stories for their children, give adults

with disabilities the chance to express themselves

through music and dance; take the therapeutic benefits

of the arts to children in hospices and hospitals, or

design a new, unique partnership, created just for your

company.

SEE THE DIFFERENCE YOU CAN MAKE

I hope you feel inspired to support our work and look

forward to hearing from you.

Nicky Goulder

Co-Founder and Chief Executive

nicky@createarts.org.uk

020 7374 8485

SCAN WITH YOUR SMARTPHONE

CAMERA TO DONATE NOW!

We host a number of fundraising events during the year

including exclusive dinners, auctions, performances

and private views.

WILLING TO CREATE THE DIFFERENCE?

A gift in your will means that vulnerable children and

adults across the UK will continue to experience

the power of the creative arts, make life-affirming

connections, learn new skills and grow in confidence.

CREATEARTS.ORG.UK/SUPPORT-US/

Impact Report 2018/19 21


FURTHER INFORMATION

Nicky Goulder

Chief Executive

T: 020 7374 8485

E: nicky@createarts.org.uk

@nickygoulder

@nickygoulder

Create

379 Salisbury House

London Wall, London

EC2M 5QQ

createarts.org.uk

create charity

@createcharity

@createcharity

Registered charity number 1099733

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