Boxoffice - July 2019

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The Official Magazine of the National Association of Theatre Owners

$6.95 / JULY / JULY 2019

POPCORN,

SODA &

BEYOND

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION

OF CONCESSIONAIRES

CELEBRATES ITS 75TH

ANNIVERSARY

BRIE LARSON STARS IN

DISNEY’S CAPTAIN MARVEL

THE FUTURE

OF CINEMA

ADVERTISING

INDUSTRY LEADERS ON

WHERE THE PRE-SHOW IS

GOING NEXT

CINEMA

DINING

PIONEERS

STUDIO MOVIE GRILL

EMBARKS ON AN AMBITIOUS

CIRCUIT EXPANSION

SUMMER

BLUES

SOCIAL MEDIA TRACKING

TACKLES SEQUEL FATIGUE

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THEATRE OWNERS


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The National Association of Concessionaires (NAC) is celebrating its 75th

anniversary this year, and though its membership encompasses all kinds of

recreation and leisure-time venues, movie theater operators have long played a

key role in the organization. And as cinemas have expanded their food offerings

to include hot meals and in-theater dining, NAC’s training and education

programs have become increasingly valuable to the exhibition community.

This edition of Boxoffice, timed with the annual NAC Concession & Hospitality

Expo, looks back at the organization’s seven-decade-plus history, beginning

as the National Association of Popcorn Manufacturers and continually

expanding its scope to a wide range of entertainment and eating options. We

congratulate NAC on this milestone and their vital role in making businesses

more efficient and consumer friendly.

Our special concessions coverage also includes an in-depth primer on popcorn—“everything

you wanted to know but didn’t know to ask,” from strains

to popping oils to international flavors. And guest columnist Jim Amos makes

the case for introducing more vegan options at the movies.

This month we also take a look at a new reality emerging at cinema complexes:

virtual reality. Leading circuits Cinemark and Cineplex, among others, are

installing VR attractions in their complexes. As premium large-format and

4-D cinemas strive to make the movie experience more immersive, what could

be more immersive than battling Stormtroopers in a VR Star Wars environment,

or “fighting for the future” opposite the Terminator? Cinemark’s James

Meredith reports that people will drive from Austin to Dallas just to take part

in their Star Wars attraction. With that kind of fan enthusiasm, there’s nothing

virtual about this technology’s potential.

Aligned with our reporting on the state of cinema advertising in 2019, we’re

proud to continue our series of profiles of “Top Women in Global Exhibition,”

a collaboration with Celluloid Junkie. This month we profile cinema

advertising leaders Stacie Tursi of National CineMedia, Darryl Schaffer and

Katy Loria of Screenvision, and Christine DelGuidice-Kraemer of Spotlight

Cinema Networks. We congratulate them on their pioneering efforts to make

cinema advertising an increasingly important and creative contributor to

movie theater revenues.

Kevin Lally

Executive Editor

Boxoffice

2 JULY 2019


2019 VOL. 155 NO. 7

HELLO 2

OBITUARY 6

Industry icon Salah M. Hassanein

TRADE TALK 8

CHARITY SPOTLIGHT 20

INDIE FOCUS 24

Rialto Cinemas Elmwood / Berkeley, CA

Women in Cinema

86

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION

OF CONCESSIONAIRES

A 75TH ANNIVERSARY TIMELINE 50

IN THE ARENA 62

NAC salutes Lexington Center's Brian McMillin

with the Mickey Warner Award

EXPANDING MENU,

EXPANDING FOOTPRINT 66

Studio Movie Grill's Brian Schultz leans

into the guest experience

A POPPIN' PRIMER 70

Everything you wanted to know about

popcorn but didn't know to ask

THE VEGAN OPTION 74

Vegan alternatives at the movies go

beyond the health-conscious set

Christine

DelGuidice-Kraemer

SVP, MARKETING

SPOTLIGHT CINEMA

NETWORKS

Stacie

Tursi

SVP, LOCAL &

DIGITAL SALES

NATIONAL CINEMEDIA

CINEMA ADVERTISING 78

TECH TALK: VR 82

TIMECODE 100

BOXOFFICE PULSE 104

SOCIAL PULSE 105

SOCIAL MEDIA 106

INVESTOR RELATIONS 108

EVENT CINEMA CALENDAR 110

ON SCREEN 112

BOOKING GUIDE 120

MARKETPLACE 128

Darryl

Schaffer

EVP OPERATIONS &

EXHIBITOR RELATIONS

SCREENVISION MEDIA

Katy

Loria

CHIEF REVENUE

OFFICER

SCREENVISION MEDIA

PLUS THE COCA-COLA COMPANY'S Cami Reynolds, VP of Strategic Partnership

Marketing / Krista Schulte, Global VP of Strategic Partnership Marketing / Mayson

Spellman, Senior National Sales Executive

Boxoffice has served as the official publication of the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) since 2007. As part of this partnership, Boxoffice is proud to feature exclusive columns

from NATO while retaining full editorial freedom throughout its pages. As such, the views expressed in Boxoffice, except for columns signed by NATO executives, reflect neither a stance nor an

endorsement from the National Association of Theatre Owners.

4 JULY 2019


SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME

THE KITCHEN

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European Adventure

JON WATTS TAKES SPIDER-MAN

OUT OF NEW YORK CITY AND INTO

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28

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WOMEN TAKE OVER IN ANDREA

BERLOFF'S NEW YORK MOB MOVIE

THE KITCHEN

34

Ride Share

BAUTISTA AND NANJIANI MAKE AN

UNLIKELY COUPLE IN STUBER

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INSURANCE COVERAGE

C O M P A N I E S

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LUCE

PIRANHAS

Beyond the Façade

JULIUS ONHA'S ONAH'S LUCE EXPLORES

THE INNER TURMOIL OF A MODEL

IMMIGRANT STUDENT

42

Bad Boys

CLAUDIO GIOVANNESI’S PIRANHAS

GOES INSIDE THE TEENAGE CRIME

GANG THAT RULED NAPLES

48

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425·957·0600

LICENSE #0589960

JULY 2019

5


OBITUARY

REPUBLISHED WITH PERMISSION OF THE WILL ROGERS MOTION PICTURE PIONEERS FOUNDATION

In Memoriam

Industry Icon Salah M. Hassanein

PHOTO: THE WILL ROGERS MOTION PICTURE PIONEERS FOUNDATION

>> Salah M. Hassanein, age 98, passed away peacefully on June

7, 2019, at his home in Del Mar, California. Hassanein was born in

Egypt in 1921 and came to the United States in 1945. He served

in the U.S. armed forces from 1945 to 1947. Hassanein was the

embodiment of the American dream: an immigrant who achieved

great success in business and, through his tireless charitable work,

continuously gave back to the communities he lived in and the adopted

country he valued so deeply.

Hassanein began his long career in the film

industry as an usher at a movie theater in New

York City and rose through the corporate ranks to

become president of United Artists Eastern Theaters

and subsequently president of Warner Bros.

International Theaters. Fluent in several languages,

Hassanein was responsible for creating a network

of movie theaters in Europe, Japan, and Australia

for Warner Bros.

From 1994 to 2000, he was president of the

Todd-AO Corporation, a sound-mixing studio in

Los Angeles. Along the way, Hassanein became

involved in several movie productions, including

Kentucky Fried Movie, Day of the Dead, Creepshow,

Knightriders, and Compromising Positions. In 2011,

he received the Ellis Island Medal of Honor in

recognition of U.S. citizens who have distinguished

themselves by exemplifying the values of the American

way of life.

Hassanein’s relentless passion for his work, his

keen intellect, and his quick wit were well known

by many he encountered during his professional

career, but those were only some of his attributes.

Hassanein was a philanthropist at heart who

spent countless hours supporting numerous charitable

organizations.

He is the namesake of the film industry’s

ShowEast Salah M. Hassanein Humanitarian

Award, presented annually to a leader in the

industry who has distinguished him or herself in

the philanthropic community. Hassanein served

as a member of the board of the Variety Boys &

Girls Club of Queens (later renamed the Salah M.

Hassanein Variety Boys & Girls Club of Queens)

for many years and was chairman of the board and

president of Variety International, among many

other board positions he held in various charities.

He served as president and honorary chairman of

the Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers Foundation

and was instrumental in creating the Will

Rogers Institute on the grounds of Burke Rehabilitation

Hospital after the closure of the Will Rogers

Hospital in 1975. His name lives on with the

6 JULY 2019


Pioneers Assistance Fund’s Salah Hassanein

Medical Grant, which provides

temporary financial aid for film industry

members in need.

In San Diego, Hassanein and his

partner, Zandra Rhodes, chaired many

gala events to raise funds to construct the

Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at UCSD

in La Jolla, California, which opened in

2011. Hassanein also proudly served as a

board member of the Athenaeum Music

& Arts Library in La Jolla and worked

extensively with the Salvation Army in

San Diego for many years.

However, the organization that was

most dear to Hassanein was Children’s

Lifeline International. In 1983, when

Nancy Reagan brought two children

from South Korea to the United States

for open-heart surgery, she turned to

the motion picture industry for assistance.

Hassanein, along with an industry

colleague, immediately responded.

Under Hassanein’s leadership, Children’s

Lifeline became the sponsor of medical

missions to developing countries where

doctors, nurses, and other medical

practitioners from U.S. hospitals perform

lifesaving pediatric cardiac surgery,

among other treatments. Over the years,

medical personnel from more than 25

U.S. hospitals have treated children on

Children’s Lifeline missions to 50 different

countries. Hassanein once said that

Children’s Lifeline was his life’s greatest

achievement.

When he wasn’t working or traveling

the world, Hassanein could be found

enjoying the sunset at the beach in Del

Mar, having lunch at the racetrack Turf

Club, planning his next family adventure,

or attending the San Diego Opera.

Salah is survived by four children:

Richard Hassanein and his wife, Adrienne

King Hassanein; Nesa Hassanein;

Salah Hassanein; and Neva Hassanein;

as well as four grandchildren, three

great-grandchildren, and his long-time

partner, Zandra Rhodes. His son Roland

predeceased him in 2015. He is also

survived by his half-brother, Esmat, and

many nieces and nephews.

INDUSTRY PEERS PAY TRIBUTE TO SALAH M. HASSANEIN

>> “Salah Hassanein was one of the true giants in our industry. He went out of his way

to help those in need and made sure that those around him did the same. Working for

Salah was like being part of his extended family, and I feel fortunate to have had that

experience. I will miss him, as we all will. Rest assured that we will continue to carry on

in his name.” –Erik Lomis, President of Distribution at United Artists Releasing and

former President of the Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers Foundation

>> “Our charity may not exist today if not for Salah. He took us on a new journey in the

1970s with the creation of the Will Rogers Institute. Because of his compassion, we have

funded the training for hundreds of pulmonary doctors and given grants to many hospitals

for vital equipment for newborns.” –Kyle Davies, President of Domestic Distribution

at Paramount Pictures and Volunteer President of the Will Rogers Motion

Picture Pioneers Foundation

>> “Salah was the smartest man I ever worked with. His understanding of complex

legal issues was astounding. His contributions to helping children all over the world

are unprecedented. The world is a better place because of Salah.” –Robert Sunshine,

Chairman of Film Expo Group

>> “One morning I received a phone call from Salah Hassanein. Salah was retired from

business but not from his charity work. Salah, as chairman of Variety’s Children’s Lifeline,

told me he was organizing lifesaving heart operations for children in the Dominican

Republic. Over 50 operations were to take place back to back. He had a full medical

team, including cardiologists, flying to the island. It was a massive logistic charitable

operation of the kind Salah was known to lead for many years.

“He said he needed my help. He was a little short of fully funding the mission.

Salah said he needed $70,000—tomorrow. I told him I would make a few calls and get

back to him.

“I called him back the next morning. I told him I had good news: I had raised

$40,000. Salah thanked me for my effort but told me he needed $70,000 for all the

children to receive lifesaving heart surgery. He told me he would send over a list with

the children’s names and I should cross out the names of children who would not be

getting operations because I could not raise the needed money. I got the message.

It wasn’t a question of whether I could or could not get this done. It was a matter of

dedication and will, because there were children in dire need. With Salah’s prompting,

I raised another $30,000!

“This was Salah at his best: a powerful, clever, strong man who knew how to get the

result he wanted and what buttons to press. A man among men, a walking testimony to

philanthropy and the harnessing of skill to help humanity. He took on the big projects

that others might have shied away from. And he made them happen.

“I have never know anyone to be a more inspiring philanthropic leader. A titan of

our industry charities. We will miss him!” –Clark Woods, Executive Vice President,

Films, at iPic Entertainment and Board Member of Variety – the Children’s Charity

International

JULY 2019

7


BOXOFFICE MEDIA

CEO

Julien Marcel

EDITED BY LAURA SILVER

SVP CONTENT STRATEGY

Daniel Loria

EVENT CINEMAS LAUNCHES

NEW DESIGNER CINEMAS

>> Event Hospitality and Entertainment

Limited launched a new cinema concept,

Event Boutique, on June 14 at its flagship

George Street cinema in Sydney, Australia.

Event Boutique is billed as “Australia’s

first Instagrammable cinema,” drawing

on the heritage of the Event-owned State

Theatre and the distinctive QT Hotels to

“deliver a theatrical, design-led cinema

experience completely bespoke in its

design aesthetic.”

Event Boutique brings this design

together with unconventional food and

beverage offerings, designer recliners and

footrests, waiter service to seat, state-ofthe-art

sound, bigger screens, and pure

laser projection.

Each auditorium offers a completely

different experience. Sydney’s first two

Boutique cinemas are The Library, paying

homage to storytelling, and Paparazzi,

celebrating the glamour of the red carpet.

Event Boutique will offer customers an

intimate movie experience with small theaters

that will seat 28 guests (The Library)

and 46 guests (Paparazzi).

The Event Boutique food offering has

been designed in collaboration with top

artisan and local producers, including

Sonoma Bakery and Vic’s Meats, to deliver

premium in-cinema dining. It will feature

designer platters of cured meats, hard

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Kenneth James Bacon

VP ADVERTISING

Susan Uhrlass

SENIOR ADVISOR

Andrew Sunshine

BOXOFFICE ® MAGAZINE

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Daniel Loria

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Kevin Lally

MANAGING EDITOR

Laura Silver

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Rebecca Pahle

CONTRIBUTORS

Jim Amos

Ky J. Boyd

Alex Edghilll

Rob Rinderman

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Ally Bacon

BOXOFFICEPRO.COM

CHIEF ANALYST

Shawn Robbins

ANALYSTS

Alex Edghill

Chris Eggertsen

Jesse Rifkin

DATABASE MANAGEMENT

Diogo Busato

ADVERTISING

VP, ADVERTISING

Susan Uhrlass

63 Copps Hill Road

Ridgefield, CT USA 06877

susan@boxoffice.com

310-876-9090

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Danny Elguezabal

Stark Services

12444 Victory Blvd., 3rd Floor

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danny@starkservices.com

818-286-3108

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Box Office Media LLC

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corporate@boxoffice.com

BOXOFFICE ® (ISSN 0006-8527), Volume 155, Number 7, July

2019. BOXOFFICE ® is published monthly by Box Office Media

LLC, 63 Copps Hill Road, Ridgefield, CT USA 06877, USA.

corporate@boxoffice.com. www.boxoffice.com. Basic annual

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8 JULY 2019


and soft cheeses, pizzetta, more extensive

dishes, and candy bar favorites.

Jane Hastings, CEO of Event Hospitality

and Entertainment, stated, “We

don’t believe in a one-experience-fits-all

approach to our cinemas or our customers.

Through our research we understand

customers want choice, even down to the

style of their seat. Those seeking premium

experiences not only expect the best seat,

sound, and vision, they want to fully immerse

in a great experience. Event Boutique,

our latest in a raft of new premium

experiences, is a result of engaging, fresh

thinking to create a unique experience

that immerses you from the moment you

walk through the door. Customers who

have been part of our design process and

have trialed the experience tell us this is

the best yet.”

Following extensive customer research,

Event Cinemas has tested and rolled out a

range of new seat options for its customers,

including new recliners and luxury

daybeds in some of its newer cinemas.

The Boutique designer recliner and footrest

was ranked best in market research

for its appeal and comfort.

Luke Mackey, general manager of

Event Cinemas, said, “Our new Boutique

cinemas enhance the viewing experience,

featuring unrivaled laser projection technology

for the clearest picture, coupled

with world-class sound, designer aesthetics,

and bespoke menus. Everything about

the Boutique experience is premium,

unique, and world-class.”

Another feature of the Event Boutique

cinemas is that they are designed to be

configurable and will be available for

private bookings and corporate functions,

from cocktail events, creative corporate

team sessions, and product launches to

private screenings.

Event Boutique will be rolled out in

select cinema locations in Australia and

New Zealand, with Newmarket in New

Zealand currently in development.

STUDIO C TO LAUNCH CINEMA

SUBSCRIPTION PROGRAM

>> In-house subscription among U.S.

cinemas continues to grow with the announcement

of a new plan from Studio

C and Celebration Cinema, which will

offer guests discounted ticket rates (including

Imax and 3-D show times) for a

monthly fee.

The Michigan-based circuit will

launch its C Rewards VIP program as

part of its revamped loyalty scheme, deploying

the plan at its 12 Michigan locations

later this year. A pilot program with

an initial 5,000 C Rewards VIP memberships

will enjoy a beta test run before the

service expands to all consumers.

“C Rewards VIP allows us to offer a

program that provides even more value

to our loyal moviegoers,” said J.D. Loeks,

president of Studio C, in a press release.

“We have been considering a subscription

program like this for a while, but

we wanted to be sure ours was sustain-

JULY 2019

9


TRADE TALK

able. Our company has a reputation for

early, smart risks, always with the goal of

elevation and sustainability of the theater

experience,” he said.

The subscription program will include

movie perks and offer entertainment

incentives such as an exclusive early ticketing

window and waived online fees for

concerts at other Studio C entertainment

destinations like the Listening Room, the

company’s first music venue scheduled to

open in Grand Rapids this fall.

“Our revamped C Rewards program

will offer members even more ways to

earn and redeem their rewards,” said Eric

Kuiper, chief creative officer for Studio C.

“As our company offers more entertainment

and dining experiences, we want

our rewards program to grow as well.

Considering the intimate nature of our

concert venue, early access to tickets will

be a major perk.”

Subscription has been a hot topic in

U.S. exhibition since the rise and fall

of MoviePass, a third-party service that

helped popularize the concept among

American consumers. MoviePass helped

open a path for competing third-party

subscription players like Sinemia to enter

the U.S. cinema market. Sinemia failed

to gain traction as a direct-to-consumer

service, shuttering its subscription plan

earlier this year.

While third-party subscription has faltered,

in-house plans at major players like

AMC and Cinemark have helped shape

a positive impression. In recent months,

numerous additional exhibitors have

launched their own in-house subscription

schemes, including Showcase Cinemas,

Studio Movie Grill, and Megaplex.

Third parties entering the U.S. cinema

subscription space have shifted their strategy

to offer exhibitors in-house subscription

solutions instead of attempting risky B2C

launches on their own. Atom Tickets

recently announced its own white-label

solution for interested exhibitors, while

Influx announced plans for a cinema-subscription

network in the United States.

COLOMBIA’S CINEMAS

PROCINAL OPENS BOGOTÁ

MULTIPLEX FEATURING

CHRISTIE TECHNOLOGY

>> Colombian chain Cinemas Procinal

has just opened a new seven-screen multiplex

in the city of Barranquilla, featuring

Christie Vive Audio and Christie digital

cinema projection throughout. CES+

(Cinema Equipment & Supplies) carried

out the installation.

The new multiplex is located in the

Carnaval shopping mall and has a seating

capacity for 1,071 people. Three of the

seven screens are equipped with Christie

CP2220 projectors, while the remaining

four screens have the Christie CP2215

model. All seven screens boast the Christie

Vive Audio cinema sound solution,

including LS1 screen speakers, LS1S

(continued on page 12)

10 JULY 2019


SHOWCASE CINEMAS PROMOTES THREE EXECS

>> Showcase Cinemas recently announced executive

promotions in its marketing, operations, and food and

beverage teams.

The company appointed Paul Valerio to vice president,

operations; Patrick Micalizzi to vice president, food and

beverage; and Rebecca Stein to vice president, studio relations

and U.S. marketing.

“We are extremely pleased to announce the well-deserved

promotions of Rebecca, Paul, and Patrick,” said Tad

Jankowski, executive vice president, National Amusements

Inc. “Their dedication, expertise, collaborative nature, and

personal passion exemplify the qualities that have helped to

make Showcase Cinemas an extremely innovative, successful,

customer-centric film exhibitor.”

Rebecca Stein joined Showcase Cinemas in 1999 as a U.S.

publicist. She later took on the role of director, children’s

marketing and entertainment, and then assistant vice president.

In this role, Stein has helped implement the Showcase

for Good program, Sensory Sensitive Screenings Program,

StarPass Loyalty Program, and the recent launch of Showcase

Subscribe. She has also fostered studio and partner relationships,

overseeing U.S. market positioning programs, the

launch of formats such as XPLUS, MX4D, and campaigns to

support the refurbishment of theaters. Stein is an active member

of NATO (National Association of Theatre Owners) and

TONE (Theatre Owners of New England). She also serves

as an ambassador to Film Row, an affiliate of the Will Rogers

Motion Picture Pioneers Foundation, fostering future leaders

of the film industry.

In her new role, Stein will focus on growing U.S. marketing

initiatives, including studio and community-partnership

programs.

Paul Valerio joined the staff at Showcase Cinemas Dedham

in 1987. Having fulfilled various cinema management

roles, Valerio joined the operations department in 2005,

first as director then as assistant vice president. During

that time, Valerio has been responsible for all operational

aspects of the U.S. cinema circuit with a focus on fiscal

responsibility and employee morale. Valerio is an active

member of NATO and an executive board member of

NATO of New York State and TONE.

In his new role, Valerio will lead the U.S. operations department

and field management teams to enhance the overall

customer moviegoing experience.

Patrick Micalizzi joined Showcase Cinemas in 1992 as a

manager at the Saw Mill Multiplex Cinemas in Westchester

County, N.Y. After being promoted to regional concessions

director and then moving to the corporate office as director

of food and beverage and more recently assistant vice

president, food and beverage, Micalizzi has collaborated on

major new builds and product and program innovations, as

well as redesign of the circuit’s concession stands. Micalizzi

also oversees the development of cinema restaurant and

bar programs. He is involved in TONE and serves as a

long-standing committee member for NAC (National Association

of Concessionaires).

In his new role, Micalizzi will lead Showcase’s food and

beverage internal and external partners to design and implement

best-in-class in-theater dining and snacking offerings.

PAUL VALERIO REBECCA STEIN PATRICK MICALIZZI

JULY 2019

11


TRADE TALK

surround speakers, S218LP subwoofers,

and Class D amplifiers.

Oscar Suárez, head of projection

at Cinemas Procinal, explained, “We

continue placing our trust in Christie for

our new projects because of the quality

and constant advances in its product

range, as well as for its customer service

throughout the warranty process, giving

us serious and professional support whenever

we need it. In my experience it is the

most reliable brand in the market.”

He went on to add that, “as far as the

projectors themselves are concerned, I

would particularly highlight the quality

of the image, the unprecedented stability,

and the permanence of brightness

over time. Another big selling point

for us is that they are compatible with

different servers in the market. And

we have never had the slightest flaw or

problem in functioning.”

Suárez is equally enthusiastic about

Christie Vive Audio, noting, “It is really

simple to calibrate, and it is so easy to

adjust to the acoustics of each screen. In

addition, spectators can really appreciate

the surround sound.”

Cinemas Procinal has 14 multiplexes

in Colombia with a total of 75

screens and seating capacity for 11,334

spectators, and is the biggest exhibitor

in Medellín. The chain is a long-time

Christie client, and over half its screens

are equipped with Christie projectors and

Vive Audio.

Diego López, Christie general manager

for NOLA and the Andes region,

said, “We are really pleased that Cinemas

Procinal continues placing its trust in

our projectors and sound systems for its

new multiplexes. The team at Cinemas

Procinal are more than happy with the

quality and proven reliability of Christie

technology, but also the local service and

support we offer in Colombia, which

gives exhibitors great peace of mind.”

SPOTLIGHT PROMOTES TWO

EXECS AND ANNOUNCES KEY

HIRE

>> Spotlight Cinema Networks, the cinema

advertising company, has announced

two promotions and a key hire within its

marketing, exhibitor relations, operations,

and event cinema departments. The

changes are effective immediately.

Bernadette McCabe was hired as

executive vice president, CineLife Entertainment;

Ronnie Ycong was promoted

to executive vice president, exhibitor

relations and operations; and Christine

DelGuidice-Kraemer was elevated to

senior vice president, marketing.

Since Spotlight’s debut in 2010, its

cinema advertising theater network and

revenue have grown significantly year

over year. 2018, a record year for signed

exhibitor contracts, was also marked by

Spotlight’s successful launch of CineLife

Entertainment to acquire and distribute

event cinema content to movie theaters

throughout North America.

“We are incredibly proud of our

leadership team as we continue to drive

growth in our sector and bring quality

content and advertising to our screens,”

said Spotlight Cinema Networks president

Michael Sakin, to whom all three

will report. “Ronnie and Christine

are an integral part of the company’s

success, and both played critical roles

in the significant evolution of Spotlight

as well as the rollout of CineLife Entertainment

over the last 18 months. These

well-deserved promotions recognize their

wide-ranging accomplishments, enthusiasm,

and dedication.”

Sakin added, “With more than a

decade’s experience in the exhibition

industry, Bernadette’s experience with

event cinema, content acquisitions, and

business development will help drive

CineLife Entertainment’s growth and

serve the needs of our exhibitor partners.

This is an important addition to our

executive team, and we all look forward

to working with her.”

McCabe will be responsible for

content acquisition and programming,

as well as all day-to-day operations for

CineLife Entertainment. The company’s

titles include the 40th anniversary release

of the original Halloween; the North

American premiere of the documentary

Nureyev, which is currently in theaters;

and the upcoming theatrical rereleases of

A Boy Named Charlie Brown and Snoopy,

Come Home. McCabe will also oversee

the company’s consumer-facing app,

CineLife, which is devoted to helping

audiences connect with indie films and

art house theaters across the U.S.

“I’m excited to be joining Spotlight

Cinema Networks, a company with a

well-deserved reputation for quality in

exhibition, to help take CineLife Enter-

12 JULY 2019


tainment to the next level,” said McCabe.

“In 18 months, the company has already

established itself as a force in the event

cinema marketplace, and I look forward

to building upon its successful launch.”

Prior to joining Spotlight, McCabe

worked at MoviePass as senior vice

president, exhibitor and business strategy.

From 2005 to 2017, she held a number

of positions with increasing responsibility

at Screenvision Media, rising to senior

vice president, business strategy, in 2015.

Ycong is responsible for managing

existing exhibitor partnerships, growing

Spotlight’s exhibitor network, overseeing

Spotlight’s ad operations, and heading

theatrical sales and distribution for

CineLife Entertainment. Ycong joined

Spotlight in 2011 as vice president of

exhibitor relations to create an exhibitor

relations department. Since then,

Spotlight’s exhibitor network has grown

by more than 150 percent. In 2018,

Ycong helped lead the launch of CineLife

Entertainment and executed the distribution

of 15 films in its inaugural year.

Ycong has over 25 years of experience in

the theatrical exhibition business.

DelGuidice-Kraemer oversees all

marketing strategies and tactics to drive

awareness of Spotlight’s extensive range

of offerings from cinema advertising,

preshow entertainment, and event

cinema to digital distribution within the

advertising and exhibition communities.

Since joining in 2012, she has increased

the visibility of Spotlight in both the ad

marketplace and exhibition communities

and led the company’s rebranding and

development/evolution of the Spotlight

preshow. DelGuidice-Kraemer was

responsible for the individual marketing

campaigns for all 15 of CineLife Entertainment’s

releases since the division’s

inception. In March, she was named as

one of the Top 50 Women in Global

Cinema by Celluloid Junkie in partnership

with Boxoffice magazine.

AMC STUBS CROSSES

20 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS

>> When AMC Theatres relaunched its

AMC Stubs program in the summer of

2016, even the most optimistic projections

never would have included a 700

percent membership growth in less than

three years in the United States. But

with the company now at more than 20

million AMC Stubs households, that’s

exactly what’s happened. At the U.S.

average of 2.6 people per household,

that means more than 50 million people,

which is more than 50 percent of the

U.S. moviegoing clientele, are enjoying

the AMC experience through an engaged

moviegoing relationship via AMC Stubs.

AMC Stubs had approximately 2.5

million members when the company relaunched

the program in 2016, adding a

free tier called AMC Stubs Insider to the

already popular AMC Stubs Premiere. In

the summer of 2018, AMC added a VIP

tier, AMC Stubs A-List.

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www.paradigmae.com p: 616.785.5656

JULY 2019

13


TRADE TALK

The significant membership growth

has played a large role in the success of

AMC’s marketing efforts in recent years.

Leveraging the knowledge of AMC Stubs

members’ moviegoing habits allows

AMC to employ its strategic marketing

tactics, including tailoring its email, text,

and mobile notifications to ensure the

marketing information being shared is

relevant to guests’ interests. As a result of

this unique insight, more than 1.5 billion

personalized emails, texts, and notifications

are being sent to guests in 2019.

Adam Aron, CEO and president of

AMC Theatres, commented, “The meteoric

rise of the AMC Stubs membership

has created a program that benefits the

entire moviegoing ecosystem, from our

guests, who are enjoying the wonderful

AMC Stubs program rewards, to our studio

partners, who now have an exhibitor

partner that can leverage moviegoing

data to market their films in a way that’s

relevant and impactful, to of course AMC

and our shareholders, who benefit greatly

from the increased engagement of a massive

consumer database.”

The program’s growth continues to

be driven in part by the benefits offered

by the three tiers of AMC Stubs: AMC

Stubs A-List, AMC Stubs Premiere, and

AMC Stubs Insider. A-List and Premiere

members earn points equivalent to a 10

percent discount at the box office and

concession stand, free size upgrades on

popcorn and soda, priority lines, and no

online ticketing fees.

Insider, AMC Stubs’ free tier, joins

Premiere and A-List by offering Discount

Tuesday savings, free refills on large popcorns,

and a birthday gift for members.

Insider members also earn a $5 reward

good at the concession stand for their

purchases at the box office and on food

and drinks.

For information about AMC Stubs

and to sign up, guests can inquire at their

local AMC Theatre, or at AMC’s website

amctheatres.com/amcstubs, or on AMC’s

iOS and Android mobile apps after

downloading or updating them with the

latest app release.

SHAWN MANDEL JOINS

CINEPLEX

>> Cineplex has announced that Shawn

Mandel, an experienced technology

executive with a track record for success,

has joined the company as its chief digital

and technology officer. With proven

experience in monetizing the value of

data through analytics, Mandel will lead

the company-wide digital, product, and

IT strategies to drive innovation across

the entire Cineplex ecosystem of businesses.

He will also provide guidance and

expertise to ensure that the more than

70 million Canadians Cineplex welcomes

through its doors every year have

unparalleled entertainment experiences,

supported through the use of the latest in

technology.

“We are a diversified entertainment

and media company with a long legacy

of leading through innovation,” said Ellis

Jacob, president and CEO, Cineplex.

“Shawn Mandel is one of the country’s

most respected technology executives,

and we see a tremendous opportunity to

bring forward new and exciting digital

entertainment experiences for our guests

and customers—with Shawn playing

a leading role in driving that development.”

Mandel’s appointment took effect

April 29, 2019. He joins Cineplex from

Telus, where he most recently served as

that company’s chief digital officer. An

executive who shares Cineplex’s passion

for innovation, Mandel has experience

in both building agile teams and digital

transformation, particularly as they relate

to enhancing corporate culture and guest

experience. He also serves as a mentor

with the Techstars Toronto Accelerator,

helping support the next generation of

Canadian innovation leaders.

“This is a uniquely exciting time to

join the Cineplex team,” said Mandel.

“From entertainment to esports, consumer

data to media sales, and almost everything

in between, Cineplex is poised for

growth as a truly integrated media and

entertainment brand, and I am thrilled to

play a leadership role on that journey.”

Cineplex’s C-suite has years of

experience working together as a team,

and this announcement, as well as the

addition of Cindy Bush as chief human

resources officer last year, rounds out

the company’s senior leadership. Both

Bush and Mandel bring over 20 years

of expertise in their respective fields to

Cineplex, with Bush having worked in

the U.K., France, the U.S., and Canada

in companies ranging from 30 to more

than 100,000 employees.

14 JULY 2019


REGAL ADDS NEW SCREENX

AUDITORIUMS IN NASHVILLE

AND HOLLYWOOD

>> CJ 4DPLEX, the cinema technology

company, and Regal have announced

that the latest round of ScreenX auditoriums

in the U.S. have opened in

Nashville at Regal Opry Mills and Regal

Hollywood, bringing the total number

of Regal ScreenX theaters to 16. The

first screening of the ScreenX format in

Nashville was Warner Bros. Pictures’ and

Legendary Pictures’ Godzilla: King of the

Monsters in the 270-degree panoramic

screens of ScreenX.

ScreenX is the world’s first multiprojection

theater technology that allows a

270-degree panoramic movie-watching

experience. ScreenX allows the audience

to go beyond the frame of the traditional

movie screen, utilizing a proprietary

system to expand the center-screen image

to the side walls, surrounding audiences

with imagery and providing a sense of

being inside the movie.

“This has been a tremendous year as

we find expansion at a rapid rate, thanks

to our great partner Regal,” said JongRyul

Kim, CEO of CJ 4DPLEX. “We

are thrilled for audiences in Nashville to

experience Godzilla: King of the Monsters

in ScreenX, where the brilliant visuals

and action sequences of the film will

be highlighted and expanded onto the

panoramic screens of ScreenX. We look

forward to bringing more of these great

cinematic experiences with our great

partners to new cities and audiences in

the future.”

“We are truly excited to be expanding

our partnership with CJ 4DPLEX

in bringing two new ScreenX locations

to Nashville,” said Richard Grover, VP

communications at Regal. “The feedback

we have been receiving from moviegoers

has been enormously positive, and we

look forward to bringing more immersive

and exciting new formats of CJ 4DPLEX

to Regal audiences across the U.S.”

Audiences were treated to an expanded

world of Godzilla: King of the Monsters,

where battle sequences between ancient

colossal creatures were featured on all

three screens of ScreenX, putting the

audience directly into the middle of

the action. As Godzilla stomped onto

the main screen, the three-headed King

Ghidorah roared on the sides, and as the

action unfolded, fog and debris flew past

with all the elements—rain, snow, thunderstorms,

and fog—extending onto the

side panels, re-creating the atmosphere of

the film inside the auditorium. Additional

highlights included extensions of

otherworldly visual sequences that accentuated

and surrounded the audience—a

lava-ridden underwater city, a deep-ocean

battle sequence, and a wide-eyed view of

a rooftop cityscape as the city crumbled

from the destruction.

GOODRICH TO BRING

FIRST-EVER IMAX THEATER

TO LAFAYETTE

>> Goodrich Quality Theaters Inc.,

headquartered in Grand Rapids, Michigan,

has announced that fans can enjoy

the Imax Experience with the opening of

the brand-new Imax theater at Eastside

10 Imax in Lafayette, Indiana. The Imax

theater opening hits just in time for the

slate of summer blockbusters beginning

with Men in Black: International.

The Imax theater screen spans 75 feet

in width with 300 comfortable, plush

rocking chairs. The Imax Experience

offers moviegoers an immersive cinematic

experience. Imax’s cutting-edge projection

system, customized theater geometry, and

powerful digital audio create a unique

environment that will make audiences

feel as if they are in the movie.

“We’ve been entertaining Tippecanoe

moviegoers for over 29 years, and we’re

super excited for our Imax to deliver a

first-rate moviegoing experience,” said

Martin Betz, COO of Goodrich Quality

Theaters. “Audiences are going to be

blown away when they see the massive

JULY 2019

15


TRADE TALK

Imax screen projecting the utmost clarity

of images and hear the powerful sound all

around them,” added Betz.

The remodeled Eastside 10 Imax has

seen myriad upgrades that include powered

reclining chairs, all-reserved seating,

expanded lobby and concessions, a drink

refill station, remodeled restrooms, enhanced

concession offerings, and a Screen

Taps bar offering beer and wine selections

to moviegoers 21 and older to take into

their movie.

Eastside 10 Imax tickets can be purchased

at www.gqtmovies.com/indiana/

eastside-10-imax. All shows and all seats

are reserved seating. You can pick your

seats online, on the GQT mobile app, or

at the theater. Reserving online prior to

your show is highly encouraged, as many

shows at the theater have been selling out.

BOSTON’S SHOWCASE

SUPERLUX INTRODUCES ART

GALLERY WITH LIVE MUSIC

>> Showcase SuperLux, a premier moviegoing

destination in the Boston area,

has launched a new program that elevates

the cinematic experience through specially

curated artwork installations and live

performances by noted local musicians.

In addition to the superior comfort, dining,

and entertainment offerings available

at Showcase SuperLux, guests will now

enjoy ongoing arts programs inspired by

classic and current films.

“We are committed to continually

raising the bar for the experience we provide

at Showcase SuperLux,” said Rebecca

Stein, vice president of studio relations

and U.S. marketing for Showcase Cinemas.

“We believe our new arts program

and its focus on locally curated pieces and

performances is a natural complement to

the moviegoing experience. We are very

proud to offer a unique arts environment

that can’t be found anywhere else.”

Showcase SuperLux has partnered

with Boston-based LuminArtz, a nonprofit

that works with local artists, to

create public art that will be featured in

the SuperLux Lounge and the cinema’s

custom-built gallery. For the gallery’s debut,

Showcase SuperLux commissioned a

series of one-of-a-kind portraits of iconic

Hollywood movie stars including Faye

Dunaway, Sophia Loren, James Dean,

and Marilyn Monroe called “Surreal

Hollywood” from artist Lia Burke. Local

video artist Pamela Hersch will bring

Burke’s paintings and other local artwork

to life on Showcase SuperLux’s new digital

display wall.

“LuminArtz is dedicated to supporting

local and regional artists by promoting

their most creative and innovative

works,” said Lyn LaFontaine, co-founder

and executive director of LuminArtz.

“We select exciting venues, in lieu of

traditional galleries, to showcase this

work because of the unique opportunity

to powerfully engage, educate, and inspire;

Showcase SuperLux is the perfect

partner to do just that.”

Showcase SuperLux’s new arts program

also features “SuperLux Sounds,” a series

of live music events that takes place in the

SuperLux Lounge every Friday and Saturday

evening. Boston native and acclaimed

independent recording and performing

artist Will Dailey will help curate local

artists for the program. Dailey is a seven-time

Boston Music Award winner and

has shared the stage with Willie Nelson,

Steve Earle, and Eddie Vedder.

The new gallery space is one of

several renovations recently completed

at Showcase SuperLux. In addition to

the digital display wall, the SuperLux

Lounge has been redesigned and features

a shuffleboard table and all-new furniture,

including plenty of cozy seating

options that guests may enjoy before or

after their movie. Guests who choose the

Lux Lite experience now enjoy the comfort

of fully extending power-operated

ultra-plush recliners, while guests who

reserve seats in the SuperLux portion of

the auditorium are invited to sit back

and relax in even more luxurious recliners

that feature in-seat heat and specially

designed tray tables featuring soft-glow

lighting underneath.

MARCUS INTRODUCES

NEW OFFERINGS AT MOVIE

TAVERN LOCATIONS

>> Marcus Theatres has been busy

upgrading and renovating its newly

acquired fleet of Movie Tavern locations.

Since completing the acquisition of the

cinema dining circuit in February, the

Marcus leadership has already earmarked

15 of the 22 Movie Tavern sites with

new amenities or plans for further upgrades.

Among the most notable changes

are Marcus’s DreamLounger recliner

seating and private label PLF offerings

like SuperScreen DLX and UltraScreen

DLX auditoriums.

“Guests already knew and loved

Movie Tavern for its innovative approach

to in-theater dining,” said Rolando Rodriguez,

chairman, president, and CEO

of Marcus Theatres, in a press release.

“Building on this successful foundation,

we are committed to elevating the moviegoing

experience through the introduction

of new amenities such as premium

large-format screens, as well as proven

programming including our popular

$5 Movie Tuesday promotion and the

Magical Movie Rewards customer-loyalty

program.”

Eleven Movie Tavern auditoriums

have been converted into the circuit’s

SuperScreen DLX private-label PLF offering,

which includes Marcus’s branded

recliners and Dolby Atmos immersive

audio. The company will be adding 10

additional SuperScreen auditoriums in

the coming months and will add one of

their UltraScreen DLX PLF auditoriums

to the Movie Tavern Roswell location.

On the F&B side, Marcus Theatres

has spent the last four months revitalizing

the Movie Tavern menu with the

additions of salads, desserts, and its

array of in-house burgers and Zaffiro’s

brand pizzas.

“We are committed to elevating the

theatrical experience through food and

beverage offerings that focus on quality,

taste, and premium ingredients,” said

Greg Creighton, executive vice president

16 JULY 2019


and COO of Marcus Theatres. “With

that in mind, our team of culinary

experts refined the menu to feature a selection

of made-from-scratch appetizers,

pizzas, entrees, and desserts that truly

offer something for everyone.”

Movie Tavern show times, locations,

and amenities can be found at www.

MarcusTheatres.com. Further amenities

and programs, provided by Marcus

Theatres, are listed below:

Movie Tavern Covington (LA): In

addition to the SuperScreen DLX auditorium,

DreamLoungers will be added

to every auditorium, plus four currently

closed movie screens will reopen.

Movie Tavern Tucker (GA): Renovations

will bring DreamLoungers to every

auditorium and a new concession stand.

Movie Tavern West 7th Street (Fort

Worth, TX): The Tavern bar will be remodeled

to feature a more modern look

and feel by fall, a complement to the

DreamLoungers added earlier this year.

Magical Movie Rewards (May):

This free customer-loyalty program

awards guests with points for every

dollar they spend, plus other perks like

free complimentary-size popcorn on $5

Movie Tuesdays, zero fees for online/

mobile ticketing, and more. To date,

the program has more than 3.3 million

members between Marcus Theatres and

Movie Tavern guests.

Student Thursday* (March): At

select locations, every Thursday, students

and faculty with a valid ID can

enjoy a movie for $6, plus free complimentary-size

popcorn.

$5 Movie Tuesday* (February): All

movies are just $5 every Tuesday, along

with free complimentary-size popcorn

for Magical Movie Rewards members.

Young at Heart*(February): Seniors

ages 60 and over can see a movie for $6

every Friday before 5:30 p.m.

*Ticket prices are subject to tax where

applicable. An additional charge applies

for 3-D, SuperScreen DLX, UltraScreen

DLX, and MTX showings during Student

Thursday and Young at Heart.

JULY 2019

17


TRADE TALK

CINEMANEXT’S

VR CONCEPT

CINEMANEXT SIGNS SAUDI

ARABIA AGREEMENT WITH

LEBANON’S EMPIRE CINEMAS

>> CinemaNext, Ymagis Group’s exhibitor-services

provider in Europe, and

Lebanese cinema chain Empire Cinemas

have announced the signing of an agreement

for the installation of the circuit’s

first-ever multiplex in Saudi Arabia. The

10-screen, 728-seat multiplex, equipped

by CinemaNext Middle East & Africa,

will open in Jizan, located on Saudi

Arabia’s southern Red Sea coast, in the

second half of 2019.

“Following the signing of our first

large-scale equipment project in Saudi

Arabia last month, we are very pleased

to be partnering with Empire Cinemas

on their first Saudi Arabian location,”

stated François Inizan, general manager of

CinemaNext MEA. “With our portfolio

of hardware and software solutions, as

well as our cinema-outfitting services

and cutting-edge innovations such as the

Sphera premium-cinema concept and

VR offer, this second agreement marks an

important milestone for CinemaNext in

further contributing to the excellence of

the moviegoing experience in

the kingdom.”

“Saudi Arabia presents a

new growth opportunity for

cinema exhibitors, and this

marks a very exciting first step

in our development in this

effervescent and previously untapped

market,” added Empire

Cinemas CEO Gino Haddad.

“We are investing in comfort

and providing exceptional experiences

for moviegoers. In addition

to its technical excellence,

CinemaNext brings to the table

a wealth of unique and innovative

products in terms of projection and

sound equipment. With our 100 years

of involvement in cinema exhibition and

CinemaNext’s first-rate services and solutions,

we are excited to play an important

role in the strong growth of Saudi Arabia’s

emerging entertainment sector.”

Empire Cinemas’ Jizan site will feature

CinemaNext’s Melody TMS, state-of-theart

projection systems, two 3-D-equipped

screens, and Dolby Atmos and 7.1 surround

sound.

With offices in 26 countries and over

13,000 screens installed globally to date,

CinemaNext is the largest

cinema exhibition services

company in EMEA. It provides

comprehensive solutions across

the board: projection equipment,

audio systems, Sphera

premium cinema concept,

VR activities, Onyx Cinema

LED, central systems, cinema

outfitting and seating, content

management, 3-D projection

systems and glasses, TMS,

digital signage, and screens.

Services include consulting, design

and project management,

equipment sales and financing,

installation, maintenance,

support (NOC), online monitoring,

spare and consumables,

service agreements, and supply

chain and logistics.

18 JULY 2019


SV SUPERIOR VALUE

SELECTING IRWIN SEATING REPRESENTS SUPERIOR VALUE


CHARITY SPOTLIGHT

TO ADD EVENTS IN AN UPCOMING ISSUE, PLEASE SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS TO INFO@BOXOFFICE.COM

DO THE HUSTLE

Oscar-winning actress

and Lollipop Theater

Network board member

Anne Hathaway hustles

to help children in need.

LOLLIPOP THEATER NETWORK

FEELS THE HUSTLE

>> With board member Anne Hathaway’s help,

the Lollipop Theater Network treated Neveah

and her family to the premiere and after-party of

MGM and United Artists’ The Hustle on May 8,

2019, at ArcLight’s Cinerama Dome in Hollywood.

The actress greeted the entire family on the

red carpet with hugs; inside, they got to meet other

members of the Hustle cast, including co-star Rebel

Wilson. Neveah is an out-patient at the UCLA

Mattel Children’s Hospital and is waiting for her

second heart transplant. Moments like these help

lift the spirits of patients and their families during

these challenging times.

WALT DISNEY COMPANY

COLLABORATES WITH THE

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

NETWORK ON LION KING’S

PROTECT THE PRIDE CAM-

PAIGN

>> To celebrate the release of Disney’s The Lion

King, in theaters in North America on July 18, The

Walt Disney Company has launched a global conservation

campaign to raise awareness of the crisis

facing lions and other wildlife across Africa. The

Lion King Protect the Pride campaign focuses on

protecting and revitalizing lion populations and

the habitats they need to thrive. Disney has already

donated more than $1.5 million to the Wildlife

20 JULY 2019


Conservation Network’s (WCN) Lion Recovery Fund (LRF) and

its partners and will make additional grants as well as invite fans

to help double the donation for a total contribution of up to $3

million. Fans may participate by taking part in celebratory experiences

and purchasing special-edition products as part of The

Lion King Protect the Pride campaign.

It’s been 25 years since Disney released the original version

of The Lion King; sadly, during that time Africa has lost half its

lions. Only about 20,000 remain. Disney supports the Lion

Recovery Fund and its vision to double the lion population

by 2050 through efforts that engage communities to ensure a

brighter future for African wildlife and their habitats. Protecting

lions supports the entire circle of life in Africa, from hyenas to

meerkats. Lions face rising threats, but research shows their numbers

can be strengthened if they and the habitats they share with

people and other African wildlife

are adequately protected.

“Disney is committed to

supporting lion conservation

efforts, and we believe The Lion

King is the perfect story to remind

us of the role we each have in

helping ensure a world where these

majestic animals are treasured and

protected,” says Elissa Margolis,

senior vice president, enterprise social responsibility, for The Walt

Disney Company. “Conservation has always been a core value

of The Walt Disney Company. That commitment is apparent in

everything from our films to our theme parks. It is why we created

the Disney Conservation Fund. Through the stories we tell

and the experiences we create, we have the power to reach people

around the world and inspire them to take action with us.”

As a kickoff to The Lion King Protect the Pride campaign,

Disney and WCN convened more than 80 leading lion conservation

experts this past May at the Lion Footprint Forum at Walt

Disney World Resort, the first meeting of its kind in 20 years,

aimed at expanding collaboration to grow conservation impact.

Participants from 18 countries and representing more than 50

organizations and foundations discussed challenges impacting

lion populations across lion-range countries and strategies to

address them. Resulting ideas and project proposals will be considered

for support through the LRF.

“The Lion Recovery Fund has a vision to bring lions back

across Africa, and Disney’s powerful storytelling is a perfect way

to get even more people aware of the lion crisis and inspired to

take action,” said Charles Knowles, president and co-founder

of Wildlife Conservation Network. “The Wildlife Conservation

Network is proud to continue its long-standing collaboration

with Disney to make a meaningful impact for people and wildlife

across Africa.”

>> Last month, Variety celebrated its FREEDOM DAY, during

which Variety chapters throughout North America presented

Freedom devices such as adaptive bikes, wheelchairs, and modified

ride-on cars to local children who live with a disability. Freedom

devices include kids in activities they may not have access to

otherwise, allow kids to keep up with their friends, and improve

their quality of life. In North America, $6 million is spent on the

Variety Freedom Program annually to support more than 4,000

children and organizations.

UPCOMING EVENT

VARIETY – THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY OF

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA: 9TH ANNUAL CHARITY

POKER & CASINO NIGHT

WEDNESDAY JULY 24TH / LOS ANGELES, CA

>> Go “All In” for a great cause and join your entertainment

industry colleagues for a high-energy evening with Vegas-style

game play, great food, and prizes at the Paramount Studios. Celebrities

walk the red carpet and help raise awareness for Variety

– the Children’s Charity of Southern California, while host Jamie

Gold, World Series of Poker Main Event Champion, kicks off

the poker tournaments and casino games. Please visit

www.varietysocal.org for sponsorship and ticket information.

JULY 2019

21


CHARITY SPOTLIGHT

In Memoriam

Jody Reynolds

October 13, 1940–June 3, 2019

VARIETY – THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY PAYS TRIBUTE

JODY REYNOLDS

>> A trailblazer.

A firecracker. A

quick-witted force.

A free spirit full

of life. A gift. A

pillar of strength

and inspiration. A

leader. A lover. A

mother to us all. She

was the definition

of a lady. And, as

it’s been said, a lady

always knows when

to leave. As such,

Jody Reynolds left

us on June 3, 2019,

after a very brief but

courageous fight with lung cancer.

Reynolds was an amazing wife, mother, sister,

aunt, and friend. She leaves behind her husband

of 51 years, Stan Reynolds; son Stan W. Reynolds

and his children Caroline and Johnny; daughter

Suzanne Reynolds Arnold (Jake) and children

Brooks, Cullen, and William; daughter Erin White

and her child Caitlyn; son Brooks Reynolds; and

daughter Kathryn Diaz (Oscar) and children

Marilyn and Roxanne. She also leaves behind her

sister Sue Lane and brother John Ahrold (Karin),

as well as numerous nephews and nieces. She was

preceded in death by her daughter Brigid Ann, her

brother William Ahrold, and her parents, Jack and

Bonnie Ahrold.

When Joanne “Jody” Kathleen (Ahrold) Reynolds

lived, she lived to serve others. She graduated

from St. Joseph Academy and the University of

Iowa. Then, after earning her degree in secondary

education from Drake University, she joined the

American Red Cross in Washington, D.C., and

worked in Vietnam and South Korea. Reynolds

was among some of the first American women to

serve in the Vietnam War, an experience that no

doubt fueled her lifelong desire to always do more

for others.

It was during an impromptu skiing trip to

Wisconsin in 1967 that Jody Ahrold met the love

of her life, Stan Reynolds. As soulmates, partners,

and friends, they have enjoyed and embraced life’s

journey together, finding strength in their unbreakable

bond even when faced with remarkable

tragedy. Their third child, Brigid, died when she

was just one year old from complications originating

at birth. When Stan and Jody drove back

from the funeral, Jody said, “We are going to

make her life count.” And they did. They became

involved with Variety – the Children’s Charity.

The couple have devoted their lives to serving

children who are sick or have special needs. Reynolds’s

passion and drive led her to become the

first female president of Variety – the Children’s

Charity of Iowa and the first female president of

Variety International. She was a powerful speaker

who had a commanding presence. Reynolds

always said one of her proudest achievements was

bringing the Gold Heart Pin campaign, which is

considered the organization’s most iconic and successful

fundraising initiative, to the United States.

Just as noteworthy, though, is the more than

$117 million she has helped raise for the charity

over the years. And it’s with those dollars and

dedication that she has given countless children

and their families the chance at a better life.

We will miss her tenacity, her smile, her light,

and her warmth. We will support and honor her by

continuing to always do more and serve others. We

hope you will join us.

Memorial gifts in Jody’s honor can be made to

Variety – the Children’s Charity of Iowa, at 505

5th Ave #310, Des Moines, IA 50309.

22 JULY 2019


INDIE FOCUS

b r o u g h t t o y o u b y

Rialto Cinemas Elmwood

BERKELEY, CA

BY KY J. BOYD

DIRECTOR AND CEO, RIALTO CINEMAS

SCREENS

Rialto Cinemas Elmwood is a historic

three-screen theater. Our main-floor auditorium

seats 178, and our two upstairs

screening rooms each seats 49 people.

TOP TITLES (2018)

A Star Is Born

Crazy Rich Asians

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Vice

Amazing Grace

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again

Bohemian Rhapsody

Ocean’s 8

Stan & Ollie

Apollo 11

FILMMAKER BOB SARLES MADE AN APPEARANCE AT

THE SHOWING OF HIS DOCUMENTARY BANG! THE BERT BERNS STORY

TOP TITLES (HISTORICAL)

We had a fantastic run of Fantastic Mr.

Fox in late 2009, grossing over $110,000.

Hidden Figures, Julie & Julia, The Post, Faces

Places, Bridge of Spies, In Bruges, Rachel

Getting Married, and Jane are among our

top-grossing films since 2007.

– continued on page 26 –

24 JULY 2019


INDIE FOCUS

NOW PLAYING

Rialto staff members

model their matching

movie-poster T-shirts.

HISTORY

The theater was built in 1914 by

architect William Dufour and builder

D.M. Etter. The theater was originally

called the Strand and was closed from

1941 through 1943, reopening on June

26, 1947, as the Elmwood Theatre.

In June 2007, Rialto Cinemas took

over the operation of the theater and

shifted the emphasis from second-run

to a hybrid first-run policy. We were

approached about the theater being

available for lease in the spring of 2007

and were able to make a deal with the

Elmwood Theatre Foundation, which

owns the building, to lease it and make

a deal with the prior operator to acquire

the FF&E.

Interesting trivia about the theater’s

marquee: the current marquee is actually

the third marquee the building has had. The first

two both extended past the sidewalk and onto

College Avenue. We are told both were damaged

by delivery vehicles. The current marquee was

removed from another theater, and the theater did

not have its name on it until September, 2009.

COMMUNITY

The Elmwood’s audience is very local to the

theater’s area of Berkeley and Oakland, but we

do draw from all over the Bay Area for some of

our special events. We consider the theater to be a

third place in Berkeley, meaning a spot where the

community gathers to share a common experience.

We have hosted many East Bay nonprofit organizations

for film-based fundraisers and events and

have hosted many filmmakers when we’ve shown

their films in Berkeley.

FOOD & BEVERAGE

Popcorn is the staple, of course. We do very

well with some locally made artisan chocolate

bars that are literally made right around the corner

from the theater.

PROGRAMMING

Through perseverance, sheer force of will,

and a little luck along the way, the Elmwood has

soldiered on as Berkeley’s only independently

owned movie theater. We’ve made a significant

impact with our alternative-content programming.

The Elmwood was in the first group of theaters to

screen National Theatre Live’s productions starting

with Phèdre when nobody knew what National

Theatre Live was. Rialto Cinemas Elmwood helped

bring recognition to National Theatre Live as a

vital brand.

GRASSROOTS MARKETING

Whenever possible, we try to partner with other

local businesses or organizations. We have found

good partners for music-based films in our local

record stores—yes, people still go to record stores!

CINEMA ADVERTISING

With increased operating costs, the revenue

from Spotlight Cinema Networks on-screen advertising

diversifies our revenue mix. Independent

theaters always need ticket and concessions revenue,

but when you can make a nice amount for

doing something that costs you nothing but a little

on-screen space, Spotlight is a win-win. They have

the best quality ads and advertisers that fit with

our customers. Importantly, we are never forced to

take an ad—it is always our choice. Our favorite

Spotlight ad was a Louis Vuitton campaign with

this very ethereal spot that looked to the viewer

like some enticing film trailer. On first viewing,

most viewers didn’t notice that in every scene was

an LV logo. So when the LV logo card came up

at the end, people were surprised because they’d

been taken in by the ad. I loved that. I consider it

Spotlight’s most effective commercial!

Another thing I greatly appreciate about

Spotlight is the thoughtful way that they approach

potential new categories of advertising. We have

had some very interesting discussions recently,

both internally within our management team and

with Spotlight, about a category of product that

we previously hadn’t accepted on-screen advertising

for before. At first glance, it appeared to be

a natural thing as our culture as a society evolves

and morphs. I was quite surprised at some of

the reactions and discussion we had around this

category. In the end, it has all been very productive

and informative. Sometimes, as a society, we

aren’t as progressive as we think we might be, and

I appreciate that Spotlight gave us the time to have

a considered and thoughtful discussion. A less

thoughtful company might have just said here’s

a potential new advertiser and here’s the share,

decide now.

26 JULY 2019


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SAMUEL L. JACKSON, TOM HOLLAND, AND JAKE GYLLENHAAL

28 JULY 2019


European Adventure

JON WATTS TAKES SPIDER-MAN OUT OF NEW YORK CITY AND

INTO A NEW ERA WITH SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME

BY DANIEL LORIA

THERE HAVE BEEN SO MANY SPIDER-MEN OVER

the past two decades that it’s difficult to keep track

of them all.

First there was Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man, starring Tobey

Maguire. The critical and commercial success of Raimi’s

first two films in the early aughts helped usher in the

superhero era in Hollywood. The franchise ran out of

steam by the third installment, however, leading to the

first attempt at a reboot under the helm of Marc Webb.

The Amazing Spider-Man, starring Andrew Garfield,

produced two movies, which showed flashes of inspiration

but ultimately struggled to connect with audiences.

And, of course, there was the musical.

I attended one of the much-maligned preview performances

of Julie Taymor and U2’s Spider-Man: Turn Off

the Dark (with Reeve Carney in the title role) during its

brief preview run on Broadway, before the show was

retooled by a different creative team. I look back on it

fondly as the most absurd entertainment experience of

my life. It featured Spider-Man dance-fighting against

villains whose costumes looked like inflatable pool toys.

The main villain was a giant spider who sang a lengthy

number about her love of shoes. (Why shoes? Because

she has eight legs, the song emphasized.) The performance

ran over three hours, including several periods

of dead time with actors suspended above the audience

in midair because of malfunctioning equipment. Sitting

in the theater, watching the multimillion-dollar fiasco

unravel before me, I remember thinking: Can anyone

rescue this character?

– more Spidey on the next page –

JULY 2019

29


COVER STORY

HOCUS POCUS

Jake Gyllenhaal as

classic comics character

Quentin Beck, otherwise

known as the master of

illusion, Mysterio

The franchise had been introduced and reintroduced

to the point of self-parody. It was on autopilot:

great power, great responsibility, green goblins, and

assorted love interests. A new Spider-Man needed

someone to save the franchise from the Spider-Men

who preceded it. True to its source material, that

hero would turn out to be a young underdog who

stepped up when given the opportunity.

Jon Watts, a director of small-budget projects

and practically unknown in Hollywood before

the critical success of his indie thriller Cop Car in

2015, suddenly found himself taking the reins of

one of the most recognizable superhero franchises

in the world.

“It was pretty thrilling. I was able to use a lot of

my personal emotions to inform the story,” Watts

tells Boxoffice. “Spider-Man: Homecoming is about

a kid who wants to prove himself and no one will

listen to him.”

The director lets out a nervous laugh before adding,

“When he finally gets the chance to step up, he

completely screws up.”

Watts is referring to a memorable scene in

Homecoming, in which his Spider-Man (played by

Tom Holland) takes the initiative to save passengers

from a disintegrating Staten Island Ferry—only to

fail spectacularly and force Iron Man to bail him

out at the last minute.

“Those were the kind of nerves I had about

jumping from something as small as Cop Car to

something as big as Homecoming,” he says. “I really

wanted to prove myself and show that I could make

a movie like this, but I had this terrible fear that I

would somehow accidentally screw things up and

split the Staten Island Ferry in half. I took a lot of

those emotions and translated them into something

I could use for the movie.”

Those feelings helped give Spider-Man: Homecoming

(2017) a grounded quality, giving equal

weight to the protagonist’s anxieties about high

school life and his role as an emerging hero. The

movie was hailed as a welcome, and overdue, return

to form for the superhero franchise. It went on to

earn $334 domestically and $880 million worldwide,

the highest-grossing entry in the series since

Raimi’s trilogy.

“One of the beneficial things of there having

been so many previous Spider-Man films is that

it limited some of the things you could do,” says

Watts, when asked about his approach to the film’s

tone. “Once we made the rule that we didn’t want

to show anything that we had already seen before,

it really helped us eliminate a lot of extraneous

ideas, concepts, visuals, and story points. It made us

30 JULY 2019


focus on finding new dimensions to explore within the story. We

explored the Vulture character a bit more [the film’s villain, played

by Michael Keaton], and gave the story a much stronger focus on

the high school component—which had been limited to the first

act of the other Spider-Man films.”

Watts’s approach to Spider-Man stems from the unique deal

struck between Sony and Disney’s Marvel Cinematic Universe,

essentially a cross-studio partnership in which the two majors

share custody of the character across their respective franchises.

Tom Holland’s Spider-Man was first introduced in Disney’s Captain

America: Civil War (2017) and has since appeared in Avengers:

Infinity War (2018) and Avengers: Endgame (2019), helping expand

and develop the character between Sony’s standalone films.

“One thing that had never been explored before was Spider-Man

being part of a larger Marvel universe,” says Watts.

“Up until Civil War, Spider-Man had been portrayed as the only

superhero in the world in his movies.”

Being part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe—New York

City’s friendly neighborhood Spider-Man was now fighting

intergalactic battles alongside the Avengers—allowed Watts and

his team to frame the hero within a bigger context. “Using the

character as a ground-level entry point into this world was

fascinating,” he adds.

And the timing of the new film, hot on the heels of

April’s Avengers: Endgame, presented the opportunity to fully

explore the fallout from the events depicted in the last two

Avengers films. “Endgame was the culmination of those

stories. In Far from Home, we are able to explore all the

unanswered questions that haven’t been dealt with from

Endgame. Our movie gets to address those questions and

show where the story is going to go next.”

That isn’t to say that Watts intends to stray too

far from the tone he established in Homecoming,

which connected with audiences more by channeling

a John Hughes teen comedy than a big

studio tentpole.

“We had something to prove on the first film:

why does the world need another Spider-Man

movie after all the ones that preceded it?” asks

Watts. “I felt like Tom Holland was such a

great Spider-Man, and people seemed to really

respond to him. So there was a little bit of a

sense of relief after Homecoming, where it felt

like the choices we had made paid off. This

sequel is an opportunity to take that tone

and run with it.”

Spider-Man: Far from Home takes place

shortly after the events of Avengers: Endgame

and finds a distraught Peter Parker, still reeling

from the effects of being (temporarily) turned to

dust in Infinity War and seeing close friends per-

NOT MARY JANE

Former Disney Channel star

Zendaya returns as Peter

Parker’s friend Michelle

“M.J.” Jones.

JULY 2019

31


COVER STORY

JON WATTS AT THE MOVIES

Moviegoing Memory

ish in Endgame. “After everything that he’s been

through, it was clear to us that Peter Parker needed

a vacation. That was the jumping off point for this

movie,” says Watts.

The movie sends Peter Parker on a European

field trip with his classmates, visiting famous

locales throughout the continent, an idea that was

partially inspired by Watts and Holland’s international

press tour for Homecoming. “We were going

from one European city to another promoting the

film with a Spider-Man costume for photo ops. I

remember standing up on a rooftop in Rome, doing

an interview and looking across the

I went and saw Todd Solondz’s Happiness at my

hometown theater, Kimball’s Peak Three Theater

in Colorado Springs. I’m amazed they played the

film there; I saw it in a packed movie theater

with people who did not know what to expect.

People were screaming at the screen, leaving

the theater. It was the most nervous laughter

I’ve ever heard.

room and seeing Spider-Man

on a red-tiled roof thinking, that’s

pretty cool—we should work this into a movie,”

says the director. “The idea of getting Peter Parker

out of New York and taking him on a European

class trip immediately opened up the possibilities

of interesting visuals and unique story points that

haven’t been explored before.”

It was also a good excuse to get out of the

Atlanta soundstages and shoot on location. Watts

says his team shot on location in cities like London,

Prague, and especially Venice. “Venice isn’t

that big; a big part of our scouting plan ahead of

going was to watch movies like Don’t Look Now

and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade so we could

plot locations out on maps and shoot the city in

new ways,” says Watts. “What’s amazing about

Venice is that everything looks great; you’re not

fighting against any bad angles. Everything there

looks like it belongs on a postcard.”

No superhero film is complete without its share

of recognizable villains, but Watts insisted in taking

a slight detour from that formula in Far from

Home. The trailer introduces Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal),

a classic bad guy from the comics making

his first appearance in a Spider-Man film. Watts

insists Mysterio has been reimagined as an antihero

in Far from Home, bringing to mind Sony’s

approach to its recent Spider-Man spin-off, Venom

(2018), though he refused to go into further detail

about the character, saying he’s excited to have

moviegoers find out more when they see the film.

The main villains presented in the movie’s trailers

are a bit obscure for casual comic book fans. The

Elementals, a group of extradimensional creatures

with unique powers, are taking top billing at the

moment as the movie’s primary antagonists. Watts

relished the opportunity to bring these characters

to the screen. “These are second- and third-tier

Spider-Man villains that we never really see outside

the Saturday-morning cartoons,” he says. “Those

were my favorite villains when I would watch

‘Spider-Man’ on Saturday mornings as a kid. It was

a chance to bring a different kind of spectacle to

this movie.”

Spectacle, after all, is at the heart of the franchise.

Despite coming from the independent-film

world, Watts has always had the theatrical experience

in mind when making films. It applied to Cop

Car as much as it does to his Spider-Man films. “I

only think of my movies as a theatrical experience,”

he says. “A big movie like this is a ride the audience

takes in a darkened theater with popcorn and a

soda. That’s the only way I think of it, not about

people watching it at home or on their phones.

It’s something you have to see in a theater. That’s

always in the back of my mind, and it informs

every decision you take on set. You want to lean in

to the sort of experiences that you can only have in

a theater with a captive audience.”

That focus on the theatrical experience has

paid off. Since Spider-Man’s nadir on Broadway,

Sony has successfully resurrected the franchise

with Watts’s films and a series of spin-offs like the

aforementioned Venom and the Academy Award–

winning animated feature Spider-Man: Into the

Spider-Verse (2018). Eight years after Spider-Man’s

disastrous Broadway debut, the question is no

longer about why there should be another Spider-Man,

but where the iconic superhero franchise

will go next.

32 JULY 2019


PHOTO: ALISON COHEN ROSA, © WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC.

Raising Hell

WOMEN TAKE OVER IN ANDREA BERLOFF’S

NEW YORK MOB MOVIE THE KITCHEN

BY REBECCA PAHLE

>> In theaters on August 9, New Line Cinema’s The Kitchen flips

the mob movie script. Set in 1970s Hell’s Kitchen, the film centers

on three women who, after their Irish mobster husbands get

arrested, find themselves in need of money to support themselves.

What’s a woman to do … except take over the operation

for herself? Turns out, between the three of them, Kathy (Melissa

McCarthy), Ruby (Tiffany Haddish), and Claire (Elisabeth Moss) are

actually better at running the mob than the good ol’ boys who

look down on them as powerless housewives. Not that things are

easy. This is still a mob movie after all.

LINING IT UP

Andrea Berloff (right) and

cinematographer Maryse

Alberti bring the Hell’s

Kitchen of the 1970s to the

modern age.

The Kitchen represents a departure for actresses

McCarthy and Haddish, best known for their

comic work. Also jumping into something new

was writer/director Andrea Berloff, who’s racked

up screenwriting work both credited and uncredited

over a decade-plus career. “The best training

to be a director of a studio movie is to put in 15

years writing screenplays,” she quips.

Berloff’s best-known movie—and the one that

garnered her an Oscar nomination—is Straight

Outta Compton, the 2015 hit that dramatized the

rise to fame of rap group NWA. It was Compton,

unsurprisingly, that helped Berloff sell her vision

of The Kitchen to Warner Bros. execs. She’d already

written the script, adapting Ollie Masters’s comic

series. When it came time to sell herself as the

movie’s future director, Berloff “went in there and

gave a really impassioned pitch about how this is

going to be a big, fun event movie. A movie that

people are dying to see, just in the way Compton

was. I laid out for them that I see this as a big,

fun, entertaining movie that we can turn into a

real event if done right.”

An undercurrent in Berloff’s pitch was a theme

that runs through The Kitchen itself. As put by

Berloff: “Don’t underestimate people. Don’t

underestimate comedians, because you know

what? They’re some of the most talented women

out there. Don’t underestimate what they can do.

Don’t underestimate me. I’m not just a writer. I

can direct, too. I hope that message permeates.

That feeling of empowerment does not apply just

to actresses or directors. It applies to everybody.

That’s the universal feeling that I want people to

hook into.”

Shot in four of New York’s five boroughs (sorry,

Queens) and Long Island, The Kitchen pairs a retro

style with a visual aesthetic that consciously avoids

the sort of lo-fi grittiness many other directors

would have drifted to, particularly in this genre.

To that end, the clothes—as chosen by costume

designer Sarah Edwards—are authentic to the

period yet steer clear of the more ridiculous end

of the ’70s fashion spectrum. “Sometimes ’70s

clothes look silly to us today. It’s got to be pieces

of that era that still translate into this era. The

women look fantastic in every scene,” says Berloff.

With cinematographer Maryse Alberti (Velvet

Goldmine, The Wrestler), Berloff aimed to present a

vision of ’70s Hell’s Kitchen—the old storefronts,

trash piling up on the sidewalks—that’s colorful,

not washed out in shades of gray and sepia.

34

JULY 2019


PHOTO: ALISON COHEN ROSA, © WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC.

“It’s a mantra that I’ve been repeating since

I was hired to do this in 2016: If this movie’s

not fun, people aren’t going to be entertained,”

explains Berloff. “If it’s too dark and gritty, it’s not

fun. I want to have a great time when I go out to

the theater, and I hope that this movie has done

that. I think if it was too gritty, people would

be turned off and wouldn’t want to see it. That’s

a reason to go to the theater: You want to see

these actresses in these roles. They look great, and

they’re having fun, and you’re going to have fun.

That was really, really clear to me from the outset.”

“Fun,” however, doesn’t mean careless. As a

screenwriter, Berloff is a heavy researcher. With

The Kitchen, unlike Straight Outta Compton, she

wasn’t writing about real people, so her research

tended more toward the realities of living in 1970s

New York. She looked into “the Irish mafia, what

that looks like—past and present. I also did a lot

of research into what society was like in 1978,

1979. What was it like for women? What was it

like for people of color? What was it like for poor

people? And what was New York City like in that

era? What was going on in society? The city was

broke. That meant that the trash wasn’t picked up,

that nothing was taken care of. What must it have

felt like to live in a city that was filthy? It’s all that

texture that makes [the movie] feel real.”

Berloff acknowledges her “incredible department

heads”—including production designer

Shane Valentino—“who cared as much about

detail and specificity as I did. I was also able to collaborate

with an incredible team of artists who understood

the joy of research and knowledge.” Still,

at a certain point, it’s time to close your research

tabs and get down to actually making the movie.

“Ultimately, I’m making a piece of entertainment.

This isn’t an intellectual exercise. That’s part of

what I love about my job, is that I can take all of

that amazing, rich research and put it through the

movie translator and make it into a really fun piece

of entertainment that’s about something.”

As passionate as Berloff is about The Kitchen,

both as a writer and director, she views herself

as not being “that precious about my work” in

general. Put another way: What serves the movie,

not the individual, is paramount. “When you’re

hired to write or direct a studio movie, you are

hired by a corporation to do a job for them. I

think that you are all the more powerful when you

can take your emotions out of that situation. We

are making a product for a corporation, and that’s

fine. There’s nothing wrong with that. I’m thrilled

that I work in that space.”

HELL’S KITCHEN TRIO

Elisabeth Moss, Melissa

McCarthy, and Tiffany

Haddish prepare to bust

up the boy’s club in The

Kitchen.

JULY 2019

35


PHOTO: ERIC CHARBONNEAU, © WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC.

Ultimately, I’m making a piece of

entertainment. This isn’t an intellectual

exercise. That’s part of what I love about my

job, is that I can take all of that amazing,

rich research and put it through the movie

translator and make it into a really fun

piece of entertainment that’s about

something. – ANDREA BERLOFF

VIVA LAS VEGAS

Andrea Berloff and

stars Tiffany Haddish

and Melissa McCarthy

set Vegas on fire at this

year’s CinemaCon.

That said, the mob movie genre is something

that Berloff has wanted to tackle for quite some

time. “I tend to write more male-driven material

because, frankly, that’s pretty much all people

wanted to pay me for in the past,” she says with

a chuckle. “But putting women in these roles

in an authentic way has been my goal for a very

long time.”

And the roles are all quite different. Taking

over the Irish mob, after all, requires a blend of

different skill sets. Kathy (McCarthy) is diplomatic,

while Claire (Moss) is more of a live wire,

the result of years of abuse at the hands of her

now-incarcerated husband. (In The Kitchen, Moss

is at the center of film

history’s most romantic

cutting-up-a-body

scene, a distinction

that isn’t likely to be

held by another actress

anytime soon.)

Most surprising in

the cast is Haddish

as Ruby, embittered

by the racism of her

adopted social group

but determined to do

whatever it takes to

get ahead. McCarthy

and Haddish are both

best known as comic

actresses, but Mc-

Carthy is coming off

an Oscar-nominated

dramatic turn in Can

You Ever Forgive Me?

Haddish is still far and

away best known for

her breakout role in

R-rated comedy Girls

Trip. The Kitchen’s

more dramatic material,

while still making use of the actresses’ comedy

chops, certainly marks a departure.

Haddish landed on Berloff’s radar when Girls

Trip was in theaters, “just starting to build into a

phenomenon—but it was not there and she was

not there.” The Kitchen producer Michael De

Luca recommended that Berloff and Haddish

have lunch, a meeting that proved fruitful. “She

completely blew me away. There’s such a depth

to her, so much soul, so much heart. She’s such a

kind person. I came away from that lunch thinking

she could do anything. She had read the script

on her own and really wanted the part. First she

went to Mike De Luca, and then she came to me,

and then the studio. She worked for it. She went

out there and got herself that part.”

Also contributing to The Kitchen’s large ensemble

are Margo Martindale, playing Ruby’s mobwife

mother-in-law; Domhnall Gleeson, as one

of the women’s early allies; Brian d’Arcy James, as

Kathy’s husband; Bill Camp, as a rival Italian mafioso;

and Common as an FBI agent monitoring

Hell’s Kitchen. Warner Bros. releases The Kitchen

in North America on August 9.

36 JULY 2019


Ride Share

DAVE BAUTISTA AND KUMAIL NANJIANI MAKE AN UNLIKELY

CRIME-FIGHTING TEAM IN MICHAEL DOWSE’S STUBER

BY KEVIN LALLY

>> An Uber ride is like that proverbial box of chocolates from Forrest Gump: You never

know whom you’re going to get. The random nature of the popular car service helps explain

the unusual star pairing of Disney and Fox’s new action comedy Stuber—six-footfour

former wrestling star and Guardian of the Galaxy Dave Bautista, and wry Pakistani

American comedian Kumail Nanjiani. Bautista plays Vic Manning, a tough L.A. police detective

who’s just had Lasik surgery when he gets a tip on the whereabouts of the drug

dealer who murdered his partner; Nanjiani is Stu, the very unfortunate Uber driver who

is recruited for the visually impaired Vic’s mission of vengeance during an L.A. heat wave.

KUMAIL NANJIANI AND DAVE BAUTISTA

38 JULY 2019


Guiding the frenetic action and character-driven

comedy is director Michael

Dowse (What If, Goon), who jumped at the

chance to bring Tripper Clancy’s screenplay to life.

“I’d seen so many action comedies that either don’t

do the action well but the comedy is great, or vice

versa. And I just thought there was an opportunity

to make something really, really great with the

script,” Dowse recalls.

Dowse did have some classic role models in

mind as he prepared the film. “We looked at 48

Hrs. and Lethal Weapon. Midnight Run was a big

influence as well. Visually, I wanted you to feel the

heat wave, so I looked at Falling Down, To Live and

Die in L.A., 52 Pick-Up, which is a beautifully shot

movie. Heat, of course. Training Day was another

big influence—L.A. movies where you really feel

the vibe of the town, and hopefully we accomplished

that.” (That said, Stuber was mostly filmed

in and around Atlanta.)

Dave Bautista was the first to be cast. “I’d

been a big fan of his work,” Dowse says. “When

I saw Blade Runner 2049, I was blown away with

his presence—he’s great dramatically; he held

the screen. And obviously with Guardians of the

Galaxy, you see his comic timing as well. I thought

that combination was really interesting. But he also

has soulfulness to him and a depth that I thought

would benefit the film.

“I was a fan of Kumail, but after seeing The

Big Sick, I was like: This guy can carry a movie.

He’s great. He’s funny and he’s also a fantastic

actor. Then it was a process of just putting the two

guys in a room and doing the chemistry read and

seeing what they’re like together. And it was just

one of those lovely things where you knew within

30 seconds of their sitting together in front of the

camera that you had a film. They were right off

the bat riffing off each other, very funny, finishing

each other’s sentences. When that chemistry comes

through just like that, you know it’s gonna get

better and better as we go along.”

Dowse notes, “A lot of these movies are based

on tension, so they have to be able to shit on each

other and take the piss out of each other and build

that tension initially. And that has to subtly evolve

into a friendship, and they pulled it off. I’m probably

most proud of the last scene where Dave gets

teared up. That’s the culmination of the entire film,

and how they got there at the end is incredible.”

Nanjiani, along with his wife, Emily V. Gordon,

was nominated for an Oscar for their script for the

semiautobiographical The Big Sick, so Dowse also

had the benefit of his writer’s instincts. “Kumail

really cares about stuff, so when he jumps into

something, he’s really in it to win it, which I love

as the director. You want somebody who really

cares and wants to collaborate and make the film

better. He got involved at the script stage—we

would workshop the script, do table reads, bring

in other writers. Kumail was really the guy who

fleshed out the film’s

whole modern-manversus-macho-man

I’d been a big fan of [Bautista’s] work,

idea. It was in the When I saw Blade Runner 2049, I was

script before, but he let blown away with his presence—he’s

it bubble up. How he great dramatically; he held the screen.

put it was, Stu needs to And obviously with Guardians of the

yell and Vic needs to Galaxy, you see his comic timing as well.

cry. That’s the epitome

– MICHAEL DOWSE

of what should happen

with the characters.

He’s such a good writer, and it’s just so nice to have

a guy like that on set who really cares, really wants

to come to work and isn’t just there to do a job but

to make it fantastic, and that was my M.O. on this

film as well.”

As for Bautista, “I think we’re just starting to

scratch the surface of what he can do as an actor.

It’s rare that a guy who comes out of wrestling,

in my opinion at least, has that much depth.

You can’t keep your eyes off him, and he’s also a

wonderful guy.”

For Stuber, Bautista was unafraid to downplay

his formidable persona. “From the wrestling ring

and most of his parts, he has a very specific look.

And I wanted him to look different. I wanted him

to look a little bit more flawed, a little more out of

shape—he wears a belly pad for most of the film.

A guy who’s divorced, mid-40s, living in a shitty

one-bedroom apartment and stewing away. I like

how he looks in his glasses; he was totally game to

do all of that. A lot of actors are very specific about

that stuff and don’t necessarily want to look flawed.

But he was ready and willing to do it.”

A highlight of the film is an all-out brawl that

erupts between the hulking Vic and the much

slighter Stu in the sporting goods store where Stu

works when he’s not driving. “I was very excited

about that scene,” Dowse says. “It’s something I developed

in the script, the idea of if you’re in a fight

in a sporting goods store, what would you use?

Sometimes there’s a bit of wish fulfillment in that:

If you could trash the store, what would you get

JULY 2019

39


PHOTO: HOPPER STONE/SMPSP; © 2019 TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORPORATION

BREAK A LEG

Kumail Nanjiani, Dave

Bautista, and Rene

Moran

away with? What I try to do with those sequences

is not over-cover them, but be specific about how

I want to shoot each piece. So we’re not resetting

and shooting the same piece from five different

angles. We’re saying, OK, this is how we’re going to

cover this piece from A to B, and B to C, and C to

D. With the amount of time that we had and the

scale we wanted, it was the only way to do it. I just

thought it’d be fun for the guys. You have to have

that scene where they fight each other—they’ve

had enough and it boils over.”

Bautista isn’t the only experienced fighter in

Stuber; the film also features martial-arts master Iko

Uwais, known for the action-packed Raid series,

as elusive, vicious drug dealer Teijo. “When we

cast Iko,” Dowse recalls, “I thought, oh, this fight’s

going to be really interesting because it’s a six-footfour

guy against a five-foot-five guy. I’ve never seen

anybody who moves as quickly as Iko moves—he’s

such an athlete, as is Dave. And what’s nice about

it is you don’t have to rely on stunt doubles as

much—you can actually shoot stuff and you don’t

have to hide people because they’re both in the

fight. That in itself allows you to make it feel more

realistic and not be limited with how you move the

camera. I was so thrilled to get Iko. I couldn’t be a

bigger fan of his work and I was thrilled to work

with him and to build the fights and learn from

him. I don’t see many people doing fights as good

as he does, and it’s not only martial arts—they

incorporate gunplay in his films too. I saw all that

stuff and thought it would work well with us.”

Overall, Dowse says

he wants the action in

his films to “feel visceral

and real and honest,

feel like people are in

danger and adhere to

the laws of physics

and gravity. And also

feel sloppy and not

very polished, so you

feel the hits and the

added stakes. Those

are the fights that I

love the most in films.

And then again, not

over-covered. My pet

peeve is fights that are

over-edited. You lose

all perspective; you

don’t care. It’s all editing,

where you really want to almost treat it like

dance, standing back and seeing the movement,

and don’t try to accent everything, [but instead]

try to get the speed and the impact of it within the

frame and not rely on cutting to do it.”

Stuber also features a strong female supporting

cast: Natalie Morales as Vic’s somewhat-estranged

daughter, a sculptor; Betty Gilpin (“GLOW”) as

Stu’s partner in a business venture and unrequited

love; fellow Guardian of the Galaxy Karen Gillan

as Vic’s ill-fated partner; and Oscar winner Mira

Sorvino as Vic’s boss.

“Natalie Morales is amazing in this film; she

works so well with Dave,” Dowse says. “She effortlessly

brings a sense of history to the relationship

in the first couple of scenes and is very funny. But

also it’s nice to see this hulky guy get talked to by

his daughter like that and put in his place.

“Betty Gilpin, we’re all part of the giant pre-Oscar

campaign for her. She’s incredible, so funny—

and so great dramatically, with a pretty thankless

part stuck on a phone for most of the film. She

might be one of the funniest actors I’ve ever worked

with—her alts [alternative lines] are insane. I just

gave up giving her alts because she was so funny.

I was like, ‘You’re killing whatever I’m coming up

with. So just keep rolling.’ And Mira Sorvino was

fantastic. What a score to get her into the film.”

Disney inherited Stuber following its recent acquisition

of 20th Century Fox. Dowse says the studio

“couldn’t be more supportive of the film; they love

it.” But he’s well aware that Stuber is a rare R-rated

40 JULY 2019


elease for the Mouse

House. “I think it does

put a lot of pressure on

us. If this works, it’ll be

great. If audiences love

it as much as I do and

go out to see this film,

it’ll be a great thing for

studios to continue to

make R-rated comedies.

“I think people

want to see action

comedies that feel real

and provide everything

an action movie

would and everything

a comedy would. And

I think our movie has

one other element

that separates it from

the fray—it has a great heart to it. That’s the

trifecta you want in a successful movie. All those

movies, you really care about the characters at

the end of them—Midnight Run, specifically.

Hopefully, audiences respond to it, but we do

feel like it’s something that Disney hasn’t done

for a long time and it’s part and parcel of the

merger. Hopefully, it opens a studio’s eyes that

these movies still work, that there’s still an audience

for them in theaters.”

TAKING ACTION

Director Michael Dowse

on the Stuber set

JULY 2019

41


KELVIN HARRISON JR. PLAYS A FORMER CHILD SOLDIER

ADOPTED BY AMERICAN PARENTS IN LUCE.

PHOTO © JON PACK

42 JULY 2019


Beyond the Façade

JULIUS ONAH’S LUCE EXPLORES THE INNER TURMOIL

OF A MODEL IMMIGRANT STUDENT

BY KEVIN LALLY

>> Star athlete and brilliant debate-team

captain at his Virginia high school, 17-yearold

Luce is accomplished by any measure.

His American success story is particularly

amazing, however, because he’s a former

child soldier from Eritrea, whose life took

a positive path when he was adopted by

white couple Amy and Peter Edgar. But

there’s more to Luce than that wholesome

picture. A troubling complication is

revealed when his teacher reads an essay

he’s written that seems to condone violence,

and she subsequently finds fireworks

stored in his locker.

MAN BEHIND THE

CAMERA

Nigerian American

filmmaker Julius Onah’s

previous film was the

J.J. Abrams–produced

The Cloverfield Paradox.

Adapted from J.C. Lee’s 2013 stage play by Lee

and director Julius Onah, Luce is a gripping drama

about race, perception, and identity that, like its

lead character, keeps you continually off-balance

and uncertain where your allegiances lie from

scene to scene. For Onah, the project is particularly

personal, since he was born in Nigeria, the

son of a diplomat, and traveled the world before

settling in Arlington, Virginia, at age 10, where he

lived with his mother and siblings after his father

returned to Africa.

“I grappled with identity in many different

ways, on a number of different levels,” Onah says of

his youthful experience as a new arrival in America.

“What did it mean to be an African? What did it

mean to be an African American? What did it mean

to be an immigrant? Because of the conditions

I grew up in, there were certain moments of my

time when I had privilege, and there were certain

moments when I didn’t have privilege. Yet, in my

interactions with people, one label or another

would be the one that they chose to apply. So, as

we continue to grapple with identity in this country

in ways that are becoming much more complex, it

requires a conversation that is much more nuanced.

And that is not something that I think as a country

at large we’re quite used to yet. We’ve had these traditional

notions of what lane everybody’s supposed

to be in.”

Onah continues, “When I first read the play, I

was struck by the sophistication it had and the intelligence

with which it was grappling with identity

and this notion that we all live on a spectrum and

are more than one thing beyond what I just see. So

is everybody in this room. And as we come to grips

with that, there are truths we’re going to find, there

are things we’re going to learn about each other that

make living in the community and the idea of what

America’s supposed to represent something much

more achievable. But we’re at a moment where, regardless

of what your politics are, I don’t think that

the idea of the spectrum that we live on and the

multiplicity of identities that one person can contain

is one that anybody has quite come to terms

with yet. There are entrenched and internalized and

now outdated ideas that we still haven’t unearthed.

It was exciting, just on a social and political level,

to explore those ideas, but also to use those ideas as

the engine of a thriller that can leave the audience

on the edge of their seats. But not in the typical

JULY 2019

43


PHOTO © JON PACK

PARENTAL GUIDANCE

Peter Edgar (Tim Roth)

and Amy Edgar (Naomi

Watts) in Luce

way. There’s no blood, there’s no guts, there’s no

war—none of the things that are typical staples of a

thriller. Luce is this kid who comes from a background

of violence, growing up in a conflict zone

and witnessing death and brutality and all these

things that are not typical for a child, yet he moves

from one war zone to another one. And that’s the

psychological war zone of identity in America.”

And here’s where race and status come into play.

“Though we all are dealing with the multitudes that

we can tame, there are some of us who have more

privileges and more power in how we get to define

ourselves, how we get to wield our identities, versus

those who haven’t. That’s another part of the big

conversation we’re having in this moment: How do

we create the kind of environment where no matter

who you are, you get to have that complex and

complicated and messy inner life and not necessarily

be punished for it? Regardless of what everyone’s

politics are, there are those who get to lead a complicated,

messy lifestyle and maybe one day become

president, and there are those who don’t. And that’s

just objective truth. That’s not political slant.”

Aside from Luce, played brilliantly by the

charismatic Kelvin Harrison Jr. (It Comes at Night),

“complicated” also describes the other main characters

in the film: Amy (Naomi Watts), the compassionate

adoptive mother who is torn apart by the

accusations against her son; Peter (Tim Roth), the

father who harbors a surprising amount of regret

and bitterness; and Harriet Wilson (Oscar winner

Octavia Spencer), the teacher whose views on race

and responsibility clash with Luce’s.

“All these actors had to have a really complex

understanding of who they were and use that as

a foundation,” Onah notes, “so that even though

different sides of them were revealed in different

scenes, it still felt like it was coming from a consistent

core. You have to have this macro-level view

of your character but also be in touch with some of

the contradictions of that character when you make

a turn and do something unexpected or surprising.

It was a lot of work, and we spent about a week and

a half, which is unusual for a movie this small, but

it speaks to the commitment of the actors, who all

came in early. We went through the script and we

talked through the characters and their relationships

and their perspectives and their politics, and

really tried to have a firm grasp of where they were

coming from.”

44 JULY 2019


Luce has the potential to turn Harrison into a

star. “Kelvin is incredible,” says Onah. “I always

tell people, you’re doing a movie like this and you

have the roles of Amy and Peter and Harriet, and

there are lists you can think of, amazing people.

And luckily I got the people at the top of the list

for each one of these roles: Naomi and Octavia

were people I imagined while I was writing. Tim,

a brilliant, brilliant, legendary actor. But with the

Luce role, there’s no list of, well, who’s going to pull

off being a 17-year-old former child of violence in

Eritrea? And not just do it, but do it convincingly

across the board in terms of, what do they look

like? Can they handle the degree of language and

text and the shifts and the nuance? And Kelvin

just blew me away when I saw his audition. The

process of working with him was quite intensive.

I was a debater in high school, I ran on the track

team, so there were elements of myself I gave to the

character. Kelvin comes from an arts family, a jazz

family in New Orleans. He is not a natural athlete,

so he did a tremendous amount of work. He took

running lessons. He took basketball lessons. We

got him a dialect coach who helped him create the

speaking patterns for the character, which was based

on a real Nigerian American author. He also had to

do a lot of reading and writing to be at that intellectual

level that the character exists on. The paper he

writes in the movie references Frantz Fanon, so he

read several Frantz Fanon books—Wretched of the

Earth; Black Skin, White Masks—and he actually

wrote the paper in the movie. And Octavia Spencer,

in character, actually graded the paper.”

The tense standoff between Luce and Spencer’s

Harriet, both black, is one of the most fascinating

aspects of this provocative film. “We wanted to be

as honest as possible about how power works, or

at least in our experience how power works. I’m an

immigrant, I’m black. J.C., who wrote the play that

it’s based on, is also a person of color. So we come

from backgrounds where we’ve been subject to

power in ways that at times have been aligned with

a character like Harriet. It’s not to say that this happens

all the time, but in this set of circumstances if

she had singled out a different kid—DeShaun [a far

less privileged, harder-edged black student], he’s not

from a position of privilege and power that allows

him to bring his parents into a situation where they

can speak up for him. Despite who she thinks Luce

is, she also forgets what kind of family Luce is a

part of. And that is a big part of where she ends up

in the story.”

Naomi and Octavia

were people I

imagined while I

was writing. Tim, a

brilliant, brilliant,

legendary actor.

But with the Luce

role, there’s no

list of, well, who’s

going to pull off

being a 17-yearold

former child

of violence in

Eritrea? And not

just do it, but do it

convincingly across

the board in terms

of, what do they

look like? Can they

handle the degree

of language and

text and the shifts

and the nuance?

And Kelvin just

blew me away

when I saw his

audition.

Yet another topical element in the film is its

subplot about Stephanie Kim (Andrea Bang), a

student whose response to a gang sexual assault

may startle audiences. “We saw it as an honest

reflection yet again of power, and the messiness and

the complexity of how a human being can behave.

There are going to be people who want a story to

conform to their ideas of how the world works. But

if we want to truthfully grapple with these really

difficult issues, we also have to contend with the

fact that there is no one-size-fits-all truth to the way

people behave. You can have an individual who

goes through an authentic, real trauma react in a

way that is complex and messy—and that does not

diminish the truth of their trauma.

“One of the most telling moments for me was

when we were screening the movie and a woman

who worked with teenage abuse victims stood up

and said, ‘This is one of the few times I’ve watched

a movie that reflected honestly the way some young

women I counsel behave.’ There’s a tendency in

these types of stories to sanitize behavior. … But

we also have to be willing to deal with people who

might do things that we don’t like.”

Onah says he’s been “a massive fan” of Naomi

Watts since Mulholland Drive. “What was so great

was the degree of preparation she brings. She asked:

Where are the white papers on adoptions from

Eritrea? Luckily, I was able to provide those to her,

because we really tried to do our homework. Part of

what is so appealing about the story for me, aside

from all these other issues we’re talking about, is the

element of parenting and the notion that you never

know the entirety of who your child might become,

what your child might be doing when they leave

the house. But as a parent, your love for them still

has to stay unconditional. How far would you go to

protect somebody you love? What would you do in

the face of somebody who is threatening everything

you’ve built? Naomi came with a keen understanding

of that. I’m not a parent myself and neither is

J.C., so we can write what feels emotionally true,

but to live it on-screen has to come from somebody

who either has incredible empathy and understanding

or has lived a version of it themselves. And with

Naomi we were lucky to have both.”

As for Spencer, “I’d always been really impressed

with Octavia. And then I saw her do something

that was like, wow, OK, there’s so much to this

woman. It was in Bong Joon-ho’s film Snowpiercer.

You’ve seen some of the roles she’s done in Hollywood

films, and then you see her do a complete

JULY 2019

45


PHOTO © JON PACK

180 in that and you’re just like: What?! OK, I’ve got

to work with this person. It takes real bravery to not

just walk in one lane and say: All right, I’ve won an

Oscar. She’s making such incredibly brave choices.”

Rising specialty distributor Neon opens Luce in

theaters on August 2, and Onah is hoping people

go out of their way to see his film in a cinema.

“For me, there’s no greater community than when

people come to watch a movie in a movie theater.

That’s my ultimate sense of community. I love all

kinds of things. I love music, I love going to an

art exhibit, but the theater for me is everything—

probably even more so than church, even though

I was raised Catholic. Because you never know

who’s going to walk into that room, and there’s an

egalitarian environment that’s created there that

is different from just about any other art form,

because it is still a popular art. It was very important

for me that this was a story that people could

experience in a theater and as they walk out of

it wonder: Well, what did the person next to me

think? What did the person next to me feel? How

am I looking at the person next to me? Hopefully

a little bit differently and not jumping to the same

conclusions about who I think they are or where I

think they may be coming from.”

Luce is Onah’s third feature, following The Girl

Is in Trouble (2015) and The Cloverfield Paradox

(2018). How does he feel he’s fared as that rarity,

a Nigerian American director? “Look, it’s hard for

every filmmaker. Obviously, as a filmmaker of color,

I’d always been really

impressed with Octavia

[Spencer, above].

And then I saw her

do something that

was like, wow, OK,

there’s so much to

this woman. It was in

Bong Joon-ho’s film

Snowpiercer. You’ve

seen some of the

roles she’s done in

Hollywood films, and

then you see her do a

complete 180 in that

and you’re just like:

What?! OK … It takes

real bravery to not

just walk in one lane

and say: All right, I’ve

won an Oscar.

there are fewer doors historically that have been

open. There are still fewer doors that are open now.

But we are clearly in a moment where I think people

are seeking new voices. The challenge for me has

always been authenticity. I moved to America when

I was 10 years old. I grew up on four different continents.

My American experience was being raised

by Nigerian parents who were not American. So

there’s a specificity to my point of view and where

I come from. And to try to bring that into storytelling,

it also doesn’t conform to boxes that people

want to put you in or the lane you’re supposed to

travel. Luce has been a really gratifying and in many

ways beautiful moment for me, because it’s the

first film I’ve gotten the opportunity to make that

allowed me to bring my experiences, my ideas, in

a way that was uncompromised to the storytelling.

I can only hope I get a chance to tell more stories

like this.

“I was lucky to go to film school at NYU. There

are people from China; there are people who are

also from Nigeria. There are people who are from

parts of Europe. And I think a lot of us who are

young voices, who want to tell stories left of center,

are all trying to find a way to get those stories out

there and hopefully provide an alternative from the

status quo, which at times can be fun and exciting.

But I really do think to move the conversation

culturally forward, we have to have things beyond

just the most recognizable, easily digestible brand or

franchise that we’ve already seen.”

46 JULY 2019


Bad Boys

CLAUDIO GIOVANNESI’S PIRANHAS GOES INSIDE

THE TEENAGE CRIME GANG THAT RULED NAPLES

BY KEVIN LALLY

>> It’s shocking but true: In central Naples, recent crime

activities—extortion, drug-dealing, blood vendettas—have been

ruled not by veteran mafiosi but by an ambitious band of teenage

boys. That brazen young gang’s rise inspired Piranhas, the first

novel by Roberto Saviano, author of Gomorrah, the acclaimed

nonfiction exposé of Naples’s criminal underworld that became an

equally celebrated 2008 film by Matteo Garrone.

ENSEMBLE CAST IN PIRANHAS

LUCA NACARLO AND FRANCESCO DI NAPOLI

PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSIC BOX FILMS PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSIC BOX FILMS

Now, Piranhas has become a feature

film directed by Claudio Giovannesi,

scheduled for U.S. release by Music Box

Films on August 2. The movie made its

world premiere at the 2019 Berlin Film

Festival, where Giovannesi, Saviano, and

Maurizio Braucci shared the Silver Bear

for Best Screenplay. The cast is made up

of nonprofessionals, headed by charismatic

discovery Francesco di Napoli as the

calculating yet naïve leader of the scruffy

crew. In subtle increments, these boys

evolve from wide-eyed strivers looking to

make enough money to impress girls and

afford bottle service at the local nightclub

to amoral hotheads embracing a life of

corruption and violence.

We met with Giovannesi the day after

Piranhas screened as the opening-night

attraction of Film at Lincoln Center’s

annual Open Roads series of new Italian

films. Our thanks to his adept translator,

Lilia Pina Blouin.

How did you find your actors?

The casting was the most important

part of the film, because we actually saw

4,000 kids in order to select eight. What

we were after were three things in particular.

On the one hand, we wanted kids

that were very familiar with the neigh-

PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSIC BOX FILMS

DIRECTOR CLAUDIO GIOVANNESI

borhood, who had firsthand knowledge

of the issues that the film was about. And

then we wanted kids with acting talent,

because it wasn’t about just memorizing

lines and spitting them out—they

needed to be kids that didn’t perceive

the presence of the camera. And then we

needed innocent faces, because the film is

about the loss of innocence. We wanted

that to be at the forefront.

I understand they never saw the

complete screenplay. Would you give

them just the day’s scenes?

Yes. Because they didn’t need to act the

scenes, they needed to live them. Day by

day they would discover what would happen.

The structure is a very simple one, a

rise-and-fall story, so they experienced the

rise part with the euphoria, the ambition,

the joy of success and the birth of friendships,

and then the fall part. Meanwhile,

they were becoming friends in real life. So

when they discovered what was happening,

they would say, “Oh no, really?” The

friendship was real, the love was real, and

they only found out how the movie was

ending when it ended.

The performances in the film are so

natural. Can you talk about working

with these young nonprofessionals and

how you’ve coaxed these performances

out of them?

The objective of each scene is for it

to come off as authentic. And there are

techniques for that. The first thing I

48 JULY 2019


taught them is not to feel the presence

of the camera, to forget the camera. It is

important for us to stick to the authenticity

of the feelings, not the words as such.

The words, if we don’t use them, it’s even

better. It’s better for the feelings to be at

the forefront and to come across. And in

order to do that, we do many, many takes.

Also, it was very helpful for them to shoot

in chronological order.

So Roberto Saviano was OK with that

process of not sticking strictly to the

script?

Well, we did stick to the script. It’s

just there was more freedom in terms of

the dialogue. But, having said that, we

wrote the dialogue with them [to capture]

the way they speak, their language.

And actually, in Italy it was released in a

subtitled version because they speak in

the Neapolitan dialect. Roberto, when

we moved on with the project, became

a co-screenwriter, and he had a lot of

respect for my choices.

So at least in terms of the dialogue,

it was a fluid thing that changed day

to day ...

Yes, they were by all means fluid,

they could change [the words]. What

couldn’t change were the objectives of

the scene, the conflicts that the characters

were going through. As far as the

dialogues were concerned, more than

changing them I tried to cut them, because

what mattered to me was not the

words as such but the looks, the gazes,

the relationships of the characters.

Do you have a personal connection to

this material?

No, not at all, because I live in Rome.

I had to get to know that area of Naples,

so I got a place there and I lived there

for two years. I had to get to know those

kids, because that is a place where, for a

lot of kids of that age, that life is the only

option. When I was 14 years old, my issue

was that I needed to choose what high

school to go to, whereas they have to go

to work in a place where there are no real

jobs, and therefore their option is to make

a lot more money with a criminal career.

And this is not just in Naples; it happens

in a lot of places in the Western world.

Did you know Roberto Saviano

beforehand?

Yes, because I had directed two episodes

of the “Gomorrah” TV series. That’s

when I met him. However, that’s a very

different kind of product. It’s a genre TV

series, a noir crime story. But back then,

he offered me his book and we decided

that I would work in a different way,

focusing on the fragility and the feelings

part of these kids’ experience. He welcomed

that approach and that’s how we

moved forward.

So is that highlighted more in the film

than it is in the novel?

Yes, that is the main shift between the

book and the movie. The film is about

fragility, it’s about the characters’ feelings,

whereas the book was more about the rise

to power, the power struggle. We wanted

to work on feelings and emotions and

place that at the center.

What do you hope audiences will take

away from this film?

This film puts human beings at the

center. Empathy with the characters for

me is the main goal. I didn’t want to make

a movie about criminals, but about kids,

about teenagers. And so it places empathy

with the kids’ feelings at the forefront—

these characters can be anyone’s kids or

brothers. When the viewer walks out

with that kind of empathy in them, it

means that I’ve conveyed what I wanted

to convey.

There are only three films in the

Open Roads series that have U.S.

distributors. What does it mean to you

that American audiences are going to

see this film in theaters?

It’s a great satisfaction for me. I’m

really into American independent films.

I admire filmmakers such as Scorsese

and Cassavetes—they were fundamental

PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSIC BOX FILMS

PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSIC BOX FILMS

to my upbringing. And therefore, being

part of that is a great honor. This can be

considered a European product because

it’s a co-production with France, and you

don’t get enough European cinema in this

country, so it’s great.

Can you talk a little bit about the

climate in Italy for filmmakers? How

difficult is it?

The problem in Italy is that we have

issues with culture as such. We’ve had

20 years of a government, the Berlusconi

government, that saw culture as an

enemy. When people are not educated

and culture isn’t held in high regard,

people become easier to control. Our

big problem is that the value of culture

is not recognized and it is not supported

by institutions. Therefore, cinema has

FRANCESCO DI NAPOLI AND VIVIANA APREA

FRANCESCO DI NAPOLI, LUCA NACARLO, AND VIVIANA APREA

been deeply affected in a negative way by

this attitude—only comedies were seen

as something that could be shown, because

only entertainment mattered. We

need to get out of this frame of mind,

and it is vital for us to create cinema that

can be relevant, not just for Italy, but for

Europe and in this case for the rest of

the world as well.

JULY 2019

49


50 JULY 2019


In 1944, a small group of 20 businesspeople in the popcorn-popping

business founded an organization then named the National Association

of Popcorn Manufacturers. Those humble beginnings would take the

organization through several name changes and would reflect the rapidly

growing business of food-and-beverage concessions in the size and diversity

of its membership over the next 75 years.

This small group has grown into a worldwide membership encompassing all

types of concession supplies and operators from venues large and small, all

working together to promote and professionalize the recreation and leisuretime

food-and-beverage concession industry.

Through all the years and changes, the heart of the association is its members,

volunteer leaders who guided policy and growth, companies who have

provided financial support for programs and services, and members who have

faithfully attended events and promoted the benefits of membership.

– continued on page 52 –

JULY 2019

51


1944

October 27 was the founding of the National

Association of Popcorn Manufacturers,

whose primary purpose, as defined

in the constitution and by-laws, was,

“Advancing the general interest of popcorn

manufacturers in all categories of the

popcorn industry throughout the U.S.”

1947

Four hundred people attended the National

Association of Popcorn Manufacturers

Convention. The association publication,

Popcorn Merchandiser, discussed planting

tips, yields, proper maintenance of popping

equipment, and strategies to promote the

consumption of popcorn.

THE

HISTORY

OF NAC

1950

The popcorn industry was facing a shortage of

corn and oil during World War II and was plagued

by government restrictions. The newly formed

association made it possible to oppose a ruling in

Washington that would have placed popcorn on the

list of nonessential agricultural products.

Women served on the association board as early as

1950.

Timeline courtesy

of NAC. This story

originally appeared in

the Spring 2019 issue

of Concession Profession.

The determining factor was research that revealed

popcorn has more energy value than over 1,000

other food products. During that same period, and

in cooperation with the government, the association

helped police against black marketing and priceceiling

violations.

TRUE FACT

A loaf of bread

cost 10 cents

52

JULY 2019


1952

A series of one-day regional educational meetings was

held across North America. These meetings continue

to this day, providing quality educational opportunities

for members and their employees who may not

be able to attend an annual national convention.

1953

On October 26, the National Association of Popcorn

Manufacturers became the International Popcorn

Association. By this time

members included all types

of concession suppliers,

popcorn processors, seed

producers, distributors,

equipment manufacturers,

brokers, concessionaires,

and retail popcorn shops.

1954

The association partnered with the theater industry

in relationships with the Theatre Owners of America

(TOA), which merged

with the Allied States

Association of Motion

Pictures Exhibitors

to form the National

Association of Theatre

Owners (NATO).

Conventions and trade

show were held jointly

with NATO and the

International Cinema

Technology Association

(ICTA). NAC managed

the NATO “Supershow”

at their fall convention

for over 30 years. These

joint conventions were

the direct precursors to

what would become ShoWest

and eventually CinemaCon.

1955

On November 15 the International Popcorn

Association became the Popcorn and Concessions

Association.

TRUE FACT

a movie ticket

cost 70 cents

TRUE FACT

A new car

in 1955 cost

$1,900

TRUE FACT

Queen Elizabeth II

crowned queen of

England

JULY 2019

53


TRUE FACT

A black-and-white

TV cost $99

1955

One more name change made the organization the

National Association of Concessionaires.

TRUE FACT

The Soviet Union

launched the first

woman into space

1963

The NAC office asked members to forward their

newly created zip codes to expedite member mail.

1970

NAC Convention education sessions included the

Wonderful World of Food Service Disposables,

Client’s View of Arena Feeding, and Packing and

Display for Impulse Sales.

1973

Charles (Chuck) Winans joined the association in

1973 and was appointed executive director in 1974

after the retirement of Louis Abramson.

54 JULY 2019


1974

The first ShoWest convention was held in San Diego.

The idea was conceptualized in 1973 by then NAC

president Al Lapidus and members of the western

affiliates of NATO during a regional NAC/NATO or

Oregon and Washington convention.

1982

The first Snack Bar University educational conference

was held in Chicago, The event was the idea of NAC

president Vern Ryles, who wanted NAC to have its

own educational gathering separate from those

shared conventions with the movie industry. The

annual event grew, added a trade show component,

and became known as the NAC Convention,

the forerunner to today’s NAC Concession and

Hospitality Expo.

1984

The association held its first Al Lapidus Classic

charity golf event in Las Vegas to align with the first

day of ShoWest. NAC members combined with other

motion picture industry representatives to raise

money for The Variety Boys and Girls Club of Los

Angeles, The Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers

Foundation, and NAC educational programs.

TRUE FACT

Washington state’s

Mount St. Helens

blows its top

NAC presented Siskel and Ebert (below) in a

concession program at the ShoWest Convention.

1985

The Concessionaire of the Year Award was instituted

and then renamed the Bert Nathan Memorial Award

after the passing of former NAC president Bert

Nathan. It is given annually at the ShoWest Theatre

Convention, now called CinemaCon, to an NAC

member in the theater concessions business.

TRUE FACT

Freddie Mercury and

Queen perform at

Live Aid

JULY 2019

55


TRUE FACT

Average U.S.

income was $24,350

1986

The association played an active role in the

inception of ShowEast by promoting attendance

and booth sales.

1999

NAC debuted NAConline.org.

The first executive concession manager certification

course was held in California. The two-day course,

written and taught by NAC director of education

Shelley Feldman, was open to graduates of the

concession manager certification program and dealt

with issues related to executive-level concessions,

including RFPs and negotiating.

TRUE FACT

Mike Tyson became

the youngest heavyweight

champ

1987

The first NAC concession manager certification

class was held, taught by speaker T. Scott Gross.

The class was based upon

the textbook Recreational

Foodservice Management

by the late Mickey

Warner, Ph.D. Subsequent

courses were taught

by Warner and Shelley

Feldman, the NAC’s then

director of education.

This course is now taught

by Larry Etter, CCM, the

current NAC director of

education. Over 1,500

concession professionals

have earned the CCM

credential since 1987.

2001

The NAC Mickey Warner Award was instituted,

named for the father of NAC certification programs

and honoring outstanding accomplishment, service,

and leadership in the non-theater concessions

industry. Shelley Feldman was the first recipient of

the award, which is given annually at the NAC Expo.

2002

The first Spanish-language concession manager

certification course was held in Mexico City. The

NAC workbook and tests were translated into

Spanish and the course was taught by Feldman with

simultaneous translation into Spanish. NAC regional

vice president Damian Piza, CCM, was instrumental

in translating the course and bringing it to Mexico.

56 JULY 2019


TRUE FACT

Average U.S.

income per year

is $50,823

TRUE FACT

Pirates of the

Caribbean: At World’s

End is year’s

top film

TRUE FACT

In-state college

tuition is $6,585

per year

2007

The association

elects its first woman

president, Maria Angles,

ECM (left).

2008

The NAC’s LinkedIn

account, established by Mark Hamilton, ACE, gives

the association its first social media channel.

2009

With an initial donation by then-NAC president Maria

Angles, ECM, the President’s

Convention Scholarship

is created to provide a

scholarship package each

year to the NAC annual

convention. It is now

called the President’s Expo

Scholarship.

Facebook becomes the

second social media tool.

The account is established

by Mike Ritta, ECM.

2011

ShoWest becomes

CinemaCon and debuts

in April. NAC continues

its affiliation by promoting attendance and booth

sales, as well as providing educational content and

hosting its own booth. The Al Lapidus Classic Golf

Event continues on the first day of the convention.

The association also uses this gathering to honor its

Bert Nathan Memorial recipient at the All-Industry

Breakfast and hold board and committee meetings

for the Sunday prior.

2012

NAC Weekly News makes its debut as a weekly communication

vehicle. This member email features timely

media coverage excerpts concerning the industry and

NAC announcements. Members now have another

avenue to advertise to their fellow members.

The association moves its home office from 35 E.

Wacker Drive to 180 N. Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

The NAC Government Relations Committee is formed

to work in conjunction with allied industry association

partners to provide trending information pertinent

to the concession and hospitality community while

advocating a sound and factual industry perspective

on legislative and regulatory issues.

2013

The Krystal La Reese-Gaule NAC Annual Membership

Award is established in memory of former NAC

board member and industry friend Krystal La Reese-

Gaule, ECM (below), who passed away due to illness

in early 2013.

The association launches a new and improved

naconline.org website on September 12. This is the

first major upgrade to the site since the original was

launched in 1999.

Daniel Borschke (left) joins the association as

executive director in October, following the

retirement of Chuck Winans after 35 years of service.

58 JULY 2019


TRUE FACT

The XXII Olympic

Winter Games are

held in Sochi

TRUE FACT

17-year-old Malala

Yousafzai

wins the Nobel

Peace Prize

2014

NAC releases the findings of an industry data initiative.

The online survey is conducted in early 2014 in

affiliation with and by Florida International University

Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management.

In April, NAC establishes its third social media

channel, this time joining the Twitter universe.

2016

NAC forms a new Outreach Committee. This group

is formed to enrich NAC’s long-standing mission:

“To provide our members with information and

services that maintain and enhance the standards of

excellence and professionalism within the recreation

and leisure time food, beverage, and related services

industry.” The committee co-chairs are Denise de

Zutter and Shelly Olesen, ACS.

The association announces that its new tagline will

be, “Where Food Meets Fun.” Association members

vote on four potential taglines before and during the

NAC Concession & Hospitality Expo in Minneapolis.

Shelly Olesen, ACS, submitted the winning idea.

In November, director of education Larry Etter,

CCM, and NAC president Terry Conlon, ECM,

travel to Buenos Aires, Argentina, to present three

seminars to Vista, the 7th Regional Convention of the

Cinematographic Industry operated by Ultracine.

TRUE FACT

Hamilton breaks

Broadway ticket sales

records

2015

The association hosts “The How-To-Guide for

Compliance with the FDA

Menu Labeling Regulations

Webinar,” conducted by

Claudine J. Kavanaugh, Ph.D.,

MPH, R.D., of the U.S. Food

and Drug Administration (FDA).

The Joe Chabot Memorial

Expo Scholarship is

established in honor and

memory of NAC board

member Joe Chabot, who

passed away unexpectedly.

NAC also renamed its annual

silent auction as the Joe

Chabot Memorial Silent

Auction, benefiting the NAC

Education Fund.

TRUE FACT

American Ashton

Eaton wins Olympic

gold in the

decathlon

60 JULY 2019


2017

NAC conducts its first concession manager

certification (CCM) online course for the 2017 spring

semester. Online students join a class that is already

being conducted for students on the University of

Memphis campus.

In October, NAC collaborates with ShowEast on

ShowEast.EDU to bring in-depth programming with a

focus on food and beverage, restaurant equipment,

and kitchen and bar design in the industry.

In December, NAC announces the formation of a

Future Leaders Committee to identify and develop

emerging leaders within the industry and the NAC

membership in upcoming years.

2018

The NAC Charity Golf Outing (formerly known as

the Al Lapidus Classic) announces a rebrand and an

expansion in the lineup of beneficiaries.

An Instagram account is established by Jacquilyn

Davis of Cinemark USA, co-chair of the newly formed

Future Leaders Committee. This the fourth NAC

social media channel.

NAC BOARD PRESIDENTS

THROUGH THE YEARS

1944–1945 W.T. Hawkins

1945–1946 Oliver Koeneman

1946–1948 Fred J. Meyer

1948–1949 Paul H. Rice

1949–1951 Harry McNamara

1951–1952 Leonard Japp

1952–1953 William Beaudot

1953–1954 Oliver Koeneman

1954–1955 J.J. Fitzgibbons Jr.

1955–1957 Bert Nathan

1957–1959 Lee Koken

1959–1960 Philip L. Lowe

1960–1962 Spiro J. Papas

1962–1964 Augie J. Schmitt

1964–1966 Edward S. Redstone

1966–1968 Jack O’Brien

1968–1971 Julian Lefkowitz

1971–1973 Andrew S. Berwick Jr.

1973–1975 Harold F. Chesler

1975–1977 Al Lapidus

1977–1979 Paul Mezzy

1979–1981 Philip M. “Perry” Lowe

1981–1983 Vernon B. Ryles Jr.

1983–1985 Shelley Feldman

1985–1987 Douglas E. Larson

1987–1989 Jack Leonard

1989–1991 Vince Pantuso

1991–1994 William P. Rector

1994–1997 David R. Scoco

1997–1999 Norman R. Chesler

1999–2001 Skip Stefansen

2001–2003 Gary Horvath

2003–2005 Chris Bigelow

2005–2007 Larry Etter, CCM

2007–2009 Maria Angles, ECM

2009–2011 Ronald P. Kruger III

2011–2013 John Evans Jr.

2013–2015 Jeff Scudillo

2015–2017 Terry Conlon, ECM

2017–2019 Andrew Cretors

JULY 2019

61


NAC 75TH ANNIVERSARY

BY KEVIN LALLY

IN THE ARENA

NAC SALUTES LEXINGTON

CENTER’S BRIAN MCMILLIN

WITH MICKEY WARNER

AWARD

BRIAN MCMILLIN

>> Anyone who works in the movie exhibition business knows

that today’s operational challenges are greater than ever,

especially with so many complexes offering more than a dozen

screens, a selection of VIP, large-format, and 4-D auditoriums,

event cinema programming, and tempting dine-in menus.

But consider the challenges at an operation like the Lexington

Center in Lexington, Kentucky, whose venues include the Rupp

Arena, the Lexington Convention Center, and the Lexington Opera

House. Attractions there run the gamut from concerts by Paul

McCartney and Garth Brooks to productions of West Side Story and

An American in Paris to University of Kentucky men’s basketball to

the Kentucky Reptile Expo and “The Price Is Right Live!”

An essential member of the executive team is

Brian McMillin, concessions manager since 1997.

McMillin will be honored with the National

Association of Concessionaires’ 2019 Mickey

Warner Award, which is presented each year at

the NAC Concession & Hospitality Expo to an

outstanding leader in the non-theater concessions

industry. Named after the late Mickey Warner,

father of the NAC Concession Manager Certification

Program, the honor for McMillin is

especially appropriate, since he currently serves

as treasurer of NAC and is a past regional vice

president. He earned NAC’s concession manager

certification in 1996, and completed his executive

concession manager certification in 2007. He has

been with the Lexington Center since 1990, when

he was hired as assistant manager.

For McMillin, the most intense service demands

are at the Rupp Arena. “We do more bar

and snack stuff at our performing-arts venue,

and for our exhibit halls we are a little more laid

back—flea markets, trade shows, things like that.

But in the arena you’ll get 23,000-plus people

for U.K. basketball and 15 to 18,000 for some

really big concerts. It’s very time sensitive. At a

U.K. game, you’ve got 23,000 people lined up

at concession stands all over the facility with like

five minutes before tip-off, and you’re wondering

how are you going to get through all these folks.

And 10 minutes later, everyone is inside watching

the game. And then at intermission you’ve got 20

minutes. Same thing. You’ve got a ton of people

out and, again, they’re lined up as far as the eye

can see. And then, shortly after the second half

commences, nobody.

“One of our big challenges here has been that,

back when the building was designed, nobody

thought freshmen at a college basketball game

was a big thing. It was more about watching the

games. We’ve seen that turn to facilities having

bigger, more expanded menus. We have never

gotten into any type of fire-suppression exhaust

system—we are very much ‘heat and eat here’

62 JULY 2019


across the board. About 20 years ago, you started

seeing more upscale concessions, especially in

buildings with basketball or hockey at the major

league level. And you see that starting to creep

into colleges as well when they’re building newer

facilities. And that has also crept into the theater

end of things with your Alamo Drafthouses

and Movie Taverns. There’s a large contingent

of smaller regional and independent folks that

may have a hard time competing. They just got

done moving to digital, and now to compete with

some of these guys, you’ve got to have something

a little more than just popcorn and soft drinks.

But there’s a lot of heat-and-eat stuff out there. It

doesn’t require huge capital investments.”

McMillin recalls, “I was assistant manager, and

then I took over when the manager retired a little

over 20 years ago. We’ve gone through one major

renovation where we increased our points of sale

by about 20 percent. That requires more personnel

to supervise, manage, hire, and find, and bigger,

more complex points of sale. Then, in an effort to

expand what we were able to offer, we started partnering

with folks like Chick-fil-A, some barbecue

places, Gold Star Chili, and a few others to get

higher perceived quality name-brand items. They

had a level of expertise that we don’t possess. We

do 60 to 80 arena events a year, and that makes it

really hard to find people if that’s all you’re doing.

It’s very hard to find people that actually do food

service, because we are a small college town. I

mean, it’s not that small anymore, but the big high

point has always been U.K. basketball or events

in the Rupp Arena that drive people into the city.

While there are a ton of restaurants, bars, and

other establishments in the area that are utilizing

all the really good waitstaff in that particular industry,

they can’t take 40, 50 nights off from their

real gig and come here, because they’ll lose that

slot. So we rely on a lot of people for whom this is

their second or first part-time job to go with their

full-time, 40-hour job. We have schoolteachers,

we’ve got people in the hospital industry and other

office environments who come down here for U.K.

basketball for four or five hours in the evening or

rock concerts, and it’s quite the challenge.”

Unlike movie theaters, where so many teenagers

get their first professional work experience, “my

median employee age is in the 50s,” McMillin

notes. “We have a lot of folks who are retired or

The NAC has been

just been fantastic. I

started attending as

an assistant manager

and I learned pretty

quickly about the educational

programs,

the networking, the

trade show. I could

justify going because

I could always pick

up a new method of

doing something or a

new product, so that

it would easily pay

for itself.

empty nesters who are picking up money for their

kids’ college or added insurance when they start

driving. And it’s a big social thing for a lot of the

folks—they meet people here. They’ll be retired

from their regular gig and still come down here

and work events. So it skews older, which makes

it challenging to hire younger folks. Our younger

folks are about 20 and up, because we serve

alcohol. Legally, we can hire [younger] people, but

it really pigeonholes them into what they can do.

And what we find with some of the younger kids

is they don’t hang out very long, because it’s so hit

or miss.”

Food service at an arena requires a certain

temperament, McMillin observes. “There’s a

lot of hurry up and wait, because you’re setting

everything up for this huge, intense rush in traffic

and then it dies for an hour and you’re kind of

reloading. It’s very hard to keep people constantly

engaged during that stage of the game. During

University of Kentucky basketball, people go, ‘Hey,

I must go and check out some of the game.’ And

if it’s enthralling enough, you might not see them

again!” he says, laughing. “At movie theaters you

have all these repeat showings and it’s probably a

little easier for somebody to sneak in and watch.

But here it’s a little challenging. We tell folks when

they come here that at least they’re going to get

to be a part of it, they’ll get to hear the concert,

or they’ll be able to say they were at Rupp Arena

when the University of Kentucky won and went on

to win the national championship.”

Unlike many other entertainment destinations,

the Lexington Center faces some practical limitations,

McMillin readily admits. “We’re a 45-yearold

building, and our concession stands are very

fixed and there’s not much we can do to add. It’s

an old concourse design, so the bigger the event,

the fewer portables we can actually put out because

of the travel space and exiting capability. We don’t

have any dining areas—it’s all stuff you have to be

able to take in and basically put on your lap. We

have to bear that in mind. We can’t get too complex

with food, because the way our seating is set

up, if somebody’s sitting in the middle, everybody’s

got to stand up to let him through. So it’s very

challenging. I really applaud what theaters are doing—plenty

of aisle space you can walk through.”

But change is coming to the Lexington Center

with the construction of a new convention center.

JULY 2019

63


NAC 75TH ANNIVERSARY

NEW KENTUCKY HOME

Artist’s rendering of the

new Lexington Convention

Center

It will partially open

toward the end of the

year and be completed

in fall 2021. “It’s going

to include three clubs

for the University of

Kentucky and us to

utilize,” McMillin

notes. “They’ll all have

a finer dining type

thing where you come

in a couple of hours before the game and get more

restaurant-quality food, a little deeper menu. And

that may actually help us out a little bit, because

then we may be able to reduce some of our reliance

on trying to cater to as many people with hamburgers

and barbecue chicken.” McMillin estimates

the new clubs will take several thousand people off

that crowded concourse.

Asked about his most memorable arena events,

McMillin responds, “The Paul McCartney concert

probably takes the cake. That was not too shabby.

We did a two-day run of Garth Brooks shows, two

shows each, which were nearly sold out, which

created a huge infrastructure problem in the city

of Lexington because you’re going to park 18,000

people for a six o’clock show, and then park another

equal-size number three hours later and flip the

building in between. And Mr. Brooks likes to do

the encores, so everybody’s kind of sweating. But

we were able to pull it off. And the first University

of Kentucky basketball games, although that was

29 years ago, still stick out in my mind. When

you get 23,000 people teeming into downtown

Lexington into this little block and into the arena,

it’s pretty memorable.”

He also cites an annual show called “Winter

Jam.” “It’s a non-ticketed event, a Christian rock

music show. The kids get here at six in the morning

and stand in line because it’s all general admission,

and we’ll have 12 to 15,000 by about three o’clock

in the afternoon. We line them up from the front

door out into our back parking lot, and they take

up about a third of the lot. And since they’ve stood

in line all day, they come to eat!”

McMillin has been active at NAC from the

beginning, and he has high praise for the organization

and its annual Expo. “The NAC has just been

fantastic. I started attending as an assistant manager

and I learned pretty quickly about the educational

programs, the networking, the trade show. I could

justify going because I could always pick up a new

method of doing something or a new product, so

that it would easily pay for itself. There was always a

return on the investment in it. I took their certified

concessions manager course. It helped me to be able

to train my assistants. After that, I got the executive

concessions management certificate. And that was

great because I learned a little bit more about what

goes on beyond my little world. They always have

great speakers and great programming at the convention.

And the networking is fantastic because

you can meet with a bunch of people that are as

crazy as you are and share a common experience,

and you realize you’re not the only guy in the world

that’s got these issues. It could be some theater folks

or parks-and-recreation folks with similar types of

needs and problems or experiences.”

He adds, “Being from the convention side, I

know what it takes to put on one of those shows. It’s

interesting to see how everything comes off so seamlessly

for everyone in attendance at the NAC Expo.”

McMillin says he regularly attends films at his

local Regal and Malco theaters and enjoys the experience.

“The larger chains are doing a really great

job with how they’re presenting everything. I think

it’s fantastic. But they just need to keep pushing

it. I think for even the smaller guys, they need to

take a look at upping their game in the food end

of things. If you can get somebody to buy pizza

or a new item, it’ll pick you up a little bit of extra

money. It provides a little more incentive for somebody

to not have to make a second stop during the

moviegoing experience. But nothing beats getting

to see a movie on the big screen—there’s always

that. As long as there’s a great presentation of it, it’s

fantastic. I love going—it’s a much more special

event now than it used to be.”

So what does this veteran concessions executive

snack on when he’s at the movies? “Popcorn, without

a doubt. That’s how I measure a good movie

theater. My popcorn plant for the arena is just

across the hall from my office—I make a run and

get a bowl all day. And when I go to a movie theater,

my wife and I will get the popcorn and twodrink

special and it’s great to be able to say, ‘Well,

gee, this tastes like it was popped yesterday—or

that’s popped fresh.’ That, and my other big one is

Twizzlers. I get them because it’s a nice-sized pack

and it’s not something I’ll go through really quick.

I did the Reese’s Pieces and the M&Ms, and they’re

gone before the pre-show is finished.”

64 JULY 2019


NAC 75TH ANNIVERSARY

BY DANIEL LORIA

EXPANDED MENU,

EXPANDING

FOOTPRINT

STUDIO MOVIE GRILL’S

BRIAN SCHULTZ LEANS IN

TO THE GUEST EXPERIENCE

How does your mission statement, “opening

hearts and minds,” resonate beyond a motto

and seep into your company culture?

Our philosophy is based on Win Five, our five

stakeholders: our team, our guests, our community,

our vendors, and our investors. In every

decision we make, we balance all five stakeholders.

If one of those stakeholders is losing at the expense

of another, it creates a problem in the long term.

We keep this in mind in every decision, including

our living wage initiative, to make sure everyone

on our team is fairly compensated.

Too often, our industry is affected by this

extraction mode: How can we get more money out

of somebody? How can we take more and pay less?

I really wish it was more about increasing the pot.

How can we actually create a great experience for

more moviegoers?

BRIAN SCHULTZ

>> A pioneer of the dine-in cinema concept since its launch

in 1993, Studio Movie Grill (SMG) has grown into one of the

most influential cinema circuits in the United States. Placing

13th on Boxoffice’s annual Giants of Exhibition list of North

America’s largest cinema circuits by screen count, SMG currently

operates more than 30 locations in the United States. In April,

the circuit announced an ambitious expansion plan with a $100

million investment from TowerBrook Capital Partners. The

announcement came on the heels of two new initiatives from

the dine-in chain: a new loyalty program, SMG Access, with an

approach tied to outreach, and plans for the launch of its own

in-house subscription service.

Boxoffice caught up with Brian Schultz, founder and CEO of

Studio Movie Grill, to get an update on the state of the company

and deeper insights into the changes in store for the iconic

movie eatery.

Now that the dine-in concept is more familiar

to consumers, is it easier to enter new

markets?

We spent a lot of time selling the concept. Now,

unless we’re going to a new city, there’s already a

built-in familiarity with in-theater dining. One of

the fun things about our new location, SMG Sunset

Walk in Orlando, is that it’s doing a good job of

seeding the market; as people come from vacation,

they return with an exposure to what we do.

How did you decide to pursue such an

ambitious expansion?

We hit a tipping point for growth, of understanding

exactly who we are and how we could

lean into our mission of opening hearts and minds,

one story at a time. I believe in the evolution of

any concept, and as leaders and innovators of

in-theater dining, we always go back to asking

ourselves: What does the guest really need? Going

back to 1993, when I started with warm beer and

frozen chicken tenders, it’s great to see how far you

66 JULY 2019


can take the concept by fine-tuning and developing

it. There’s always the danger of going too

far—serving sushi or other hand-crafted meals, for

example—so it’s really about figuring out a sweet

spot where you can deliver a unique service.

I started asking myself, what does Studio

Movie Grill do that is important and different?

Why should we even exist? In 2018, I was hitting

a point where it was my 25th year doing this.

Half my life has been invested in this concept,

and it was a good time to reflect on the future.

We stepped back and asked ourselves if it was a

good time to sell and start a new chapter. We also

considered if this was a good time to look at what

we were doing and explore what the next evolution

could be.

Some dine-in circuits did sell during that time.

What convinced you to stay and go all-in on an

expansion?

I love this business. I think what we’re doing

is really important. As I looked at other opportunities,

I realized we can create a positive wake

in the world by being in this space. That’s why

we went out and got funded. We’re too big to be

considered a small independent, but we’re too

small to be a major. So we made the decision to

go big. We’re going to bring our concept to a lot

of different cities and reinforce our presence in

some of the cities that we’re in. We’re going to

build a product that spoils our guests so much

that they’ll never want to go anywhere else. More

importantly, they’ll come more often because

we’re going to be smart enough to roll it out at

a price that makes sense so they can come every

week. We’re appealing to moviegoers and keeping

the theatrical experience healthy. I think we’re

doing it by innovating in ways that send a signal

to other segments of the industry about ways

they can keep things vibrant.

EAT. DRINK. MOVIES.

Studio Movie Grill has

314 screens at 30 locations,

placing it at No. 13

on Boxoffice’s Giants of

Exhibition.

JULY 2019

67


NAC 75TH ANNIVERSARY

SMG OUTREACH

Children’s annual Red

Balloon Ride and Run

is a family-friendly fun

run, walk, and cycling

event held at Children’s

Medical Center in Plano,

Texas

—from the Studio Movie Grill

profile featured in the April

2018 edition of Boxoffice

The building blocks are there. Last year, SMG

launched a loyalty program and started experimenting

with subscription. As an early partner

of MoviePass, you knew what you wanted and

what you didn’t want in a subscription program.

When I first started, we’d do a lot of special

events around community-based content. When

we did that, it was to advocate a position that

I had, or to support a cause that I deeply cared

about. That’s no longer the case, and it hasn’t been

for a long time. Today we’re a platform for an

interaction of ideas and discussion. Now we ask

ourselves, what does the community want? With

the amount of data and the amount of experience

we have, it became obvious. They don’t want

caviar, they don’t want sushi. They want good,

fresh made-to-order food at a price they can afford.

That’s how we get them to come back; that’s how

we become a local place for them to gather.

How does that translate in terms of content

and programming?

We distinguish content by community. What

we show in South Chicago is very different than

what we might show in Plano, Texas. I like being

able to actually identify and communicate directly

with our audience as we begin to see the results

from our loyalty program.

Dine-in is not a one-size-fits-all solution,

whether that’s in menu or alcohol service.

How important is it to distinguish yourself as

a circuit, and is that something you need to

achieve in the kitchen or through operations?

I’ve always been blessed to have amazing

mentors. One of the mentors who helped me in

this area was Norman Brinker, who started Brinker

International. He used to tell me, “There are lots

of different restaurants. Don’t try to differentiate

yourself with a piece of tile or some random menu

item. Differentiate yourself by offering hospitality.”

I can’t point to just one strategy that differentiates

Studio Movie Grill from any other dine-in theater;

strategies can be imitated. The feeling you get

when you walk into a Studio Movie Grill has to be

one that drives an incredible desire to return. We

want to deliver a great experience. That begins with

our website and how we market and communicate

our food and our programming. This idea of hospitality

and servant leadership, maybe it hasn’t been

fully baked into the moviegoing experience across

the board. That’s why it’s something we continually

focus on getting right.

You mentioned starting out with warm beer

and frozen chicken fingers. How has the SMG

concept evolved in recent years?

68 JULY 2019


We’re driven by a simple philosophy: plan, do,

check, adjust. We’re constantly innovating. Our

focus is to be seamless, whether it’s buying your

ticket, finding your show time, getting to your

seat, ordering food—how can we do this in a seamless

way so you can enjoy the experience?

We’re seeing a lot of private-label PLF. Are you

planning anything in that space?

Moviegoing should be for everybody. I like the

idea of democratizing moviegoing, so it’s tricky for

us at SMG to get into the premium conversation.

With that being said, I would actually put presentation—screen

size, laser projection, seating—up

against any of our competitors. We do offer an

upgrade in our circuit, usually two auditoriums

in our locations that are branded SX, “Studio Extreme.”

We have a psychographic that loves seeing

movies in these big PLF auditoriums, and we have

another that loves the more intimate, smaller theaters.

There is a little bit of customization required,

and we make sure to articulate that so guests can

select the experience they want.

You’re building an experience. People can

watch a movie anywhere, but what SMG

is offering are unique experiences tied to

watching movies. That being said, it seems like

every circuit is currently caught up in trying to

develop its own customized offerings. It makes

me question if we might be looking at a bubble

when it comes to premium amenities. At what

point does an experience turn into a gimmick?

You need to be creative and continually innovating.

One of my favorite innovations is called

Black Box Theater. Years ago, I got really into auditorium

design and started investigating fancy lighting

designs that hearkened back to the grandeur

of cinemas. I have a musical theater background,

and I began to ask myself, what if we apply that

black box concept to a cinema? What if the entire

auditorium were black? How could we make the

connection to the screen as immersive as possible,

without any distractions? And this would apply to

the entire experience, from a change in staff uniforms

to making sure we have all the food orders

out by the time the movie starts. The idea would

be to move away from anything that distracts from

the experience.

We have some locations that are right across the

street from traditional multiplexes. At the start, I

was secretly hoping that those theaters would see

business improve. And it looks like it has. Part of

the reason is that dine-ins have less seating capacity,

so there’s a spillover. Another reason is because

most dine-ins attract a 20-something demographic,

which is the one that traditional cinemas are

having trouble retaining and engaging. All of a

sudden, when these audiences start going to the

movies again, there’s a halo effect: When there’s a

good movie out, even some of the bad movies see a

bump at the box office. What we’re trying to do is

get people to go to the movies more often.

Are you concerned about saturation among

dine-in cinemas?

I think it’s a mistake when copycats open

right next to each other. Just as there are different

restaurants for different tastes, there are different

cinemas for different tastes. That might be a bit

of a provocative thing to say, because for most of

our industry—exhibition and distribution—the

old thinking used to be that the main driver was

the movies. For dine-in, while there’s no question

that the movie is still very important, it’s not as

dominant a factor. We have a lot of folks for whom

Tuesday night is date night, or maybe it’s Sunday

afternoon. They’ll pick a film that seems reasonably

appealing, but they come back to SMG because

they like the experience and the way they’re treated

when they come to one of our theaters. A percentage

of your audience will return simply because we

offer them great hospitality.

Have you considered any international markets

for expansion?

We’re doing research on that. There are some

countries that are better suited than others in terms

of openness and willingness to entertain this kind

of concept. We’re very open to royalty deals, and

that might be one of the ways we explore international

expansion.

I’m going to end the interview by asking for

a short answer to a big question. What is the

future of cinema?

It doesn’t have to be dine-in, but you have

to create an experience. If you’re just building a

theater, you might not have great prospects in this

environment. And you need to have great service

and hospitality; I just don’t see anything being

successful without it.

The feeling

you get when

you walk into a

Studio Movie Grill

has to be one

that drives an

incredible desire

to return. We

want to deliver a

great experience.

That begins with

our website and

how we market

and communicate

our food and our

programming.

This idea of

hospitality

and servant

leadership,

maybe it hasn’t

been fully

baked into the

moviegoing

experience

across the board.

That’s why it’s

something we

continually focus

on getting right.

JULY 2019

69


FOOD & BEVERAGE

BY REBECCA PAHLE

A POPPIN’ PRIMER > EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW

ABOUT POPCORN BUT DIDN’T KNOW TO ASK

POPCORN: Since the Great Depression, it’s been the movie theater staple.

Patrons love it for its taste and convenience. Theaters love it for its high

profitability. But look beyond the bag—or tub, or bucket—and you’ll find that the

world of that little popcorn kernel is surprisingly complex.

Popcorn Isn’t Just Popcorn

First of all: Not all popcorn is the

same. What people tend to think of as

“movie theater popcorn” is actually butterfly

popcorn, characterized by “wings”

that emerge as the kernel is popped. Go

to a movie theater in the Unites States

and you’re getting medium-sized butterfly

popcorn. Buy a bag of pre-popped

popcorn at a grocery store or gas station,

and you’re probably looking at large

butterfly popcorn. In addition to being,

you guessed it, larger, large butterfly

popcorn is a lot more durable and less

likely to break up during manufacturing

and shipping.

Medium butterfly popcorn, on the

other hand, is more tender—a quality

that farmers and scientists have spent

decades accentuating. A typical hybrid

strain of popcorn, explains Joe Macaluso,

popcorn-industry veteran and vice president

of U.S. and Canadian sales at Gold

Medal Products, takes between five and

seven years to develop. Over the decades,

that process has given moviegoers a better

product, one that’s more tender with fewer

of the fiddly little bits that get stuck in

your teeth. “The characteristics that have

been developed over the years to improve

eating quality wouldn’t have been nearly

as good” in the past, says Macaluso. Hop

in your time machine and pop back 30

years to treat yourself to some movie

theater popcorn, and “the hull remnants

would be higher. There would be more

hard centers.” The process is gradual,

and it’s ongoing; Macaluso notes that the

popcorn evolution “is probably going to

be never ending. I hope it keeps getting

better and better and better. That’s definitely

our intent.”

Your average moviegoers are probably

also familiar—even if they don’t know

it—with the “mushroom” variety of popcorn.

Round and wingless, mushroom

popcorn is ideally suited to caramel corn;

its spherical shape means it’s easier to coat

evenly, and its tougher texture means it

can stand up to that sweet, sweet caramel

without breaking apart. Caramel corn being

“more chewy and crunchy,” Macaluso

explains, means “you don’t notice the fact

that it’s not a tender kernel” underneath.

There are other varieties of popcorn,

but let’s stick to the movie concessions—

butterfly and mushroom are what you

snack on while you’re watching the latest

summer blockbuster.

Feel the Heat

Popcorn needs to be popped in

some sort of oil, and if you’re in North

America, you’re looking at two types:

70 JULY 2019


JULY 2019

71


FOOD & BEBVERAGE

coconut and canola. “Everyone used to

use coconut oil,” explains Jo Burgoon,

director of concession sales at Ventura

Foods, which includes among its brands

Odell’s and LouAna popcorn oils. “Then,

in the ’80s, a report was released that

gained a lot of notoriety about saturated

fats being bad. And so a lot of people

switched from coconut oil to canola oil.”

Since then, additional research has made

the coconut-versus-canola issue much

less black-and-white, with coconut oil

regaining popularity in part because it’s

perceived as a more “natural” product.

But which is healthier: coconut oil or

canola oil? We at Boxoffice are not here

to give you nutrition advice. The short

answer, according to Burgoon, is that

different people have different opinions,

and it depends on what you want. Another

differentiator: Because coconut oil

is higher in saturated fat, it gives popcorn

a “different mouthfeel. You can almost

feel the creaminess of the popcorn. The

canola oil is low in saturated fat, so it has

a drier texture when it pops. One’s not

necessarily better than the other. It’s a

personal preference—and there are certainly

people who eat both and wouldn’t

even notice the difference.” AMC, Regal,

and Marcus theaters use coconut oil,

while Cinemark opts for canola, and

other regional chains use a blend.

The relative popularity of canola

and coconut oil has fluctuated over the

years, Burgoon notes, but the products

themselves have stayed pretty much the

same. Toppings, on the other hand, have

evolved. In addition to popping oils,

Odell’s and LouAna sell topping oil derived

from soybeans. But another option,

Odell’s anhydrous butterfat topping,

made from fresh cream, has grown in

popularity “as more people want to have

the option of real butter.”

Soybean oil typically comes from the

United States and South America, while

canola oil hails from Canada and coconut

oil from Asia. Weather events in those

places affect crop yields; currently, says

Burgoon, the industry is “holding its

breath” because of flooding in the Midwest.

When it comes to popcorn kernels,

though, adverse weather isn’t likely to

have an immediate effect on how much

the consumer pays. That, explains Macaluso,

is because of a little—but very, very

important—thing called “expansion.”

The Bigger the Better

Expansion, as you might guess, refers

to how much a kernel expands when it’s

popped. As with the quality of popcorn,

Macaluso notes, expansion has improved

over the past decade, “which is important

because higher expansion produces higher

yield. Our customers out there make

more money, because they get a lot more

servings out of a 50-pound bag of popcorn

compared to 10, 20, 30, 40 years

ago.” The fact that movie theaters can get

so many servings out of one bag means

that, as noted above, the cost to consumers

of an individual serving probably isn’t

going to increase in any meaningful way

due to fluctuations in crop yield.

Popcorn’s high rate of expansion

means theaters get more bang for their

buck (or, because we’re talking about

popcorn, “more pop for their pound”)—

but it also makes popcorn an easy and

affordable product to ship around the

world. And that’s critical, explains Preferred

Popcorn founder and CEO Norm

Krug, because while the popcorn market

in North America is more or less saturated,

in some international markets the

popping has just begun.

Krug highlights China, which has

seen its movie theater industry expand

exponentially over the past

several decades. The country is

a “relatively new market,” for

popcorn, Krug notes. A recent

study of Chinese college students

conducted by Preferred

Popcorn found that most

of its respondents “never

consume popcorn at home.

Their entire exposure to

popcorn has been at the

movie industry.” Compare

this to America, where roughly 70

percent of the average person’s annual

popcorn consumption takes place in

the home.

“When we first went to Japan 20 years

ago, [popcorn] was a fairly new snack

there, too,” says Krug. Throughout Asian

markets, popcorn doesn’t have the foothold

that it has elsewhere, so “the cinema

industry has been a big catalyst towards

making new countries aware of it. … The

cinema industry is a great way to promote

our product. Better than any way I can

think of. If you were standing in a store

handing out samples, you would not get

the same response that [you do by selling

in the] magical climate of a cinema.”

And why are those international

chains so eager to sell a product that their

clientele doesn’t have much experience

with? You guessed it: expansion. “They

come on board quite quickly when they

see the amazing profitability of popcorn,”

says Krug. “It has the gift of expansion.

When you can send one 50-pound bag

72


to someone, and they pop it, and they’re

able to turn that one bag into a thousand

32-ounce servings, that is a very, very

great gift that makes it possible to export

it around the world.”

International Appeal

Popcorn’s profitability may be universal—but

there’s no reason the product

itself has to stay the same from market to

market. Explains Krug, popcorn is a “base

product that is easy for different countries

to modify and serve in ways that are

attractive to different cultures.”

What would a popcorn tour of the

world show you? Moviegoers in China

and South Korea prefer mushroom popcorn,

as opposed to the butterfly variety

most often used in the United States. In

Thailand, Krug notes, you might find

your popcorn cooked in fish oil, which

gives it a “different flavor than U.S.

popcorn.” Mostly, though, Asian markets

use coconut oil or palm oil. The quality

of the latter isn’t as good, notes Ventura

Foods director of international strategy

and planning Matt Young, but it’s a more

cost-effective option than the alternatives.

Canola oil, produced mostly in Canada,

is a less-than-viable option for Asian

exhibitors that have comparable products

closer to their doorsteps.

Order popcorn in an Asian market,

and it will more likely come sweet than

salty. India, on the other hand, likes its

popcorn salty and butterfly. Where popcorn

consumption differs from the U.S.

is in the popularity of a wider variety of

flavors. 4700 BC, a subsidiary of leading

Indian exhibition chain PVR Cinemas,

sells flavors ranging from “Chipotle

Ranch Golden Cheese” and “Lemon and

Chili Golden Cheese” to “Mocha Walnut

Choco-All-Ate” and “Jamaican Rum

Choco-All-Ate.”

Flavored popcorn is also popular in

Mexico, where things trend toward the

spicy. “Mexico prefers popcorn very

much [like the United States does], but

they’ve shown a lot of leadership in trying

different flavors,” says Krug. Mexican

chain Cinemex, for example, offers Oreo,

jalapeño, Tabasco, condensed milk, cheddar

spice, cheddar nacho, and Tajín (a sort

of spicy lime seasoning) popcorn flavors,

among others. Recently, Cinemex brought

two new flavors—blazin’ cheddar and

mushroom truffle—to its CMX-branded

location in the Mall of America.

Mushroom or butterfly. Salty or sweet

or spicy. “Theater owners are good businesspeople,

and their goal is to provide

their customers with an experience that

they will enjoy,” says Krug. “It’s really

pretty easy to do that with popcorn. They

can adapt it to the culture. That’s the big

thing I’ve noticed as I travel internationally.

There’s not a right or wrong! They’re

all good.”

JULY 2019

73


FOOD & BEVERAGE

VEGAN BURGER

74 JULY 2019


THE

VEGAN

OPTION

VEGAN ALTERNATIVES

AT THE MOVIES GO BEYOND

THE HEALTH-CONSCIOUS SET

by Jim Amos

Chief Operating Officer, Scout 22

>> The NAC’s 2019 Concession and Hospitality

Expo convenes July 30–August 2 in Chicago, and

food-and-beverage representatives from North

American cinema chains will be on hand to sample

new offerings in the concession world to determine

which new products will be ready to tempt moviegoers

in the coming year.

While most in attendance will be looking for

the new popcorn flavoring or pretzel dip to add

to their theater snack centers, the smart ones may

be expanding their view and looking into the real

growth sector of the food business: vegan options.

While overall growth in the food industry topped

off at 2 percent last year, plant-based products rose

21 percent, a staggering number, and with the

explosion into the mainstream of companies such

as Beyond Meat and Impossible, that percentage is

likely to be significantly higher in 2019.

Yet, if one pays a visit to a movie theater concession

stand, one will find with rare exception

that vegan options are woefully lacking. Ask a

concession attendant what they offer for vegans or

vegetarians and you’ll undoubtedly be referred to

popcorn, which sometimes is not vegan at all, or

pretzels or perhaps, heaven forbid, gummy bears.

Not exactly a treasure trove of options, is it? On a

recent visit to a multiplex here in the San Fernando

Valley region of Southern California, an area at

the forefront of the plant-based movement in the

U.S., I asked a concession employee how the bags

of nuts were selling. The young man looked at me

with a puzzled expression and after a painfully long

pause replied with, “I didn’t even know we carried

them.” Well OK then.

To be fair, North American cinema chains have

experimented in the past with healthy snacks. They

did not sell well, and exhibitors whom I spoke with

rationalized pulling

these products out of

their stands by saying

that moviegoers want

an escape and didn’t

want to eat, as one

major chain concession

manager told me,

“food fit for a squirrel.”

The problem with

that view is that vegan

options have exploded

over the past few years,

and plant-based versions of the foods we all love

and grew up with are not only available but are

experiencing a growth explosion. There’s no better

example of how people want escapism while still

eating (somewhat) healthy and ethically than in

the sports-stadium world.

Only a few short years ago, if you wanted to

watch your favorite sports team without gorging

on a burger or hot dog, then you’d have to try

to smuggle in your own snacks without getting

caught. International spies trying to evade Interpol

didn’t have to work this hard to avoid detection.

Now, however, most stadiums in North America

offer at least basic vegan options, and some sports

venues have taken the lead and could show the

cinema industry a thing or two about appealing

to customers who’d like to go meatless while still

enjoying the experience.

Yankee Stadium, for example, offers products

from both Beyond Meat and Impossible at its

Bareburger concession stand. The Minnesota Twins

stadium, Target Field, offers brats and hot dogs

from local favorites The Herbivorous Butcher.

Globe Life Park, home of the Texas Rangers, has

an all-vegan concession stand, The Ballpark Vegan.

Staples Center, home of the L.A. Lakers, Kings,

JIM AMOS

Jim Amos is COO of

Scout 22, a marketing

and PR agency that specializes

in vegan, ethical,

and conscious capitalist

companies. Previously

he spent over 20 years

with Sony Pictures, four

of which as president of

domestic distribution.

He also worked as head

of sales at both Fathom

Events and STX Entertainment.

He is a regular

contributor for Forbes,

writing about the movie

and music industries.

JULY 2019

75


FOOD & BEBVERAGE

and Clippers offers nearly 20 vegan options at the

arena. Lincoln Financial Field sells vegan versions of

Philly steak sandwiches, hot dogs, and burgers. Even

Lambeau Field, home of the Green Bay Packers, has

veggie bratwurst and veggie burgers for sale to their

infamous Cheesehead fans.

But the news is not all bleak on the vegan-option

front at your local multiplex. Circuits such as

Alamo Drafthouse and Laemmle here in the States

and Everyman in the U.K. are featuring plant-based

options of moviegoers’ favorite fare, and they are

selling well. Caitlin Kleppinger, concessions manager

for the Laemmle chain, states, “Our customers

have been very enthusiastic about the new vegan

menu items. Modern movie theater

concessions stands

are expected to

have more than

ONLY A FEW SHORT YEARS AGO, IF YOU WANTED just popcorn,

TO WATCH YOUR FAVORITE SPORTS TEAM

soda, and

WITHOUT GORGING ON A BURGER OR HOT DOG, candy. As we

THEN YOU’D HAVE TO TRY TO SMUGGLE IN YOUR expand our offerings

to meet

OWN SNACKS WITHOUT GETTING CAUGHT.

INTERNATIONAL SPIES TRYING TO EVADE the expectations

INTERPOL DIDN’T HAVE TO WORK THIS HARD of our audience,

TO AVOID DETECTION.

we’re excited that

we have found

high-quality options

that cater to the vegan and

vegetarians that attend our theaters.”

Zeffirellis, a single-screen independent theater

in the Ambleside area of the U.K., more resembles

an award-winning restaurant with a wealth of

vegan options than a movie theater. One would be

hard-pressed to find a similar experience here in

North America.

The vast array of ready-to-eat plant-based products

that is currently on the market means that vegan

options shouldn’t be limited to dine-in theaters.

You can now get vegan hot dogs, burgers, nuggets,

and other snack items that can be prepared and

served to moviegoers in a relatively short amount of

time at the concession stand.

While the percentage of Americans giving up

meat at least once a week is growing, it is especially

prevalent in the 18–45 age bracket, which is a sweet

spot for the movie industry and cinema chains.

QSR magazine notes that consumers under 40 have

upped their plant-based intake by 59 percent. Millennials

and members of Generation Z are adopting

plant-based diets at an early age and should be a

source of growth for decades to come. Futurity

reports that two-thirds of consumers have reported

eating less of one type of meat, and most of them

have switched to a diet that includes plant-based

versions of their favorite foods.

Unfortunately it sometimes feels that the only

group not to have received that memo is the exhibition

industry. Fast food chains like Subway, Del

Taco, The Habit, Taco Bell, Shake Shack, and Carl’s

Jr. have vegan options in all or some of their stores,

and Burger King is experimenting with the Impossible

Burger in Europe. Pizza giants like Little Caesars

and Pizza Hut either currently have vegan options

or are planning to add them. Even McDonald’s is

weighing whether to feature plant-based burgers in

its locations.

The choice to make vegan versions of moviegoers’

favorite junk foods is not purely financial, either.

With a growing commitment from companies to

have as little impact on the planet as possible, it’s

difficult to ignore a fact like the one that shows

that it takes nearly 1,000 gallons of water to make

one fast food burger or that one plant-based food

company estimated that, through the sale of its

products, it saved nearly 3.5 million animals that

would have been sacrificed if those food items had

been animal-meat based. Back in February, Forbes

posted a particularly eye-opening piece about how

the fast food industry needed to face up to the water

and climate risks for which it’s responsible, risks that

are significantly decreased if they concentrated even

a portion of their food output on plant-based rather

than meat-based. In this era of corporate responsibility,

every company has to take a hard look at its

environmental footprint.

So it’s time for cinema chains to realize that vegan

does not mean a bunch of hippies sitting cross-legged

in their lobby chanting and discussing existential

dualism. These days, plant-based offerings replicate

their customers’ desire for hearty, delicious movie

theater concession fare, but in a more healthy and

humane way. Only 3 to 5 percent of the U.S. population

is vegan, so it’s clearly evident that the rapid

growth of vegan offerings from fast food outlets and

the success of brands such as Beyond Meat—which

in May shocked the financial world with an outrageously

successful IPO—show that vegan fare will

appeal to the average moviegoer looking to replicate

the in-theater gastronomical experience they’re accustomed

to, but in a way that is good for themselves,

the animals, and the planet.

76 JULY 2019


CINEMA ADVERTISING

BY DANIEL LORIA

PROMOTING

THE PRE-SHOW

CINEMA ADVERTISING

CROSSES $750M FOR THE

THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR

DYNAMIC DUO

Screenvision’s Katy Loria

(L) and Christine Martino

(R) at the company’s

Upfront Event in NYC

>> Another record year

at the box office once

again led to a strong year

for cinema-advertising

companies. According to

the Cinema Advertising

Council (CAC), the

sector’s national nonprofit trade association, revenue

among the organization’s members reached a

total of $781.1 million in 2018, crossing the $750

million mark for the third consecutive year. The

CAC figures include all forms of advertising within

a cinema in their analysis, yet the category is clearly

dominated by on-screen advertisers—who claimed

nearly $700 million of that figure last year.

“2018 was another record year for us,” confirms

John Partilla, CEO of Screenvision, citing it as the

company’s fourth consecutive year of record revenues.

Similar sentiments were shared by the three

other companies interviewed for this article: Before

the Movie, National CineMedia (NCM), and

Spotlight Cinema Networks—all of whom report a

significant boom on the back of a robust box office.

That momentum wasn’t limited to the strength

of summer blockbusters alone. Spotlight Cinema

Networks, which specializes in a national network

of art house and luxury theaters, earned record revenues

in the latter half of the year according to its

president, Michael Sakin. Specialty programming

of award contenders from major studios like Fox’s

Bohemian Rhapsody ($216.8 million) and Warner

Bros.’ A Star Is Born ($215.2 million) released in

the fourth quarter helped drive adult audiences—

and advertisers—throughout the holiday season.

Business was just as good for Before the Movie,

which focuses on crafting customized pre-shows

for independent exhibitors. The company’s CEO,

Corey Tocchini, reveals that his company registered

record earnings from local advertising—a particular

strong suit for the organization. According to

the CAC’s annual statistics, local ads only represent

a small stake of all cinema-advertising revenue.

The bulk of the grosses come through national and

regional accounts, which are responsible for 89.5

percent of the sector’s overall business. National

and regional sales also experienced a boost, increas-

78 JULY 2019


ing by 5.4 percent against 2017.

“2018 was a great year for us,” says

NCM’s Cliff Marks, who was named the

company’s president last May. “Not only

did we see revenue growth across all our

businesses—national and regional—we

also saw the emergence of our digital

division.” That digital division has helped

bring NCM’s advertising reach outside the

cinema screens and onto viewers’ mobile

phones through interactive games like

Noovie Arcade and Noovie Shuffle. “It

allows us to communicate with consumers

when they’re at home, when they’re sitting

in an airport waiting to board their flight.

Our vision is to create an immersive array

of products that allows us to engage with

movie audiences wherever, whether it’s

through games like Fantasy Movie League,

Noovie Shuffle, or Name that Movie, a

promotion in the lobby of our theaters, or

a 3-D ad on the big screen.”

Before the Movie has made similar

inroads into consumers’ mobile phones with

its stake in Fuze Viewer, an augmented-reality

(AR) app, which can be activated to

produce effort-free lobby experiences on the

part of the exhibitor.

Despite these technological advances,

companies like Spotlight Cinema Networks

insist that they’re not part of a general

plug-and-play strategy that works for all

exhibitors across the board. “It depends on

the nature of your network,” explains Sakin.

“For the segment that’s looking to market

itself to the general public—teenagers and

younger audiences—artificial intelligence,

interactivity, and gaming are definitely ways

to go to embrace that 12 to 24 demographic.

If you focus on the 21- to 49-year-olds

like we do, it’s all about the content and

quality of the pre-show. Exhibitors have

spent a lot of time and money in creating

high-end environments for their customers,

and we need to equal that experience with

our pre-show. We can’t divert from that

experience with an interactive pre-show

or anything else that is too over the top or

overbearing.”

Spotlight prides itself on its highly cus-

SPOTLIGHT CINEMA

NETWORKS

President Michael Sakin

BEFORE THE MOVIE

Adam James (L), Corey

Tocchini (Center), and

Keyo Tocchini (R)

NATIONAL CINEMEDIA

President Cliff Marks

JULY 2019

79


CINEMA ADVERTISING

FILMMAKER SOFIA

COPPOLA IN THE

SPOTLIGHT CINEMA

NETWORKS PRE-SHOW

tomizable pre-show, which can feature short films,

movie content, or even extended running times for

premium ads. “We have luxury travel and fashion

partners who have aired five-to-ten-minute shorts

on our screens,” says Sakin. “We are always willing

to customize the experience as long as it’s more

entertaining for the consumer.”

Screenvision has also taken an innovative

approach to its pre-show this year. The company

recently announced a partnership with the Geena

Davis Institute on Gender in Media to feature and

promote films with a favorable GD-IQ rating in its

pre-show, a metric used by the institute to identify

films with gender-balanced portrayals. Additionally,

Screenvision will be participating in the Association

of National Advertisers’ #SeeHer Gender

Equality Measure (GEM), a certification used to

identify ads with a realistic portrayal of girls and

women. “It’s something that we are really proud

of,” says Christine Martino, EVP of national sales.

Screenvision is planning to create a title package

around GEM-certified titles, where #SeeHer advertisers

can attach their own GEM-certified ads.

Initiatives like these have helped the cinema-advertising

sector stand out as a dynamic and innovative

platform in today’s media market. “We’re

beginning to get clients that hadn’t considered

cinema in the past,” adds Martino. “About half of

our audience watches light to no TV; the first place

you’re going to be able to reach those consumers is

at the movies. The leading streaming services and

OTT services are not ad supported, so if you’re

looking to reach consumers with premium video,

cinema is the one destination that can still deliver.”

Cinema advertising has therefore emerged as an

ideal platform for premium video advertising in

an era when these platforms can be hard to find.

The CAC reports that a total of 185 new brands

entered cinema advertising in 2018. The council

cites last year’s top five cinema sales categories as:

telecommunication, internet, and media; automotive;

insurance and real estate; entertainment; and

consumer electronics.

Each company surveyed in this piece shared

its own unique growth drivers. Before the Movie,

for example, reported increases in advertisers from

the health care, hospitality, and solar industries.

A network with a more mature demographic like

80 JULY 2019


Spotlight Cinema Networks reported alcohol as

a consistent performer. “We have adult audiences

who come to our theaters looking for a date night

or evening out, and we’re uniquely positioned to

appeal to those consumers,” says Sakin.

The key for continued growth in cinema

advertising lies in the power of data analytics.

“NCM is, first and foremost, a media company,”

says Marks. “The brands we’re working with are

making decisions about where they spend their

marketing dollars. Do they put them in Google,

Facebook, Snapchat, Amazon, or do they put

them in cinema? For cinema advertising companies

to be most competitive as media entities, we

must be able to be as accountable and attributable

as other media players. We need to be competitive,

and if we can’t garner good first- or second-party

data, we’re not going to be able to be

competitive with the media industry, television,

digital, and social. The revenue we bring to the

exhibition community will go down if we cannot

be as competitive with the digital media industry

as we need to be. For us, data is critical to be a

modern media company that can tell brands what

we’re doing with their money and how we can

help them drive more sales.”

“Addressable advertising is our biggest challenge

right now,” agrees Spotlight’s Sakin. “Advertisers are

making a considerable investment in creative and

media, and they want to know they are getting the

right eyeballs. Cinema advertising’s challenge is going

to be how we answer this addressability question.”

It’s a challenge that every company in the

space is actively working on, whether it’s through

first-party data or second-party channels. The future

of cinema advertising will rely on the insights

advertisers can draw from moviegoing audiences—and

their ability to refine their targeting and

re-targeting campaigns. Cinema, after all, offers an

increasingly elusive proposition for advertisers: a

captive audience.

“We are all part of a great industry,” says Tocchini.

“As long as Hollywood keeps telling great stories,

people will flock to cineplexes, and brands will want

to be a part of that experience. [Cinema advertising]

just needs to deliver to exhibitors, brands, and

moviegoers alike: keep it interesting, keep it relevant,

keep it simple, and we will all be successful.”

JULY 2019

81


82 JULY 2019


TECH TALK

BY REBECCA PAHLE

Virtual reality: In 2019, it may seem like

it belongs to the province of museums,

film festivals, and tech-forward consumers

with the means and will to purchase

an expensive personal device. But as VR

technology has evolved over the past

several years, so too has its accessibility.

For some moviegoers, trying out the latest

advances in VR is as easy as going to their

local cinema.

WELCOME

TO THE NEW

REALITY

THEATERS INVEST IN VR FOR A

HIGH-TECH CONSUMER EXPERIENCE

>> It’s taken some time to get here. In 2016,

Imax and a handful of investors created a $50

million fund to, explained CEO Richard L.

Gelfond at the time, “fund VR experiences that

excite and attract a larger user base to capitalize

on opportunities across all VR platforms, including

Imax VR.” Over the following two years,

Imax VR installations could be found in select

locations in New York, Los Angeles, Toronto, and

Bangkok, with custom VR experiences inviting

participants into the worlds of Imax releases like

Justice League and Creed II. In December of 2018,

Imax announced to its shareholders that it would

be shuttering its VR operations; all in-theater VR

experiences that had not closed down already did

so shortly thereafter.

Imax may be out of the picture, but that doesn’t

mean the exhibition industry has given up on

VR. Two Cinemark locations currently boast VR

experiences: there’s San Jose, California’s Century

20 Oakridge theater and the Cinemark West Plano

outside Dallas, Texas. The two locations work with

two separate VR companies: The Void for West

Plano and Spaces for San Jose. “We picked theaters

that are not only in an innovative hub, in an area

that made a lot of sense from a technology and VR

standpoint,” explains Cinemark SVP marketing

James Meredith, “but we also had to have a certain

amount of available space in our lobbies where we

could carve out a particular area to truly create an

experience that was additive to the overall entertainment

experience.”

North of the border, The Void installations can

also be found in three of Cineplex Entertainment’s

Rec Room entertainment centers, located in Edmonton,

Alberta; Mississauga, Ontario; and Toronto.

Cineplex’s recently announced upcoming entertainment

complex in Winnipeg, Manitoba, will also

have a VR component. Currently, The Void has VR

experiences based on Star Wars and Ghostbusters,

with a Marvel-themed experience forthcoming and

Ralph Breaks VR, based on Disney’s Ralph Breaks the

Internet, in the rear-view mirror; Spaces is currently

running Terminator Salvation: Fight for the Future,

where players try to hold their own against the

eponymous killer robots.

VR experiences, argues Meredith, provide the

same sort of benefit as, say, luxury seating or an

expanded food and beverage menu. Sure, there’s

a big difference between stepping into The Void’s

Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire to stare down Darth

Vader and ordering a cocktail while you lounge in

a luxury recliner. But the basic idea is the same:

giving moviegoers a reason to unplug from their

home-entertainment devices and come to the

theater. Void and Spaces alike, says Meredith,

are “focused on offering experiences that can’t be

replicated at home.”

“One thing that I’ve always believed is that

you need to provide people a really good reason to

get them out of the home and get them into [an

outside] location,” echoes The Void co-founder

and chief creative officer Curtis Hickman. The

Void does that, putting participants wearing

high-tech equipment on a “stage,” in VR parlance,

where they can “freely roam around and explore

big worlds from a major IP in a very experiential,

almost Disney-esque way. It really does hearken

people back to the original ideas of Walt Disney:

transporting people to these places that they love.

That’s really the foundation for what we do. We

don’t provide an arcade experience, or even a video

game experience.” The addition of environmental

effects—hot air and motion effects in Secrets of

PHOTO ON PAGE 82: NAGRA/MYCINEMA

JULY 2019

83


TECH TALK

VROOM VROOM

Players enjoy a

big-screen racing

experience or can ride

virtually in the seat of a

race car via myCinema’s

RacerXClub.

PHOTO: NAGRA/MYCINEMA

the Empire to make participants feel like they’re

on the volcano planet of Mustafar being shot at

by Stormtroopers—further makes the experience

more real than anything currently available

through home entertainment.

At Cinemark, notes Meredith, “we’re constantly

trying to create an experience that, number one,

can’t be replicated at home, and, number two,

offers a different entertainment level for all our

guests.” That means casting a wide net, offering entertainment

options for fans of movies, big-screen

sporting events, dining, gaming … and VR. So far,

things are paying off. The chain’s Plano location

is “in an area where there are a lot of Fortune 500

companies who have their headquarters in and

around the area. It’s not uncommon for a group of

four people, eight people, to come over at lunch

and go through the [VR] experience. It’s a perfect

amount of time. So you’re actually able to use

the theater during times of day when it wouldn’t

normally be busy.”

The Void and Spaces alike, Meredith adds, draw

not just people from their homes or offices but

from different cities entirely: “It’s not uncommon

for somebody in Austin or another city in Texas to

drive over to Dallas, because they’ve heard so much

about the Star Wars Void experience. And we’re

seeing that in the Bay Area, too, where people will

drive from different areas to experience the Terminator

Spaces experience.”

Another selling point of VR experiences is that

they’re communal, not individual, experiences.

We’re talking four people working together to fight

Terminators, not four hundred people sitting in an

auditorium to share the experience of watching a

movie—but the concept, though scaled down, is

the same. “It’s completely immersive,” says Meredith.

“They get to experience it themselves—but

they also get to experience it with guests. It’s that

communal experience that people, especially in this

day and age, are really reaching for.”

With Terminator Salvation: Fight for the Future,

players also have the ability to keep score, “which

makes for a lot of fun with groups of four, especially

if people want to come back a couple of different

times to try and beat their score,” says Meredith.

“So there is truly a gamification model to it.”

With that word—“gamification”—VR touches

84 JULY 2019


on another trend that’s had tongues wagging over

the last several years: esports. In the context of

theatrical exhibition, this typically refers to theaters

hosting events where guests can play (and watch

others play) popular video games. It’s a huge draw

in Asian markets and has begun penetration in the

U.S. as well. The Nagra Kudelski Group’s myCinema

is taking things in a different direction—one

that integrates VR—with its RacerXClub, which

puts players in the seat of racing cars and pits

them against one another (and, potentially, against

competitors in other theaters entirely) on virtual

versions of real-world racetracks. The RacerXClub

is available with the VR component (HTC’s VIVE

Pro headset), or without—in the latter case, the

player will watch the racetrack on a screen in front

of them. Says Glenn Morten, VP, strategy and

solutions, at Nagra myCinema, they expect the

first RacerXClub units to be installed—one in a

theater, one in a family entertainment center—in

August or September.

Other VR experiences are in the works from

multiple companies working in the theatrical

space. In addition to RacerXClub, myCinema

is working on a “very interesting post-apocalyptic

Paris experience. You sit in a chair, and

you basically fly over Paris and through tunnels

and everything else, and see the world after the

apocalypse. It also is a competitive racing type of

thing that you can do. But it’s a whole new world!

It’s not sitting there in a car, racing.” This year’s

CinemaCon also showcased VR products from

4D CJPLEX and MediaMation; the latter, called

the Jurassic World VR Expedition, can currently

be found in non-theater locations like Dave &

Busters. Motion-seating company D-Box has

also ventured into the world of VR, bringing its

VR-augmented system to various event spaces

over the last several years. And it’s not all about

entertainment: ICE (Immersive Cinema Experience)

has partnered with U.K. company Sinemas

to create “Virtual Showrooms.”

VR and the movies, Hickman says: “They’re

two different entertainment mediums that really

help each other. The Void brings people to the

location. It really becomes a supplemental piece of

entertainment to any location, and a very impactful

one.”

STAR WARS: SECRETS

OF THE EMPIRE

Your Mission: Recover

Imperial intelligence

vital to the rebellion’s

survival. Disguised as

Stormtroopers, you will

be transported with

your friends and family

to the molten planet

of Mustafar. Grab your

blaster, solve puzzles,

and fight giant lava

monsters to fulfill your

team’s orders.

JULY 2019

85


TOP

WOMEN

IN GLOBAL

EXHIBITION

2019

EDITED BY REBECCA PAHLE

86 JULY 2019


Earlier this year, Boxoffice partnered with Celluloid Junkie to present the fourth annual

list of Top Women in Global Exhibition, published in our CinemaCon issue. Throughout

2019, Boxoffice will continue to honor the women who have an immeasurable impact on

the exhibition industry with a series of in-depth profiles. In this issue: top-ranking executives

from the concessions and cinema-advertising spaces.

SPOTLIGHT

CINEMA NETWORKS

CHRISTINE DELGUIDICE-KRAEMER

SVP, MARKETING

>> Spotlight Cinema Networks specializes in

a national network of art house and luxury

theaters in the highly competitive U.S. cinema-advertising

market. The company counts

Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas, Silverspot Cinemas,

Landmark Theatres, and Laemmle Theatres

among its influential exhibition partners in the

U.S. Christine DelGuidice-Kraemer’s marketing

role at the Spotlight Cinema Networks

has expanded as the company entered the

event-cinema space in 2018 with its CineLife

Entertainment division. CineLife Entertainment

made a splash in its first year with the international

release of John Carpenter’s Halloween,

which reached nearly 1,800 screens in 28

countries. DelGuidice-Kraemer oversees the

marketing duties for cinema advertising and

event cinema.

How has the world of in-theater marketing

evolved since you joined Spotlight? How do you

see it evolving in the coming years?

In-theater marketing has changed much over

the past seven years. While the immersive experience

remains a pivotal attribute for in-theater

marketing, here are a few developments that have

contributed to the evolution of Spotlight:

Advanced digital technology, such as content

distribution and in-theater signage, provides the

opportunity to reach moviegoers at all touchpoints

within our network’s theaters. Additionally, these

advancements afford our clients flexibility and

short lead times.

Long-form content, either created by Spotlight

or provided by clients. Brands continue to

face an increasingly crowded media marketplace

to get their messages

seen and heard.

Compounding the

problem are the

dramatically shifting

media consumption

habits of consumers,

who are increasingly

being drawn to smaller

screens on mobile

devices. Spotlight provides

the platform for

advertising partners to

stretch their creative

muscle and craft

cinematic movie-quality

content that’s big

on storytelling with

dramatic pacing and

development, music,

and visuals to ensure

their brand messaging

makes a lasting impression.

Luxury auto,

apparel, and travel are the top categories utilizing

Spotlight’s capabilities and platform.

Engagement marketing is another area of

growth. Advertisers and consumers alike look for

opportunities to provide direct engagement with a

brand via brand experience. Engagement experiences

facilitated in-theater include branded theater

and pre-show takeovers, first-to-market initiatives

such as a hyper-real audio “test drive” for a luxury

auto utilizing Dolby Atmos technology, and

dimming theater lights via smart speaker activation

in movie theaters. Brand engagement extensions

beyond the theaters include premier film festival

and film awards programming sponsorships where

advertisers receive significant brand exposure,

product placement, and/or sampling opportunities.

In collaboration with Art House Convergence,

we’ve created CineLife, our consumer-facing app,

CHRISTINE

DELGUIDICE-KRAEMER

PHOTO: DOUG GOODMAN

JULY 2019

87


TOP WOMEN IN GLOBAL EXHIBITION 2019

to unite art house and independent theaters under

one app. CineLife helps these theaters serve their

interests and provide discerning movie audiences

with a mobile resource that deepens their relationship

with the films they love.

In-theater marketing will continue to change

as new technologies and offerings hit the marketplace.

We will continue to seek new initiatives that

solve an issue and/or enhance the overall cinema

experience. We have grown significantly during the

past seven years, and I expect nothing less for the

coming years.

What’s your favorite part of your job at

Spotlight?

I like the autonomy I have, because it allows

me to innovate. I also love the people I work with!

There is a genuine spirit of cooperation and shared

goals—all revolving around helping our clients—

that I have not found at other corporations.

It is always changing, always evolving, and I get

a front-row seat watching the process of a simple

idea grow the company. Every day is different, and

it is a constant adventure!

Can you talk a bit about some of the mentors

you’ve had in this business?

With over 20 years in marketing, I’ve had the

opportunity and privilege to work with many

mentors throughout my career. The knowledge,

guidance, motivation, emotional support, and role

modeling shared has been instrumental. I strive to

pay it forward whenever I can.

MY MOVIE MEMORY

CHRISTINE DELGUIDICE-KRAEMER

My mother took my sister and me to see Charlotte’s

Web at Radio City Music Hall. Once the movie started,

everyone in the audience just focused on the enormous

screen. It was mesmerizing the way the big screen captured

the audience’s attention. I’ve been hooked ever since! Nowadays,

you can find me at either an art house theater

or a dine-in for a date night—I am a movie junkie!

What is your proudest achievement of your

time so far at Spotlight?

There are actually a few that stand out. Spotlight

was still in its infancy when I joined in 2012.

Since then, I’ve been able to significantly increase

the visibility of Spotlight in both the ad marketplace

and exhibition community through corporate

rebranding, online presence, promotions, events,

and partnerships. Another key initiative was the

development and continued evolution of our preshow.

It was critical to deliver a pre-show that resonated

with our luxury and art house theaters and

their moviegoers. Our elegant pre-show focuses on

less clutter and features independent short films

from exclusive partners, including IMG/WME’s

M2M and Vimeo. It has been heartwarming to

receive positive feedback from exhibitor partners,

advertisers, and moviegoers regarding our format

and growth.

Our event cinema division, CineLife Entertainment,

launched in 2018. Along with an aggressive

event cinema release calendar (and individual event

marketing campaigns), it was key to create/sustain

visibility as an event cinema distributor within the

exhibition and distribution communities. I’ve been

88 JULY 2019


able to successfully establish our presence in this

realm through division branding, online presence,

press, and event promotions.

What are the key accomplishments you would

still like to make during your time at Spotlight?

A few key endeavors include developing an

online community of our moviegoers to converse

with on a daily basis regarding everything and

anything about the movies and our art house and

luxury cinema network. This level of engagement

will be critical to our continued growth within the

advertising, exhibition, and event cinema distribution

communities. Additionally, I look forward to

taking our affiliations to the next level and expanding

our offerings and presence even further.

What advice would you give to women just

entering the movie exhibition business?

My advice is to work hard and find ways to

create your own opportunities. Seek experiences or

relationships with people outside of your organization

to diversify your circle of who you do business

with and broaden your learning experiences (e.g.,

volunteer on a communications committee). It’s

also important to build and nurture your network

while always remembering to pay it forward by

taking the time to meet with other women. Lastly,

be authentic and stay true to yourself.

You’ve been integral to Spotlight’s expanding

into the event cinema space. Can you give us a

glimpse of what sort of growth is planned for

CineLife Entertainment moving forward?

Bernadette McCabe has recently joined

Spotlight to spearhead our event cinema division,

CineLife Entertainment. We anticipate several

major announcements in the coming months. It’s

a bit premature for me to discuss, but we’re excited

about the upcoming release of two original Peanuts

classics: A Boy Named Charlie Brown and Snoopy,

Come Home. This is the first time each feature film

is available for theatrical viewing since 1969 and

1972, respectively.

Describe your ideal moviegoing experience.

Being fully immersed in the experience from

the time you walk through the theater door, an

inviting film-viewing environment inclusive of

luxury amenities, forward-thinking film, and firstclass

customer service.

NATIONAL CINEMEDIA

STACIE TURSI

SVP, LOCAL & DIGITAL SALES

Part of the National CineMedia family since

2005, Stacie Tursi was named SVP of affiliate

partnerships at NCM—the largest cinema-advertising

network in the U.S.—in 2016. Since

then, Tursi’s team has worked diligently to

serve its theater network, which comprises

over 20,000 screens in the U.S. In 2018, NCM

announced the addition of 300 theaters to

its network, including top regional players

like Bow Tie Cinemas, Cinergy Entertainment,

Megaplex Theatres, and MJR Digital Cinemas.

How has the world of in-theater marketing

evolved since you joined National CineMedia?

How do you see it evolving in the coming years?

It’s funny; when I look back over the last 20

years, the pitch hasn’t really changed. We have the

best content, reach, and engagement there is to

offer for advertisers looking to reach people who

love entertainment. What has changed are the size

of the NCM network—which is the largest cinema

network in the U.S. and, I think, the world—and

our pre-show and product offerings. We started

back in the day with rolling stock and slides that

required manual delivery, placement, and execution.

Today, NCM connects national, regional,

and local brands to movie audiences in our Noovie

pre-show, seen on movie screens nationwide. We

also offer other forms of cinema advertising and

STACIE TURSI

JULY 2019

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TOP WOMEN IN GLOBAL EXHIBITION 2019

promotions in theater lobbies. In addition, we sell

online and mobile advertising through our Cinema

Accelerator digital product to reach entertainment

audiences beyond the theater.

As brands, agencies, and partners look to

leverage powerful location and audience data to

target their audiences in the places and moments

that matter most, we will continue to expand our

growing NCM Digital products to go beyond the

big screen, extending in-theater campaigns into

online and mobile marketing programs to reach

entertainment audiences. NCM now offers cool

movie-related digital experiences including Noovie

.com, the go-to digital destination for all things

movies, including trailers, show times, tickets, and

more; Shuffle, Noovie’s new movie trivia game that

movie fans can play anytime, anywhere; Noovie

ARcade, the big-screen interactive augmented-reality

(AR) game; and Fantasy Movie League, the box

office predictions game that combines the fierce

competition of fantasy sports with the insanely

popular world of entertainment and movies. It’s

all about creating a community of movie fans who

interact with Noovie at every step in their moviegoing

journey.

What’s your favorite part of your job at NCM?

The people. They are our most important asset,

and we rely on them to determine the customer experience.

Building a strong organizational culture

differentiates us from our competitors. Our people,

vision, and values are our unique identifiers.

I like to identify and develop talent early in

people’s careers, helping to broaden skills by

providing access to operating roles and leadership

opportunities, both horizontal and vertical moves,

in core business functions.

If our people are happy, then our customers are

happy. It’s really that simple.

Can you talk a bit about some of the mentors

you’ve had in this business?

It’s a long list. I learn every day from people

both inside and outside the industry. I look for

people who are willing to break from formal

roles and titles and are, instead, willing to build

common ground as people. Having mentors (both

formal and informal) has helped me to shape my

character, values, self-awareness, empathy, and

capacity for respect.

MY MOVIE MEMORY

STACIE TURSI

In the summer of 1969, my mother took me to

see my very first film, Bambi. I remember the

popcorn and soft drink (a rare treat), finding our seats,

waiting in anticipation for the film to start, the lights

dimming, and the thrill of having time with my mother.

While I can recall every bit of the experience like it

was yesterday, what made it so memorable was when

Bambi’s life was touched by tragedy. It was the

first time I saw my mother cry.

How would you evaluate the progress women

have made in the exhibition business in the

past few years?

I think we’ve seen some progress, but there is

no denying there is a dearth of women in senior

positions in our industry. I’m happy to say that

at NCM, 47 percent of our workforce is female,

and 48 percent of those serve at an executive or

leadership level.

Ultimately, the most important factor in determining

success isn’t gender, it’s you!

What is your proudest achievement of your

time so far at NCM?

Generally, I’m most proud of keeping people

moving in the right direction. My role, as I see it,

is to align people to strategy, vision, and values and

prepare the organization for change. Watching people

grow and evolve is what keeps me motivated.

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TOP WOMEN IN GLOBAL EXHIBITION 2019

Specifically, I am most proud of NCM being

included in the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s

2019 Corporate Equality Index, the national

benchmarking tool on corporate policies and

practices pertinent to LGBTQ employees. It’s important

to me that we have a sense of purpose and

believe that the company has a positive impact on

our employees, community, and the world at large.

I am proud to be a part of an organization

where inclusion and diversity are part of our strategy,

and one that looks for ways to support all of

its employees.

What are the key accomplishments you would

still like to make during your time at NCM?

I continue to focus on three things:

• the brains of our business:

vision and strategy

• the bones of our business:

organizational structure

• the nerves of our business:

culture

If we concentrate on making continuous improvements

to these three areas, we will be better

positioned for whatever comes our way. In the end,

I hope to leave the company a little better off than

I found it.

What advice would you give to women just

entering the movie exhibition business?

If a job description focuses only on title, experience,

and responsibilities, it may not speak to

the heart of what motivates you. Look for roles (or

invent roles) that leverage your skills in a way that

makes a difference by adding value to the business

through advancing something that both the

employees and customers benefit from.

It’s critical to get comfortable in your own skin.

Be willing to take risks. And don’t be afraid to

self-promote!

Describe your ideal moviegoing experience.

We all know that the moviegoing experience

starts long before we get to the theater. The ideal

experience for me starts with buying tickets,

selecting seats, ordering (healthy) concessions, and

arranging a round-trip Lyft, all in one online/mobile

transaction. The Lyft gets me to the theater 20 to 30

minutes prior to published show time. Concessions

are delivered to my seat while I play Noovie ARcade

and Noovie Shuffle movie trivia, where I earn points

and rewards for game play and purchases.

The theater, of course, is clean, comfortable,

and staffed with people who care about my experience.

And the movie is one that everyone has been

talking about and that I’ve been dying to see—one

of Hollywood’s best of the year.

After the film, I can redeem my points/rewards

at the theater to purchase film-related and Noovie

goods. I’m able to save my choices to my profile for

future purchases.

My Lyft arrives 20 to 30 minutes after the

movie ends, and I head home happy and entertained.

While I’m in the car, I get new film-release

notifications and special offers to start planning my

next trip to the movies!

That, I believe, is the future of moviegoing.

We’re working hard at NCM and with our exhibitor

partners to build that future.

SCREENVISION MEDIA

KATY LORIA

CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

DARRYL SCHAFFER

EVP OPERATIONS & EXHIBITOR

RELATIONS

Screenvision veterans Katy Loria and Darryl

Schaffer have been instrumental in the cinema-advertising

company’s success. In 2018

alone, Screenvision was able to sign 35 exhibitor

partnership contracts to its cinema-advertising

network. The company renewed longterm

partnership agreements with leading

exhibitors National Amusements and Malco

Theatres last year, along with adding new

players like California-based Maya Cinemas.

Schaffer and Loria lead the exhibitor-relations

and sales teams, respectively, and are poised

to help Screenvision achieve further growth in

2019. Earlier this year, Screenvision announced

its adoption of a pair of initiatives—the GD-IQ

Check, developed in collaboration with the

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media; and

the GEM score, a creation of the Association of

National Advertisers’ #SeeHer movement—to

encourage accurate and equal gender repre-

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KATY LORIA

sentation in their programming. In

addition, Schaffer has been named to

the board of Variety – the Children’s Charity of

New York.

How has the world of in-theater marketing

evolved since you joined Screenvision? How do

you see it evolving in the coming years?

Darryl Schaffer: Well, for one thing, in-theater

advertising revenue has grown substantially since

I joined Screenvision over 25 years ago. It has

become an incredibly meaningful part of an exhibitor’s

bottom line. In fact, Screenvision’s revenue

has actually grown by about 125 percent since I

joined! The move from analog to digital delivery

was a huge evolution, as well, and an exciting and

challenging one to be a part of.

We’ve always been proud of the relationships we

have with our network exhibitor partners and the

way we work with them to ensure greater innovation

and flexibility on both sides. We will continue

to do this in the coming years, bringing more

solutions and new ideas for how we use on-screen

and lobby inventories in addition to how we use

data to enhance our offerings to advertisers and,

therefore, our exhibitor partners.

What’s your favorite part of your job at

Screenvision?

DS: I truly love working with our 170 exhibitor

partners. I always look forward to meeting with

exhibitors, whether it be to move the business

forward, solve a problem, or negotiate a contract.

I really enjoy the process of negotiating long-term

deals with our exhibitor partners; every time I look

DARRYL SCHAFFER

back on a negotiation, I

feel as if it helped make the

relationship stronger and,

in the case of new partners,

as if it was a way to build a

new relationship.

I am also really proud

of the exhibitor-relations

team, and love working

with them day to day. We

have amazing tenure on

the team, with 16 people

averaging 15 years at

Screenvision!

Katy Loria: That’s an

easy question, but I have a

long answer, so I’ll try to abbreviate: the

movies, the people, and the value proposition.

Everyone’s Monday morning watercooler

talk involves the movies, so how lucky are we that a

favorite pastime is also our business? I feel incredibly

fortunate to work within the Screenvision

Media family. I’m inspired on a daily basis by the

creativity, hard work, enthusiasm, and just plain

smarts that the people around me bring into the

building every day. And last but not least, the place

Screenvision holds within the media landscape is

pretty compelling—we sit at the intersection of the

most premium video, a coveted audience of moviegoers,

and a giant screen in a very special environment.

Stated mildly, the impact of the ads that run

in our medium is substantial. We are happy to be

part of a brand’s solution in the pursuit of audiences

who seek out premium video experiences.

Can you talk a bit about some of the mentors

you’ve had in this business?

DS: There have been a few CEOs at Screenvision

who have certainly been my mentors, including

Travis Reid and, most recently, John Partilla. I

have definitely learned from each of them in different

ways. Also, I have to say that I learn from our

exhibitor partners every day: listening to them has

undoubtedly taught me how to do my job better. I

am so grateful for these relationships.

KL: Throughout my career, I’ve been fortunate

to work with many strong leaders who have

also graciously played the role of mentor—and

a good number of them have been women and

working moms. At Screenvision, I’m honored to

work side by side with one of the best and most

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TOP WOMEN IN GLOBAL EXHIBITION 2019

respected women in exhibition, so I have to say

Hall of Famer Darryl Schaffer! She epitomizes

patience and impartiality and is an encyclopedia

of knowledge.

What is your proudest achievement of your

time so far at Screenvision?

DS: It has been incredibly rewarding to build

such a robust network of exhibitor partners, now

with over 15,000 screens, and to have a great team of

people around me. It has also been extraordinary to

be part of such a charitable industry and company.

In 2017, Screenvision Media was awarded Vendor

of the Year at the Geneva Convention, which was a

great honor, and I was inducted into the ShowEast

Hall of Fame the same year. That was certainly one

of my proudest moments, because I was surrounded

by the Screenvision team and my family.

KL: I have loved being part of Screenvision’s

growth within the media marketplace and am

proud of the visibility and voice we have in the

premium-video landscape. The development of

our team into a consultative sales force has been

integral to this growth, and I’m especially proud

of the partnerships they’ve forged and continue

to nurture.

How would you evaluate the progress women

have made in the exhibition business in the

past few years?

DS: It has definitely been interesting to see this

evolution within exhibition. I used to almost only

work with men on the exhibitor side, and now it is

much more balanced. I think that this list of the top

women in global cinema is a testament to that and,

needless to say, I am very proud to be included on

the list with so many amazing women and friends,

including my Screenvision colleague Katy Loria!

MY MOVIE MEMORY

DARRYL SCHAFFER

I grew up in the city and I loved going to the

movies from a young age. I remember my dad

taking me to the theater on 86th Street to see Star

Wars and many other movies. We would always

go to Papaya King afterwards.

KATY LORIA

I’m sure most would answer this with their first

movie, but my memory isn’t that good. What I do

remember clearly is my parents strongly discouraging

me from seeing my first rated-R movie. I technically

wasn’t old enough, and they knew that not only would I

have my eyes closed most of the time, but that the movie

would also haunt me. As is usually the case,

they were right. The movie was Alien (1979).

What are the key accomplishments you

would still like to make during your time at

Screenvision?

DS: I hope that we continue to evolve to

become even better, more relevant partners for the

exhibitors in our network. There is nothing that

stands out as a key accomplishment to still achieve,

but at the end of the day I want our exhibitor partners

to look to us as a material vendor and a key

collaborator that they really enjoy working with.

What advice would you give to women just

entering the movie exhibition business?

DS: I think that it is an incredibly exciting time

to be connected to the movie-exhibition business.

With all of the innovation and investments being

made, not to mention the record-breaking box

office results, I truly believe that the best is yet to

come. The advice I would give to anyone entering

the business would be to enjoy it, because we are so

lucky to be in this exciting industry!

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TOP WOMEN IN GLOBAL EXHIBITION 2019

Describe your ideal moviegoing

experience.

DS: While the moviegoing experience

has evolved and innovated in amazing

ways with regard to seating, presentation,

and food and drink options, I just like a

comfortable seat close to the aisle and a

good movie!

KL: When I can get my teenage son

and daughter to agree on a movie (!), it’s

usually a family experience. We are notoriously

early to the theater—I have to get

settled into my seat before heading to the

concession stand for a tub of popcorn.

And I don’t share my popcorn.

What can companies like Screenvision

do to encourage diversity within the

exhibition industry?

DS: I’m proud to say that Screenvision

Media values diversity, with women making

up half of the executive team. I love

what our sales team, led by Katy Loria, is

doing to promote the meaningful representation

of women in film via a partnership

with the Geena Davis Institute on

Gender in Media, in which our Front +

Center preshow will give a special look

at upcoming films that receive GD-IQ

certification.

KL: Equality should stand for a place

where we all belong. It’s incumbent on us

to foster an environment where everyone

feels not only welcome, but invited and

encouraged to participate. If we don’t

encourage that dialogue, the workplace

and the world will get boring pretty

quickly. On a tangible front, it begins

with recruiting and carries through to hiring,

training, and mentoring diverse team

members, from the ground floor all the

way through to the board.

Katy, can you talk a bit about

Screenvision’s partnership with the

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in

Media and how it came about?

KL: I can remember attending a

panel at Cannes Lions several years back

and being shocked to learn that less than

20 percent of women in movies had

speaking roles. It seemed impossible. I

don’t know whether I was more taken

aback by the statistic or that I hadn’t noticed

the inequality myself. Because we

think Screenvision sits at a pretty cool

intersection of film, media, and distribution,

it just naturally made sense to use

our network to help bring awareness to

an initiative that is not only important

within our walls, but also those of the

brands that we work with. As we learned

more about the important research being

done at the Geena Davis Institute on

Gender in Media in the film industry—

as well as efforts within the media industry

being heralded by #SeeHer—we

grew increasingly excited to introduce

content opportunities on the big screen

that tie gender equality messaging with

the brands in support of it. We hope

the moviegoing audience will not only

appreciate the content but also continue

to support the films that are presenting

balanced representation both on screen

and behind the camera.

Darryl, It sounds like Variety – the

Children’s Charity of New York is

poised to do some really great,

interesting work. Can you talk a bit

about why you joined the board of

directors and what sorts of projects

you’re planning?

DS: I’ve always been proud to work

in such a charitable industry, and we at

Screenvision Media have consistently supported

industry charities like Variety and

Will Rogers. When the New York branch

of Variety was being re-formed, it was an

honor to be asked to join the board. In its

new formation, Variety – the Children’s

Charity of New York will be focused

on freedom and future. The Freedom

program delivers vital life-changing

equipment and services for mobility,

independence, and social inclusion,

while the Future program delivers crucial

life-enriching communication equipment,

services, education, and self-esteem

to individual children and children’s

organizations. Earlier in June, we gave

away an adaptive bike as part of Variety

International’s Freedom Day, and I was so

thrilled to be part of that opportunity!

THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

CAMI REYNOLDS, VP OF STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP MARKETING

KRISTA SCHULTE, GLOBAL VP OF STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP MARKETING

MAYSON SPELLMAN, SENIOR NATIONAL SALES EXECUTIVE

The Coca-Cola Company is the market leader when it

comes to providing the “beverage” component of food and

beverage for most exhibitors. Coca-Cola’s cinema team

benefits from an all-star trio of women executives. Krista

Schulte goes beyond the cinema space, overseeing airlines,

ski resorts, and theme parks, just to name a few areas.

Cami Reynolds and Mayson Spellman are two of Coca-

Cola’s senior sales executives in North America, dealing

with accounts for some of the largest cinema chains in the

world, including AMC and Cinemark.

98 JULY 2019


CHEERS! to our friends

& Coca-Cola colleagues

KRISTA SCHULTE

Global Vice President,

Strategic Partnership Marketing

CAMI REYNOLDS

Vice President,

Strategic Partnership Marketing

MAYSON SPELLMAN

Sr. National Sales Executive,

Strategic Partnership Marketing

2019

TOP 50

WOMEN

IN GLOBAL

CINEMA

© 2019 The Coca-Cola Company.


TIMECODE

BY KENNETH JAMES BACON

THE MODERN THEATRE

FOR 45 YEARS, BOXOFFICE PUBLISHED A SPECIAL INSERT THAT DELVED INTO THE

NERDY NUTS AND BOLTS OF THEATER OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

PART 7 OF OUR 12-PART DEEP DIVE INTO THE BOXOFFICE ARCHIVES

>> The Modern Theatre was a section of Boxoffice that

ran once a month from July 1933 through May 1979,

at which time the magazine was briefly changed to a

newsprint tabloid format. Boxoffice, a weekly since its

beginning in 1920, became a monthly in September 1980.

The section was produced independently from the rest of

the magazine, including ad sales, by the Harrison Toler

Company in Chicago. After the February 28, 1948, issue,

the section was produced at

Boxoffice’s corporate offices

in Kansas City.

A typical Modern Theatre

section ran dozens of pages,

sometimes as many as 80.

These were often themed:

seating, air-conditioning, design,

and construction. Below

is a typical article, one written

by Herman A. DeVry, inventor

of the portable movie

JAN. 12, 1935

projector; the original is now

housed at the Smithsonian. So, remember when you had

to watch industrial films in class? Blame this guy.

MAY 4, 1935

JAN. 6, 1945 JAN. 1, 1956 JUNE. 81, 1979

100 JULY 2019


CLASSIC AD

American Seating placed

this two-color ad in

our May 4, 1935, issue.

Founded in 1886 as

Grand Rapids School

Furniture, the company

changed its name in

1931 and now specializes

in public transportation

seating. True to its

name, American Seating

manufacturers all its

products in the U.S.

GoldE Manufacturing Co., of Chicago, designed

and built both film and slide projectors from 1920

through 1958. This small ad, from the July 21,

1945, edition of The Modern Theatre is promoting a

35-millimeter slide projector used for displaying ads

or other images on theater screens. Today, working

older models can be had on eBay for less than $100.

ONLY THE BEST

The Modern Theatre was

written by many experts

in theater design and

construction, lighting,

seating, flooring,

air-conditioning, and

concessions. The advisory

board, listed here in

1942, included several

well-known firms. Rapp

and Rapp designed

New York’s Paramount

Building, while William

Pereira designed the

Transamerica Pyramid.

JULY 2019

101


TIMECODE

IF YOU REBUILD IT,

THEY WILL COME

The Modern Theatre

often featured stories

on theater refurbs and

rebuilds. I chose this

example, from May, 8,

1952, because it features

a theater I once

patronized. Seattle’s

Coliseum was one of

the first purpose-built

cinemas in the U.S.

and was called “the first

of the world’s movie

palaces” by the Royal

Institute of Architects.

Located in the heart

of the city, it was glorious

when lit at night.

The theater closed

in 1990 and is now a

Banana Republic.

CONCESSIONS STAND

Suppliers large and

small touted their wares

in the pages of The Modern

Theatre. Important

note to BBQ lovers:

Though this ad is from

1959, you can still buy

James River Smithfield

BBQ sauce.

Smaller advertisers populated the back pages

of The Modern Theatre, and many were concessions

suppliers. This ad from Feb. 6, 1961,

from Greer Enterprises, features a Glenray

Hot Dog rotisserie for $150, or a rebuilt model

for $105. Today, you can go to eBay and pick

up one of these for just … $500.

102 JULY 2019


PRIZE PATROL

As we are highlighting

the National Association

of Concessionaires in

this issue, here’s a contest

they ran in the June

5, 1961, edition of The

Modern Theatre. Don’t try

to mail your promotional

scrapbook entry to the

address in the ad—it will

go to a nice apartment

several blocks west of

NAC’s current location.

SOUND DECISION

The Modern Theatre

published major features

on drive-in theaters

throughout the decades.

Cinema Radio was the

first company to popularize

listening to the

soundtrack in your car via

the radio rather than external

speakers. This ad

introduced the concept

in the February 17, 1975,

issue of Boxoffice.

STAY SEATED

The final edition of The

Modern Theatre was published

in May 21, 1979,

just a year before the

magazine went monthly.

Among the several dozen

ads, many were placed

by suppliers who appear

in our pages today, like

Christie, C. Cretors and

Co., and Irwin Seating,

who appears on page 19

of this issue.

NEW PRODUCTS

Our friends at Gold

Medal Products (p. 109)

introduced this old-timey

machine in our pages on

January 19, 1977.

JULY 2019

103


FASTER, FASTER ...

One of the most remarkable movie franchises of the 21st century is the Fast and the

Furious series. Inspired by a Vibe magazine article on undercover street racers in New

York City, producers Rob Cohen and Neal H. Moritz transplanted the action to Los Angeles

and created one of the surprise smashes of 2001. Beginning with film number four

and continuing through number seven, each entry in the series topped its predecessor’s

domestic box office, as the casts got more diverse and the stunts and heist/espionage

plotlines more outrageous. And internationally, the franchise has become a monster:

Furious 7 and The Fate of the Furious (no. eight) both earned over $1.2 billion worldwide.

Now, the series is unveiling its first spinoff, Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw, in

which sworn enemies Luke Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham)

join forces to fight a genetically enhanced villain played by Idris Elba. Will all that muscle

take the franchise to new heights? We’ll know after the Universal release debuts in

North America on August 2. Here are the domestic and worldwide tallies:

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS 2001 $144,533,925 / $207,283,925

2 FAST 2 FURIOUS 2003 $127,154,901 / $236,350,661

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS: TOKYO DRIFT 2006 $62,514,415 / $158,468,292

FAST AND FURIOUS 2009 $155,064,265 / $363,164,265

FAST FIVE 2011 $209,837,675 / $626,137,675

FAST & FURIOUS 6 2013 $238,679,850 / $788,679,850

FURIOUS 7 2015 $353,007,020 / $1,516,045,911

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS 2017 $226,008,385 / $1,236,005,118

PAUL WALKER IN

FURIOUS 6 2013

104 JUNE JULY 2019


powered by

Social Pulse is a new monthly feature that tracks the primary social media accounts of the top

100 cinema circuits in North America. Each month will feature updated rankings, figures, and

different insights gathered from our team of social media analysts.

TOTAL FOLLOWERS

ALL DATA AS OF JUNE 18, 2019

POWER RANKING

LIKES + SHARES + COMMENTS

ENGAGEMENT RANKING

LIKES + SHARES + COMMENTS/FANS

INTERACTIVITY RANKING

COMMENTS/FANS

1 CINEPOLIS USA 18.2M

1 CINEPLEX

1 ODYSSEY THEATRES

1 ODYSSEY THEATRES

2 AMC THEATRES 6.3M

2 HARKINS

2 STARLIGHT CINEMAS

2 STARLIGHT CINEMAS

3 REGAL 3.7M

3 AMC THEATRES

3 MAYA CINEMAS

3 MAYA CINEMAS

4 CINEMARK 1.3M

4 CINEMARK

4 CLASSIC CINEMAS

4 CLASSIC CINEMAS

5 CINEPLEX 702.4K

5 REGAL

5 EVO CINEMAS

5 EVO CINEMAS

6 SHOWCASE US 666.2K

6 CARIBBEAN CINEMAS (PR)

6 MOVIESCOOP CINEMAS

6 MOVIESCOOP CINEMAS

7 HARKINS 524.7K

7 SANTIKOS

7 CEC THEATRES

7 CEC THEATRES

8 SANTIKOS 328.1K

8 SHOWCASE (US)

8 LANDMARK CINEMAS OF CANADA

8 LANDMARK CINEMAS OF CANADA

9 MARCUS THEATRES 285.7K

9 ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE

9 EPIC THEATRES

9 EPIC THEATRES

10 STUDIO MOVIE GRILL 281.5K

10 MARCUS THEATRES

10 METROPOLITAN THEATRES

10 METROPOLITAN THEATRES

TOTAL FOLLOWERS

TOTAL FOLLOWERS

TOTAL FOLLOWERS

1 AMC THEATRES 406.6K

2 REGAL 283.1K

3 CINÉMAS GUZZO 210.2K

4 ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE 99.8K

5 CINEMARK THEATRES 87.9K

6 CINEPLEX 52.7K

7 IPIC 39.7K

8 HARKINS 31.7K

9 ARCLIGHT CINEMAS 23K

10 CARIBBEAN CINEMAS (PR) 22.9K

1 REGAL 562.8K

2 AMC THEATRES 446.2K

3 CINEPLEX 174.5K

4 ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE 152.9K

5 CINEMARK 60.6K

6 HARKINS 34.4K

7 SANTIKOS 26.3K

8 ARCLIGHT CINEMAS 22.2K

9 MARCUS THEATRES 16.2K

10 CELEBRATION CINEMA 14.7K

1 AMC THEATRES 385.4K

2 REGAL 133.4K

3 CINEMARK 76.5K

4 ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE 31.4K

5 CINEPLEX 17.2K

6 B&B THEATRES 10K

7 LANDMARK THEATRES 3.1K

8 ARCLIGHT CINEMAS 2.4K

9 HARKINS 2.4K

10 IPIC 1.8K

JULY 2019

105


SOCIAL MEDIA

BY ALEX EDGHILL

A BAD CASE OF SEQUEL-ITIS

SUMMER 2019 IS A SEEMINGLY

TROUBLED SEASON FOR SEQUELS

With 2019 lagging behind last year in terms of box office earnings,

many have singled out the recent string of underperforming sequels

as the main culprit of the deficit. Why are so many of these once

glitzy and glamorous sequels underwhelming at the box office?

>> As is usually the case with the box office,

memories are short and the huge recent successes

of Avengers: Endgame and John Wick: Chapter 3

– Parabellum must have already faded out of pundits’

minds as the industry is swept up in negative

headlines. One disappointing weekend is a miss,

two becomes a trend, and by the third—the sky

is falling!

Let’s start with the positive. Lionsgate’s John

Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum opened in mid-May

to rave reviews (currently at 89% fresh on Rotten

Tomatoes) and a stellar franchise-best $56.8

million weekend bow, nearly doubling its predecessor’s

debut. What is perhaps most impressive

about the series is that it is barely five years old.

The first film’s entire gross actually grossed less

than Parabellum’s opening week. What sets this

title apart from the early summer’s streak of disappointing

titles? With its positive reviews and the

social media buzz they engendered across the three

major platforms we cover (Facebook, Instagram,

Twitter), the film easily led all comparable titles.

If no one is clamoring for your film online, it’s

simply not going to do well—something especially

true for sequels. Sequels are highly visible to their

core demographics and, at least theoretically, are

supposed to have higher awareness to generate a

greater box office return. In this regard, Parabellum

was a cut above the rest.

Other results weren’t as favorable, starting with

Godzilla: King of the Monsters, which opened to

$47 million, almost half of what its predecessor

made back in 2014. Critics were not helpful in

this regard as its 40 percent fresh rating on Rotten

Tomatoes was a far cry from the 75 percent the last

one received. Though it did have some bright spots

on Instagram, its overall buzz levels were lacking,

and it failed to generate enough interest from

casual fans.

Next up, the pioneering franchise of comic

book adaptations, Dark Phoenix, the closing

chapter in Fox’s X-Men series. Critics weren’t kind,

giving the title a 23 percent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes,

a low for the franchise. Looking at its social

media returns, it was clear it was going to have

trouble generating revenue after it struggled to

generate buzz ahead of release. The warning signs

started in earnest with its most recent predecessor,

X-Men: Apocalypse, which opened significantly below

X-Men: Days of Future Past ($65 million versus

$90 million). Dark Phoenix continued that trend.

The Secret Life of Pets 2 was a follow-up to one

of the most successful movies of 2016 but couldn’t

PERFORMANCE OF SEQUELS AT THE BOX OFFICE SINCE MAY

Movie Domestic Opening Int’l Opening Rotten Tomatoes %

Men in Black: International $30.0 $73.7 24%

Shaft $8.9 — 34%

The Secret Life of Pets 2 $46.7 $11.6 57%

Dark Phoenix $32.8 $103.7 23%

Godzilla: King of the Monsters $47.8 $130.0 40%

John Wick: Chapter 3–Parabellum $56.8 $36.5 89%

106 JULY 2019


muster the same level of hype as the original,

which opened north of $100 million and made

almost $900 million at the worldwide box office.

Critics didn’t particularly enjoy the sequel (it has

a 57% fresh rating versus the original’s 73%), and

while it will emerge as a modest hit, it likely won’t

be the runaway success many had hoped. Family

films generally tend to have weaker than average

social media returns, but the fact that it lagged at

around 25 percent or less of the numbers Aladdin

managed meant that it was not on enough older

moviegoers’ radars to become a crossover hit.

Shaft opened on June 14 and was not received

kindly by critics (34% on Rotten Tomatoes) nor at

the box office ($8.9 million). Its social media footprint

was miniscule, with fewer than 25,000 total

followers across all three social media platforms.

For whatever reason, the film didn’t resonate with

younger to middle-aged moviegoers, which proved

to be its undoing.

Finally there is Men in Black: International,

which opened to a seemingly paltry $30 million

over Father’s Day weekend. The three previous

films in the Men in Black franchise had each

opened north of $50 million. Once again, critical

reception was negative (24% on Rotten Tomatoes),

though the film’s overseas gross might help make

it a bigger hit than its domestic opening suggests.

Its social media returns were the strongest since

Parabellum, but it still struggled to even get to 50

percent of the latter’s marks.

Looking at these social media figures, we have

to ask ourselves: Are North Americans truly showing

sequel fatigue, or are we just going through a

patch of poorly received films? Not a single one of

the five sequels since John Wick: Parabellum crossed

the 60 percent fresh mark on Rotten Tomatoes; regardless

of marketing spend or franchise awareness,

if you don’t have a quality product, you will often

struggle to generate revenue. There are, of course,

some exceptions. Timely sequels to hugely popular

films can produce huge opening weekends despite

poor reviews by resting on the laurels of the prior

film. These films weren’t afforded that luxury.

Another issue they all struggled with was lack

of interest among targeted audiences on social

media. If your target audience is not talking about

you and interacting with your posts on social

media, it is highly unlikely you’ll get them to buy

a ticket. With social media and engagement and

marketing on those channels becoming increasingly

more popular, it makes the lack of buzz even

more glaring.

But as stated earlier, this bad crop of sequels

doesn’t indicate the sky is falling. At least not

yet. The upcoming slate has some titles that are

performing notably well on social media, including

Spider-Man: Homecoming and The Lion King.

There is plenty of time to turn around

this negative narrative and challenge the

box office records set last year. When

films do well, it’s usually seen as an indication

of the product itself. When

they fail to connect with audiences,

however, the conversation often

turns to shrinking audiences. It’s

important to step back and see

the full picture: We’re barely through

half the year—there are still plenty of

sequels left on the release schedule.

PERFORMANCE OF SEQUELS AT THE BOX OFFICE SINCE MAY

Movie

TWITTER FACEBOOK INSTAGRAM

Post Likes Shares Post Likes Shares Post Likes Comments

Men in Black: International 61,288 8,047 14,220 3,339 209,514 1,411

Shaft 2,749 742 1,893 456 17,457 263

The Secret Life of Pets 2 6,073 1,100 12,034 2,879 52,827 699

Dark Phoenix 92,860 21,164 34,257 3,947 9,405 201

Godzilla: King of the Monsters 46,422 12,652 29,275 11,282 173,380 3,086

John Wick: Chapter 3–Parabellum 146,911 42,233 471,822 116,510 492,232 5,670

JULY 2019

107


INVESTOR RELATIONS

BY ROB RINDERMAN

THAT’S THE TICKET

er demand for this chain of theaters on the Atom

platform,” said Matthew Bakal, chairman and

co-founder of Atom Tickets.

“Our first priority is to make purchasing tickets

as seamless as possible for our guests,” said Mark

Zoradi, Cinemark chief executive officer. “Through

our partnership with Atom Tickets, Cinemark’s

customers will now have even more opportunities

to easily access tickets to every must-see movie.”

ATOM & AMC STUBS A-LIST

DEMONSTRATE GROWTH

>> ATOM TICKETS recently added CINEMARK

(CNK), the third-largest U.S. exhibitor (with

more than 340 locations and nearly 4,600 total

screens), to its growing social movie-ticket app network,

which has now expanded to include in excess

of 26,000 North American cinema screens.

Commencing midsummer, Atom Tickets users

will be able to purchase movie tickets at new partner

Cinemark’s cinemas. Atom’s list of exhibition

partners also includes the top two U.S.-based

theater circuits, AMC and REGAL CINEMAS (CINE-

WORLD GROUP—CNNWF), as well as HARKINS

THEATRES, National Amusements’ SHOWCASE

CINEMAS, and a number of others. In aggregate,

Atom’s movie-ticket platform presently has access

to 60 leading exhibitors, including seven of the top

10 domestic circuits.

Movie-ticket purchasers on Atom’s website or

its app can reserve advance seats to any showing

for themselves as well as their moviegoing guests,

invite friends via contacts, and rapidly check in at

the multiplex using a mobile device. In sum, Atom

Tickets facilitates convenience in today’s digital age,

virtually eliminating the need for paper tickets.

“We’re thrilled to have Cinemark as our newest

exhibitor partner to satisfy the significant consum-

>> AMC THEATRES (AMC) announced in May

that its Stubs A-List program had crossed the

800,000-member milestone, earning it designation

as North America’s leading moviegoing subscription

service. For 2019 to date, the program has

added close to 200,000 additional moviegoers,

including 100,000 during the recent spring season.

“With AMC Stubs A-List, we believe we’ve

cracked the code to make this concept successful

for AMC, our shareholders, our studio partners

and, most importantly, our guests,” said the company’s

president and CEO, Adam Aron. “Members

are seeing many more movies than they did before

A-List was created, they are seeing movies more

than once, and they’re bringing their friends and

family members along, who are paying for their

tickets at full price,” he added.

Reflecting upon AMC’s aforementioned A-List

success and several other factors, B. Riley FBR equity

analyst Eric Wold recently revisited his view on

AMC shares in early June. This followed a “surprising”

share price decline in excess of 30 percent from

its mid-April highs, compared to much smaller

declines for the other exhibitor stocks and a minor

drop in the S&P 500 index over that same period.

In Wold’s search for a rationale explaining the

steep AMC stock selloff, he came up with four

potential reasons that would represent overreactions

or misunderstandings by the general investor

base that can be taken advantage of: (1) concerns

with a softer 2020 box office outlook (see below);

(2) misunderstanding of Stubs A-List benefit; (3)

impact of lease accounting financial statement

changes; and, (4) risk of additional stock sales by

WANDA GROUP (the China-based parent company

of AMC).

In Wold’s research update he opined, “We

108 JULY 2019


elieve the changes to implied leverage ratios and

EBITDA valuation multiples within the various

financial databases have caused confusion … which

would falsely indicate an adverse change in AMC’s

leverage and liquidity situation (although nothing

has actually changed).

“In our opinion, AMC remains well positioned

to benefit from a strong underlying box office environment,

with the successful launch of the Stubs

A-List subscription program not only providing an

incremental margin tailwind, but improving visibility

into recurring revenues that can help to offset

normal seasonal/film-slate volatility,” he added.

Wold reiterated his buy rating and left the

company price target unchanged at $20. He also

pointed out that at the time of his report (June 6,

2019), shares were also sporting an attractive 6.7

percent annual dividend yield.

>> Among the recent (future) film-slate changes

causing concern for 2020 full-year industry box

office projections is DISNEY’S (DIS) pushing the

projected release date of Avatar 2 from December

18, 2020, to December 17, 2021.

The original blockbuster Avatar, which grossed

all-time-record global box office receipts of approximately

$2.8 billion, first graced domestic theater

screens back in December 2009. The highly anticipated

sequel release date already has been pushed

back several times, with the move to calendar 2021

representing the latest delay.

For folks keeping score at home and those planning

their long-range moviegoing calendars, Avatar

3 currently has a release date of December 22,

2023, Avatar 4 has a projected date of December

19, 2025, and Avatar 5 is expected to hit multiplexes

two years later, on December 17, 2027.

>> LIONSGATE ENTERTAINMENT (LGF) recently

sold the 2020 streaming and linear rights for its

theatrical titles to two properties controlled by

Disney, Hulu (OTT streaming channel acquired

from Comcast) and FX, a cable channel that was

purchased from Fox Corporation (Fox) in the $71

billion-plus blockbuster transaction that closed

earlier this year.

Rob Rinderman is an

avid follower and fan

of the cinema and

exhibition businesses.

He has assisted many

public and privately

held companies with

communications and

business development

consulting services for

over two decades and

written as a freelance

journalist covering these

industries since 2015.

JULY 2019

109


EVENT CINEMA CALENDAR

EASY RIDER 1969

Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper

CINELIFE

ENTERTAINMENT

cinelifeentertainment.com

310-309-5774

NUREYEV

Now Available

Documentary

A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN

Sun. 8/18, Weds. 8/21, Sat. 8/24

Kids & Family

SNOOPY, COME HOME

Sun. 9/29, Thurs. 10/3, Sat. 10/5

Kids & Family

FATHOM EVENTS

fathomevents.com

855-473-4612

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019:

WHISPER OF THE HEART

Mon. 7/1 (dub), Tues. 7/2 (sub)

Anime

HAMLET: NT LIVE 10TH

ANNIVERSARY

Mon. 7/8

Theater

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: IL BARBIERE

DI SIVIGLIA SUMMER ENCORE

Weds. 7/10

Opera

SOUND! EUPHONIUM:

THE MOVIE - OUR PROMISE:

A BRAND NEW DAY

Thurs. 7/11, Mon. 7/15

Anime

EASY RIDER 50TH ANIVERSARY

Sun. 7/14, Weds. 7/17

Classics

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: AIDA

SUMMER ENCORE

Weds. 7/17

Opera

MANNY PACQUIAO VS.

KEITH THURMAN

Sat. 7/20

Boxing

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

GLORY 30TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 7/21, Weds. 7/24

Classics

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

Mon. 7/22

Documentary

IS IT WRONG TO TRY TO PICK UP

GIRLS IN A DUNGEON?:

ARROW OF THE ORION

Tues. 7/23

Anime

THE MUPPET MOVIE

Thurs. 7/25, Tues. 7/30

Classics

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019: KIKI’S

DELIVERY SERVICE

30TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 7/28 (dub), Mon. 7/29 (sub),

Weds. 7/31 (dub)

Anime

KATHY GRIFFIN:

A HELL OF A STORY

Weds. 7/31

Comedy

I LOVE LUCY:

A COLORIZED CELEBRATION

Tues. 8/6

Television

DCI BIG, LOUD & LIVE

Thurs. 8/8

Sports

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

HELLO DOLLY!

50TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 8/11, Weds. 8/14

Classics

MILLENNIUM ACTRESS

Tues. 8/13, Mon. 8/19

Anime

RIFFTRAX LIVE -

THE GIANT SPIDER INVASION

Thurs. 8/15, Tues. 8/20

Comedy

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019:

MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO

Sun. 8/25 (dub), Mon. 8/26 (sub),

Weds. 8/28 (dub)

Anime

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

Sun. 9/1, Weds. 9/4

Classics

MARGARET ATWOOD:

LIVE IN CINEMAS

Tues., 9/10

Inspirational

YOU ARE HERE

Weds. 9/11

Documentary

THE GAME CHANGERS

Mon. 9/16

Documentary

PROMARE

Tues. 9/17 (dub), Thurs. 9/19 (sub)

Anime

110 JULY 2019


TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION

25TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 9/22, Tues. 9/24, Weds. 9/25

Classics

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019:

THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY

Sun. 9/29 (dub), Mon. 9/30 (sub)

Anime

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: TURANDOT

Sat. 10/12 (live), Weds. 10/16 (encore)

Opera

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

ALIEN 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 10/13, Tues. 10/15, Weds. 10/16

Classics

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: MANON

Sat. 10/26 (live), Weds. 10/30 (encore)

Opera

BOLSHOI BALLET: RAYMONDA

Sun. 10/27

Ballet

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019:

SPIRITED AWAY

Sun. 10/27 (dub), Mon. 10/28 (sub),

Weds. 10/30 (dub)

Anime

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:

MADAMA BUTTERFLY

Sat. 11/9 (live), Weds. 11/13 (encore),

Sat. 11/16 (encore)

Opera

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

THE GODFATHER: PART II

Sun. 11/10, Tues. 11/12, Weds. 11/13

Classics

BOLSHOI BALLET: LE CORSAIRE

Sun. 11/17

Ballet

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019:

PRINCESS MONONOKE

Sun. 11/17 (dub), Mon. 11/18 (sub),

Weds. 11/20 (dub)

Anime

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: AKHNATEN

Sat. 11/23 (live), Weds. 12/4 (encore)

Opera

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:

THE MAGIC FLUTE HOLIDAY

ENCORE

12/7/2019

Opera

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

WHEN HARRY MET SALLY

Sun. 12/1, Tues. 12/3

Classics

BOLSHOI BALLET:

THE NUTCRACKER

Sun. 12/15

Ballet

STUDIO GHIBLI FEST 2019: THE

TALE OF THE PRINCESS KAGUYA

Mon. 12/16 (dub), Weds. 12/18 (sub)

Anime

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: WOZZECK

Sat. 1/11 (live), Weds. 1/15 (encore)

Opera

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:THE

GERSHWINS’ PORGY AND BESS

Sat. 2/1 (live), Weds. 2/5 (encore), Sat.

2/8 (encore)

Opera

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: AGRIPPINA

Sat. 2/29 (live), Weds. 3/4 (encore)

Opera

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:

DER FLIEGENDE HOLLÄNDER

Sat. 3/14 (live), Weds. 3/18 (encore)

Opera

THE MET: LIVE IN HD: TOSCA

Sat. 4/11 (live), Weds. 4/15 (encore),

Sat. 4/18 (encore)

Opera

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:

MARIA STUARDA

Sat. 5/9 (live), Weds. 5/13 (encore)

Opera

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE

roh.org.uk/cinemas

cinema@roh.org.uk

DON GIOVANNI

Tues. 10/8

Opera

DON PASQUALE

Thurs. 10/24

Opera

CONCERTO / ENIGMA

VARIATIONS / RAYMONDA ACT III

Tues. 11/5

Ballet

COPPÉLIA

Tues. 12/10

Ballet

THE NUTCRACKER

Tues. 12/17

Ballet

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY

Thurs. 1/16

Ballet

LA BOHÈME

Weds. 1/29

Opera

NEW MARSTON / NEW SCARLETT

Tues. 2/25

Ballet

FIDELIO

Tues. 3/17

Opera

SWAN LAKE

Weds. 4/1

Ballet

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA /

PAGLIACCI

Tues. 4/21

Opera

THE DANTE PROJECT

Thurs. 5/28

Ballet

ELEKTRA

Thurs. 6/18

Opera

MYCINEMA

www.mycinema.live

APOCALYPSE NOW: FINAL CUT

August

Classics

ZEROVILLE

September

Premiere

JULY 2019

111


ON SCREEN

BY KEVIN LALLY

WIDE RELEASES

THE LION KING

JULY 19 / DISNEY

>> Disney brings photorealistic computer animation to the reimagining of

one of its most beloved cartoon features, the 1994 musical about the comingof-age

of lion cub Simba following the murder of his noble father. Director

Jon Favreau pioneered the technology with his hit 2016 version of The Jungle

Book. Donald Glover, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and the

original’s James Earl Jones head the voice cast of the African adventure, which

also spawned a long-running, award-winning Broadway musical.

CAST DONALD GLOVER, BEYONCÉ KNOWLES-CARTER, JAMES EARL JONES,

CHIWETEL EJIOFOR, ALFRE WOODARD, SETH ROGEN, BILLY EICHNER, JOHN

OLIVER, ERIC ANDRÉ RATING PG RUNNING TIME TBA

112 JULY 2019


ONCE UPON A TIME ... IN HOLLYWOOD

JULY 26 / SONY-COLUMBIA

>> Writer-director Quentin Tarantino created a sensation at

Cannes with this trippy time capsule of the L.A. movie and

TV biz in 1969, featuring Leonardo DiCaprio as a fading TV

star and Brad Pitt as his longtime stunt double. In a provocative

gambit, DiCaprio’s neighbor is the doomed Sharon Tate.

CAST LEONARDO DICAPRIO, BRAD PITT, MARGOT ROBBIE, JAMES

MARSDEN, DAKOTA FANNING, AL PACINO, TIMOTHY OLYPHANT,

LUKE PERRY, MARGARET QUALLEY, DAMIAN LEWIS, KURT RUSSELL,

BRUCE DERN, EMILE HIRSCH, LENA DUNHAM RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME 159 MIN.

FAST & FURIOUS

PRESENTS:

HOBBS & SHAW

AUGUST 2 / UNIVERSAL

>> In Furious 7, Diplomatic Security

Service agent Luke Hobbs (Dwayne

Johnson) and rogue British Special Forces

assassin Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham)

were fierce enemies. But now they must

team up to fight a genetically enhanced

anarchist (Idris Elba) in possession of

a terrifying bio-weapon. Directed by

David Leitch (Atomic Blonde, Deadpool

2), Hobbs & Shaw seeks to answer the

question: How much testosterone can

one film handle?

CAST DWAYNE JOHNSON, JASON

STATHAM, IDRIS ELBA, VANESSA KIRBY,

HELEN MIRREN, EIZA GONZÁLEZ, EDDIE

MARSAN RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

JULY 2019

113


ON SCREEN

THE ART OF RACING

IN THE RAIN

AUGUST 9

DISNEY-20TH CENTURY FOX

>> The year has already seen A Dog’s Way

Home and A Dog’s Journey. Next up for

connoisseurs of canine cinema is this tale

narrated by a philosophical dog named Enzo

(voice of Kevin Costner), whose owner is a

Formula One race car driver. Mark Bomback

adapted the bestselling novel by Garth Stein.

Simon Curtis (Goodbye Christopher Robin,

My Week with Marilyn) directed.

CAST MILO VENTIMIGLIA, AMANDA SEYFRIED,

GARY COLE, KATHY BATES, RYAN KIERA

ARMSTRONG, MARTIN DONOVAN, KEVIN

COSTNER RATING PG RUNNING TIME TBA

DORA AND THE

LOST CITY OF GOLD

AUGUST 9 / PARAMOUNT

>> The popular Nickelodeon TV heroine

Dora the Explorer makes her live-action debut

in this adventure that finds her entering

high school—and embarking on a mission to

save her parents and find a fabled lost city. Isabela

Moner of Transformers: The Last Knight

and Instant Family takes on the title role for

director James Bobin (Muppets Most Wanted).

CAST ISABELA MONER, EUGENIO DERBEZ,

EVA LONGORIA, MICHAEL PEÑA, JEFFREY

WAHLBERG, NICHOLAS COOMBE, MADELEINE

MADDEN, ADRIANA BARRAZA RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME TBA

THE KITCHEN

AUGUST 9 / WARNER BROS.

>> Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish,

and Elisabeth Moss show their range as the

wives of Hell’s Kitchen gangsters in 1978

who take over the neighborhood criminal

rackets when their husbands are sent to

prison. It’s not a comedy. Andrea Berloff,

who earned an Oscar nomination for

co-writing Straight Outta Compton, makes

her feature directing debut.

CAST MELISSA MCCARTHY, TIFFANY HADDISH,

ELISABETH MOSS, DOMHNALL GLEESON,

JAMES BADGE DALE, BRIAN D’ARCY JAMES,

MARGO MARTINDALE, COMMON, BILL CAMP

RATING R RUNNING TIME 99 MIN.

114 JULY 2019


SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK

AUGUST 9 / CBS FILMS-LIONSGATE

>> Oscar winner Guillermo del Toro is one of the producers of

this horror flick about a group of small-town teenagers in 1968

who unearth a book of grotesque, spooky stories that have a

diabolical way of coming true. André Øvredal (Trollhunter, The

Autopsy of Jane Doe) directed.

CAST ZOE MARGARET COLLETTI, MICHAEL GARZA, GABRIEL

RUSH, AUSTIN ABRAMS, DEAN NORRIS, GIL BELLOWS, LORRAINE

TOUSSAINT, AUSTIN ZAJUR, NATALIE GANZHORN RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME TBA

JULY 2019

115


ON SCREEN

WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE

AUGUST 9 / UNITED ARTISTS RELEASING

>> In this adaptation of the bestselling novel by Maria

Semple, Cate Blanchett stars as a wife and mother who

suddenly disappears after years of sacrifice for her family.

That dog-eared copy of Eat Pray Love could be the

first clue. Richard Linklater (Boyhood, Before Midnight)

directed and co-wrote the screenplay.

CAST CATE BLANCHETT, BILLY CRUDUP, KRISTEN WIIG,

EMMA NELSON, LAURENCE FISHBURNE, JAMES URBANIAK,

JUDY GREER RATING PG-13 RUNNING TIME TBA

THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2

AUGUST 14 / SONY-COLUMBIA

>> It’s been three years since the wingless Angry Birds

were propelled from smartphone screens to the big

movie screen and collected $107 million in North

America. Now, they and their green, porcine enemies

are back for a new battle overseen by directors Thurop

Van Orman and John Rice.

VOICE CAST JASON SUDEIKIS, JOSH GAD, LESLIE JONES,

BILL HADER, PETER DINKLAGE, TIFFANY HADDISH,

RACHEL BLOOM, AWKWAFINA, STERLING K. BROWN,

DANNY MCBRIDE, EUGENIO DERBEZ, PETE DAVIDSON,

NICKI MINAJ RATING PG RUNNING TIME TBA

BLINDED BY THE LIGHT

AUGUST 14 / WARNER BROS.

>> In 1987, a frustrated British Pakistani teenager

finds new inspiration when he discovers the music of

Bruce Springsteen. The new film from Bend It Like

Beckham director Gurinder Chadha had Sundance

audiences dancing in the dark.

CAST VIVEIK KALRA, HAYLEY ATWELL, ROB BRYDON,

KULVINDER GHIR, NELL WILLIAMS, AARON PHAGURA

RATING PG-13 RUNNING TIME 117 MIN.

GOOD BOYS

AUGUST 16 / UNIVERSAL

>> Comedy bad boys Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg

are among the producers of this R-rated comedy, in

which a trio of hapless sixth-graders gets into increasingly

wild trouble over the course of one day. Adorable

Jason Tremblay from Room is one of the kids dropping

the f-bomb. Gene Stupnitsky makes his feature directing

debut and penned the script with his Bad Teacher

writing partner, Lee Eisenberg.

CAST JACOB TREMBLAY, KEITH L. WILLIAMS, BRADY

NOON, MOLLY GORDON, MIDORI FRANCIS, LIL REL

HOWERY, WILL FORTE, IZAAC WANG RATING R RUNNING

TIME 89 MIN.

116 JULY 2019


47 METERS DOWN: UNCAGED

AUGUST 16 / ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS

MOTION PICTURES

>> 47 Meters Down scared up $44 million in 2017, so

it’s back to the ocean depths for this new thriller that

finds a group of young people (including the daughters of

Jamie Foxx and Sylvester Stallone) diving in the ruins of

an underwater city and encountering deadly sharks amid

the labyrinth of caves. Director Johannes Roberts hopes to

take a big bite out of the late-summer box office.

CAST JOHN CORBETT, NIA LONG, SOPHIE NÉLISSE, CORINNE

FOXX, SISTINE ROSE STALLONE, BRIANNE TJU, DAVI SANTOS

RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

THE INFORMER

AUGUST 16 / AVIRON

>> Joel Kinnaman of “The Killing” and “Altered Carbon”

is the action hero at the center of this thriller about

a former Special Ops soldier who becomes an informant

for the FBI in a sting assignment against a New York

City crime boss. But when an undercover NYPD officer

is killed during the operation, he’s targeted by both the

mob and the feds. Andrea Di Stefano (Escobar: Paradise

Lost) directed.

CAST JOEL KINNAMAN, ROSAMUND PIKE, CLIVE OWEN,

COMMON, ANA DE ARMAS RATING R RUNNING TIME 113

MIN.

JULY 2019

117


ON SCREEN

LIMITED RELEASES

BOTTOM OF THE 9TH

JULY 19 / SABAN FILMS

>> Joe Manganiello (“True Blood,”

Magic Mike) stars opposite his wife,

Sofía Vergara, in this drama about a

man who’s served 17 years in prison

for a youthful act of violence and now

hopes to pursue a late career in baseball.

Raymond De Felitta (Two Family House,

City Island) directed.

CAST JOE MANGANIELLO, SOFÍA VERGARA,

DENIS O’HARE, BURT YOUNG, MICHAEL

RISPOLI, VINCENT PASTORE RATING R

RUNNING TIME TBA

DAVID CROSBY:

REMEMBER MY NAME

JULY 19 / SONY PICTURES

CLASSICS

>> Twice inducted into the Rock & Roll

Hall of Fame (as a member of The Byrds

and Crosby, Stills & Nash), musician

David Crosby, now 77, looks back on his

eventful career—and also talks about his

addictions, health problems, and run-ins

with the law. A.J. Eaton directed.

FEATURING DAVID CROSBY, CAMERON

CROWE, STEPHEN STILLS, GRAHAM NASH,

HENRY DILTZ RATING R RUNNING TIME

95 MIN.

HONEYLAND

JULY 26 / NEON

>> A beekeeper in the mountains of

Macedonia practices ancient traditions

that are jeopardized when a family of

nomads moves next door. Ljubomir

Stefanov and Tamara Kotevska’s documentary

won three prizes at Sundance:

the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize and

Special Jury Awards for Cinematography

and Originality.

RATING NOT RATED RUNNING TIME 87

MIN.

MIKE WALLACE IS HERE

JULY 26 / MAGNOLIA PICTURES

>> At one time the words “Mike Wallace

is here” had the power to terrify the

unfortunate subjects of his aggressive

investigative reporting at CBS, especially

during his many decades at the top-rated

“60 Minutes.” Avi Belkin’s documentary

portrait includes never-before-seen

footage of this dogged and sometimes

controversial TV journalist at work.

FEATURING MIKE WALLACE RATING PG-13

RUNNING TIME 94 MIN.

THE MOUNTAIN

JULY 26 / KINO LORBER

>> In the 1950s, young introvert Andy

is hired as a photographer on Dr. Wallace

Fiennes’s tour of asylums to promote

lobotomies. As Andy begins to identify

with the patients he encounters, he becomes

caught up in California’s growing

New Age movement. Rick Alverson (The

Comedy) directed.

CAST JEFF GOLDBLUM, TYE SHERIDAN,

HANNAH GROSS, DENIS LAVANT, UDO KIER

RATING NOT RATED RUNNING TIME 106

MIN.

SKIN

JULY 26 / A24

>> Onetime Billy Elliot Jamie Bell,

currently on screens as Elton John’s lyricist

Bernie Taupin in Rocketman, shows

his range as Byron Widner, a real-life

heavily tattooed white supremacist who

renounced his bigoted ways but struggled

to sever his ties with his former cohorts.

Israeli director Guy Nattiv makes his U.S.

debut here.

CAST JAMIE BELL, DANIELLE MACDONALD,

VERA FARMIGA, DANIEL HENSHALL,

BILL CAMP, LOUISA KRAUSE RATING R

RUNNING TIME 120 MIN.

LUCE

AUGUST 2 / NEON

>> A former child soldier in Eritrea,

teenage Luce has transformed himself

into a star athlete and accomplished

debater at his Virginia high school.

But when a teacher is disturbed by the

incendiary content of one of his essays,

this inspiring role model reveals a darker,

more complex side to his personality.

Julius Onah directed this adaptation of

J.C. Lee’s stage play.

CAST NAOMI WATTS, OCTAVIA SPENCER,

KELVIN HARRISON JR., TIM ROTH, NORBERT

LEO BUTZ, ANDREA BANG RATING NOT

RATED RUNNING TIME 109 MINS.

THE NIGHTINGALE

AUGUST 2 / IFC FILMS

>> In 1825 Australia, a 21-year-old Irish

convict completes her seven-year sentence

but is brutalized by the British lieutenant

overseeing her. She then seeks revenge

with the help of an aboriginal tracker.

Writer-director Jennifer Kent unnerved

audiences in 2014 with her debut horror

tale, The Babadook.

CAST AISLING FRANCIOSI, SAM CLAFLIN,

BAYKALI GANAMBARR, DAMON HERRIMAN,

EWEN LESLIE, MICHAEL SHEASBY RATING R

RUNNING TIME 136 MIN.

PIRANHAS

AUGUST 2 / MUSIC BOX FILMS

>> Author Roberto Saviano (Gomorrah)

based his 2016 novel on a group

of teenagers in Naples who took over

local mafia extortion and drug-running

activities. Director Claudio Giovannesi’s

film adaptation earned the Silver Bear

for Best Screenplay at this year’s Berlin

Film Festival.

CAST FRANCESCO DI NAPOLI, VIVIANA

APREA, AR TEM, ALFREDO TURITTO,

VALENTINA VANNINO RATING NOT RATED

RUNNING TIME 105 MIN.

118 JULY 2019


MICHELLE WILLIAMS AND JULIANNE MOORE IN

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS’ AFTER THE WEDDING (AUGUST 9)

THEM THAT FOLLOW

AUGUST 2 / 1091 MEDIA

>> Writer-directors Britt Poulton and

Dan Madison Savage peer inside the world

of Appalachian Pentecostals who believe

that handling deadly snakes is a legitimate

test of their faith. Alice Englert plays the

pastor’s daughter who harbors an explosive

secret; the intriguing cast also includes

Booksmart’s Kaitlyn Dever and recently

anointed Oscar winner Olivia Colman.

CAST OLIVIA COLMAN, KAITLYN DEVER,

ALICE ENGLERT, JIM GAFFIGAN, WALTON

GOGGINS, THOMAS MANN RATING R

RUNNING TIME 98 MIN.

AFTER THE WEDDING

AUGUST 9 / SONY PICTURES

CLASSICS

>> Julianne Moore stars in her second

American remake of a foreign-language

film this year (the first was Gloria Bell),

portraying a wealthy New York City

executive whose daughter plans to reveal

some shocking family secrets during

her wedding. Michelle Williams plays

a visitor who’s seeking a donation for

the Indian orphanage where she volunteers.

Moore’s husband, Bart Freundlich,

helmed this English-language version of

the Oscar-nominated 2006 Danish drama

from Birdbox director Susanne Bier.

CAST MICHELLE WILLIAMS, JULIANNE

MOORE, BILLY CRUDUP, ABBY QUINN

RATING PG-13 RUNNING TIME 110 MIN.

BRIAN BANKS

AUGUST 9 / BLEECKER STREET

>> This drama from director Tom

Shadyac (Liar Liar, Bruce Almighty) is

based on the true story of Brian Banks, a

star high school football player accepted

by USC who is falsely accused of rape

and sentenced to a decade of prison

and probation. He enlists the California

Innocence Project to clear his name and

pursue his dream of playing in the NFL.

CAST ALDIS HODGE, GREG KINNEAR,

DORIAN MISSICK, SHERRI SHEPHERD,

TIFFANY DUPONT, MELANIE LIBURD

RATING PG-13 RUNNING TIME 99 MIN.

ONE CHILD NATION

AUGUST 9 / AMAZON STUDIOS

>> In 2015, China halted its draconian

policy of making it illegal for a couple to

have more than one child, but the repercussions

of that edict continue. Nanfu

Wang and Jialing Zhang’s documentary

presents chilling evidence of forced sterilizations

and abortions, child abandonment,

and government abductions.

FEATURING NANFU WANG RATING R

RUNNING TIME 89 MIN.

THE PEANUT BUTTER

FALCON

AUGUST 9 / ROADSIDE

ATTRACTIONS

>> A young man with Down syndrome

flees the retirement home where he lives

to pursue his dream of attending the

wrestling school run by his idol, The

Salt Water Redneck. He’s joined on his

journey by an outlaw on the run, played

by Shia LaBeouf. Directors Tyler Nilson

and Michael Schwartz wrote their script

specifically for lead actor Zack Gottsagen,

who has Down syndrome in real life.

CAST ZACK GOTTSAGEN, SHIA LABEOUF,

DAKOTA JOHNSON, THOMAS HADEN

CHURCH, BRUCE DERN, JON BERNTHAL,

JOHN HAWKES RATING PG-13 RUNNING

TIME 93 MIN.

AQUARELA

AUGUST 16 / SONY PICTURES

CLASSICS

>> Aquarela is a cinematic contemplation

on the beauty and raw power of

water, to be screened in select theaters at

48 frames per second. Director Victor

Kossakovsky filmed in seven countries

and across the Atlantic Ocean, from

Russia’s frozen Lake Baikal to Venezuela’s

Angel Falls.

RATING PG RUNNING TIME 104 MIN.

JULY 2019

119


BOOKING GUIDE

DISNEY

MALEFICENT: MISTRESS OF EVIL

OCT. 18, 2019

ANGELINA JOLIE

A24

646-568-6015

MIDSOMMAR

Fri, 7/3/19 LTD.

C Florence Pugh, Jack Reynor

D Ari Aster

R · Hor

THE FAREWELL

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Awkwafina, Diana Lin

D Lulu Wang

PG · Com/Dra/Fam

SKIN

Fri, 7/26/19 LTD.

C Jamie Bell, Danielle Macdonald

D Guy Nattiv

AMAZON STUDIOS

310-573-0652

brian.flanagan@amazonstudios.com

ONE CHILD NATION

Fri, 8/9/19 LTD.

D Nanfu Wang, Jialing Zhang

R · Doc

BRITTANY RUNS A

MARATHON

Fri, 8/23/19 LTD.

C Jillian Bell, Michaela Watkins

D Paul Downs Colaizzo

R · Com/Dra

THE REPORT

Fri, 9/27/19 LTD.

C Adam Driver, Annette Bening

D Scott Z. Burns

R · Thr

THE AERONAUTS

Fri, 10/25/19 LTD.

C Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones

D Tom Harper

R · Act/Adv · IMAX

HONEY BOY

Fri, 11/8/19 LTD.

C Shia LaBeouf, Noah Jupe

D Alma Har’el

R · Dra

AVIRON PICTURES

THE INFORMER

Fri, 8/16/19 LTD.

C Joel Kinnaman, Rosamund Pike

D Andrea Di Stefano

R · Cri/Dra

BLUE FOX

ENTERTAINMENT

William Gruenberg

william@bluefoxentertainment.com

SAVING ZOË

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Laura Marano,

Vanessa Marano

D Jeffrey G. Hunt

R · Dra

PURGE OF KINGDOMS

Fri, 7/19/19 LTD.

R

KILLERMAN

Fri, 8/30/19 LTD.

C Liam Hemsworth,

Emory Cohen

D Malik Bader

R · Act/Cri/Dra

BLEECKER STREET

THE ART OF SELF-DEFENSE

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Jesse Eisenberg,

Alessandro Nivola

D Riley Stearns

NR · Com

BRIAN BANKS

Fri, 8/9/19 LTD.

C Aldis Hodge, Greg Kinnear

D Tom Shadyac

NR · Dra

DISNEY

818-560-1000

Ask for Distribution

THE LION KING

Fri, 7/19/19 WIDE

C Donald Glover, Beyoncé

D Jon Favreau

PG · Fan

3D/IMAX/Dolby Vis/Atmos

MALEFICENT:

MISTRESS OF EVIL

Fri, 10/18/19 WIDE

C Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning

D Joachim Rønning

NR · Fan

FROZEN 2

Wed, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Idina Menzel, Kristen Bell

D Jennifer Lee, Chris Buck

NR · Ani · 3D/ Dolby Vis/Atmos

STAR WARS:

THE RISE OF SKYWALKER

Fri, 12/20/19 WIDE

C Daisy Ridley, Adam Driver

D J.J. Abrams

NR · Act/Adv/SF

3D/IMAX/Dolby Vis/Atmos

ONWARD

Fri, 3/6/20 WIDE

C Chris Pratt, Tom Holland

D Dan Scanlon

NR · Ani · 3D

MULAN

Fri, 3/27/20 WIDE

C Yifei Liu

D Niki Caro

NR · Fan/Act/Adv · 3D/IMAX

UNTITLED MARVEL FILM

Fri, 5/1/20 WIDE

NR · 3D

ARTEMIS FOWL

Fri, 5/29/20 WIDE

C Ferdia Shaw, Josh Gad

D Kenneth Branagh

NR · Fan · 3D

SOUL

Fri, 6/19/20 WIDE

D Pete Docter

NR · Ani · 3D

JUNGLE CRUISE

Fri, 7/24/20 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson, Emily Blunt

D Jaume Collet-Serra

NR · Act/Adv

THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN

Fri, 8/14/20 WIDE

NR

120 JULY 2019


ENTERTAINMENT

STUDIOS MOTION

PICTURES

310-277-3500

Ask for Distribution

BETHANY HAMILTON:

UNSTOPPABLE

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

D Aaron Lieber

PG · Doc

47 METERS DOWN:

UNCAGED

Fri, 8/16/19 WIDE

C John Corbett, Nia Long

D Johannes Roberts

NR · Hor/Thr

ARCTIC DOGS

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C Jeremy Renner, James Franco

D Aaron Woodley

PG · Ani

FOX

STUBER

JULY 12, 2019

DAVE BAUTISTA AND KUMAIL NANJIANI

ALL RISE

Fri, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Jennifer Hudson,

Kelvin Harrison Jr.

D Anthony Mandler

R · Dra

FOCUS FEATURES

424-214-636

DOWNTON ABBEY

Fri, 9/20/19 WIDE

C Hugh Bonneville,

Laura Carmichael

D Michael Engler

PG · Dra

FOX

310-369-1000 · 212-556-2400

STUBER

Fri, 7/12/19 WIDE

C Dave Bautista, Kumail Nanjiani

D Michael Dowse

R · Act/Com

THE ART OF RACING

IN THE RAIN

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Milo Ventimiglia,

Amanda Seyfried

D Simon Curtis

NR · Act/Dra

AD ASTRA

Fri, 9/20/19 WIDE

C Brad Pitt

D James Gray

NR · SF/Thr

THE WOMAN

IN THE WINDOW

Fri, 10/4/19 WIDE

C Amy Adams

D Joe Wright

NR · Cri/Dra/Mys

FORD v. FERRARI

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

C Matt Damon, Christian Bale

D James Mangold

NR · Dra

SPIES IN DISGUISE

Wed, 12/25/19 WIDE

C Will Smith, Tom Holland

D Nick Bruno, Troy Quane

NR · Ani

UNDERWATER

Fri, 1/10/20 WIDE

NR · Act

THE KING’S MAN

Fri, 2/14/20 WIDE

D Matthew Vaughn

NR · Act/Adv

CALL OF THE WILD

Fri, 2/21/20 WIDE

NR · Dra

THE NEW MUTANTS

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

C Anya Taylor-Joy,

Maisie Williams

D Josh Boone

NR · Act/Hor/SF

Dolby Vis/Atmos

FREE GUY

Fri, 7/3/20 WIDE

C Ryan Reynolds

D Shawn Levy

NR · Com/Act

FOX SEARCHLIGHT

212-556-2400

READY OR NOT

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

C Samara Weaving, Adam Brody

D Tyler Gillett,

Matt Bettinelli-Olpin

R · Hor

JOJO RABBIT

Fri, 10/18/19 WIDE

C Roman Griffin Davis,

Thomasin McKenzie

D Taika Waititi

NR · Com

GOOD DEED

ENTERTAINMENT

FIRECRACKERS

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Michaela Kurimsky,

Karena Evans

D Jasmin Mozaffari

NR · Dra

IFC FILMS

bookings@ifcfilms.com

SWORD OF TRUST

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Marc Maron, Jillian Bell

D Lynn Shelton

R · Com

TRESPASSERS

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Janel Parrish, Angela Trimbur

D Orson Oblowitz

NR · Hor

THE NIGHTINGALE

Fri, 8/2/19 LTD.

C Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin

D Jennifer Kent

R · Dra

VITA & VIRGINIA

Fri, 8/23/19 LTD.

C Gemma Arterton,

Elizabeth Debicki

D Chanya Button

NR · Dra

JULY 2019

121


BOOKING GUIDE

MIKE WALLACE IS HERE

Fri, 7/26/19 LTD.

D Avi Belkin

PG-13 · Doc

COLD CASE HAMMARSKJOLD

Fri, 8/16/19 LTD.

D Mads Brügger

NR · Doc

MYCINEMA

480-430-7017

APOCALYPSE NOW:

FINAL CUT

Fri, 8/19/19 LTD.

C Marlon Brando, Martin Sheen

D Francis Ford Coppola

R · Dra/War

LIONSGATE

ANGEL HAS FALLEN

AUG. 23, 2019

GERARD BUTLER AND MORGAN FREEMAN

ZEROVILLE

Fri, 9/6/19 LTD.

C James Franco, Megan Fox

D James Franco

NR · Com/Dra

OFFICIAL SECRETS

Fri, 8/30/19 LTD.

C Keira Knightley, Ralph Fiennes

D Gavin Hood

NR · Dra

LORO

Fri, 9/13/19 LTD.

C Toni Servillo, Elena Sofia Ricci

D Paolo Sorrentino

NR

DEPRAVED

Fri, 9/13/19 LTD.

C David Call, Joshua Leonard

D Larry Fessenden

NR · Hor

JANUS FILMS

TINY: THE LIFE OF

ERIN BLACKWELL

Fri, 7/19/19 LTD.

D Martin Bell

NR · Doc

KINO LORBER

A FAITHFUL MAN

Fri, 7/19/19 LTD.

C Laetitia Casta, Lily-Rose Depp

D Louis Garrel

NR · Rom/Com/Dra

THE MOUNTAIN

Fri, 7/26/19 LTD.

C Jeff Goldblum, Tye Sheridan

D Rick Alverson

NR · Dra

ANTHROPOCENE:

THE HUMAN EPOCH

Wed, 9/25/19 WIDE

C Alicia Vikander

D Jennifer Baichwal, Nicholas de

Pencier, Edward Burtynsky

NR · Doc

LIONSGATE

310-309-8400

SCARY STORIES TO

TELL IN THE DARK

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Zoe Colletti, Michael Garza

D André Øvredal

NR · Hor/Sus

ANGEL HAS FALLEN

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

C Morgan Freeman,

Gerard Butler

D Ric Roman Waugh

NR · Act/Thr

TOD@S CAEN

Fri, 8/30/19 WIDE

C Martha Higareda,

Omar Chaparro

D Ariel Winograd

NR · Rom/Com

RAMBO: LAST BLOOD

Fri, 9/20/19 WIDE

C Sylvester Stallone, Paz Vega

D Adrian Grunberg

NR · Act

MIDWAY

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C Woody Harrelson,

Patrick Wilson

D Roland Emmerich

NR · Act/Dra/War

KNIVES OUT

Fri, 11/27/19 WIDE

C Daniel Craig, Chris Evans

D Rian Johnson

NR · Dra/Sus

UNTITLED CHARLES

RANDOLPH FILM

Fri, 12/20/19 WIDE

C Charlize Theron,

Margot Robbie

D Jay Roach

NR · Dra/Bio

RUN

Fri, 1/24/20 WIDE

C Sarah Paulson, Kiera Allen

D Aneesh Chaganty

NR · Sus

I STILL BELIEVE

Fri, 3/20/20 WIDE

C Jon Erwin, Andrew Erwin

NR · Dra

MAGNOLIA PICTURES

212-379-9704

Neal Block

nblock@magpictures.com

NEON

hal@neonrated.com

HONEYLAND

Fri, 7/26/19 LTD.

D Tamara Kotevska,

Ljubomir Stefanov

NR · Doc

LUCE

Fri, 8/2/19 LTD.

C Naomi Watts, Octavia Spencer

D Julius Onah

NR · Dra/Thr

MONOS

Fri, 9/13/19 LTD.

C Julianne Nicholson,

Moisés Arias

D Alejandro Landes

NR · Thr/Dra

PARASITE

Fri, 10/11/19 LTD.

C Song Kang-ho, Chang Hyae-jin

D Bong Joon-ho

NR · Com/Dra/Thr

PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON

FIRE

Fri, 12/6/19 LTD.

C Noémie Merlant, Adèle Haenel

D Céline Sciamma

NR · Dra/Rom

122 JULY 2019


CLEMENCY

Fri, 12/27/19 LTD.

C Alfre Woodard, Aldis Hodge

D Chinoye Chukwu

NR · Dra

1091

Richard Matson

323-540-5476

rmatson@theorchard.com

THEM THAT FOLLOW

Fri, 8/2/19 LTD.

C Olivia Colman, Kaitlyn Dever

D Britt Poulton,

Dan Madison Savage

R · Thr

BEFORE YOU KNOW IT

Fri, 8/30/19 LTD.

NR · Com

OSCILLOSCOPE

LABORATORIES

212-219-4029

PARAMOUNT

CRAWL

JULY 12, 2019

KAYA SCODELARIO

JAY MYSELF

Fri, 7/31/19 LTD.

D Stephen Wilkes

NR · Doc

MIDNIGHT TRAVELER

Fri, 9/18/19 LTD.

D Hassan Fazili

NR · Doc

PARAMOUNT

323-956-5000

CRAWL

Fri, 7/12/19 WIDE

C Kaya Scodelario, Barry Pepper

D Alexandre Aja

R · Hor

DORA AND THE

OST CITY OF GOLD

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Isabela Moner,

Eugenio Derbez

D James Bobin

NR · Adv

GEMINI MAN

Fri, 10/11/19 WIDE

C Will Smith,

Mary Elizabeth Winstead

D Ang Lee

NR · Act/Thr · Dolby Vis/Atmos

TERMINATOR: DARK FATE

Fri, 11/1/19 WIDE

C Arnold Schwarzenegger,

Linda Hamilton

D Tim Miller

NR · Act/SF · Dolby Vis/Atmos

PLAYING WITH FIRE

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

NR · Com

RHYTHM SECTION

Fri, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Blake Lively

D Reed Morano

NR · Thr

LIMITED PARTNERS

Fri, 1/10/20 WIDE

C Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne

NR · Com

SONIC THE HEDGEHOG

Fri, 2/14/20 WIDE

C James Marsden, Ben Schwartz

D Jeff Fowler

NR · Ani/Adv/Com

UNTITLED A QUIET

PLACE SEQUEL

Fri, 3/20/20 WIDE

NR · Hor/Thr

THE LOVEBIRDS

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

NR · Rom/Com

THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE

Fri, 5/22/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

TOP GUN

Fri, 6/26/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv

RUMBLE

Fri, 7/31/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

INFINITE

Fri, 8/7/20 WIDE

NR · SF

ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

323-882-8490

MARIANNE & LEONARD:

WORDS OF LOVE

Fri, 7/5/19 WIDE

D Nick Broomfield

R · Doc

THE PEANUT BUTTER

FALCON

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson

D Michael Schwartz, Tyler Nilson

NR · Com

FIDDLER: A MIRACLE OF

MIRACLES

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

D Max Lewkowicz

PG-13

JUDY

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

C Renee Zellweger

D Rupert Goold

PG-13 · Bio · Dolby Atmos

THE LAST FULL MEASURE

Fri, 10/25/19 WIDE

SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS

SUMMER NIGHT

Fri, 7/12/19 WIDE

C Ellar Coltrane, Ian Nelson

D Joseph Cross

NR · Com/Dra

THIS IS NOT BERLIN

Fri, 8/23/19 LTD.

C Xabiani Ponce De León,

José Antonio Toledano

D Hari Sama

NR · Dra

SONY

212-833-8500

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM

HOME

Fri, 7/2/19 WIDE

C Tom Holland, Jake Gyllenhaal

D Jon Watts

PG-13 · Act/SF

3D/IMAX/Dolby Vis/Atmos

JULY 2019

123


BOOKING GUIDE

ESCAPE ROOM 2

Fri, 8/14/20 WIDE

NR · Hor/Thr

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Tom Prassis

212-833-4981

DAVID CROSBY:

REMEMBER MY NAME

Fri, 7/19/19 LTD.

D A.J. Eaton

R · Doc

AFTER THE WEDDING

Fri, 8/9/19 LTD.

C Michelle Williams,

Julianne Moore

D Bart Freundlich

PG-13 · Dra

SONY

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

NOV. 11, 2019

TOM HANKS

AQUARELA

Fri, 8/16/19 LTD.

D Victor Kossakovsky

PG · Doc

ONCE UPON A TIME IN

HOLLYWOOD

Fri, 7/26/19 WIDE

C Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt

D Quentin Tarantino

NR · Dra

THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2

Fri, 8/14/19 WIDE

C Jason Sudeikis, Josh Gad

D Thurop Van Orman, John Rice

PG · Ani

OVERCOMER

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

C Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer

D Alex Kendrick

PG · Dra/Rel

ZOMBIELAND 2: DOUBLE TAP

Fri, 10/18/19 WIDE

C Emma Stone,

Woody Harrelson

D Ruben Fleischer

NR · Act/Hor/Com

Dolby Vis/Atmos

BLACK AND BLUE

Fri, 10/25/19 WIDE

C Naomie Harris, Tyrese Gibson

D Deon Taylor

NR · Act/Cri

CHARLIE’S ANGELS

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

C Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott

D Elizabeth Banks

NR · Act/Com

Dolby Vis/Atmos

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE

NEIGHBORHOOD

Fri, 11/22/19 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Marielle Heller

NR · Dra

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE

JUNGLE SEQUEL

Fri, 12/13/19 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson

NR · Com/Act/Adv

Dolby Vis/Atmos

LITTLE WOMEN

Fri, 12/25/19 WIDE

D Greta Gerwig

NR · Dra

GRUDGE

Fri, 1/3/20 WIDE

D Nicolas Pesce

NR · Hor

MILLER/LORD PRODUCED

SPA MOVIE

Fri, 1/10/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

BAD BOYS FOR LIFE

Fri, 1/17/20 WIDE

NR · Act

PETER RABBIT 2

Fri, 2/7/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

BLOODSHOT

Fri, 2/21/20 WIDE

NR · Act · Dolby Atmos

UNTITLED SPA ANIMATED

FRANCHISE

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

FATHERHOOD

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

C Kevin Hart, Melody Hurd

D Paul Weitz

NR · Dra

UNTITLED AFFIRM FILMS

COACH PROJECT

Fri, 4/10/20 WIDE

NR

GREYHOUND

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Aaron Schneider

NR · Dra/War

UNTITLED GHOSTBUSTERS

Fri, 7/10/20 WIDE

NR · Hor/Com

UNTITLED SONY ANIMATION

FILM

Fri, 7/24/20 WIDE

NR · Ani

SONY/MARVEL MORBIUS

Fri, 7/31/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Thr/SF

WHERE’S MY ROY COHN?

Fri, 9/20/19 LTD.

D Matt Tyrnauer

NR · Doc

PAIN AND GLORY

Fri, 10/4/19 LTD.

C Antonio Banderas,

Penélope Cruz

D Pedro Almodóvar

NR · Dra

FRANKIE

Fri, 10/25/19 LTD.

C Marisa Tomei,

Brendan Gleeson

D Ira Sachs

NR · Dra

STX ENTERTAINMENT

310-742-2300

MY SPY

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

C Dave Bautista, Kristen Schaal

D Peter Segal

NR · Act/Com

PLAYMOBIL: THE MOVIE

Fri, 8/30/19 WIDE

C Anya Taylor-Joy,

Daniel Radcliffe

D Lino DiSalvo

NR · Ani/Fam

124 JULY 2019


HUSTLERS

Fri, 9/13/19 WIDE

C Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez

D Lorene Scafaria

NR · Dra

21 BRIDGES

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

C Chadwick Boseman

D Brian Kirk

NR · Cri/Thr/Act

COUNTDOWN

Fri, 10/25/19 WIDE

C Elizabeth Lail, Anne Winters

D Justin Dec

NR · Hor

BRAHMS: THE BOY II

Fri, 12/6/19 WIDE

C Katie Holmes

NR · Hor/Thr

UNITED ARTISTS

RELEASING

310-724-5678

Ask for Distribution

WHERE’D YOU GO

BERNADETTE

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Cate Blanchett, Billy Crudup

D Richard Linklater

PG-13 · Com/Dra

THE ADDAMS FAMILY

Fri, 10/11/19 WIDE

C Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron

D Conrad Vernon

NR · Ani · Dolby Vis/Atmos

BAD TRIP

Fri, 10/25/19 WIDE

C Eric Andre, Lil Rel Howery

D Kitao Sakurai

NR · Com

BOND 25

Fri, 4/8/20 WIDE

C Daniel Craig

D Cary Joji Fukunaga

NR · Act/Thr

LEGALLY BLONDE 3

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

C Reese Witherspoon

NR · Com

BILL & TED FACE THE MUSIC

Fri, 8/21/20 WIDE

C Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter

NR · Com/Adv

UNITED ARTISTS RELEASING

WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE

AUG 9, 2019

CATE BLANCHETT

UNIVERSAL

818-777-1000

FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS:

HOBBS & SHAW

Fri, 8/2/19 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson,

Jason Statham

D David Leitch

NR · Act/Adv · Dolby Vis/Atmos

GOOD BOYS

Fri, 8/16/19 WIDE

C Jacob Tremblay,

Keith L. Williams

D Gene Stupnitsky

R · Com

ABOMINABLE

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

C Chloe Bennet

D Jill Culton

NR · Ani · 3D/Dolby Atmos

THE HUNT

Fri, 9/27/19 WIDE

D Craig Zobel

NR · Act/Thr

LAST CHRISTMAS

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C Emilia Clarke, Henry Golding

D Paul Feig

NR · Rom/Com

QUEEN & SLIM

Fri, 11/27/19 WIDE

NR · Dra/Rom

BLACK CHRISTMAS

Fri, 12/13/19 WIDE

C Imogen Poots, Aleyse Shannon

D Sophia Takal

NR · Hor

CATS

Fri, 12/20/19 WIDE

D Tom Hooper

NR · Mus

1917

Fri, 12/25/19 WIDE

C George McKay,

Dean-Charles Chapman

D Sam Mendes

NR · Dra/War

UNTITLED BLUMHOUSE

PRODUCTIONS

Fri, 1/3/20 WIDE

NR · Hor

THE VOYAGE OF DOCTOR

DOLITTLE

Fri, 1/17/20 WIDE

C Robert Downey, Jr.,

Ralph Fiennes

D Stephen Gaghan

NR · Com · Dolby Vis/Atmos

THE TURNING

Fri, 1/24/20 WIDE

C Mackenzie Davis,

Finn Wolfhard

D Floria Sigismondi

NR · Thr

THE PHOTOGRAPH

Fri, 2/14/20 WIDE

C Issa Rae, Lakeith Stanfield

D Stella Meghie

NR · Rom

THE INVISIBLE MAN

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

C Elisabeth Moss, Storm Reid

NR · Hor

TROLLS WORLD TOUR

Fri, 4/17/20 WIDE

C Anna Kendrick,

Justin Timberlake

D Walt Dohrn

NR · Ani

FAST & FURIOUS 9

Fri, 5/22/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv

CANDYMAN

Fri, 6/12/20 WIDE

D Nia DaCosta

NR · Hor

UNTITLED JUDD APATOW/

PETE DAVIDSON COMEDY

Fri, 6/19/20 WIDE

D Judd Apatow

NR · Com

MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU

Fri, 7/3/20 WIDE

NR

JULY 2019

125


BOOKING GUIDE

WARNER BROS.

WONDER WOMAN 1984

JUNE 5, 2020

KRISTEN WIIG

UNTITLED NEXT PURGE

CHAPTER

Fri, 7/10/20 WIDE

NR · Hor

VERTICAL

ENTERTAINMENT

BREAKER

Fri, 7/5/19 LTD.

C Chantz Marcus, Peter O’Brien

D Wade F. Jackson

NR · Dra

LYING AND STEALING

Fri, 7/12/19 LTD.

C Theo James, Emily Ratajkowski

D Matt Aselton

NR · Thr

WARNER BROS.

818-977-1850

THE KITCHEN

Fri, 8/9/19 WIDE

C Melissa McCarthy,

Tiffany Haddish

D Andrea Berloff

NR · Cri/Thr

BLINDED BY THE LIGHT

Fri, 8/14/19 WIDE

PG-13 · Bio/Com/Mus

Dolby Vis/Atmos

IT CHAPTER TWO

Fri, 9/6/19 WIDE

C James McAvoy,

Jessica Chastain

D Andy Muschietti

NR · Hor · IMAX/Dolby Vis/Atmos

THE CONJURING 3

Fri, 9/11/19 WIDE

NR · Hor

THE GOLDFINCH

Fri, 9/13/19 WIDE

C Ansel Elgort, Nicole Kidman

D John Crowley

R · Dra

JOKER

Fri, 10/4/19 WIDE

C Joaquin Phoenix

D Todd Phillips

NR · Act · Dolby Vis/Atmos

UNTITLED BEN

AFFLECK MOVIE

Fri, 10/18/19 WIDE

NR

MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN

Fri, 11/1/19 WIDE

NR · Dra

DOCTOR SLEEP

Fri, 11/8/19 WIDE

C Ewan McGregor,

Rebecca Ferguson

D Mike Flanagan

NR · Hor

THE GOOD LIAR

Fri, 11/15/19 WIDE

C Ian McKellen, Helen Mirren

D Bill Condon

NR · Dra

SUPERINTELLIGENCE

Fri, 12/20/19 WIDE

C Melissa McCarthy,

Bobby Cannavale

D Ben Falcone

PG · Act/Com

JUST MERCY

Fri, 1/17/20 WIDE

C Brie Larson, Michael B. Jordan

D Destin Daniel Cretton

PG-13 · Dra

BIRDS OF PREY

Fri, 2/7/20 WIDE

C Margot Robbie,

Mary Elizabeth Winstead

D Cathy Yan

NR · Act/Adv

GODZILLA VS KONG

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

NR · SF/Act

UNTITLED DC FILM

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

NR · Act/Adv/SF

SCOOBY-DOO ANIMATED

FEATURE

Fri, 5/15/20 WIDE

NR · Com

WONDER WOMAN 1984

Fri, 6/5/20 WIDE

C Gal Gadot, Kristen Wiig

D Patty Jenkins

NR · Act/Adv/Fan · IMAX/3D

IN THE HEIGHTS

Fri, 6/26/20 WIDE

NR

Mus/Rom/Dra

TENET

Fri, 7/17/20 WIDE

D Christopher Nolan

NR

WELL GO USA

ENTERTAINMENT

FREAKS

Fri, 8/23/19 WIDE

D Emile Hirsch, Bruce Dern

D Zach Lipovsky, Adam B. Stein

NR · SF/Thr/Mys

126 JULY 2019


OUR SPONSORS

ISABELA MONER

STARS IN

DORA AND THE

LOST CITY OF GOLD

Barco / Cinionic

inside front cover

Cardinal Sound 128

C. Cretors & Company 33

The Coca-Cola Company 99

Dolphin Seating 57

Encore Performance Seating

back cover

Enpar 81

Geneva Convention 47

Gold Medal Products 109

Harkness Screens 9

Home Market Foods 27

Irwin Seating 19

LightSpeedDepth Q 128

MOC Insurance 5

National CineMedia 91

Packaging Concepts Inc. 73

Paradigm Design 13

Proctor Companies 37

QSC 3

Ready Theatre Systems 11

COMING IN

AUGUST

SHOWSOUTH COVERAGE &

AWARD WINNERS

CINESHOW COVERAGE &

AWARD WINNERS

ANNIVERSARY:

UNITED ARTISTS CENTENNIAL

TECH TALK: SOLAR ENERGY

ART HOUSE CONVERGENCE REGIONAL RECAP

INTERVIEW WITH MARK ZORADI OF CINEMARK

Retriever Software 41

Screenvision Media 95

Sensible Cinema 128

Sonic Equipment 23

Spotlight Cinema Networks 25, 83

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 59

Telescopic Seating Systems

inside back cover

VIP Cinema Seating 1

Webedia Movies Pro 65, 77, 97

JULY 2019

127


MARKETPLACE

Passive Polarization

for 3D Digital Cinema

Fast, Bright, Reliable...

Quality you can Trust.

Over 2,500

locations worldwide.

Patented in the US, EU, CAN & CHINA

HELP WANTED

SENIOR LEVEL CHANNEL ACCOUNT MAN-

AGER wanted by NEC Display Solutions for

expanding Digital Cinema group. Seeking

minimum 8 years’ experience within hi-tech,

cinema or Pro A/V industry to drive strategic

growth. Field-based, travel throughout US

& Canada required. Apply: www.necdisplay.

com/careers

FOR SALE

VINTAGE TWO-SCREEN MOVIE THEATER,

484 seats with the iconic marquee characteristic

of old movie theaters with updated

digital technology, 2k and 7.1 sound system.

Excellent opportunity for exhibitors to invest

in Puerto Rico in an iconic classic movie theater.

Serious inquiries only. For a Powerpoint

presentation and equipment list, email to

cecilesola46@gmail.com or call 787-398-0912.

HISTORIC CENTRAL ILLINOIS, 5-SCREEN

MOVIE THEATER. Many upgrades including

digital projection and new seats. Free municipal

and theater-owned parking. Serious

inquires contact Peter (217) 652-9700.

USED DIGITAL PROJECTORS AND SOUND

EQUIPMENT. 3 Solaria One Plus projectors

with NAS and projector base. 14 JBL stage

speakers, 12 JBL surround speakers. Processors

and monitors. Contact: boothmw@

chakerestheatres.com or call Mark at (937)

323-6447.

USED DIGITAL PROJECTORS, Five complete

booths including sound equipment. Three

years old. Contact seller at moviescope1000@

gmail.com.

BISTRO CHAIRS FOR SALE: (392) Red vinyl

and (328) gray vinyl seven year old Seating

Concepts Palermo style in-theatre bistro

chairs to be available in early Spring 2018. All

chairs equipped with tray tables. Some of

the seats will require covers/repairs. Please

contact mhooker@aztcorporation.com or

972-428-2943 for more information.

TWO BRAND NEW 3000 watts Christie Xenon

lamps for 35mm projectors. Contact: Atul

Desai 949-291-5700.

PREFERRED SEATING COMPANY, your

source for new, used and refurbished theater

and stadium seating. Buying and selling

used seating is our specialty. Call toll-free

866-922-0226 or visit our website www.‐preferred-seating.com.

18 SETS OF USED 35MM AUTOMATED

PROJECTION SYSTEM (comes with Projector,

Console, Automation Unit and Platter)

comprising of 10 sets of Christie and 8 sets

of Strong 35mm system available on ‘as is

where is’ basis in Singapore. Contact seller at

engthye_lim@cathay.com.sg

APPROXIMATELY 2,000 SEATS FOR SALE.

MOBILIARIO high-back rockers with cup

holders. Located in Connecticut. Contact

(203)758-2148.

6 PLEX EQUIPMENT PACKAGE. Six complete

booths digital projectors/sound, 72 speakers,

seats, screens/frames, concession equipment,

computers, led signs/marquees, safe/

misc equipment. Serious inquiries only. For

equipment list email contact@digitalequipmenttechnologies.com

or call 801-548-0108

or fax 801-281-0482.

www.depthq3d.com

CLASSIC GEM FOR SALE. Tiny, hand-made

storefront arts cinema, 99 seats, in historic

seaside community north of Boston. Ongoing

37 years. Profitable. Remarkable community

support. Original owners getting old. Contact

portmovies@aol.com

BE READY FOR YOUR NEXT DRIVE-IN OR

OPEN AIR CINEMA EVENT! Used inflatable

screens from 5m (16ft) to 27m (88ft) width for

sale. Contact Mr. Alexander Thye, info@moviescreens-technologies.com.

HELP WANTED

TRI STATE THEATRE SUPPLY in Memphis, TN

has openings for experienced Digital Cinema

Techs nationwide. Please send your resume to

include qualifications, certifications and salary

requirements to fred@tristatetheatre.com

THEATRE MANAGEMENT POSITIONS

AVAILABLE Pacific Northwest Theatre Company.

Previous management experience

required. Work weekends, evenings and

holidays. Send resume and salary history to

movietheatrejobs@gmail.com

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

The three-screen Stavros Niarchos Foundation

Parkway Film Center in Baltimore is seeking

an OPERATIONS DIRECTOR to oversee

all aspects of running the theater and concessions.

The Film Center, a partnership among

the Maryland Film Festival, Johns Hopkins

University and MICA will open in spring of

2017 and offer a broad range of the world’s

best art-house, independent, documentary,

and classic cinema. The full job description

and application instructions are found at mdfilmfest.com/about-the-festival/jobs.php.

128 JULY 2019


CLASSIC AD FOUR-PAGE INSERT FROM JANUARY 27, 1945


CLASSIC COVER AUGUST 19, 1974

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