BeatRoute Magazine AB Edition July 2019

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a monthly arts and entertainment paper with a predominant focus on music – local, independent or otherwise. The paper started in June 2004 and continues to provide a healthy dose of perversity while exercising rock ‘n’ roll ethics.

Currently BeatRoute’s AB edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton (by S*A*R*G*E), Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

JULY 2019

FREE

RISING

STAR

JESSIE

REYEZ

FIGHTS

TO KEEP

IT REAL

PLUS

STAMPEDE

MADNESS

FOLK FEST

HAVIAH

MIGHTY

JIM

CUDDY


Contents

shitlord fuckerman, June 19 at Broken City.

Read our review of this show on page 28

and more online at beatroute.ca

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

Up Front

4

7

8

11

The Guide

Vintage-pop country artist

Whitney Rose is bound for

glory.

Drink

In search of the ultimate

spritz; three alternatives to

the classic Aperol Spritz.

Fashion

Dr. Martens teams up with

The Who to create a line of

gear for a new generation.

That’s Dope

Levo’s home infuser takes

cooking with herbs to a

whole new level of reefer

madness.

Music

13

25

28

31

Concert Previews

Haviah Mighty, Jonah Yano,

Fat Mike’s Punk In Drublic,

Jim Cuddy, The Jerry Cans

and more!

The Playlist

All the singles we can’t stop

listening to this month.

Sled Island Music

Festival in review

Cementing their legacy as

a beacon for top-tier acts,

Sled Island delivers four

unforgettable days.

Album Reviews

Bleached, Daniel Caesar,

Killy, Sum 41, Skye Wallace,

Bruce Springsteen and

more!

JULY 2019

RISING

STAR

JESSIE

REYEZ

FIGHTS

TO KEEP

IT REAL

Cover Story

22

PLUS

YVR PRIDE

PLANNER

FOLK FEST

HAVIAH

MIGHTY

JIM

CUDDY

Jessie Reyez

Canada’s rising R&B

sensation, Jessie Reyez,

keeps her family close and

her honesty dialed up as

she readies to climb bigger

stages.

FREE

Screen Time

39

40

41

42

Travel

38

Yesterday

Director Danny Boyle reimagines

a world without The Beatles.

Marianne & Leonard

Director himself part of love

triangle in heartfelt doc about

relationship between songwriter

Leonard Cohen and his muse,

Marianne Ihlen.

Rolling Thunder Revue and

Echo In The Canyon

Wild Rose

Jessie Buckley plays a wild

dreamer in boot-stomping country

music drama.

Cross-Canada Camping

Music Festival Guide

From camping under the stars to

camping with the stars, Canadian

music festivals are plugging in to

electrify the camping experience.

YYC

43

44

46

48

49

50

Nick Cave

The other Nick Cave unleashes

his soundsuits at the Glenbow for

his first Calgary solo exhibition.

Stampede Agenda

Get your yahoos out with cowpoke-friendly

cocktails to make

the most out of Stampede week.

The Calgary Folk Music

Festival

There’s more than folk at the 40th

edition of the festival that jumps

genres with Belle and Sebastian,

DJ Champion, Sheila E., Sharon

Van Etten and many more.

Calgary Fringe Festival

Independent theatre breaks

on through to the other side of

Inglewood with packed package

of plays.

Live Music Cheat Sheet

A tear-out guide to the best

shows of the month.

Savage Love

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 3


The Guide

JULY

Whitney Rose: Bound

for Glory via PEI

Sunday, July 7

Calgary Stampede (The Big Four)

w/ The Sheepdogs, Corb Lund, Blackie &

The Rodeo Kings

Tix: $89.90, ticketmaster.ca

For someone who “sings like the Lone Star state

was hers” but was born and raised in Prince Edward

Island, the praise for Whitney Rose flows

like a Sunday morning service.

Rose, who started singing for customers

at the age of two in her grandparents’ bar, is

Canada’s immaculate country music conception.

After bouncing in and out of different

colleges then living off the radar in rural

Nova Scotia, Rose made the pilgrimage to

Toronto with a handful of songs, looking to

make a record. There she settled in at the

Cameron House, a Queen Street lounge

renowned for its community of emerging

roots artists — Blue Rodeo, among

others, started there — and released

her first self-titled album on the bar’s

label in 2012.

Influenced by the “queen bees” of

Nashville, Rose cites Kitty Wells, Tammy

Wynette and Dolly Parton as some of

her favourites, a class of distinction

that she herself easily belongs to.

Rose now resides in Austin, Texas

where’s she’s become part of the

city’s creative melting pot. Although

a bonafide country artist, Rose is

also a new breed not limited to the

purist category of classic country.

The title of her album, Rule 62

(2017), is a reference to the

defacto Alcoholics Anonymous

guideline which says,

“Don’t take yourself too

damn seriously.” Abiding

by that advice, Rose jokingly

refers to her artistic

style as “vintage-pop-infused-neo-traditional-country.”

By BRAD SIMM

3More

Stampede

coverage,

page 44

Editor/Publisher

Michael Hollett

Senior Editor/

Western Canada

Glenn Alderson

Associate Editor

Brad Simm

Creative Director

Troy Beyer

Editorial Coordinators

Jordan Yeager

Sebastian Buzzalino

Contributing

Writers/ Coordinators

Sarah Bauer • Jenessa Blanchet

Ben Boddez • Sebastian Buzzalino

Lauren Donnelly • Jaime Eisen

Karina Espinosa

Courtney Heffernan

Kathryn Helmore • Safiya Hopfe

Jeevin Johal • Brendan Lee

Christine Leonard • Joey Lopez

Sofia Montebello • Trevor Morelli

Pat Mullen • Johnny Papan

Tory Rosso • Yasmine Shemesh

April Summers • Graeme Wiggins

Jordan Yeager

Contributing Photographers

& Illustrators

Sebastian Buzzalino

Jerez Challenger • Stasia Garraway

Jesse Gillett • Michael Grondin

Zee Khan • Nolan Knight

Tenzing Lama • Richmond Lam

Mandy-Lyn • Darrole Palmer

Liz Renstrom • Barry Russe

Yung Yemi

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Distribution

BeatRoute is distributed in

Vancouver, Victoria, Calgary,

Edmonton, Winnipeg and

Saskatoon

Contact us

2405 East Hastings St.

Vancouver, BC

V5K 1Y8

e-mail: editor@beatroute.ca


@beatrouteBC


@beatroutemedia


beatrouteBC

beatroute.ca


UPCOMING EVENTS

JUL 4

JUL 11

JUL 13

JUL 19

JUL 26

JUL 28

MICHAEL WHITE

Bass Invasion Tour

TWIZTID

Generation Nightmare Tour

HARRY AND THE POTTERS

Lumos Tour

FERMENTED BEET ORCHESTRA

KASADOR

ROAD WAVES

Songs in the Sky Tour

Tickets and full listings

TheRecRoom.com

The Rec Room® is owned by Cineplex Entertainment L. P.

Upcoming Events

GATEWAY

Tue. Sept. 17 | MRG Concerts Presents:

Ziggy Alberts

with Emily Brimlow

GATEWAY

Sat. Sept. 28 | ConcertWorks Presents:

Cancer Bats

with Single Mothers and Sharptooth

GATEWAY

Fri. Sept. 27 | Stampede Entertainment Presents:

Too Many Zooz &

Five Alarm Funk

GATEWAY

Sat. Nov. 30 | The Gateway Presents:

Hilltop Hoods

with Adrian Eagle

ODYSSEY

Fri. Sept. 27 | The Odyssey Presents:

Lloyd Spiegel

with Tim Williams

Monthly Wingo & Trivia nights return in September!

Follow The Gateway on Facebook/Instagram/Twitter

to stay informed on all upcoming events!

Saitsa.com/events

THE GATEWAY IN SAIT CAMPUS CENTRE, 1301 - 16 AVENUE NW, CALGARY, AB. 18+, LEGAL ID REQUIRED. THIS EVENT IS OPEN TO ALL SAIT STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, ALUMNI, MEMBERS, AND GUESTS. PLEASE VISIT SAITSA.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 5


Drink

THAT’S

AMARO

Often made with Aperol, the Amaro Spritz may well be the cocktail

of the summer. Powered by bitter aperitifs and sparking

wine, this delicious, refreshing and low-calorie sipper

is a classic for a reason.

By GLENN ALDERSON

T

he New York Times spilled

their way onto some people’s

shit lists recently with a

stuffy and pretentious article

calling out the Aperol Spritz

as simply “not a good drink.”

They claimed the effervescent summer

beverage made popular by the company

Aperol (Campari America) and their

popularized hashtag #spritzlife was

making a whole lot of noise around an

aperitivo that wasn’t deserving of all

the fuss or fizz.

Messing around with hashtags is

no way to spend your summer, but

the NYT got it all wrong. Road tested

and popularized since the 50s, when

you take away the brand appeal of

Aperol, there’s an amaro, an Italian-style

liqueur at the heart of this

classic cocktail and Aperol isn’t the

only player in the game.

Simple, easy-to-make, low cal and

refreshing — put an orange wedge on

it and you’ve found your new summer

squeeze. So pop a bottle of a favourite

mediocre sparkling wine and spice up

summer with these aperitif alternatives

to the Aperol Spritz.

THE ULTIMATE SPRITZ

3 parts Prosecco or sparkling

wine chilled

2 parts your choice of amaro

2 parts club soda or blood

orange soda

Garnish with orange slices,

or pitted green olives

CANADIANIZE

YOUR SPRITZ

Who needs Aperol with

these local lights

The Woods Amaro

A rustic and creative

aperitif true to the brand’s

ethos, Woods Spirit

uses rhubarb, gentian

root, wormwood and

BC botanicals, including

grand fir needles and

blackberry honey, to

create a unique product

that pairs well in spritzes

or acts as an excellent

sub for vermouth in any

classic cocktail. Amaro is

a multi-faceted and intoxicatingly

layered digestif

that boasts a syrupy

sweetness, followed by

the signature bitterness

Amaros are often known

and loved for.

Bitterhouse Aperitifs

Step up your cocktail

game with Bitterhouse

Aperitifs. Offering three

varied options, set your

patio party ablaze with

DaMan, a grapefruit and

pomello flavoured libation,

heavy on the citrus

notes; LaDame with its

sweet notes of candied

orange; or Rubato, a

rhubarb-flavoured aperitif

with a light bitterness that

can also work as a great

substitution for Campari

in your next negroni. For

those on the go, Bitterhouse

now offer a full

mixed spritz in a can.

Odd Society Spirits

Mia Amata Amaro

Named after master

distiller Gordon Glanz’s

daughter, Mia, who also

co-produced it, Mia

Amata translates to “My

beloved.” This complex

digestive liqueur is flavoured

with exotic botanicals

including myrrh gum,

kola nut, candied plum,

vanilla and cacao.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 7


Fashion

DOCTOR WHO

Dr. Martens X The Who collab creates a walking, talking line for a new generation By KATHRYN HELMORE

T

ranscending trends,

making a statement

and never succumbing

to predictability is

an art form few brands can

maintain. Steeped in controversy

and contradiction,

Dr. Martens footwear has

been a battle cry of fascist

skinhead movements in the

70s, the punt of protest to

80s punk movements and

accessorized ripped jeans and

introspection as the footwear

of 90s grunge.

As part of their AW 2019

line Dr. Martens have collaborated

with touring British

royalty The Who, once again

proving that their boots don’t

just walk, they talk.

The Who line captures

the essence of Mod fashion

culture: its boots, loafers and

accessories subvert sacred

symbols and pay homage to

non-conformity.

With The Who arriving

in Vancouver on October

21, this collab is a relevant

throwback. Turn on “My

Generation” and tune into

the history, ideology and rebellion

locked into the iconic

stitching and grooved edges

of this latest collection.

1481 WHO

The second style Dr. Martens

ever made, it was crafted for

industry yet made a statement

when worn with braces, close

cropped haircuts and non-conformity.

The 1481 WHO Black

Smooth replaces the trademark

yellow stitching for a WHO red

that complements the band’s

symbol located at the heel.

THE WHO

BACKPACK

Crafted from the hardwearing

Kiev Leather and designed with

a double carry handle and a

buckle-fastened external pocket,

the backpack does what Dr.

Marten’s and The Who do best:

fuse performance with style and

expression.

THE TOOMEY WHO

For those who wish to rail

against conformity, The Toomey

WHO is Doc Martens take on

the slip-on canvas shoe. With a

lightweight sole and aggressive

bumper, decorated with the

WHO roundel on the lip and

signature red and blue arrows

on the ridge, the shoe embodies

Doc Marten’s commitment to

practical and comfortable style.

8 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


1460 WHO

Released April 1, 1960, the

iconic 1460 rejected the timid,

old-fashioned uniform of working

class men. For the young generation,

it was a tool of rebellion.

With a Royal Air Force roundel

at the heel, the 1460 WHO pays

homage to The Who and Mod

culture’s subversion of British

symbolism and tradition.

Win a Party for you

and 4 Friends!

ADRIAN SMOOTH

When paired with tailor-made

suits with narrow lapels and

Nouvelle Vague haircuts, the

Adrian Smooth loafer, first released

in 1980, was a disruption

of gender roles. With the effeminate

double tassel and kiltie

fringe, combined with a Union

Jack on the front panel, the

Smooth Black is no exception.

THE PRESSLER

WHO

Compared to its leather clad

peers, The Pressler is more at

home in a half pipe than a political

rally. A modern skate shoe

with a comfortable lightweight

sole, this comparatively low

profile piece is brought to life

with the iconic WHO logo in the

corner and red stripes decorating

the shoe’s stitching and

grooved edges.

JOIN US AT 1637 37 STREET SW

ENTER AT DUBLINCALLING.COM/CALGARY

@DUBLINCALLINGCALGARY

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 9


J U L Y

B R U N C H • L U N C H • D I N N E R • L I V E M U S I C

PRESENTED BY

Leeroy

Stagger

JULY 12

Mariel

Buckley

JULY 6

HOT LITTLE

ROCKET

JULY 6

S T A M P E D E

AT

THE

LIVE MUSIC

ALL DAY EVERYDAY

11 AM TO LATE

WET SECRETS

& GROUNDERS

JULY 13

PRESENTED BY

JOHNSON CROOK • THE BLAKE REID BAND • COLE BRADLEY • DREW GREGORY •

DUSTIN BENTALL • KALSEY KULYK • MICHELA SHEEDY • THE 427S • A DAY AS WOLVES

• TOTAL GADJOS • THE RONDEL ROBERTS BAND • EAMON MCGRATH • JESS KNIGHTS

BAND • SINZERE • AARON POLLOCK • BOOTS AND THE HOOTS • MATT MASTERS BAND

• THE BOBBY TENDERLOIN UNIVERSE • POLYJESTERS • JUSTINE VANDERGRIFT • EMILY

TRIGGS • GRACE GARDNER • JORDYN POLLARD • KALEY BIRD

no cover

VINYL BRUNCH

WITH DJ ARCHIVE

VIBE • EAT • DRINK

EVERY SUN

THE YYSCENE PRESENTS

SONGSMITH

SUNDAYS

DOUG HOYER

WITH

JULY 5-14

JULY 21 & JULY 28

VARIATIONS

JAZZ • TUES

1STJason valleau

3RDcam buie trio

4THspecial guest

VISIT KINGEDDY.CA FOR

INFO AND TICKETS

RIIT

THU JULY 18

BILL DURST

FRI JULY 19

EARLY TRENCH

EVERYTHINGYOUEVERLOVED

FUZE

FRI JULY 26

LATE J9 PRODUCTION

AFTER SCHOOL SPECIAL

JACK GARTON

AND THE DEMON SQUAD

WITH DOUBLE FUZZ

AND L’OMLETTE

SAT JULY 27

G R O O V E

T H EORY

CALGARY

JULY 18 AND 25

HAPPY HOUR

MATT MASTERS

WITH

EVERY NOT STAMPEDE FRIDAY

King Eddy | 438 9 Avenue SE, Calgary kingeddy.ca @KingEddyYYC #KingEddyYYC

10 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


That’s Dope

THE WEED

LOVERS’

KITCHEN

APPLIANCE

HAS

ARRIVED

By CHRISTINE LEONARD

T

ake the mystery out of

buying premade edibles.

After all, the best way to

know what’s going into an

edible is to make it yourself.

Whether you’ve been

waiting for the right time to jump

on the edible bandwagon or you’re a

seasoned kief chef, the convenience

of rendering your own countertop oil

infusions might be the best option

for your body and your wallet.

Making the art of crafting DIY edibles

easy, the LEVO is a remarkable

and somewhat pricey little culinary

gadget that is designed solely for the

purpose of turning your botanicals

(i.e. cannabis flowers or other edible

herbs) into tasty and economical oils

and butters.

The brainchild of ganjapreneur

Chrissy Bellman, LEVO introduces

homemade infusions to the average

consumer, offering a high-quality,

healthy alternative to store-bought

products, which may contain undesirable

solvents and additives.

Dishwasher safe and available in

a range of appealing colours, these

sleek appliances occupy no more

space than a Keurig and can also be

used for processing herbs of all kinds

into restaurant-caliber sauces and

compound-rich skincare products.

Simply load in your favourite botanical

along with your choice of

consumable oil, butter or glycerin,

set the timer and return to a golden

bounty. Why not skip the fuss and

muss of the laborious, time-consuming

and, let’s face it, distinctly smelly

are pre-dried and lightly cooked before

infusion, unlocking their full potency.

Both machines deliver carefully

controlled and consistent heat that

is applied for the duration of the infusion

process to retain the bud’s desirable

terpene (organic compounds)

profiles, yielding the maximum flavour,

odour and therapeutic benefits.

No need to hover in the pantry –

connecting to the LEVO app allows

you to control your concoctions on

the go, while also having access to

LEVO’s Herb and Oil Calculator, custom

recipes and more. Relax, man.

Thanks to the unit’s WiFi connectivity,

you can remotely set and check

on your infusions and monitor the

machine’s progress on your phone. ,

levooil.com

traditional methods of deriving your

own cannabis-based infusions? Simply

press a few buttons, walk away

and return to dispense your infusion

into a mason jar. Wham! Bam! Careful

with that amber jam!

Eliminating unwanted emulsifiers,

smoke and packaging, the basic

LEVO model will set you back

$199.99 USD and contains a stainless-steel

reservoir that can infuse up

to 16 ounces at one time.

Priced at $449.99 USD when ordered

from the manufacturer, or a

comparable $459.99 from Canadian-based

suppliers like TrimLeaf.ca,

the LEVO II has “Activate” and “Dry”

cycles that decarboxylates your

chopped cannabis flowers and leaves

for you. This means that the herbs

THIS MONTH

IN CANNABIS NEWS

AND VIEWS

THREE DOPE

COOKBOOKS

REVIEWED

What to do with the triumphant oils of your kitchen

witchery? There’s lots of ways to use canna-butters

to create palatable treats ranging from salad dressings

to cocktails. Fortunately, enterprising cookbook

publishers aren’t far behind the cannabis industry

when it comes to providing tasteful instructions and

mouthwatering recipes that anyone can use to infuse

their mealtime with a little me time.

BONG APPÉTIT: MASTERING

THE ART OF COOKING WITH

WEED

by the editors of Munchies

Ten Speed Press, $40

A proper MUNCHIES and Viceland

television series joint, Bong Appétit

is packed with 65 “high-end”

recipes for the cannabis-tuned

palette. Sophisticated North African

Broccoli Salad and Sausage

Pappardelle Bolognese dishes are

mellowed out by fun noshes like

Green Mac and Cheese and chocolatey

Stoner Candy Bites with

kettle chips and rainbow sprinkles.

EDIBLES: SMALL BITES

FOR THE MODERN

CANNABIS KITCHEN

by Stephanie Hua with Coreen

Carroll

Chronicle Books, $28.99

“Let’s make some tasty edibles,

and let’s not fuck up our friends.”

Complete with a discussion of the

effects and benefits of cannabinoids

and terpenes, this gorgeous

tome provides advice on enjoying

and entertaining with unique

recipes using sous vide infusions,

canna-honeys, magical maple

syrup and a seriously addictive

hazelnut spread.

GET BAKED:

SPACE CAKES,

POT BROWNIES AND

OTHER TASTY

CANNABIS CREATIONS

by Dane Noon and Lex Lucid

Spruce $10.99

Witchetty grub for raucous tea

parties. This potent UK export rolls

out 40 recipes for hash-filled tucker,

from savoury main meals to the

sweetest of treats – The Ultimate

Brownie. Suggesting a subtler

stone for those who prefer a discreet,

smoke-free high, Get Baked

serves up history and humour.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 11


MUSiC

Artist to Watch

A MIGHTY

NEW FORCE

IN HIP-HOP

Brampton Ontario’s

MC Haviah Mighty

raps to empower

By COURTNEY HEFFERNAN

After a fiery performance

at the NXNE festival stage

in downtown Toronto, Haviah

Mighty is still in constant

motion, waving to fans and

chatting with photographers,

all while assisting

her crew with equipment

takedown.

The rising hip-hop star

has performed four times

throughout the week,

including at halftime at a

Toronto Raptors outdoor

viewing party in her Brampton

hometown, and her energy

hasn’t diminished. On top of

that, Mighty’s most ambitious

album to date, 13th Floor,

was released a month ago to

acclaim, earning her a spot on

the recently announced 2019

Polaris Music Prize Long List.

Mighty is a commanding

presence on stage. Her raps

CONTINUED ON PG. 14 k

I’m hoping that

I can continue to

push hip-hop in the

direction of being more

accepting so more

people will understand

the music women

are making and

enjoy it.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 13


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

HAVIAH

MIGHTY

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

are dexterous and her movements

are athletic. Though only a small

number of people were present at

the start of her show, her electric

performance turned passersby

into a captivated audience. And by

the time she played her last song, the crowd

stretched down Yonge Street for more than

half a block.

When Mighty jumps from the stage to greet

her fans after the show, she speaks with

the warmth and enthusiasm of an artist who

genuinely appreciates her audience. She says

one of the most consistent aspects of her live

shows is the “upbeat energy I’m getting back

from the audience, no matter where the show

happens or what the audience is like.”

Even when she plays to a large audience,

which she is doing more often, Mighty aims to

connect with individuals: “It’s important to connect

with people by looking at them, by being in

the same space as them, by sharing the experience

with them and creating less of a separation,”

she says backstage after her gig. This

HAVIAH MIGHTY

Saturday, July 27

Phillips Backyard

Weekender (Victoria)

sense of connection creates a “more rewarding”

experience for her audience and for her.

In conversation, Mighty is engaging and

self-assured. “I feel more confident in what I’m

saying,” she says, when she finally sits down to

relax. Her confidence is evident in the type of

music she included on 13th Floor. On “Blame”

Tix: $39.50,

backyardweekender.com

and “Fugazi,” Mighty’s swagger

and production quality rivals that

of some of hip hop’s biggest names.

Her growing acclaim has also

given her the platform to address

meaningful subjects. “Thirteen” is a

moving song about slavery in North

America and the ways it reverberates in the

present as systematic oppression of Black

people. She released the song now because

“the social climate was ready to hear it and I

was ready to say it,” she says. “I wasn’t going

to release an album with a bunch of songs that

were fun but not speak on something I feel

passionate about.”

Her passion is evident in her performance

of “In Women Colour,” which she hopes will

help her audience learn more about her and

understand her “very personal experiences”

as a Black woman in Canada.

“There are many young women just like

me who need to hear this,” she says. “I feel

triumphant that I have overcome the things

people have said. Had I let it change who I am

as a person, ‘In Women Colour’ and 13th Floor

wouldn’t exist.”

As Mighty’s star continues to rise, she says,

“I’m hoping that what I add to the industry

can continue to push hip-hop in the direction

of being more accepting so more people will

understand the music women are making and

enjoy it.” ,

Proud sponsor of Sled Island & the Calgary Folk Music Festival

www.beaseatery.com Open 8am Daily for Breakfast 1023 9th ave s.e. (inside bite in Inglewood)

14 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


Artist to Watch

JONAH

YANO:

LIVING

THE DREAM

J

apanese-born, Toronto-based

singer-songwriter Jonah Yano

can’t believe the shape his life

is taking. He went from being

unknown, working at a small

cafe to having future-jazz innovators

BADBADNOTGOOD on his gorgeous new

single, “Nervous” , from his debut EP of

the same name.

Yano’s smooth voice has a tempered

sound that oozes confidence and soul,

sounding like the lovechild of James

Blake and Norah Jones.

Yano was born in Hiroshima and moved

to Port Coquitlam, BC, when he was four.

“Half of my family are musicians or

have musical history,” he says. “My

grandma did a royal conservatory and my

father is a folk songwriter in Japan.”

After playing music throughout high

school in BC, Yano gave up on the idea of

pursuing it entirely.

“I thought it was so unrealistic. It was a

self-doubt thing. I went to university and

dropped out, did some travelling to ‘find

myself’ and then moved to Toronto and

got back into music three years ago.”

Being in Toronto proved fruitful for

Yano after he befriended BADBADNOT-

GOOD drummer Alex Sowinski at a show

for T-dot duo MONEYPHONE. Yano says

the scenario feels like a scene straight out

of a biopic.

“Isn’t it crazy? Like, what the fuck is

going on? Alex and I developed a friendship

naturally. Obviously the conversation of

music was going to come up eventually. I

played him the demo for ‘Promise’ and he

said, ‘Cool, let me show this to the guys and

we’ll play on it.’ Like, sure man, I’m not even

freaking out at all right now. Sure, send it

to the rest of BADBADNOTGOOD, that’s

normal and within the realm of reality.”

Yano released his debut EP, Nervous,

with LA-based label Innovative Leisure

last month, who caught wind of his release

right before he self-published it online,

stopping him just in time so that they could

give the project the proper professional

treatment it deserves.

Although he plans on continuing his

creative relationship with BADBADNOT-

GOOD, Yano has bigger goals in mind.

“My biggest goal is to go to Japan and

write songs with my dad. I haven’t seen

him since I was 10 years old and that will

be my magnum opus. How fucking cool

would that be?”

Nervous is out now on all streaming

platforms.

By Joey Lopez

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 15


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

M

FAT e

i

S

iK

P U n k

DR

ubL

i N

i c

16 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


NOFX’s Fat Mike lives life on the edge and occasionally falls off.

F

PUNK IN DRUBLIC

CRAFT BEER &

MUSIC FESTIVAL

Edmonton:

Saturday, July 6

Edmonton EXPO Centre

Vancouver:

Saturday, July 13

PNE Amphitheatre

Tix: $69.50,

ticketleader.ca

at Mike lives a life of absurdity.

The NOFX leader is bringing

his Punk In Drublic Craft Beer

& Music Festival to Western

Canada this month, continuing

his infamous legacy of

testing the limits of what people

can and can’t do.

As the frontman of NOFX,

one of the world’s most successful

and controversial independent

punk acts, he’s built a career on writing

quick, catchy tunes and pushing people’s

buttons.

Born Michael Burkett, Fat Mike is the

first to admit that he could care less about being offensive.

He wears his love for punk rock, kinky sex,

alcohol and cocaine like patches on a denim vest.

Burkett’s drunken, drug-fuelled escapades were

filmed for the NOFX tour documentary, Backstage

Passport. In the NOFX book, Hepatitis Bathtub and

Other Stories, he discusses the first time he drank

his girlfriend’s urine. In 2010, while performing as

his alter-ego, Cokie the Clown, Burkett passed what

was assumed to be shots of tequila to members of his

audience. After knocking their drinks back, Burkett

played a video of himself “topping up” the bottle,

walking on-stage moments later and serving a bitter

piss-tequila concoction to that same audience. He

was met with echoes of laughter, disgust and appall.

But there are some lines even he can’t cross. At

Punk Rock Bowling and Music Festival in 2018, Burkett

riffed on a joke made by NOFX guitarist Eric

Melvin about the Route 91 Harvest Festival shooting,

the deadliest mass shooting in United States

history. It had happened only eight months prior in

the same city. Their comments immediately resulted

in a downward spiral for the band. Beer sponsor

Stone Brewing Co. cut all ties with the band and

many NOFX shows were cancelled, including Burkett’s

2018 Punk in Drublic Festival. He says it was

the worst week of his life.

“I don’t apologize for shit and I did apologize for

this,” Burkett says. “Fletcher [Dagge] from Pennywise

said, ‘Think about the eight-year-old girl

whose mother didn’t come home.’ That really hit

home with me. I apologized and I meant it. If someone

still has a problem with it, that’s their problem.

I didn’t shoot anybody. I made a joke that was

insensitive and it’s probably the thousandth time

I’ve done that. I didn’t apologize for the country,

I apologized for the people that lost somebody. It

was a shitty thing to say.”

By JOHNNY PAPAN

The storm has calmed for Burkett and his

projects. His label, Fat Wreck Chords, is still

running strong and Punk in Drublic is returning

this year. Burkett also released a new

record, You’re Welcome, under his Cokie

the Clown alter-ego. An artistic turnaround

for Burkett, You’re Welcome is an acoustic,

piano-laden, intimate expression of his life

experiences, an unveiling of haunting memories

usually masked by his boisterous public

front.

“It wasn’t therapeutic,” Burkett says. “It was very

difficult to do. The first song is about me finding my

wife after she tried to kill herself in the bathtub. I

found her just in time. When I sing that live, it’s acapella.

The crowd is absolutely silent. No one’s moving,

no one’s filming. It’s like giving a eulogy. I did a

show at SXSW and never saw a crowd like that before.

Damian from Fucked Up! said it was the most awkward,

uncomfortable thing they’ve ever seen. I like

that feeling. And then there’s the song ‘Fair Leather

Friends.’ That one really fucking hurts me.”

“Fair Leather Friends” is about Burkett feeling

betrayed by his closest friends after beginning a relationship

with adult film star Soma Snakeoil. Friends

stopped coming for dinner at his house, and the couple

wasn’t invited to social gatherings. Burkett remembers

being invited to a bonfire that honoured the birthday

and life of deceased No Use For A Name frontman

Tony Sly. It was an annual event Burkett didn’t even

know about until he and Snakeoil split up.

“I didn’t go,” he says. “I’m only invited now that

I’m divorced from Soma? He was one of my best

friends. I recorded half his records with him. We

toured together. And they didn’t invite me because

of the woman I was with. That’s why I have a hard

time singing this song. It’s embarrassing. I can’t believe

people would do that.”

Other stories told on the Cokie album include

Burkett being neglected by his father, finding his

roommate who hanged himself, and being the one

to help his suffering mother reach eternal slumber.

“If you’re going to do something, fucking go for

it,” Burkett concludes when asked why he felt inclined

to pursue a project that brings him so much

pain. “I wanted to sing about the worst tragedies of

my life. It’s not a commercially viable record, it’s

a fucking big bum out, but it touches people. I’d

rather touch people than write fucking Offspring

songs and talk about taking her home and making

her dessert. Some of the songs don’t make me look

good. It’s really ugly and heartbreaking, but music

is supposed to make you feel.” ,

FAT MIKE’S

TOP 5

THINGS TO DO AT

PUNK IN DRUBLIC

1

Over 40 Locally Brewed Craft

Beers to Choose From

Analog Brewing, Best of Kin,

Hells Basement, Outcast

Brewing and Troubled Monk

are among the many beer

offerings in Edmonton. Breweries

featured in Vancouver’s

festival include Andina, Bridge,

Luppolo, Mariner, Yellow Dog

and more.

See the full list at http://punkindrublicfest.com/

2

No Beer Lineups

“We would sit around and

talk about everything that’s

wrong with festivals, like waiting in line for

a beer. We fixed that. We found different

ways to do it so you don’t have to wait in

line.”

3

Rock Throwing

“You buy three rocks for

five bucks and you get to

throw rocks at plates. If you

smash a plate, you win a

beer!”

4

Wheel of Misfortune

“We have three dominatrixes

on tour and not only do

they beat me up every night

on the bus, but they have a

wheel. Five bucks gets you

two spins. You can get paddled,

they’ll make you eat an egg…

whatever, it’s all bad. My favourite

is ‘take beer’ where they knock the

beer out of your hand. One time

these guys bought 10 spins for their

friend. He got so fucked.”

5

Hang Out With Fat Mike

“I hang out with these fans. I like to

watch shit and I like to hang out with people.

Punk rock is about community. I was

so bummed out when I missed Anarchy

Camp last year because when

people bought VIP tickets and

came early, they got greeted

by me, or someone from

NOFX or people from other

bands like, ‘Hey, welcome to

the show. Let’s take a picture.’

It’s punk, you know?

I think it’s nice.”


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

JIM

CUDDY

This isn’t

his first

rodeo.

After three-plus decades

with Blue Rodeo and five

solo records, Canada’s

honey-voiced roots

legend keeps it fresh

creating with his pals.

By MICHAEL HOLLETT

18 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


A

fter turning off the main

highway, about 90 minutes

outside Toronto, you

drive down a dirt road

followed by another dirt

road that leads to a dead

end to get to Canadian

music legend Jim Cuddy’s

family’s farm.

A modest A-frame

with a new addition attached and a weathered

barn dot a rolling landscape with a hilltop

view of a pond and woods below. Cuddy

offers a warm welcome and a seat at an

immense harvest table in a bright and sunny

kitchen that’s clearly been designed to be the

focal point of indoor activity in this beautiful

country place that he and his wife bought

with his sisters-in-law years ago.

Cuddy will be heading back down that

dirt road soon for another summer of touring,

including a bunch of Western Canada

gigs, both with his original band, Blue Rodeo,

as well as his decades old solo project,

The Jim Cuddy Band (JCB).

More than 30 years into a monumental

music career, Cuddy, clearly, still loves to

play.

After serving up drinks, Cuddy rubs his

hands together in glee discussing making

music with friends, whether it’s around a

campfire, in the barn just outside, or on stage

in front of tens of thousands of people.

“It’s easy to keep it fresh,” he

says with a smile. “JCB has been a

band for 21 years. Remarkable for

any band, let alone a second band.

Playing is fun for us. We don’t get

enough chance to do it.”

Playing live means, there’s always

something to figure out. The

musicianship and the adaptability

of the players allows Cuddy to constantly

reimagine his shows and

the nature of the performances.

“The lifeblood of a band is to

play together, we have so many

great times when we’re doing gigs.

We enjoy it, that’s what’s fun. It’s

enjoyable playing music and it’s

enjoyable playing with people

who are really really good.”

“If there comes

a time the Blue

Rodeo guys

say we should

record, I’ll be

ready.”

BLUE RODEO

Medicine Hat:

Thursday, July 6

Canalta Centre

Cuddy proudly beams, speaking of the

great musicians he gets to work with in Blue

Rodeo and JCB, and three artists — bedrock

bass player Bazil Donovan, guitarist Colin

Cripps and, occasionally, violinist Anne

Lindsay — play with both outfits.

Cuddy likes to stay busy, needs to, and he

formed his solo band, in part, to fill the down

time between Blue Rodeo projects.

A self-described “schemer,” Cuddy loves

making plans and hatching ideas. A recent

scheme saw Cuddy turn this farm into a recording

studio when he spied an opening

in his schedule last September. Itching to

make a new record, he spotted a three-day

gap in his touring and decided to record

a “live from the floor” album in his barn

with his solo band and his latest, the

excellent Countrywide Soul, is the

result.

He’s also a jammer. Regardless of

how busy he is each year at Canada’s

JUNO Awards, Cuddy and his

friends host an epic, late-night

jam suite that’s all about playing

and little about schmoozing.

And every summer, he and his

family host a massive weekend

long party at this farm, with

camping, that inevitably ends

up around the fire pit with

guitars picked and voices

blending around the flames.

Playing guitar one night

by himself in his barn,

Edmonton:

Saturday,August 10

Edmonton Folk Festival

Vancouver:

Saturday,August 17

Vancouver Folk Festival

Tix: $45-88

THE JIM

CUDDY BAND

Victoria:

Thursday, August 15

Butchart Garden’s

Summer Concert Series

Salmon Arm:

Friday, August 16

Salmon Arm Roots &

Blues Festival

Tix: $33.80-$85

trapped inside by a torrential

downpour, the acoustics and the

setting inspired him to call the

band in to record.

And while Cuddy usually has

a firm hand in his recording process,

he wanted the players and the

playing to define the new album. A

tractor trailer with a mobile studio

negotiated the tiny dirt road into

the farm and Cuddy became just

another player in the project.

“I wanted to do it like a kitchen

party; it’s part of the fun. We sat in

our seats and we played the songs

as if we were just playing them for

each other, just sharing the joy of

music, and it worked. You’re not

editing when you’re just playing,

you’re just enjoying how everybody plays. I

just wanted to sit in my chair and be a member

of the band.

“A lot of times I didn’t listen to playbacks;

typically I’d be listening to everything and

that would be how we build a record. It was

nice not to feel chained to every decision.”

With everything being recorded live, there

were no “do-overs,” no re-working of solos or

fine tuning with edits. And clearly that was

part of the fun for Cuddy. He loved giving his

players the space to play.

“It was fun in a three-ring circus, put-up

the-tent and bring-in-the-jugglers kind of

way. I like that, especially if it has a calm and

friendly centre. It’s about what Steve Earle

would say, “magnetize the fucker,” to put that

joy on record.”

He contrasts these sessions with Blue Rodeo’s

process.

“Blue Rodeo recording is very complicated

because there are two singers, two songwriters

and two methods and so it’s very different.

Whatever we have done in the past will not be

what we do in the future, if we record.

“There was a little talk about making another

record but there hasn’t been any talk

since last summer. Greg Keelor has a solo record

coming out so I don’t know when we’ll

get to that point. If there comes a time the

Blue Rodeo guys say we should record, I’ll be

ready, or I’ll just keep going on my own. It’s

fortunate for me to have these choices.”

The new album features reworkings of

some old Blue Rodeo and Cuddy tracks, two

new songs and a couple of cool covers.

Asked if we can expect a full album of covers

some day, Cuddy’s hardcore work ethic

comes out.

“I would do one or two covers on an album,

I wouldn’t do more than that. I feel like my

worth as a musician is about songwriting and

singing and if I’m not doing that, then I’m not

doing my job. If the balance was more towards

covers I just wouldn’t feel right. That is my job

and I’m supposed to do my job. It might be fun

but I wouldn’t be satisfied.” ,

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 19


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

NORTHERN

LIGHTS

Nunavut trailblazers The

Jerry Cans want Canada

to hear the unique Inuit

voices of the north

By JAIME EISEN

I

t’s soundcheck on Monday

night during Toronto’s NXNE

music and gaming festival and

the back room of the Horseshoe

Tavern feels like a family

reunion. A tight group of smiling

musicians are onstage

jamming with Josh Q

of Iqaluit blues outfit

The Trade-Offs. Each

member is taking their

turn to solo before

coming back together.

“I feel like I haven’t hung out with

my buddies in a long time,” says Q

into the mic with a laugh.

His buddies are The Jerry Cans,

pioneers of the burgeoning Iqaluit

music scene and curators of the

second Nunavut Music Week, which

ran from April 25 to 28, and its subsequent

NXNE showcase. While

Jerry Cans bassist Brendan “Dotes”

Doherty and drummer Steve Rigby

play onstage, frontman Andrew Morrison

dances with his infant daughter

to songs she obviously knows well.

They’re far from home, but

they’re in their element.

Friends since childhood, Dotes,

Morrison and Rigby started The

Jerry Cans around a decade

ago, playing classic

rock covers at Iqaluit music

hub, the Legion. Their

self-described “Northern

sound”—Celtic-inspired

folk rock with reggae

beats paired with traditional

throat singing and

lyrics sung in Inuktitut—

THE JERRY CANS

Sunday, July 28

Squamish Constellation

Festival

didn’t emerge until Nancy Mike (accordion

and throat singing) and Gina

Burgess (violin) joined the group.

The combined punctuation of Burgess’

high-energy fiddle and Mike’s

throat singing give the roots rock

base a distinctive cross-cultural feel.

Their sound may have many shifting

influences, but it’s always pointedly

indebted to their home.

Mike and Morrison—also romantic

partners—write most of the lyrics

together in Inuktitut, one of the

principal Inuit languages of Canada,

considered “vulnerable” by UNES-

CO. They rarely sing in English, even

translating covers.

“We’ve gotten hate mail about

how the frontman of this band is

white,” Mike says. “But he speaks

Tix: $80, single day pass,

constellationfest.ca

Saturday, August 3

Canmore Folk Music

Festival

Tix: $45, single day pass,

canmorefolkfestival.com

Inuktitut because my family

was supportive of him

learning it throughout our

relationship.” Conversations

about accountability

are essential to the group,

even more so after a group

of Inuit artists boycotted

this year’s Indigenous Music

Awards over cultural

appropriation concerns.

“We always try to listen to what

our communities are saying these

days about how we should move

forward as a band,” says Mike. “We

don’t ever want to move forward if

people are uncomfortable with what

we are doing.”

Mike and her bandmates want

to make sure Inuit voices are being

heard—across the country, but also

at home.

“When you come from such a

small place where there’s absolutely

no history of this music business

infrastructure, you have to figure out

how to do it yourselves, and that’s

what we did,” she says. “When it

comes to Nunavut Music Week, our

goal is to make sure the younger artists

don’t have to struggle

through the same shit

we had to go through.”

Inuit Association executive director

Brian Winters echoes this

sentiment in between sets later in

the evening. He’s a huge fan of The

Jerry Cans and the lineup of Indigenous

artists they’ve curated for

their showcase.

“One of the biggest issues with

the country we live in that we now

call Canada is that it’s never recognized

or made space for our languages

or the things we’re saying,”

he says. “The things we’re saying

are so important—especially in

our language. For people to hear

that and respect that is just really

beautiful.”

The crowd swells around the

stage when The Jerry Cans start

to play. Some are fans from back

home, wearing hats that proudly

say “Inuk” and singing along in

a language they all seem to know

well. Many are hearing the band

play for the first time. Everyone is

transfixed.

When asked how they approach

bringing their unique northern

sounds to a southern audience,

Mike is quick to respond. “Do I

have to explain anything to a

southern audience?” she asks

with a shrug. “Just hear it and

feel it. That’s all.” ,

20 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


YOUR

OLD FLAMES

ARE BACK

JOHNFLUEVOGCALGARYTHAVESW··

JOHNFLUEVOGEDMONTONAVENW··

FLUEVOGCOM


COVER STORY

CANADA’S

NEXT HUGE


By JORDAN YEAGER

POP STAR


I like

keeping the

people who know

me best around

me. They keep me

grounded and

authentic.

JESSIE REYEZ

Saturday, July 27

Squamish Constellation

Festival

Tix:$65-$80 single day,

$199-$425 weekend pass:

constellationfest.ca

W

e could all learn

something from

Jessie Reyez. She

holds her roots

close, whether

that’s the city

she was born in

(Toronto), the

suburb she was

raised in (Brampton)

or her closest friends (among

them, her parents, siblings, nieces

and nephews). Reyez speaks quickly,

but her timbre is laidback and reflective,

she knows herself, and she’s not

afraid for others to know her, too.

Take one listen to her raw and soulful

take on R&B and this becomes even

more evident. Her vulnerable and

sincere lyrics pull no punches – in

fact, the Juno Award-winning singer-songwriter

describes herself as

brutally honest.

That honesty first caught people’s

attention with the release of

“Gatekeeper,” a track she wrote after

producer Noel “Detail” Fisher

tried to coerce her into sexual acts

in exchange for fame. Reyez turned

that dehumanizing, objectifying experience

on its head and, in the years

since, has collaborated with Daniel

Caesar, Normani and Calvin Harris,

among many others. While she admits

that sometimes her brutal honesty

might get her into trouble, she’s

self-aware enough to know that what

she values above all else is holding

herself accountable.

“Not to throw a pity party or anything,

but I’ve dealt with

a lot of people in life who

have been dishonest with

me,” says Reyez. “It’s

scarred me to the point

where I just don’t want

to be a hypocrite, and I

don’t want to treat people

the way I’ve been treated in the

past that’s left me so bruised. Maybe

that’s why I’m honest, sometimes

brutally honest, sometimes crude,

because I just don’t want to put

someone else through the suffering

that I’ve been through. And it shows

up in my life, and it shows up in my

relationships, and it shows up in my

music by default.

“Of course it’s gotten me into trouble,

but I feel like the trouble that it

gets me into is at least present,” she

continues. “It’s something that I can

go through right then and there, as

opposed to having a lie that might

get worse over time and accumulate,

because that’s usually what lies do. I

think the truth always comes out no

matter what, so you can either deal

with it then if you fuck it up, or you

can deal with it in a few years on top

of paying interest karma.”

Much of her mindset – which

might come off as blunt, but is rooted

in empathy and compassion – can

be attributed to her parents. Reyez

describes her mom as “patient” and

her dad as “resilient,” and she learns

from them every day when she sees

how they react in any given situation.

“I’m lucky to have the guidance

of my mom. My mom is

the one that will tell me

that sometimes I have to

be a little more delicate.

Not everyone is expecting

that bluntness, so I

just have to be a little bit

more delicate to make

sure that I’m not being mean and

just being honest. They’re sometimes

synonymous, which is funny: mean

and honest.”

Some artists define success as a

wall full of accolades and a bank account

full of zeroes. Reyez wouldn’t

disagree – like anyone putting in the

time to master their craft, she wants

recognition for her hard work. But

success has a deeper meaning for her

than platinum plaques and shelves of

trophies.

“There’s three things I want before

I feel like I can properly rest,”

says Reyez. “I want to buy my dad

a farm, and I want to found an orphanage

and name it after my mom.

My dad’s always been very close to

nature and animals. He grew up in a

rough household – he lost his mom

and grew up with his evil dad. But he

had a homie in Colombia who had a

farm, and a lot of his childhood memories

were at that farm. He just loves

it, so it would be dope to get him his

own. And my mom started off as a

preschool teacher. If you were to see

my mom with kids… you know how

there’s, like, horse whisperers? She’s

a kid whisperer. When I was growing

up, our downstairs was a daycare and

TOP 3 PICKS

of the Squamish

Constellation

Festival

Bahamas

Getting his start as a

touring guitarist for everyone

from Feist to Jack

Johnson, the Canadian

folk musician has picked

up JUNO Award nominations

for each one of his

four solo albums, winning

in Alternative and Music

Video last year for his

project Earthtones.

Serena Ryder

A staple in the Canadian

music scene for the last

15 years, we’re willing to

bet you still have her 2012

single “Stompa” stuck in

your head after all this

time. Now running her own

radio program in Toronto,

Ryder will be bringing her

impressive three-octave

range and folk-rock sensibilities.

A Tribe Called Red

The 2018 Group of the

Year JUNO winners named

themselves after the

groundbreaking hip-hop

group A Tribe Called

Quest because they

wanted to put out similar

messages of political protest.

Catch their innovative

blend of traditional Indigenous

music with modern

electronica.

By Ben Boddez

we lived upstairs. Even if there were

seven kids and screaming babies, my

mom would stay calm and peaceful. I

feel like there are not a lot of people

in the world who can actually do that.

There are teachers that shouldn’t be

teachers because they lack that patience,

they lack that ability. But she

has that innately.”

The third thing she wants, understandably,

is recognition – “Grammys

and plaques and everything on

my wall to solidify that I mastered

music.”

Reyez is so close with her family

that she brings her parents on tour.

One time, her dad even went crowd

surfing. But they weren’t always the

best of friends. Like many of us,

Reyez distanced herself from her

family in her teenage years. But after

going through a breakup that left her

battling depression, she noticed that

her family were the ones waiting for

her on the other side.

“I think that’s the first time I realized,

for me, blood is thicker,” she

says. “A lot of people say ‘Don’t let

this industry change you.’ I see why

it would be easy for someone to

change, and I feel like keeping the

people who know me best around me

is the best mirror that I could have.

They keep me grounded and authentic.

They remind me of who I am and

why I started.”

Recently, Reyez has learned how to

turn inward and keep herself grounded,

too. Whether it’s through practicing

meditation or eating her greens,

self-care is an increasingly important

element of her day-to-day routine.

“This is going to sound real funny,

but I just this year started being

conscious of what self-love is,” says

Reyez. “Awareness of mental health

and physical health and how they’re

intertwined. It took me a long time

to even realize that, and I was so focused

on work and life and moving,

but you can’t let yourself get overwhelmed.

You can’t let yourself lose

that peace, because the second that’s

gone, if I’m the engine that’s moving

this whole operation, then what happens?

I have to look out for myself to

make sure that I’m looking out for

everyone else.

“I’m happy that I’m working on

my discipline, and it’s permeating in

different areas of my life. It’s permeating

in how I move from meeting to

music, and it’s permeating in what I

eat and how I treat myself. I’m proud

of making that a priority this year,

and I’m going to make sure that it

stays a priority in my life.” ,

24 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


The Playlist:

10

2

songs in heavy rotation at the BR offices right now

4

1

5

8

6 9

HAZELWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY - THE VINYL DISH

1

The Free Nationals

Time

(Ft. Mac Miller & Kali Uchis)

Mac Miller’s first posthumous

release couldn’t have been left in

better hands. The backing

band for his close friend

Anderson .Paak pairs

his laid-back drawl

with a shimmering

funk instrumental

and the smooth vocals

of R&B diva

Kali Uchis.

3

2 Selci

Truth In The Sea

A direct hit from this rising Calgary-based

pop star, Selci lays

down an ocean of entrancing electro-R&B

to set yourself adrift on.

The slowly ascending synths

weave around her delicate,

echoing vocals and surprise

whistle tones.

3

Taylor Swift

You Need To Calm

Down

The rebranded, pastel-coloured

Swift takes aim at her haters

on the second single from

her upcoming project. The

track features some

impossibly catchy

building harmonies

and some shoutouts

to the LGBT

community. We

wonder though, if

she’ll ever let that

snake emoji thing go.

4

The Dirty Nil

Astro Ever After

These prolific punks are building

momentum for their third album

with a track that alternates between

quieter verses showcasing

Luke Bentham’s passionate high

notes and a shockingly distorted

chorus. Headphone users beware

— or indulge. Whichever works.

Mariel Buckley

5 Casting Stones

The Albertan alt-country/roots artist

directs her earnest delivery and

poignant lyricism at political topics,

imploring people to give voice to

the voiceless. The extended bluesy

guitar solo only enhances her

powerful message.

6

Lower Dens

Young Republicans

An upbeat indie-pop satire that

paints the disillusioned youth

of the political party as some

kind of cannibals, frontman

Nate Nelson singing the lyrics

with wide-eyed joy over

a retro beat. This is definitely

one of the strangest

political tracks this year.

7

7 Dreamville

Down Bad

(Ft. JID, Bas, J. Cole, EARTHGANG &

Young Nudy)

One of the first two singles released

from the massive compilation

on the way from J. Cole’s

Dreamville record label, this posse

cut is mostly driven by throwback

sounds and JID’s youthful voice on

the chorus - but we’ll give the best

verse to Cole.

8 Kindness

Hard To Believe

Fresh off of impressive production

work with everyone from Solange

to Robyn, the multi-talented singer-songwriter

teases the September

launch of his new album and

links up with two more dynamic

voices, Jazmine Sullivan and

Sampha, for a piece of chilled-out

synth-funk.

9 Notifi

Won’t Get Lonely

This track is so Toronto it’s a wonder

that Drake’s OVO label didn’t

immediately snap him up when it

dropped. An eerie alt-R&B track, you

could easily mistake this for the 6ix

God if you didn’t know any better.

Except this guy also produced this

hard-hitting beat.

10

The Underachievers

Wasteman

This up-and-coming Brooklyn duo

adopt a word from the UK grime

scene to throw at their detractors.

Absolutely nobody else can sound

this hard while making references

to Ariana Grande and Cyndi Lauper

hits within the same track.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 25


FF19BRSpread.qxp_Layout 1 2019-06-27 2:19 PM Page 1

A T B M A I N S T A G E

THURSDAY JULY 25

5:30 - 10:30 PM

FRIDAY JULY 26

5:45 - 11:30 PM

SATURDAY JULY 27

5:30 - 11:30 PM

5:30 pm

Tal National

(Steve Poltz)

6:30 pm

Tune-Yards

(The Torchettes)

7:45 pm

Sharon Van Etten

(Sofia Viola)

9:10 pm

Belle & Sebastian

emcee: Steve Poltz

5:45 pm

Yissy García & Bandancha

(The Young Novelists)

6:40 pm

Ndidi O

(surprise popup)

7:40 pm

Rheostatics

8:50 pm

Sheila E.

(Bedouine)

10:15 pm

Half Moon Run

emcee: Zoey Roy

5:30 pm

Ranky Tanky

(Ali Hassan)

6:30 pm

The Garifuna Collective

(Joan Shelley)

7:35 pm

Asleep at the Wheel

(surprise popup)

8:55 pm

Lucius

(Willie Watson)

10:15 pm

Nathaniel Rateliff

& The Night Sweats

emcee: Ali Hassan

N A T I O N A L E V E N I N G S T A G E 4

THURSDAY JULY 25

5:45 – 10:15 PM

5:45 pm

Mauno

6:55 pm

La Force

8:00 pm

iskwē

9:15 pm

The Harpoonist

& The Axe Murderer

FRIDAY JULY 26

6:15 – 10:15 PM

6:15 pm

Combo Chimbita

7:35 pm

Revel In Dimes

9:00 pm

DJ Champion

SATURDAY JULY 27

6:15 - 10:15 PM

6:15 pm

The Devil Makes Three

7:40 pm

Mekons

9:05 pm

Weaves

F R

FIE

3:0

Dy

isk

La

Ma

DJ

4:3

No

Rh

Th

T

Th

Ka


I D A Y A F T E R N O O N

LD LAW • STAGE 3

0 - 4:15 pm

namic Audio


Force

uno

Champion

0 - 5:45 pm

rthern Wish

eostatics

e Harpoonist &

he Axe Murderer

e Devil Makes Three

t Danser

NATIONAL • STAGE 4 RIGSTAR • STAGE 5

3:00 - 4:15 pm

Mujeres Poderosas

Sofia Viola

Yissy García and Bandancha

Sheila E.

Los Pachamama y Flor

Amargo

4:30 - 5:45 pm

World Party

Hamsa Hamsa

Tal National

Combo Chimbita

3:00 - 3:45 pm

concert

Hamsa Hamsa

4:00 - 4:45 pm

concert

Bedouine

5:00 - 5:45 pm

concert

The Young Novelists


SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

Live

MUSiC

SLED ISLAND

2019 in review

By SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO, CHRIS-

TINE LEONARD and TORY ROSSO

Sled Island kicked off another phenomenal

year with a jet-lagged Japanese

Breakfast bringing music fans together

at the Legion on a damp Wednesday

evening and the energy remained high

throughout the festival’s four days with

stand-out acts like JPEGMAFIA, Bully,

guest curator Julian Baker and more

rolling through to brighten the corners of

a city that only got hotter as the weekend

progressed.

More than 250 acts took centre stage

to give attendees sweaty and unforgettable

live music experiences and we were

on the ground to see it all living, breathing

and pulsing. Here are some of our favourite

festival highlights.

Wednesday, June 19

7Future Womb

Ship & Anchor

Mikaela Cochrane is an actress, a burlesque

performer, a multi-instrumentalist

and, most of all, a total dreamer. She elevates

Future Womb’s theatrical avant-pop

from “just a show” into a total spectacle,

including gender-bending, space-cosmic

outfits for the band and heart-wrenching

songs that aren’t afraid to confront her

traumas straight on. (SB)

5shitlord fuckerman

Broken City Patio

Most were drawn to the Broken City patio

on Wednesday afternoon on the strength

of shitlord fuckerman’s name alone. But,

backed by weirdo DIY electronic beats

and clad in an uncanny plastic mask and

cowboy hat that read, “Bad Boy,” in rhinestones,

shitlord fuckerman delivered an

engaging set worthy of the name. (SB)

7Japanese Breakfast

#1 Legion

Though admittedly jet lagged, having flown

in from South Korea the day before, Japanese

Breakfast performed an inspiring,

lively set at the sold out Royal Canadian

Legion for the first headlining show of Sled

Island. The packed crowd was treated to

an extended performance of “Diving Woman,”

complete with synth-layered jams. And

when the band sank into their somewhat

melancholy prom-themed orchestration,

“Boyish,” the crowd all had their cell

phones recording, singing along with Michelle

Zimmer, “I can’t get you off my mind,

I can’t get you off in general.” (TR)

Japanese Breakfast

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

28 BEATROUTE JULY 2019

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO


SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO JESSE GILLETT

Saturday,

June 22

7Physical

Copies

Dickens Pub

Edmonton’s new-wave

maniacs stood at the

head of a packed Dickens

Pub and put on a

loveable, dancey show

that was equal parts

too-cool-for-school and

self-deprecating. The

long-time bandmates

were tight and had the

entire crowd hanging

from the ceiling — even

running over their set

length as everyone was

too wrapped up in the

moment to care about

the clock. (SB)

7Ian Blurton’s

Future Now

The Palomino

Heads were sent spinning

into the Strat-osphere

and guitar hero

worship ran unchecked

as renewable-resource

and Canadian legend

Ian Blurton, flanked by

his stellar new band Future

Now, displayed his

skills in pulling energy

from the atmosphere

to generate pure rock

and roll dynamite. Huge

riffs, huge amps and a

late-night show set the

tone for total wizardry.

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

Friday, June 21

7DRI HIEV

Performance Hall @ National

Music Centre

As part of Indigenous Resistance

In Music’s cross-programming

with Sled Island, DRI HIEV put on

a powerful set in the Performance

Hall at NMC. Their industrial noise

punk ground away at colonization

while the four moving bodies on

stage provided a warm touch of

humanity that felt like an act of

resistance in and of itself. (SB)

3Bully

The Palace Theatre

While Bully’s records may lean

towards Nirvana-style grunge, their

live performance is more Dinosaur

Jr 90s rock and roll histrionics. The

foursome were on point as they

barrelled through their set without

pause, leaving a capacity crowd

panting in their wake. Frontwoman

Alicia Bognano was unstoppable

and electric. (SB)

Sunday, June 23

Har Mar Superstar

The Palomino

For the final set of Sled

Island, the horseshoe basement

of the Palomino was

tropical and dense. Fronted

by singer Sean Tillmann,

who came out in a Sriracha

bottle costume, the band

ripped through an intense,

dance-fueled, beer-exploding

set, featuring hits such

as “Restless Leg,” “Lady

You Shot Me” and “We Don’t

Sleep.” By the end of the

set, Tillmann, stripped to his

underwear, announced, “My

name is Sean, I go by Har

Mar Superstar. We love Sled

Island and we love Calgary.”

A perfect way to end the

perfect festival. (TR)

(CL) JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 29

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO


NMC

JEAN-MICHEL BLAIS

MONDAY, JULY 29

supported by

DETAILS AT STUDIOBELL.CA/WHATS-ON

Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre | 850 4 Street SE Calgary, AB

studiobell.ca @nmc_canada #StudioBell

30 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


Reviews

MUSiC

Album Review

THE BLACK KEYS

Let’s Rock

Easy Eye Sound /

Nonesuch Records

It’s been a hot minute since we

last heard from The Black Keys,

but their heavy blues rock

refrain remains the same. Reunited

with his better half and

percussionist Patrick Carney,

vocalist/guitarist Dan Auerbach

demonstrates that getting back

in their brotherly Rubber Belt

groove was as easy as falling

off a tandem bicycle.

Recorded from scratch at

Auerbach’s Easy Eye Sound

studios in Nashville, Let’s Rock

reportedly came together

with very little preparation or

premeditation. Edging away

from the disco ball and asphalt

sizzle of 2011’s El Camino and

the polished tones of 2014’s

Turn Blue, the stripped-down

nostalgia of Let’s Rock offers

heartfelt tribute to the ultimate

tool of the trade - the electric

guitar. Irresistibly retro, yet

tuned to a modern frequency,

the album is already commanding

the airwaves thanks to

catchy-as-hell and radio-ready

singles like “Lo/Hi,” “Eagle

Birds” and “Go.” These three

Cowtown-meets-Motown

forerunners preface an album

stacked with glossy, voluptuous

ditties that bump ‘n’ grind

like a preacher’s daughter.

Thumping bass notes and

gliding vocals add sleek lines

to “Shine a Light,” padded out

by lux backups from guest

vocalists Leisa Hans and Ashley

Wilcoxson. Lonely forest

mating ritual “Eagle Birds”

gets down and dirty, while the

stomping Austin gospel of “Lo/

Hi” hits the album’s two sweetest

spots - earnest storytelling

and an unrelenting boogie beat

that drives the drama towards

satisfaction.

At peace with the past, the

sugarcoated dirge “Walk on

Water” echoes Auerbach’s time

as “king of a one-horse town,”

but you know you’re being

lured in for the big come up

when “Tell Me Lies” struts into

Karmatown.

Yep, The Black Keys have returned

to form nicely, which is

most fortunate because we’ve

been waiting.

Christine Leonard

JUNE 2019 BEATROUTE 31

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 31


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

Interview

KILLY

Light Path 8

Secret Sound Club

ABBATH

Outstrider

Season of Mist

SUM 41’S

SOBERING

NEW WORLD

ORDER

SUM 41

Order In Decline

Hopeless Records

Punk teens of the early 2000s

were shocked when Dave

“Brownsound” Baksh announced

his departure from Sum

41 in 2006. A founding member of

the band, Baksh’s Indo-Guyanese

background complemented with his

shreddy, heavy guitar playing made

him a unique and recognizable figure

in the scene at the time. After

nine long years, Baksh returned

to Sum 41 at the Alternative Press

Awards in 2015 and appeared on

the band’s 2016 album 13 Voices.

Three years later, the band is ready

to come in heavier and harder with

their new record, Order In Decline.

“We were in agreement that we

had to come out of the gates really

strong on this record,” Baksh says.

“The album’s title is based on a

system that has never worked —

the order of the world. Not only

in our continent, but all over the

place. The order of everything

seems to be in decline, in our view.

It seems like we’re kind of leaving

the next generation out to dry.”

Overall, Order In Decline is

aggressive in sound and mature

in composition. It walks a fine line

between punk rock and metal

yet still finds room for melancholic,

reflective ballads. It is the

second record written by Sum 41

frontman Deryck Whibley since

overcoming major health complications

caused by alcoholism.

“Man, even if he was a garbage

person to be around sober, I’ll

still be happier than when he

was deep into the drinking,” says

Baksh. “Being home, hearing

about what was going on and not

being able to reach out, it hurt a

lot. Now, the friendship that we

had since the first day of high

school in transportation technology

class, you know, it’s been

rekindled. I think it’s stronger than

it was before.” Johnny Papan

Following a recent JUNO nomination

for Breakthrough Artist of

the Year, Toronto rapper Killy has

dropped a sophomore project that

shows off his versatility amid a

variety of cinematic and orchestral

instrumentals.

Killy stands tall at an intersection

between trap music and more melodic,

alt-rock-influenced hip-hop,

blending hard-hitting trap instrumentals

and flows with his unique

nasally vocal delivery and cryptically

poetic lyrics.

Light Path 8 adheres to quite

a few modern day rap trends, but

Killy turns the rap game on its head

and disrupts them on almost every

song with surprising, genre-bending

moments, showing his potential and

versatility as a rapper and songwriter.

Killy’s pop instincts are much

more fluid than his penchant for

rapping, tapping into some Post

Malone-inspired inescapable

earworms on tracks like “Eye for

an Eye” and “Simulation.” These

shorter track lengths and poppy

melodies are designed for streaming

on repeat and getting stuck in

your head — and it works.

Killy has said he named his latest

offering Light Path 8 because he’s

focused on the journey rather than

the destination, and it’s through this

collection of songs that he’s proving

to find his way out of the dark

depths of a competitive industry.

Best Track: Track: Evil Eye


Ben Boddez

Abbath Doom Occulta is the

corpse-painted face and venomous

voice of black metal in his

Norwegian homeland. Born Olve

Eikemo, the 45-year-old multi-instrumentalist

has famously served

as Immortal’s lead vocalist, lyricist,

guitarist, bassist, keyboardist and

drummer.

An extreme and extremely versatile

artist, his eponymous offshoot

metal project, Abbath, recently

reformed with a fresh lineup and a

renewed sense of purpose.

The aggressive quartet’s current

incarnation attacks Abbath’s

sophomore effort with rapid-fire

percussion, caustic vocals and

power guitar enslaughts. Plunging

headlong into the heat of an epic

fantasy battle, the album fuses

the new wave of heavy metal with

rhapsodic melodies and Abbath’s

own dark philosophies.

Delivered with face-flaying furosity,

white-knucklers like “Harvest

Pyre,” the wiley “Scythewinder”

and wildly imaginative “The

Artifex” prove as intricate as they

are intense. Occulta growls like a

lion, pacing between the bars of

solid steel and shadowy malice on

“Bridge of Spasms,” cheering on

the band’s hellish machinations.

Ominous and oozing with

goblinesque screams, “Pace Till

Death” hails the flames and traps

the audience between inferno and

abyss. Wrapping up their harrowing

eight-song saga with a pang

of nostalgia, Outstrider makes a

grand exit with an amped-up cover

of Bathory’s “Hecate.”

Best Track: Harvest Pyre

Christine Leonard

32 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


Interview

SKYE WALLACE

Skye Wallace

Independent

BLEACHED

CHANNEL

THEIR INNER

BLONDIE

The self-titled album from Toronto

based artist Skye Wallace claims

the sloppy grunge reminiscent of

Courtney Love and her posse of

furious friends, yet pauses on the

precipice. The album flips between

wildly energetic to greasy and

moody and is nevertheless slow,

polished and rhythmic; elements

that betray the singer’s classic vocal

training and background in folk.

While a gritty departure from her

dark-folk history, Wallace’s album

nevertheless remains inspired by

the Canadian landscape and experience.

Her split residence between

Toronto and Vancouver, combined

with a vagabond existence that

dragged her across Newfoundland

and Yukon, informs an album that

plays out like a Canadian fantasy

tale.

“Coal in Your Window,” the

album’s first single, is an old-school

story of forbidden romance about

a boy and a girl who secretly hook

up in the boiler room. Yet, this ain’t

your basic barn-yard, rolling-in-thehay

romp. The lyrics might be folk,

but the guitar solos are straight

out of an 80s superhero knock out

scene and the harmonics deliver a

raw and gritty punch.

Vancouver audiences will experience

Wallace’s signature fusion of

folk and punk at the Wise Hall on

July 9.

Best Track: Coal in Your Window

Kathryn Helmore

BLEACHED

Don’t You Think You’ve

Had Enough?

XL Recordings

At the end of 2017, sisters

Jennifer and Jessie Clavin

knew they wanted to take their

music in a new direction. Their

sunshine drenched garage punk

band, Bleached, just wrapped

up two major tours opening

for Paramore and the Damned.

Inspired by the energy those

bands elicited each night, the

Clavins resolved to go back to

the drawing board and write the

kind of live bangers that would

be fit for stadiums.

Up until that point, the LA

rockers have benefited from lo-fi

fuzz and playful punk jams. But

according to Jennifer Clavin, it

was only a matter of time before

Bleached dove into different

sonic territory. “I feel like a lot

of bands over time put out one

disco song, even if it’s not part

of the plan,” Clavin laughs. “Like,

Metallica’s ‘Jump in the Fire’ has a

disco beat throughout, and it’s one

of their best songs, in my opinion. I

slowly realized that I was drawn to

that kind of sound.”

For their upcoming album,

Bleached worked with producer

Shane Stoneback (Vampire Weekend,

Sleigh Bells), whose penchant

for vintage gear complemented the

band’s 70s-inspired aesthetic. The

resulting Don’t You Think You’ve

Had Enough? is glossy and upbeat,

a dance record that shows the

most growth for the band out of all

their releases to date. Tracks like

“Hard to Kill” and “Somebody Call

911” are slick, disco-infused tunes

à la Blondie. Meanwhile “Rebound

City” recalls the rock and roll ethos

of the Runaways, maintaining the

edge of Bleached’s earlier work.

It’s also the most collaborative

effort between the two sisters, who

returned to their original two-piece

set up. Clavin is quick to praise her

sister, Jessie, who took over the

majority of the guitar work for this

album.

“She mainly plays guitar live,

but she’s honestly the best bass

player I know,” she says. “She was

controlling all the bass, and I think

because of that it ended up being

this dancier record.”

More than creative exploration,

the Clavin sisters underwent significant

personal changes that fuelled

the majority of their song writing.

It’s the first time the two open up

about their sobriety, a theme that

underscores the entire album.

In her lyrics, Clavin reflects on

ending toxic relationships and

friendships, shedding self-destructive

habits, and the difficulty of

leaving the past behind. She later

realized that her raucous lifestyle

only hindered her ability to write

music from a truly honest place.

“I was really working on being

present. When I was drinking and

partying, I thought I needed that

kind of lifestyle to help me write

music, which I think is something a

lot of artists struggle with,” Clavin

admits. “But as a sober person, I

knew to get to that creative place

I needed to be present. And I realized

playing music in itself is a form

of meditation that forces you to be

present.”

Clavin says she learned not to

judge herself in the moment and to

allow her ideas to take shape on

their own. As she began to examine

her life with greater self-awareness,

she also opened herself up to

the idea of self-love. It’s something

she accepted when, on an impulse,

she decided to retreat to her

aunt’s house alone one weekend.

There, she immersed herself in

the beauty of the surrounding

California desert and decided to

write one great song.

“I ended up writing ‘Daydream,’

which is one my

personal favourite songs from

the album,” she says. “It was this

real moment of clarity where I

realized, ‘Okay, I got this. Being

sober totally works for me.’

Because the other version of me

would’ve just bought a bunch of

wine and gotten wasted trying to

write something.”

The two sisters, newly motivated,

have made some of their

most focused and ambitious

music on Don’t You Think You’ve

Had Enough?. They may have

freed themselves from unhealthy

influences, but their bond together

continues to be as strong

as it has ever been.

“I have to remind myself of

how lucky I am to have my sister

at my side, because I have other

musician friends that are sober,

but the rest of their band isn’t,”

she says. “I know it amazes

people that we can get along together.

But it’s really comforting

to be in a band with her. In the

end, I think we just have a lot of

fun with it, which is why it works

out so well.”

Karina Espinosa

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 33


34 BEATROUTE JULY 2019

ALL AGES!


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

DANIEL CAESAR

CASE STUDY 01

Golden Child Recordings

Toronto’s alternative R&B neo-soul

king Daniel Caesar dropped his

sophomore project CASE STUDY

01 as a surprise on a packed

release day, but still managed to

grab all the much deserved online

attention.

After his excellent breakthrough,

Freudian, fans were left waiting for

more of his high-concept songwriting

and aching falsetto. The album

opens with American physicist J.

Robert Oppenheimer’s famous

atomic bomb speech, and Caesar

satisfies those desires by dropping

the musical equivalent of one

immediately after.

In true Torontonian fashion,

CASE STUDY 01 is an eclectic

mix of sounds, mostly staying true

to his passionately crooned slow

burns while honoring where Caesar

came from with a couple of other

welcomed diversions. Jamaican

music is a huge part of the Toronto

scene and Caesar has Jamaican

roots. Hearing this side of him on

“Cyanide” is almost as nice as his

return to the gospel music he grew

up on, with a soulful choir enhancing

tracks like “Open Up” and

“Restore The Feeling.”

It wouldn’t be a Caesar album

without some deep ruminations on

life either, as he ponders the heat

death of the universe, scientific

phenomena, and – most affectingly

– struggles with staying true to his

faith on “Too Deep To Turn Back.” .

Best Track: Open Up

Ben Boddez

K.FLAY

Solutions

Interscope/Night Street

K.Flay is finished caring what

anyone thinks. Solutions, her third

full-length offering, is a 10-track altpop

hip-hop album whose singles

hint at a project brimming with catharsis.

She wrote the album after

returning home from her last tour

and finding herself in a dark headspace.

After revisiting what made

her happy in childhood, before

vices like drugs and alcohol made

emotional suppression easier than

self-reflection, she was inspired

to return to that mindset through

doodling, long phone calls with her

mom, and reconnecting with music

in its purest form. Solutions is the

result.

The album opens with “I Like

Myself,” an affirming anthem about

accepting the fact that maybe

we’re all more average than we

present ourselves to be on social

media.

K.Flay slows down and gets

more pensive on “Nervous,” which

is a just-as-synthy but less bassheavy

exploration of the nervous

excitement of a new relationship

when that uncertainty over where

things stand still lingers heavily in

the air.

Solutions uses instrumentation

sparingly in a way that complements

K.Flay’s confident vocals

and refined lyricism, which weave

the album together from track one

to finale “DNA.”

The project is a personal one

that offers an intimate glimpse into

the mind of an artist whose energy

is palpable.

Best Track: Nervous

Jordan Yeager

BRUCE

SPRINGSTEEN

Western Stars

Columbia Records

Western Stars is a 180 degree

departure from Springsteen’s

recent studio records, shifting the

emphasis from bass, drum and

guitars to lush, rich and elegant

orchestral arrangements. They

reverberate from the Southwestern

States combining Springsteen’s

brisk acoustic work with the

sweeping, country-pop overtones

of Jimmy Webb’s stellar LA studio

hits from the late 60s. The production

is majestic and panoramic — a

soundtrack arching across the

desert floor and open skies cast

upon Hollywood’s big screen.

While melodies swell, sometimes

stratospheric, Springsteen’s storytelling

pulls it all down into quiet,

intimate pockets. Many characters

bare a resemblance to those found

in 1987’s Tunnel Of Love, with lives

burdened and broken by choices

made that can’t be undone.

Yet there’s also the freewheeling

hitchhiker, first to appear on the

record, who’s got no destination in

mind except raking in the experience

of each ride. At the desert

cafe, truckers and bikers meet, the

roadhouse overflows with drink

and dance where “summer girls in

the parking lot slap their make-up

on and flirt the night away.”

Western Stars is a complex landscape,

optimistic and joyous as it is

desolate, fatalistic and bittersweet.

In it Springsteen draws on people

and places as well as his own history

grounded in that corner of the

universe resulting in a remarkable

concept album where the magic

flows once again.

Best Track: Moonlight Motel


Brad Simm

GIRLFRIEND

MATERIAL

Cool Car

Dine Alone

Led by Tokyo Police Club keyboardist

Graham Wright, Girlfriend

Material fleshes out the sounds

from the band’s 2017 self-titled EP

with jangly pop hooks and plenty of

lyrics about relationships, breakups,

and recoveries.

These songs effectively portray

a confidence for the here and now,

rather than an aching for what

should have been. First single,

“First of the Month,” recalls the

fantastic guitar licks and tempo

changes that made TPC’s debut

album so fun to listen to, retaining

a youthful cynicism about the world

today.

Maturity also shines through on

Cool Car. With experienced musicians

like fellow TPC member Josh

Hook and Hollerado’s Jake Boyd

rounding out the project, Wright is

confident and free to write songs

from the heart.

Sonically, it’s not too far from

anything we’ve heard from Tokyo

Police Club or Hollerado before,

but the songs on Cool Car display

an energy and infectiousness that

will have you bobbing your head

and singing along. If you’re looking

for a side hustle to complement

your rotation of Can-rock faves this

summer, Cool Car is the pimped

out Toyota Tercel you’ve been

waiting for.

Best Track: First of the Month

Trevor Morelli

THOM YORKE

ANIMA

XL Recordings

Some dream theorists suggest

that within our unconscious, dwell

alternate versions of our personalities.

One such logician, Carl Jung,

conceptualized the idea of “Anima”

as representing the unconscious

feminine qualities of the male

psyche. This approach seems

fitting for the title of Radiohead

lead singer Thom Yorke’s new

solo album, whose falsetto voice

and undiscerning vulnerability has

always been the focal point of his

music.

ANIMA is an electronic record,

like his last release Tomorrow’s

Modern Boxes. Opening track

“Traffic,” begins with a simple UK

House beat but becomes chaotic

and busy as Yorke’s tender vocals

weave in and out between inconsistent

patterns. The tracks aren’t

messy; the production remains

calculated, but the unpredictable

trajectory of the songs keeps them

exciting.

It’s not all overly complicated

though. Tracks “Twist” and “Dawn

Chorus” ditch the club vibe for

more delicate melodies, further

exploring Yorke’s feminine dreamscapes.

But this only lasts until the

album’s final track, “Runwayaway,”

which meshes nightmarish ambient

rhythms with electronically altered

vocals, leaving you gasping for air

upon awakening.

For a full scale experience,

check out the album’s visceral accompanying

short film directed by

Paul Thomas Anderson, available

now on Netflix.

Best Track: Impossible Knots

Jeevin Johal

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 35


TRAVEL

CROSS-CANADA CAMPING

MUSIC FESTIVAL GUIDE

CAMPOUT

& ROCK OUT

C

amping festivals:

because sometimes,

we all need

an excuse to go

days on end without

showering.

Whether you’d rather

spend the weekend on

a muddy, dusty farm

surrounded by people

wearing onesies and sucking

on soothers or bring

your parents, nephew, and

litter of puppies to camp in

a clean, cool river-side RV,

the coast-to-coast selection

of festivals in Canada

is unparalleled.

While they might vary in

content – some emphasize

electronica, while others

are exclusively metal – festival

culture in general aims

to foster a sense of family

and give their guests a

transcendent, ephemeral

experience of feeling at

home.

Music, painting, yoga,

performance art and a

cozy, beer-stained tent to

return to at the end of the

night… what more could

you need? (Sunscreen.

The answer is sunscreen.)

By JORDAN YEAGER

Shambhala

36 BEATROUTE JULY 2019

Winnipeg Folk Festival

Shambhala


River & Sky Music/Camping Festival

ASTRAL HARVEST: July 4-7 on

1 the North Country Fair festival

grounds near Driftpile, AB

“Home is not a place, it’s a feeling.”

Astral Harvest is more than just

a music festival – their itinerary also

features almost 20 seminars about

topics ranging from beekeeping to

cultural appropriation vs. appreciation

to ayahuasca and Inka healing

techniques (BYOA). There are yoga

classes, fire shows, aerialists, and

bubble blowing parties. Camping is

first-come first-served, so if you’re

bringing the whole family, arrive

early and claim a plot on the quieter

Family Camping site.

2

WINNIPEG FOLK FESTIVAL: July

11-14 at Birds Hill Provincial Park

near Winnipeg

Despite the name, Winnipeg Folk

Festival hosts artists who play indie,

electronic, pop, and a wide variety

of other genres, too. They have

Tarot readings, puppetry, an LED

gallery and a costume booth to outfit

you for the day. Kacey Musgraves

is one of their headliners this year

– don’t forget to wait until she says

“yee” before you say “haw.”

Winnipeg Folk Festival is another

contender that offers two campgrounds

to suit your needs. The

Festival Campground has room for

6,000 people and feels like a little

commune, with everyone making

art and friends between the tents.

The Quiet Campground is a third of

the size, so you’re covered whether

you’d rather find your new best

friends or get a good night’s sleep.

RIVER & SKY MUSIC/CAMPING

3 FESTIVAL: River & Sky Music/Camping

Festival: July 18-21 near Sudbury, ON

Situated along the Sturgeon

River, River & Sky works closely

with locals to create a sustainable

retreat to nature for festival-goers.

This festival is a smaller one, and

they believe that a smaller, more

intimate experience is best both

for the environment and for the

visitors. The campground is situated

in Fishers’ Paradise, a quiet haven

outside West Nipissing, Ontario that

grants visitors access not only to

the river but also to a lake. Bring

your kayaks, your donut-shaped

floaties, and your pups, because

River & Sky is one of few festivals

that welcomes pets.

4

CANADA’S

TOP 5

FUTURE FOREST:

July 26-29 near Fredericton, NB

Future Forest doesn’t think of

its guests as audience members,

but rather as active participants

in the creation of a communal

experience. Hosted in a 200-acre

wilderness preserve, the festival

originally began in 2012 as a fundraiser

for friend of the fest DJ Jay

Hamilton when he was diagnosed

with cancer. It’s this community

vibe that they strive to recreate

year after year; instead of corporate

sponsors, they invite local

artisans to sell their wares, from

jewelry to clothing to handblown

glass (anyone need a new pipe?).

5 SHAMBHALA:

August 9-12 at the Salmo River

Ranch near Nelson, BC

Shambhalove, Shambhalife –

those who frequent Shambhala

think of it as a second home. Every

year, thousands of attendees

flock to the farm for the electronic

fest. Each of the festival’s six

stages has its own stage director,

ensuring that the universes they

create will never be the same

from one year to the next. Don’t

forget a face mask – you will be

breathing in dust and cow manure.

Shambhala also stays away from

corporate sponsors. For a festival

that often sells out within minutes,

it’s about as grassroots as you

can get.

Shambhala is a lifestyle, and

people who frequent the fest go all

out for it every year. You want to

paint a school bus and sleep in it

for a week? Bring it! Rather build a

wooden pirate ship, affix it to your

truck and drive that over? Please

do! Each year, the themes of their

campgrounds change. This year’s

haven’t been announced yet, so if

you’ve got a vision, why not apply

to start your own?

HONOURABLE MENTIONS:

Laketown Shakedown: June 28-

30 in Cowichan Valley, BC

Midsummer Music Festival: July

5-7 in Smithers, BC

Armstrong Metalfest: July 12-13 in

Armstrong, BC

Hillside Festival: July 12-14 at

Guelph Lake Conservation Area

Vancouver Island Music Fest: July

12-14 in Courtenay, BC

Bass Coast: July 12-15 in Merritt,

BC

Starbelly Jam Music Festival: July

19-20 in Crawford Bay, BC

Evolve: July 19-21 in Moncton, NB

Kispiox Valley Music Festival: July

26-28 in Duncan, BC

ArtsWells Festival of All Things

Art: August 2-5 in Wells, BC

Edge of the World Music Festival:

August 9-11 in Haida Gwaii, BC

Regina Folk Festival: August 9-11

at Victoria Park, Regina


38 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


SCREEN

TIME

We believe

in Yesterday

Danny Boyle’s

Yesterday imagines

a world without The

Beatles

By PAT MULLEN

I

magine a world without The

Beatles. Imagine all the people

who never heard “Let It

Be,” “Penny Lane,” “A Day in

the Life” or any of their songs

that revolutionized music.

That’s the simple premise of

Yesterday, which imagines a music

history without Paul, John, George,

and/or Ringo. The Fab Four are

wiped from the Earth when struggling

artist Jack Malick (Himesh

Patel) wishes for a miracle, gets

struck by a bus and awakens in a

world in which only he knows The

Beatles’ tunes. Ka-ching, ka-ching!

While the film is as familiar as a

Beatles’ song, it’s as impossible to

resist. The script by Richard Curtis

(Love Actually, About Time) gives

audiences a sweet love story as

Jack’s rise to stardom pulls him away

from his devoted manager, Ellie (Lily

James), as she stays in Suffolk to work

her day job as a schoolteacher and he

jets to LA to pursue his dream. The

pair has great chemistry with James

drawing on her Cinderella charm,

while Patel creates an endearing underdog

in Jack and fuels a soundtrack

of summer fun performing The Beatles’

greatest hits.

As Jack enjoys his success, his

peers — including Ed Sheeran (who

is a good sport about poking fun at

himself) — yearn to know the stories

that inspired “Strawberry Fields

Forever” or “In My Life,” and the film

sometimes strains under the simplicity

of its premise as it reworks the

same conflict over a few dozen Beatles’

songs.

Jack’s success is bittersweet as he

knows in his heart that he doesn’t

come by it honestly, even though his

exuberant covers of these songs electrify

the crowds. He struggles with his

betrayal of Ellie and with selling out

his artistic integrity for success. His

music brings joy to people around

the world, which leaves him with the

choice to erase The Beatles forever or

continue living a lie.

Directed with whimsical energy

and the right flavour of cheese by

Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire,

Steve Jobs), Yesterday doesn’t seek

to reinvent The Beatles’ music. Both

the approach and the story are relatively

safe, but the film is a novel exercise

in nostalgia.

The earnestness of the film

is too sweet to deny as Jack

saves Beatles’ tunes from

oblivion and revisits Liverpool

haunts like Abbey

Road, Penny Lane, and Eleanor

Rigby’s grave to jog

his memory. Yesterday

reminds audiences of the

magic of The Beatles by

making them recognize

the ways in which music

in general defines pivotal

moments in their lives.

Yesterday also makes

a strong case that this gen-

eration won’t see an act on par with

The Beatles. As Jack navigates the biz

and lets his soulless new manager

(a deadpan funny Kate McKinnon)

sculpt him into a star, Yesterday

places The Beatles’ songs within the

American Idol era in which stars are

pre-packaged and manufactured like

products.

The hustle teaches Jack that a true

artist is one who draws from his experiences

and pours himself into

his songs. The songs speak to

Jack’s audience, but not in the

same way Beatlemania made

the Fab Four speak to their

generation and inspire music

fans today. Yesterday is

an impossibly charming

essay that reminds us why

few artists live forever.

Yesterday is now in

theatres.

Ed Sheeran was not

Danny Boyle’s first

choice for Yesterday. It

was actually Coldplay’s

Chris Martin.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 39



SCREEN TIME

LEONARD

COHEN’S

LOVE

A great songwriter and his muse

explored in Marianne & Leonard:

Words of Love By PAT MULLEN

D

irector

Nick Bromfield had a unique perspective

in creating a remarkable documentary

about the complicated love affair

between Leonard Cohen and his legendary

muse Marianne Ihlen — he was in the middle

of a love triangle involving the tortured couple.

Broomfield has a habit of inserting himself into

his movies, but this time he’s both a character and

an inquisitor as he reflects upon two lives that

shaped his path. His personal inquiries drive docs

like Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer,

Kurt & Courtney, Biggie & Tupac, and Tales of the

Grim Sleeper. His latest film, Marianne & Leonard:

Words of Love is his most personal film yet and it

benefits from his ability to open himself up to enter

his subjects.

Words of Love chronicles the long relationship

between the late Leonard Cohen and his Norwegian

muse, also recently passed, Marianne Ihlen,

which began in 1960 on the Greek island of Hydra

and spanned decades, crossed continents, and inspired

generations. She’s the girl Cohen sings “so

long” to as well as many other musings.

She would eventually say “so long” to Broomfield,

who also had a relationship with Ihlen and

made his first documentary on her advice, he looks

at the romance of the poet and his muse with objectivity

and poetic grace. He’s the Nick Carraway to

Cohen’s Jay Gatsby and Ihlen’s Daisy Buchanan as

he watches from an inquisitive distance.

The doc features extraordinary footage of Cohen

and Ihlen that Broomfield shot with D.A. Pennebaker

(Don’t Look Back) over the summers in Hydra.

This previously unseen material is a valuable

archive of Cohen’s career as he flourished on the

arty island with Ihlen as his inspiration. Both Cohen

and Ihlen’s voices appear in archival interviews

atop the footage, as they passed away in 2016 just

three months apart, while Broomfield offers new

interviews with their surviving friends and peers.

This intimate glimpse into the creative process

reflects on the poet’s ability to draw inspiration

from a muse, but also stifle her in the service of his

art. The doc offers stories of times good and bad as

Cohen wrote songs like “Bird on a Wire” and “So

Long, Marianne” while under her wing, but then

was unfair to her own aspirations and responsibilities.

Broomfield strikes a personal chord when he

tells how the instability of Cohen and Ihlen’s onagain/off-again

relationship had long-term mental

health consequences for Ihlen’s son, Axel, who becomes

the film’s tragic figure.

Broomfield explains how Ihlen eventually left

Hydra, moved home and settled while Cohen skyrocketed

to fame. The film looks at Cohen’s success

in the post-Marianne years as he expanded

his audience by experimenting with musical styles.

Broomfield presents an extensive range of concert

footage that captures the deep, gravelly romanticism

of Cohen’s voice.

An extended sequence on “Hallelujah” takes

audiences to the peak of Cohen’s ability to craft

success through words of love. John Lissauer, who

produced the record for Cohen, recalls how Columbia

executives feared “Hallelujah” would ruin

Cohen and says the label terminated him immediately

upon hearing the song. Despite the song being

one of the industry’s biggest successes, Lissauer

says the label’s unexpected dislike for “Hallelujah”

inspired Cohen’s retreats to Mt. Baldy monastery

for extended periods of self-reflection.

As Cohen’s fortune humbles him in later years,

Broomfield returns him to Ihlen. The film provides

intimate access to Ihlen’s’s deathbed where

she receives a letter from Cohen that thanks her

for the endless love and inspiration. Broomfield,

surprisingly, doesn’t comment on the scene. He

steps back, lets the words of love hang in the air,

and invites audiences to appreciate a life they knew

mostly through songs.

Marianne & Leonard is a touching love letter to

artists and the kindred souls who inspire them.

Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love opens in select

Canadian theatres on July 12 and across Canada in the

weeks that follow.

WE HAVE A HEART ON


the

2019

F O R

C A L G A R Y

F R

I N G E

unrestricted, unexpected,

unforgettable

40 BEATROUTE JULY 2019

Anything Anything Goes Theatre Goes Theatre – something – for for EVERYONE! EVERYONE!

Anything Goes Theatre – something for EVERYONE!

August

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3- 11 2018

- 11 2018

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use code:

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I’LL TAKE YOUR DEAD

THE NEW THRILLER FROM THE DIRECTOR OF ‘THE HERETICS’

“JUST A REALLY FREAKING

WELL DONE MOVIE”

- CALGARYMOVIES.COM

“INVENTIVE and CREEPY”

- AIN’T IT COOL NEWS

“EVERY SINGLE PERFORMANCE

IS FANTASTIC”

- BeatRoute

“poignant and vengeful”

- LA TIMES

Rolling Thunder Revue

It’s never been a secret that director

Martin Scorsese has a specific soft-spot

for music. Rolling Thunder Revue is his

latest escape from big-screen Hollywood

features; a documentary that immortalizes

Bob Dylan’s famed cross-American tour

from 1975 to 76.

Named after the tour of the same name,

the film is a sprawling take on the grassroots

concerts that Dylan and a rotating

cast of friends — including Joni Mitchell,

Joan Baez, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott and tour

daddy Allen Ginsberg — paraded into

small venues and stadiums at a time when

Americans were spending more time

experimenting and collectively questioning

their surroundings.

Scorsese splices never-before-seen

archival footage with a few strangely

intriguing fabricated vignettes, all-the-while

creating something much more than your

traditional concert-documentary, and a

vibrant experience worthy of the original

Revue itself.

Rolling Thunder Revue is streaming now on

Netflix.

Brendan Lee

OPENING

JULY 5, 2019

GLOBE CINEMA / CALGARY

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JULY 11, 2019

METRO CINEMA / EDMONTON

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l o n g - m c q u a d e . c o m

Echo in the Canyon

Los Angeles’ Laurel Canyon neighbourhood

in the 60s was home to some of

the most influential song-writers in music

history.

With Echo in the Canyon, first-time director,

Andrew Slater, teams up with Jakob

Dylan (son of Bob Dylan), as they both lean

back and reminisce about the long-forgotten

time and place, interviewing many of

the people who lived it.

From the Beach Boys to The Byrds and

The Mamas and the Papas, the many interviewees’

memories of the time are a mix of

drug-induced fogginess and romanticism

that translates to all smiles.

Slater does a fantastic job reminding us

that, although the time and place may have

drifted out of reach, it’s the music that lasts

forever.

Echo in the Canyon is now screening in select

theatres across Canada.

Brendan Lee

Visit www.long-mcquade.com/insider

CALGARY CALGARY EAST CALGARY NORTH

225 58th Ave. S

(403) 244-5555

3405 5 th Ave. NE

(403) 245-3725

10 Royal Vista Dr. NW

(587) 794-3195

PLUS 5 STORES

IN EDMONTON

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 41


SCREEN TIME

THREE

CHORDS

AND THE

TRUTH

Jessie Buckley plays

a wild dreamer in

Wild Rose. Think of

a Glaswegian version

of A Star is Born.

By PAT MULLEN

I

f Ally Campana and Jackson

Maine had a smokin’ hot threesome

with Susan Boyle, the star

born from the passionate tryst

would be Rose-Lynn Harlan.

Played by an outstanding Jessie

Buckley, Rose is a hot mess of an

aspiring singer/ex-con from Glasgow

with dreams of being a country star.

She struts out of the slammer with

the confidence of Johnny Cash when

the film introduces her sporting cowgirl

boots and a sparking house arrest

anklet. She returns to her two kids,

named Lyle and Wynonna after her

country idols, and mother Marion

(Julie Walters) who shudders when

Rose resumes talk of pursuing her

dreams in Nashville.

Rose’s day under house arrest is

such a booze-fuelled bender that loses

her gig at the Glasgow Grand Ole

Opry and barely makes curfew. In an

effort to straighten her out, Marion

gets Rose a job cleaning the home of

a wealthy socialite, Susannah (Sophie

Okonedo). Rose makes the best of it,

belting out country tunes as she vacuums

the floor while guzzling Susannah’s

whisky. When Susannah’s kids

overhear Rose singing, though, Susannah

gears into bleeding heart mode

and makes it her mission to realize

Rose’s dreams.

Wild Rose deviates little from

the well-trodden formula of movies

about stars in the making. However,

artists record traditional country

songs over and again and director

Tom Harper delivers a wild, moving,

and boot-stompingly good cover on a

film we’ve seen before.

Wild Rose will make a country fan

out of anyone since it lives by Rose’s

belief that music is “three chords and

the truth,” a motto tattooed on her

arm that is best read when she raises

her fist to her heart.

Fuelled by an excellent soundtrack

of country tunes, the film closes with a

mic drop of an original song, “No Place

Like Home” (written by actress Mary

Steenburgen) that shows the range of

Buckley’s talent as Rose reconciles her

dreams with her duties in Glasgow.

Buckley delivers on the promise

of her breakthrough performance in

last year’s Beast and creates a true

dreamer in Rose, a woman of unbridled

energy and hunger with one hell

of a voice. She owns the stage as Rose

accepts that the heart of Nashville

beats wherever she plays her tunes.

Wild Rose is a film for anyone who

aspires to live the dream—and pursues

it anyway long after realizing it’s

out of reach.

Wild Rose opens theatrically on July 5.

42 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


07.19

YYC

SOUNDSUITS:

The other Nick

Cave is in the

house

By JENESSA BLANCHET

Not unlike the stylish musician

who shares his name, internationally

acclaimed contemporary

artist Nick Cave is a rock

star in his own right and his

first solo exhibition in Canada

has landed at the Glenbow

Museum this summer.

And, like The Other Cave,

both performers have “suits”

defining their look. The Chicago-based

craftsman is a

dazzling progressive sculptor,

dancer and performance artist,

drawing viewers into a “more

is more” universe, a creative

melting pot that reflects Cave’s

humble, small town upbringing

and his advanced fine arts

education.

Best known for his iconic

Soundsuits, which first

appeared in 1992 in response

to the beating of Rodney King,

Cave has created more than

500 sculptural costumes that

envelop the body generating a

transformative second skin.

These sensational suits,

that Cave builds employing his

fluency with fabrics and found

materials including: hair, sticks,

sequins and buttons, are

intended to create a symphony

of sound in movement but are

also displayed statically, like

altars, each a testament to

the broader social messages

that continue to inspire Cave’s

work.

The exquisitely curated exhibition

runs now until Sept. 22,

during which time the Glenbow

will host several special events

including a cocktail party, artist

talk and tour, July 18 at 7 pm.

CALGARY’S ESSENTIAL

JULY HAPPENINGSk

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 43


07.19YYCSTAMPEDE SPECIAL

The

Quarter Horse

The Nash

925 11 St SE

Formerly the National Hotel that

dates back to the early 1900s, The

Nash oozes historic Calgary from

every stylishly renovated Victorian

pore. The Quarter Horse is a

refined mix of bourbon, single-malt

Scotch whisky, fino sherry, yellow

chartreuse, quinine-blackcurrant

and wine cordial. A complex beauty,

altogether irresistible.

50 Boxes

of Earth

Proof

1302 1 St SW

Shrouded in a wall of curtains, Proof

is like stepping into the Wizard of

Oz’s inner chamber, especially with

its sci-fi, fantasy and literary theme

drinks. 50 Boxes of Earth, culled

from the novel Dracula, is a brooding

concoction that drops dark

cherry into Johnnie Walker Black

with a pepper and garlic oil combo

stripping down the sugar. Definitely

your first gothic rodeo.

Love on LSD

SHELTER

1210 1 St SW

Radiating with post-apocalyptic

overtones and trippy, infectious

trip-hop, Shelter is one of the most

decadent fall-out bunkers around.

Love on LSD, a beautiful burst of

sunshine, comes streaming through

with bubbles that tingle citrus fresh,

rose-infused gin and a heart-shaped

lemon served on top.

A

ROUNDUP

OF STAMPEDE

COCKTAILS

TAKE OFF THE BEER GOGGLES FOR THIS YEAR’S STAMPEDE AND

CHECK OUT A CHUCK WAGON LOAD OF COCKTAILS FROM SOME OF

THE MOST SOUL-SATISFYING LOUNGES ON THE COWBOY TRAIL.

By BRAD SIMM

Smokey

and the Bandit

Bourbon Room

National on 10th

341 10 Ave SW

Playful and Playboy-esque, large

scale nude portraits of women circa

mid-60s to the early 70s line the

walls of this hideaway, which occupies

its own sexy-mofo category.

Smokey is Buffalo Trace bourbon,

and mezcal is the bandit who steals

your mind transporting you further

into dreamland.

Golden Cadillac

Margarita

Milk Tiger

1410 4 St SW

Clean simple lines and rich consuming

colours, Milk Tiger is low on

pretension and high on happy-tosee-you-here!

This mainstay is hip

and modernaire, but very much the

cozy, neighbourhood cocktail bar.

The glittering gold Caddy is loaded

with tequila, Grand Marnier and lime

juice. Needless to say, you’ll have to

surrender your keys before ordering

round three.

Toronto

Cannibale

813 1 Ave NE

Nestled in Bridgeland donning

its rustic Italian roots, Cannibale

resembles a classy, prohibition-era

rec room tucked away in the mansion.

How the hell does a cocktail

named Toronto fit in the Stampede

selection? The Horseshoe Tavern

on Queen St., established 1947, is

arguably one of the first and finest

venues in Canada to host quality

country music. Fueled by Alberta

Distillery’s splendid Dark Horse

rye, Fernet Branca and Angostura

bitters with a touch Demerara syrup

makes the Toronto strong steed,

but an absolute Stampede cocktail

worth rustling.

Nitro Dude

Pinbar

501 17 Ave SW

Pinbar, with pinball machines galore,

a dynamite 70s colour scheme and

the best rock and roll Spotify list

on the planet, is an action lounge

supreme. The morning glory Nitro

Dude is built with vodka, coffee

liqueur, Café Rosso carbonated cold

brew, cola, cream and chunks of ice.

Need a little time to wake up, buckaroo?

You got it, now bounce back up

on that bronco and ride!

44 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


STAMPEDE

AT THE

KING EDDY

5 ESSENTIAL

SHOWS

10 DAYS OF

PROGRAMMING

FEATURES

SOMETHING

FOR EVERY FAN

By SOFIA MONTEBELLO

L

OVE

1

IT OR HATE IT, Stampede is a fixture in Calgary’s social calendar. Everyone tries to cash in on the Greatest Show

on Earth and bars are jammed day and night with shows, beers and hordes of denim-clad Calgarians.

The King Eddy, just blocks from the Stampede grounds, offers 10 days of Stampede-themed shows. This year, every

night features a double header, including an early show (9 pm) and post-fireworks after-party (11:30 pm). From classic

country heaters to indie-minded acts, everyone should be able to find a little slice of Stampede they can two-step to.

Here are our Top 5 notable shows to polish your boots for.

July 6: Mariel Buckley

(early show)

Tix: $15 adv/$20 door

Mariel Buckley is Calgary’s reigning queen

of Americana. Her seamless aesthetic oozes

the kind of rose-tinted nostalgia that still

imagines country music as a safe space for

three chords and the truth. With a shit-hot

band behind her, and at least one classic

Canadiana cover per set, if you don’t know

Buckley yet, you’ll know and love her after

this show.

2

July 6: Hot Little Rocket

(late show)

Tix: $12 adv/$15 door

Stick around for the after-party as Calgary’s

recently reunited Hot Little Rocket

headline the party. Missed their first

sold out reunion in May at the Palomino?

Saddle up to the Eddy after taking in the

nightly fireworks on their rooftop patio and

bask in the glory days of Calgary’s indie

rock history.

3

July 10: Dustin Bentall

(early show)

Tix: $15 adv/$20 door

You can draw a direct line between Dustin

Bentall (son of Barney Bentall) and American

country troubadours like Gram Parsons

or the Flying Burrito Brothers. Born with a

knack for a good hook and the songwriting

chops to match, Bentall’s alt-country take

on the genre is fun and catchy. Prepare to

fall in love as so many have done in the past.

4

July 11: The Wet Secrets

w/Grounders (late show)

Tix: $12 adv/$15 door

Don’t take your cowboy boots off yet! You

can fuse your best two-steppin’ with The

Wet Secrets’ bouncy disco-flavoured rock

and roll. Bringing the dance party wherever

they go, make sure you don’t have any early-morning

pancake breakfasts to attend on

the 12th. They’re joined by Toronto’s dreamy

psych pop band, Grounders, for a special

double-headed rager well into last call.

5

Mariel Buckley

July 12: Jess Knights

(late show)

Tix: $12 adv/$15 door

Caught somewhere in the webbed world of

blues, soul and country, Jess Knights’ powerhouse

vocals centre her talented band as

a force majeure. Knights has cut her chops

on the boozy side of the tracks, her whiskey-house

voice driving each number home.

Settle in as Jess Knights harkens back to

the divey days of the original King Eddy.

THE STAMPEDE

PARTIES THAT

MATTER

By BRAD SIMM

Out come the hay bales, wood corrals and

storefront windows painted in a variety of

cowpoke scenes with “Howdy Partner”

sprawled across the glass in big cartoon

letters.

Yup, we’re all dressed up in Stampede

kitsch, transforming your regular watering

hole into a yee-haw saloon. Nothing wrong

with that; in fact cowboy kitsch signals the

Stampede is alive and kicking. To embrace

the spirit, here are four big broncs you can

wrangle with your Wranglers on.

Palomino Smokehouse

(109 7th Ave. SW)

Located in the heart of the city, the Palomino

is Cowtown’s premier BBQ joint with the

largest oven in Western Canada to simmer

and slow-cook meat. The room doesn’t turn

into a saloon, it is one all year round. Their

Stampede shaker is the Booze, Boogie and

BBQ Sh*t Show on Monday, July 8, featuring

good ol’ whiskey drinkin’ Bob Log III laying

down his swampy Southern stomp.

The Ship and Anchor

(534 17th Ave. SW)

17th Avenue’s longest standing pub,The

Ship’s Stampede tradition is their no-holdsbarred

Hank and Pasty whoop-up that’s on

par with St. Paddy’s Day. Liquor Mountain,

the Red Hot Hayseeds along with the sassy

sweetheart of the rodeo Amy Nelson, and

hotrod heartbreakers, the Mike Fury 4, are

this year’s showstoppers.

Broken City

(613 11th Ave. SW)

Their rooftop patio is a favourite Stampede

stopover, even if the party theme says otherwise.

Don’t be fooled, the Anti-Stampede

Queer Dance and BBQ with its DJ line-up

screams yahoo in a spectrum of vidid colour.

The Original Dollyfest debuts as an all-day

fun-tastic affair, including a free breakfast,

Dolly Parton paintings, Dolly drag performers

and non-stop bands playing Dolly covers

with proceeds going towards those living

with HIV.

Mikey’s on 12th

(918 12th Ave. SW)

The old Mikey’s Juke Joint was the real deal;

a downtown roadhouse with a Tex-Mex

Louisiana menu. The new Mikey’s is still that,

it’s just bigger and offers a wider selection of

music with its classy full-blown stage. Their

10-day Roots Round Up features Calgary’s

honky-tonk king, Tom Phillips, rising rockabilly

stars Peter and his Wolves, along with the

new Queen of Country, Whitney Rose and an

onslaught of other dusty, roots rockers.

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 45


07.19YYCSTAMPEDE SPECIAL

CORB LUND: Western

Canada’s unsung

barroom hero

By BRAD SIMM

R

ancher, rodeo-rider and country

singer with punk rock roots, Corb

Lund has been carving out his

own brand of honky-tonk, twang,

campfire ballads and barroom singalongs

since the mid-90s. Although he doesn’t bask

in rhinestone glory, Lund, without question, is

Western Canada’s favourite literary six-string

son.

As the pipeline debate rages on, you might

think Western Canada’s favourite rodeo riding,

country music singing, literary six-string

son would weigh in on this critical concern.

“There will be no pipeline songs,” Lund

firmly announces. “I seldom take a position on

things like that publicly because I don’t have

enough information. Everybody talks like they

know all the answers and I feel I’m pretty well

read, but the more I investigate it, the more

I don’t know what the hell to believe about

anything anymore.”

It’s been over three years since Lund

released his last album, Things That Can’t

Be Undone. While he prepares to enter the

studio this fall, an EP of covers will

soon be out that includes: AC/DC’s

“Ride On” with Ian Tyson, Dr. Hook’s

“Cover Of The Rolling Stone” with

Hayes Carll along with Mary Robbin’s

“They’re Hanging Me Tonight” and an old

Eagles’ song, “Outlaw Man.”

And what about original songs on the new

disc?

“I got a song about grizzlies,” he chuckles.

“It’s all the conflicting advice you get if you

meet one: – play dead, don’t play dead; run,

don’t run; run up a hill, run down a hill; climb

a tree, don’t climb a tree. It’s about how no

one really knows how to deal with the

grizzlies.”

If Lund encountered the

furry beast? “I’d shoot it with a

pump shotgun. But I’d never

want to have to do that, except

in a dire situation,” he

says emphatically. “I’d also

carry some bear spray.”

Rats, on the other

hand, he has a lot less

mercy for. Alberta is

proud of its rat-free

status that the provincial

government maintains

with a special rat patrol

agency, who recently

unloaded on the ugly

pests. Hearing about

the conquest, Lund

wrote a tune, praising

the patrol’s diligence.

“They found a manifestation of rats in the

dump at Medicine Hat. Blew the nest up with

dynamite and brought in fish and game guys,

whoever they had, to pick off the stragglers

with shotguns. I thought, ‘That’s awesome. I

want that job.’”

Laughing, Lund says the lyrics are “really

graphic, really violent,” adding, “I found every

possible way to kill a rat and put it in the

song.”

Admitting he gets bored with a lot of subjects,

Lund always has a lot of humour in his

songs that he likes to find weird angles for.

Another new tune, “No Regerts”, is about bad

tattoos and bad misspellings.

“If you do a Google search for misspelled

tattoos, it’s appalling. I don’t know how someone

doesn’t notice. But whatever, not my

circus, not my monkey.”

Sunday, July 7 / Calgary Stampede, Big Four

Roadhouse / Tix: $18

MICHAEL GRONDIN

07.19YYCMUSIC

Go Folk

Yourself

THURSDAY, JULY 25

Ease into the festival experience on Thursday

with only two stages are active, but it’s a

great day to get the lay of the land.

At 5:45 pm, head to Stage 4 for Halifax-based

whisper-folk quartet, Mauno.

Between gorgeous arrangements that seem

to float on the breeze, they keep things

interesting with guitar freak-outs, experimental

electronic beats and bright, jangling

melodies.

Duck out a song early from Mauno and

wander across the island to the mainstage,

where late-festival addition, Tune-Yards,

will fill the afternoon skies at 6:30 pm with

imaginative polyrhythms, global art-pop and

riotous punk attitude.

There’s a half-hour break, then head back

to Stage 4 for iskwē at 8 pm and her blend

of bombastic pop and soulful rock will bring

the politics of unceded land (CFMF takes

place on Treaty 7 land) and how to undo the

ravages of colonization.

The final two acts of the night go in

radically different directions. Hunker down

at Stage 4 (pro tip: the grassy knoll stage

right under the trees is a perfect place to lay

down a blanket and relax while still enjoying

sightlines), The Harpoonist & the Axe

Murderer will bring their bluesy rock and

roll to close the night at 9:15 pm. Otherwise,

head back to the mainstage at 9:10 pm for

the dulcet vibes of Belle & Sebastian, whose

twee ‘90s indie rock still feels as vibrant in

2019 as ever.

Mauno

Belle & Sebastian

Tune-Yards

46 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


Calgary Folk

Music Festival

July 25 to 28, 2019

The Calgary Folk Music Festival (CFMF)

has marked the height of summer for 40

years, blazing along under clear skies and

scorching bands that deliver more than

just folk music in its truest sense, this year

with acts like Belle & Sebastian, Sharon

Van Etten, Sheila E., DJ Champion and

many more. Delicate singer-songwriters

are paired with energetic, 10-piece world

music bands and mainstage performers

anchor a handful of other discovery

stages nestled in every nook on Prince’s

Island Park.

Whether you’re a long-running tarpie at

CFMF, readying your gear for a prime spot

on the lawns, or biking down to the island

for a first-time hang at the beer gardens,

here’s BeatRoute’s best-of four-day

schedule.

By SOFIA MONTEBELLO

Weaves

T. Buckley

Samantha Savage Smith

SATURDAY,

JULY 27

The first full, 10-am-to-midnight, day at

CFMF. Start the day with Calgary’s T.

Buckley at 10:30 am at Stage 2, whose

endearing folk is as well-sculpted as his

beard. Continue the local streak after

that with The Torchettes at 11:15 am

at Stage 3 — their soul rock is reminiscent

of the Motown glory days and

Deicha Carter’s powerhouse vocals are

undeniable.

At 1:25 pm, explore the indie side of

Calgary’s scene with an on-point collab

between Lab Coast, Mauno, Samantha

Savage Smith and Bedouine on Stage

4. Quirky melodies and jangly harmonies

collide as these standout local bands

work their pop magic.

The afternoon and evening are wide

open for you to explore, depending on

your tastes and desires. The beauty of

CFMF is in following your nose around,

hearing on-the-ground tips and seeing

where the day takes you as you wander

from stage to stage.

Wherever Saturday leads, end up at

Stage 4 for Toronto’s Weaves at 9:05

pm. An art-pop tour de force, the foursome

led by Jasmyn Burke turn a hook

inside out and subvert expectations of

what a pop song can be.

DJ Champion

FRIDAY, JULY 26

Stages begin to open up on Friday

and the festival hits its stride. See

Thursday night faves, iskwē, Mauno

and La Force, collab at Stage

3 at 3 pm, swapping songs and

improvising parts.

At 6:40 pm, check out Ndidi O

on the mainstage. From northern

BC to LA, to Toronto and now Calgary

for CFMF, Ndidi O’s musical

path travels well-worn grooves

that at once feel comforting and

Ndidi O

forceful. Bask in her powerful pop

jazz as her voice rings out over the

treetops, perhaps with a beer in

hand from the gardens at the top

of the mainstage lawns.

Cap your evening at Stage 4

with DJ Champion at 9 pm. The

Montreal native grew up playing

in punk bands, but has since

immersed himself in enormous,

anthemic beats that make sweaty

work of the dance floor.

SUNDAY, JULY 28

Ease into a Folk Fest Sunday with Samantha

Savage Smith at 11 am on Stage 1. The

Calgary singer-songwriter’s ethereal voice and

her low-key vibes and the music she crafts will

find a permanent place in new fans’ hearts.

Lethbridge’s, Shaela Miller takes over

Stage 2 at 12:50 pm with a set that’s pure

country for 2019. She’s as comfortable

two-steppin’ as she is wearing all black and

getting angsty.

Travel back to a simpler moment in time

and find a home on the range with Boots &

the Hoots, Willie Watson, We Banjo 3 and

Joan Shelley at 1:50 pm on Stage 4. Boozy

country meets home-stylin’ twang with these

trad country powerhouses.

Head over to Stage 3 at 4:45 pm for one of

the weekend’s most anticipated sets by Mdou

Moctar. The guitar legend is as known for his

African and British blends of guitar music as

he is for his activism. Noise, jazz, funk, metal

and Britpop all swirl together at the hands

of Moctar and his band, who have reshaped

Niger’s music scene for a global audience.

The festival closes Sunday night with The

Strumbellas, mainstage at 9:05 pm. The

Toronto band’s festival-ready folk pop is

anthemic and uplifting, a perfect way to draw

out the last dance moves.

Want more? Weasel into the after-party at

the Westin Hotel, where off-the-cuff sets from

weekend faves will have lucky door crashers

dancing deliriously into Monday morning.

The Strumbellas

Boots & the Hoots

Mdou Moctar

Shaela Miller

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 47


07.19YYCFRINGE

07.19YYCMUSIC

Calgary Fringe

Festival

August 2

to10, 2019

Fringe festivals are full of creative performances as artists play a high-stakes and creative game of risk

and rewards. Calgary Fringe Festival takes over Inglewood each year in a variety of entertaining forms.

Here are five shows that promise to please. Various locations / Tix: $15, calgaryfringe.ca By BRAD SIMM

Didn’t Hurt / Festival Hall (1215 10th Ave. SE)

Growing up poor among the working-class of Pittsburgh, then in the

isolated regions of Northern BC, Didn’t Hurt is the story of poet, actor,

singer-songwriter Rodney DeCroo’s struggle with violence, addiction and

suicidal thoughts. Not a nice story and not for the faint of heart, DeCroo

probes and penetrates into dark corners of toxic masculinity. Its redeeming

value reveals how PTSD can be wrestled to the ground and tamed.

Kohkum & Me

Motel Theatre (225 8th Ave. SE)

Adopted by Christian parents at six

months, Tommy is a young Indigenous

man who longs to discover

his spiritual roots. He jumps on a

Greyhound bound for Vancouver

and journeys to the centre of his

skull. While fasting to ward off

a flesh-eating demon, he meets

Kohkum, an Indigenous elder who

claims she’s Jesus. Drawing Tommy

deeper into himself, she transforms

him into the mythical character

Running Coyote. Part musical, part

comedy, Tommy’s adventure roams

across strange borders.

Canary in the Gold Mine or

How I Learned to Stop

Worrying and Love 5G

ArtPoint Gallery

(1038 17th Ave. SE)

With various news outlets recently

reporting that horns growing

from the heads of young cell

phone users addicted to their

device this production seems especially

topical. The Piti Theatre

Company’s Canary in the Gold

Mine is a hilarious tale about the

wackiness of WiFi. In it, a young

wife goes without sleep for two

years because of her newfound

“electro-sensitivity.”

An Honest* History of

Bullshit

Ironwood Stage & Grill

(1229 9th Ave. SE)

Paco Erhard is a writer, stand-up

comic, world traveler and very

good at doing what he knows

best — how to be German. Born

in Munich, Erhard’s comedy is

driven by social commentary

on international affairs tackling

tough subjects such as nationalism,

racism, homophobia, religion

and terrorism. Best known

for his successful show, 5 Step

Guide to Being German, Erhard

tackles the lies, spin doctors

and the fake news so we don’t

have to worry. A German has it

all under control!

Sex, Drugs

and Jazz Hands

ArtPoint Gallery

(1038 17th Ave. SE)

Channelling the perils of online

dating and recreational drug

use, with all its wonderful highs

and terrible lows, Winnipeg

native Krystle Meixner navigates

her way through familiar and

unfamiliar territory of sex with

strangers, getting wasted and

living to tell the tale about who

she really is or who she became

in the aftermath. With her banjo

on her knee, Meixner’s comedy

show is a cabaret romp through

modern romance.

YAMANTAKA //

SONIC TITAN:

an explosive force

of nature

By CHRISTINE LEONARD

Like the sound of the sky rending open, Toronto-based progressive

art-rock collective Yamantaka // Sonic Titan enter the summer

festival season. They are a musical meteorite streaking towards the

planet’s surface and an explosive force of nature. The gender-bending

experimentalists will be staging their psychedelic space-metal

operas at Canadian dates including Yellowknife’s Folk on the Rocks,

the River & Sky camp-out in Field, ON and Victoria’s Phillips Backyard

Weekender.

Holding a mirror up to the status quo, Yamantaka // Sonic Titan

appropriates elements of pop, rock and heavy metal and blends

them through influences gleaned from Buddhist, Haudenosaunee

and First Nations traditions, along with their own mixed Asian-European

heritages. Embedded in manga art, video games and science

fiction themes, their enthralling tracks are ablaze with socio-political

commentary. DIRT, their latest album released in 2018, is no

exception. The album revolves around the story of abandoned turtle

starship, Anowara, and the heroine Aentsik’s quest to collect the final

remnant of arable soil. It’s the same edict the ecologically-minded

band has espoused since the beginning: “If the trees die, we die,”

says founding member and percussionist, Alaska B.

“I think we are concerned about the same things any reasonable

person should be concerned with: anthropogenic climate change,

plastic pollution, overuse of antibiotics, animal extinction, unsustainable

agriculture, pollution, corporate and government surveillance

Indigenous rights, human rights, transphobia, sexism, racism,

homophobia,” continues Alaska.

“Our music is often interpreted to focus entirely around the

cultural identity politics, but the lyrical content and themes in our art

all deal with the suffering of living beings, environmentalism and the

inevitability of death.”

It’s a tall order for humanity, let alone a fringe-dwelling Canadian

rock band, but if anyone’s up to the challenge, it’s the self-defining,

fire-spitting, world-shaking, dirt-venerating music collective and

theatre company who has earned the surname Sonic Titan.

Edmonton: Thursday, July 11 / 9910

Calgary: Saturday, July 13 / The Palomino

Victoria: Sunday, July 28 / Phillips Backyard Weekender

48 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


The Cheat Sheet BR PICKS THE 5 ESSENTIAL LIVE MUSIC SHOWS

INDIE

METAL

ROOTS

1 YAMANTAKA//

SONIC TITAN

July 13, Palomino Smokehouse

Yamantaka//Sonic Titan’s noh-wave

powers thundering psych cult not

afraid to fuck with colonial views

of how harsh noise and ephemeral

beauty can coexist.

2 DRUGDEALER

July 27, Palomino Smokehouse

Michael Collins is Drugdealer, a

noir-romance spectacle that’s

lustrous, loopy and lysergic, an acid

lust that continues well into the

next morning.

3

JOY FORMIDABLE

July 17, Commonwealth

North Wales’ Joy Formidable’s

alternative/shoegaze feels like an

intense, lucid dream, with driving

anthems that pound like a heart.

4

REUBEN & THE DARK

July 4, Coca-Cola Stage @

Stampede Park

Calgary’s indie folk leader, Reuben

Bullock, returns home to play his

first Stampede with an emotive

exploration of the secrets can be

found in songs.

5

SUMMER SCHOOL

July 7, Citizen Brewing Company

BIG Winter Classic presents this

one-day, two-stage Stampede respite

including: Kitty & the Rooster,

Montreal’s Cadence Weapon, local

faves Thomas Thomas, Mitch Belot

Band, and more.

1

DECIMATE METAL FEST

July 5 - 6, Border Crossing /

July 7, Blind Beggar Pub

Back for its second year, Decimate

brings the heavy and the heavier

for three stacked days featuring:

Into Eternity, Planet Eater, Hammerdrone,

Centuries of Decay and

Quietus.

2

TERMINUS: OVERRIDE

July 25-28, Dickens Pub

Terminus unleashes a weekend of

dark electronic, synth, goth and

industrial acts including: Covenant

(Sweden), Health (USA) and Neuroticfish

(Germany).

3 WORMWITCH

July 12, Palomino Smokehouse

Vancouver’s Wormwitch bring the

myth and magic of 70s fantasy

dreams wrapped in heavy riffs and

howling vocals.

4 NECROT

July 19, Dickens Pub

Oakland’s Necrot has been leaving

a corpse-paint-stained mark on the

American death metal scene since

2011.

5 ANCIIENTS

August 1, Palomino Smokehouse

All hail Vancouver’s almighty lords

of the riff, Anciients – High on Fire

meets Opeth.

1

BOBBY TENDERLOIN

UNIVERSE

July 12, Broken Cityl

Edmonton’s The Wet Secrets play

musical chairs and instruments in

western duds delivering atmospheric

and vibey yeehaw country.

2

DOLLY FEST

July 7, Broken City

A day of Dolly devotion with Dustin

Bentall, Kacy Lee Anderson (Kacy

& Clayton), Shaela Miller, Samantha

Savage Smith and Miesha Louie,

plus drag from Mr. Terri Stevens

and Terra Extravaganza.

3

CALGARY FOLK MUSIC FEST

July 22-25, Prince’s Island Park

Celebrating 40 years on the island,

the stacked lineup includes: Belle

& Sebastian, Sharon Van Ettern,

Weaves, Mdou Moctar, iswké, Nathaniel

Rateliff & the Night Sweats

and 70-plus more.

4

MARIEL BUCKLEY

July 6, King Eddy

Mariel Buckley’s Americana songwriting

is as fierce as it is honest.

5

TRIXIE MATTEL

July 4, The Palace Theatre

Trixie Mattel, the incomparable

winner of season three of RuPaul’s

Drag Race All Stars hosts the

ultimate Stampede kick-off party,

presented by Hot Mess

POP

JAZZ

HIPHOP/R&B

1

Lucy Rose

July 16, Commonwealth

Lucy Rose’s post-acoustic pop

exists in the space between dream

and truth, pulling at threadbare

remnants of a forgotten life..

2

JOCELYN ALICE

July 24, Commonwealth

Jocelyn Alice’s homecoming show

will make a packed room feel like

a house party with all your best

friends.

3

BISHOP BRIGGS

July 6, Coca-Cola Stage @ Stampede

Bishop Briggs plunders and

poaches elements from electronic,

pop, folk and R&B to concoct her

own signature blend, viral cocktail.

4 SINZERE

July 11, King Eddy

From dancehall to rap, there are

few genres hip-hop maverick

Sinzere hasn’t gathered as she

uplifts Calgary’s blossoming R&B

scene.

5

A TRIBE CALLED RED

July 12, Big Four Roadhouse

@ Stampede

The Indigenous DJ duo are radically

decolonizing Canadian music

infusing elements of traditional

sounds into modern electronic

styles.

1

CALGARY INTERNATION-

AL BLUES FESTIVAL

July 29 — Aug 4, various venues

The 15th annual Calgary International

Blues Festival returns with

a banging lineup. Festival passes

start at $129 for the full weekend.

2

NEW ORLEAN’S

WEEKLY JAZZ NIGHT

Betty Lou’s Library, every Thursday night

Betty Lou’s has all the charm

of a Prohibition-era Speakeasy,

featuring live jazz most nights.

Thursdays, be whisked away

New Orleans with the hot, house

band.

3

TROY TURNER

July 12, Blues Can

New Orleans-based blues man,

Troy Turner has shared stages

with Stevie Ray Vaughn and Etta

James but his sound is wholly his

own.

4

CREEDENCE CLEARWA-

TER REVISITED

Friday, July 26 at Celebrities Nightclub

Dust off the dad-rock dance

moves and be bayou bound with

Faux-Fogerty and friends for a

nostalgic blast from the past

5

OXFORD STOMP

SJuly 12, Shaw Millenium Park

Take a break from Stampede

yeehaw with good oleCanadiana

from Bryan Adams and Amanda

Marshall at this family-friendly allday

affair (3 pm doors).

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 49


Savage Love

BY DAN SAVAGE

Tie Points

I’m a single gay guy in my late

30s. I’m quite introverted and

a bit shy, yet I have a big sexual

drive and a rich libido. I’ve always

found the gay scene overwhelming,

and my several attempts at

online dating were not very successful.

I feel my quiet ways tend

to put people off and I hardly

ever get the chance to show my

more playful or crazy sides, as

it takes me a bit to feel comfortable

to show those. Whenever

I was able to, my partners were

usually pleasantly surprised and

we could enjoy plenty of fun, but

I can count these occasions on

the fingers of one hand. I feel

most guys just stop at my gentle

disposition and assume I must

be a bit boring if not a prude

altogether. Turns out I actually

have quite a few kinks—bondage

being one of them—but so far I

have hardly been able to explore

them with a partner. Often those

drawn to me haven’t really been

of the sexually adventurous kind.

By my looks I don’t really fit into

any of the “tribes” that a lot of

gay men identify with. Part of

me doesn’t care, but at the same

time I find myself on the outside

looking in when searching for

a nice guy for a date or more.

Would you have any kind of

advice to crack this shell of mine

open?

Always Looked Over,

Never Embraced

Next time you find yourself on the

outside looking in, ALONE, take a

moment to look around. Because

that small scrum of guys who fit

neatly into whatever gay tribe

happens to be dominating the bar/

pool/whatever—the guys on the

inside looking at themselves or

looking at their phones or looking

at themselves on their phones—

are usually surrounded by a much

larger group of guys who don’t

fit neatly into that particular tribe

or any other obvious tribe. And if

the guys looking longingly at the

easy-and-obvious tribe would look

around, they’d see a whole lot of

guys like them—guys who might

be feeling a little awkward or out

of place, guys who are attractive in

perhaps less conventional or immediately

apparent ways, guys with

hidden depths, etc. In other words,

ALONE, guys like you.

And speaking of guys like you, did

you know you have a motherfucking

superpower that makes you a

member of all gay tribes and your

own unique tribe?

“Bondage is the great unifier

among kinksters,” said Joshua

Boyd, a gay bondage “enthusiast,”

as they say, in his mid-30s who

lives and ties in the Seattle area.

“Bondage guys are from all walks

of life, and they range from twinks

to muscle guys to bears, cubs,

jocks, and average Joes.”

So just as you’ll find gay guys in

every race, ethnic group, economic

class, faith community, etc., bondage

guys can be found in every gay

tribe and bondage guys make up

their own unique tribe.

“ALONE should put any search for

a long-term relationship on hold

and look for more casual kinky

fun,” said Boyd. “Recon (recon.

com) has always been a good

place for me to start conversations

with fun guys—I even met my

husband there. The bottom line

is there are others who share his

interests, and they are waiting to

connect with him.”

But you’re shy! You’re introverted!

Connecting is hard! Boyd describes

himself the same way—shy,

introverted, difficultly connecting—

and not only is he married, ALONE,

he doesn’t lack for casual play

partners and he’s got play pics all

over the internet to prove it.

Tyger Yoshi also describes himself

as shy and introverted—and I

recently watched shy, introverted

Yoshi do a bondage demo at Trade,

a gay leather bar in Denver, where

he suspended a guy from the

ceiling.

“When I first started exploring my

interest in bondage, I was lucky

enough to be in a city where

opportunities were plentiful, even

for a shy, introverted person like

me,” said Yoshi, who’s also in his

mid-30s. “There were people

who wanted to mentor me, but I

struggled taking that first step of

accepting help.”

The kind of help Yoshi is referring

to—the kind of help he eventually

accepted—can most easily

be found at munches, i.e., casual

meet-ups where kinky people, both

queer and straight, socialize and

connect with other like-minded

kinksters. (Munches ≠ play parties.)

Spend five seconds on Google,

ALONE, and you’ll also find kinky

educational organizations that

offer classes for people who want

to hone their bondage skills while

learning about consent, safety, and

other best practices. And whether

you’re a bondage top (you want

to tie) or a bondage bottom (you

want to be tied) or a switch (tie

and be tied), you’ll make friends

in bondage classes. And if you

wind up clicking with someone,

that person isn’t going to assume

you’re a prude (they met you at a

bondage class) and that person will

definitely be sexually adventurous

(you met them at a bondage class).

And unlike gay bars or clubs, a person’s

skills are just as important as

their looks at gay bondage parties

and events.

“After you start making connections

and building your circle, find

local fetish/kink events that are

happening around you—you may

need to reach out to the pansexual

community—and see if one of

your new friends from the munch

or the class or Recon is willing to

go with you to check it out,” said

Yoshi. “And as you start exploring

more of your kink side, consider

the possibility of separating kink

and sex at first. Let people know

that you are interested in bondage

but haven’t tried much and you

want to practice. Having an exploratory

or practice session is much

different than having a bondage

sex session, and people may be

more willing to facilitate that exploration.

And from my experience,

if you’re able to get up the courage

to go out to a kink play party (with

a friend for support), the likelihood

of finding someone who’s willing to

assist in new or first time experiences

increase.”

So, ALONE, that thing you’ve been

holding back until you get to know

someone? Your interest in bondage?

Lead with that. Get involved

in the kink scene, work on your

skill set, be friendly and open—be

the nice guy—and you’ll meet lots

of men you have something in

common with. Trust me, your tribe

is out there every day when you’re

in Seattle.

On the Lovecast, this show is soooo

gay: savagelovecast.com.

mail@savagelove.net

Follow Dan on Twitter

@fakedansavage

50 BEATROUTE JULY 2019


it’s better at the

tickets available at wildhorsesaloon.ca | 500 6th ave sw

ThursdayJuly4 friday july 5

funk hunters

chali 2na defunk

sunday

july

7

Lee Murphy

monday

July8

tuesday

July9

friday

&

@wildhorseyyc

bc dc

july

12

the official afterparty of

roundup wednesday oxford friday

musicfest july 10 stomp july 12

JULY 2019 BEATROUTE 51


CANADA’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT CONCERT PROMOTER

UPCOMING SHOWS

BLACK MOUNTAIN

WITH MAJEURE

Sep 17 - The Starlite Room

AUGUST BURNS RED

July 9 - Union Hall

July 10 - The Palace Theatre

LUCY ROSE

July 16 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

July 17 - The Starlite Room

REEL BIG FISH

& THE AQUABATS

July 19 - The Palace Theatre

JOCELYN ALICE

& SPECIAL GUESTS

July 24 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

COMETHAZINE

& SPECIAL GUESTS

July 28 - Union Hall

THE APPLESEED CAST

Aug 14 - The Starlite Room

Aug 15 - Dickens Pub

SUN KIL MOON

Sept 4- Bella Concert Hall

Sept 5 - The Starlite Room

HONORS

& SPECIAL GUESTS

Sept 11 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

LISSIE

Sept 12 - The Starlite Room

Sept 13 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

52 BEATROUTE JULY 2019

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT MRGCONCERTS.COM

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