NZPhotographer Issue 21, July 2019

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH?

I currently have 2X Canon 30D and 1X Canon Rebel

but I plan to replace both of the 30D's as soon as

Canon release their new range. They have been

reliable but have done their time.

My lenses include the Canon 50mm, Canon 17–85mm,

Sigma 70–300mm, and a Tamron 150–600mm. I have

plans to add a Canon 70–200 to the future kit. I also

have a Manfrotto tripod and various studio equipment.

TELL US ABOUT THIS PHOTO

We stayed at Bayete lodge within the Manyoni

private game reserve in the Mkuze area of Kwa Zulu

Natal. Manyoni is not only a game reserve but also

specialises in conservation and re-introduction of

endangered species (Black Rhino, Wild Dog and

Cheetah). There are a few lodges within the reserve

focusing on giving visitors the wildlife experience.

The best time for wildlife photography at game

reserves is before sunrise or late afternoon as this is

the time that animals are either going down to rivers

for water or feeding/hunting so it was during an early

morning game drive (the sun had just come up) in the

Manyoni Game Reserve, that we came across this

Black Backed Jackal sitting in a pile of old rhino dung

on the side of the road.

Initially we stopped about 50m away and took photos

but as the jackal seemed relaxed, we decided to

slowly creep up to see how close we could get for

better shots. We were able to get alongside on the

opposite side of the road which is where this photo

was taken. This is unusual behaviour, because if you

approach jackals (or any wildlife) they will normally

run a short but safe distance away.

We were able to spend about 5 minutes taking photos

until the jackal decided that it had other things to do!

WHAT WAS HAPPENING BEHIND THE CAMERA

THAT WE CAN'T SEE?

We were about 8 people in the vehicle, including the

game ranger, all of us having cameras. In order for

photos to be taken this close up, there cannot be any

noise (even talking is done in a quiet whisper) nor any

sudden movements as it will scare the jackal away. It

may looked and act relaxed but its daily life depends

on being alert – It was continually looking at us and

the surrounding area for any danger.

WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE JACKAL?

The jackal is a very cunning animal that is related to

wolves and dogs. They are generally found in pairs,

but can also live solitary lives. They hunt small animals

and birds, but where large predators live (lion, leopard

etc.) they will salvage from these animals.

IS THIS YOUR FAVOURITE SHOT FROM YOUR TRIP?

The simple answer is probably no. Not because I don’t

love the shot, but because it’s difficult to pick a favourite.

BEHIND THE SHOT IS PROUDLY

SUPPORTED BY

Photos reflect memories of where I was at the time the

picture was taken and what it took to capture it. For

example, the time we sat in a vehicle for four hours in

36° heat and 90% humidity, waiting for exactly the right

shot of a leopard (published in NZP issue’s 2 & 20). Or

the series of photos of an impala antelope that had

just given birth. Or waiting patiently for the bright green

chameleon to cross the road in front of our vehicle,

until it climbed safely into the trees (NZP issue 2). And

the side-striped jackal which I have only ever been

able to photograph on one occasion. Photos that may

never be repeated or seen again.

So when I look at my photos, these memories flood

back and fan my desire to create even more.

WHAT WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS CAN YOU

SHARE WITH US?

For a wildlife photographer to consistently take good

photos, I think these 3 things will help:

1. You need to know your subject or be with

someone that can help and guide you with

information.

2. Have a plan – Decide what it is you are going

to photograph and what type of photo you

are looking for. With wildlife it is so easy to get

distracted and go off on a tangent. Be prepared

to 'hunt' for your subject and once you find it,

spend as much time as possible photographing it.

This may take months or even years.

3. Have patience, lots and lots of patience, and then

you may get your shot.

I always encourage others to join groups and/or clubs,

in this way you will pick up valuable knowledge from

those who have the same interest as you never stop

learning and improving as a photographer – I myself

am always looking to improve and learn from others.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.gazza.photography

www.facebook.com/gary.reid.3705

albums.excio.io/profile/Gazza

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