Gateway To The Copper Corridor

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2019 Summer Gateway, Visitors Guide.

Locals frequent community disc golf course

Globe

By Susanne Jerome

Staff Reporter

As the threesome of

Danny Trammell,

Justin Justice and Stephen

Palmer hit the links at 7

a.m. on a Saturday, you could

see that Disc Golf is not your

grand-dog’s Frisbee game, nor

is it your grandfather’s golf

game either. Instead of a bag

full golf clubs, players carry

a selection of discs on to the

course at the Old Dominion

Mine Park.

These Golf Discs are smaller

than ordinary Frisbees, and

the “drivers”, which are made

to go straight and far by holding

their spin are smaller still

and not meant to be kind to the

mouths of dogs. Putter discs

are larger and more pliable.

They don’t have to go far before

the spin fades, and they

veer in the opposite direction

of the spin.

Since it is more of a loss, (a

disk can cost $15) players often

put their phone numbers on

their disks in order to get them

back, which they often do. It’s

Susanne Jerome/Gateway

Local disc golfers Justin Justice, Stephen Palmer, and Danny

Trammell pose by their first target.

a point of honor in the sport.

Also, a finder can post the disk

on a disk pro shop’s web page

for a store discount of $3 and a

disk owner can retrieve a disk

for $3 is cash. Trammell says

people have gotten disks back

after they have lain hidden for

over two years. In latter parts

of the Old Dominion course

the players planned to spot for

each other because of the disk

eating brush around the fairway

there.

As they complete the first

hole, players emote about mistakes

they made in a game that

is more physical but just as

precise as golf. There is a huge

butterfly effect, tiny variations

at the launch causing huge and

discombobulating variations

in the outcome. On the first

hole, one player held on too

long as he ran up the marker to

release his disc. It went all the

more straight and true due to

his firm grip, as Danny Trammell

explained it, but in the

wrong direction.

The par for the nine-hole

course is 30, and the first hole

is an 890 ft. par 4. Since a pro

can throw at much as 500 feet,

he (or she) could finish it in

two throws. A good throw for

an average amateur is about

300 feet.

Now days the hippie and

canine catch aura around the

sport is pretty much dissipated

as it gains maturity. According

to the Pro Disc Golf Association

there are 1600 courses in

the country, most of them being

free.

The courses set on smallball

golf courses tend to cost

something but are much

cheaper than the old game of

golf.

The Pro Disc Golf Association

claims 9000 members. A

winner in a big tournament

can earn as much as $5,000.

And now pros are beginning

to acquire sponsors.

Susanne Jerome/Gateway

Stephen Palmer putts at the Old

Dominion Mine Park Disc Golf Course.

Susanne Jerome/Gateway

Justin Justice throws from the red disc,

marking where his last throw landed.

Susanne Jerome/Gateway

Danny Trammell drives to his next target.

Gateway - Summer 2019 11

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