World 08-07-19

coolvt

The World
World Publications
Senior Living Section
Vermont Car Show

© ADOBE STOCK

The Vermont Antique And Classic Car Meet

AUGUST 9, 10, & 11, 2019

FARRS FIELD • ROUTE 2, WATERBURY

Flea Market, Car Corral, Parade, Street Dance and much more!

Sponsored by the Vermont Automobile Enthusiasts

RAIN

OR

SHINE!

SEE

PAGES

4 & 5

ANTIQUE

RACE CARS

&

TRACTORS

CN VN’ V N

Vol. 48, No. 14 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 August 7, 2019

On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

W O R L D C L A S S M U S I C

I N T H E H E A R T O F V E R M O N T

2019 Vermont Dairy Farm

of the Year

page 2

Low Unemployment Rates

Spur Innovation and

Opportunity for

CVMC Nurses

page 11

Senior

Living

Central Vermont

Chamber Music Festival

August 12th - 25th

Randolph & Woodstock

MEDIA SPONSOR

pages 17-24

INSERTED IN THIS

WEEK’S WORLD

May not be available in all papers

SEARS HOMETOWN

www.cvcmf.org

Box Office 802.728.6464

August 9-10 th • Fri 9-8, Sat 9-6

ANNIVERSARY

SALE

20 % OFF

STOREWIDE!

Discount applies to regular price merchandise only. Some exclusions may apply due to manufacturers pricing restrictions. Excludes Yeti and Gun Safes.

359 N Main St.

Barre, Vermont

(802) 476-7446


VERMONT TIRE & SERVICE

Buying 4 All Season Tires? Get $290 In Extras!

FREE

ALL WHEEL ALIGNMENT

FREE

TIRE ROTATION

FREE

Flat Repair

FREE

Tire Mounting

Remember Vermont Tire For All Your Car Maintenance And Repair Needs

VERMONT

8 State

Inspection

IS DUE

Engine

Diagnostics

A/C

Service

Exhaust

Repair

South Burlington

1877 Williston Rd.

658-1333

1800-639-1901

Mon.- Fri. 7:30am-5pm Sat. 8am-12pm

Not responsible for typographical errors

Montpelier

90 River St.

229-4941

1800-639-1900


PROUD TO SELL

VP RACING

FUELS

PRODUCTS!

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 802-433-1038

NOW

HIRING!

Shurfine English Muffins, Hotdog/Hamburger

Rolls & White Bread 14-oz .......................................2/$3.00

Shurfine Skim $2.99gal. Shurfine 1% $3.19gal.

Shurfine 2% $3.39gal. Shurfine Whole Milk $3.99gal.

Premium 91 octane Non-ethanol Gasoline at the pumps

Great for your small engine lawn tools, motorcycles, classic cars, &

more! We stock many high performance fuels in 5 gallon cans!

Need fuel for the track? Ask about ordering by the 54 gallon drum.

Remember VP Racing Fuel is the Official Fuel of Barre’s Thunder Road!”

NOW CARRYING THE BURLINGTON FREE PRESS 7 DAYS A WEEK

Monday-Thursday 5:00am-10:00pm, Friday 5:00am - 10:00pm

Saturday 6:00am until 10:00pm, Sunday 6:00 am until 10:00pm

Check out our DIETZ & WATSON Deli Meats, Sandwich

Condiments, Beef Jerky, and meat snacks including Dietz Nuts!

THREE DAY MEAT SALE FRIDAY SATURDAY & SUNDAY!

Fresh Ground

Chuck

Family Pk.

$

3 99 /lb

Sirloin Steak

$

6 99 /lb

SPECIALS GOOD THROUGH

HSUNDAY, AUG. 11H

Not responsible for

typographical errors.

NEW!

McKenzie

Natural Casing

Franks

2.5 l.b box

Hickory Smoked or

Thick Cut Bacon

1 lb. pkg.

Sugardale

$

14 99 $

3 99

Pork Chops

or Spareribs

Boneless

Family Pkg.

$

2 99 /lb

NEW!

Hillshire Farms

Cheddurwurst or

Polska Kielbasa

13.5 oz.

$

3 49

2/ $ 5

Fresh

Chicken Thighs

Boneless

Family Pkg.

$

1 49 /lb

Fresh Chicken

Drumsticks

Family Pkg.

99 ¢ /lb

OPEN

EVERYDAY!

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 802-433-1038

DEBIT EBT/SNAP Cards Welcome

Jennifer and Morgan Churchill and their children Nora and Samuel are all smiles after Wonder Why

OPEN AT 5:00AM WEEKDAYS & 6:00AM SAT. & SUN.

Farm, their 235-head certified organic dairy farm in Cabot, Vermont, was named the Vermont Dairy

Farm of the Year for 2019. (photo: Peggy Manahan/UVM Extension)

OPEN UNTIL 10PM

NIGHT & WEEKEND HELP!

EVERY NIGHT THIS SUMMER!

Stop by for an application! 2019 Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year

NOW CARRYING HEADY TOPPER AND OTHER GREAT VT CRAFT BEERS IN OUR ICE COLD CAVE! Wonder Why Farm, a 235-head

certified organic dairy operation in

Cabot, Vermont, has been named

FRESH & LOCAL - MADE IN VERMONT SALE

the 2019 Vermont Dairy Farm of the

Year.

Morgan and Jennifer Churchill

VT

were selected for this award for their

Maple

overall excellence in dairying as well

Syrup

as their innovative ways to improve

Butternut

Butternut Farm

Farm Bove’s Maple Cream Ben & Jerry’s Cabot herd management and produce

12 oz. Squeeze Pasta Sauce Cookies Ice Cream Cheese high-quality milk, including installing

robotic milkers in a Bottle

24 oz.

$

2 99 14 oz.

$

4 49 Pint

$

3 99 8 oz. Bars

$

6 99 state-of-theart

freestall barn.

The Churchills currently milk 120

cows in a Galaxy Astrea 20.20 automatic

milking system, shipping their

milk to Stonyfield Organics in

Londonderry, New Hampshire.

Daily milk production averages 70

pounds per cow--or 21,350 pounds

per year--with 3.9 percent butterfat

and 3 percent protein, numbers

attributable to good management

practices, not only for cow comfort

and health, but also for selective

breeding for year-round calving.

The couple bought the farm in

2012 from Morgan’s uncle, Walter Churchill,

after leasing it for several years, transitioning

the older, low-input farm into a high-level

operation able to support a profitable, sustainable

dairy. Two years prior to purchasing

the farm, they remodeled the existing tie-stall

barn to milk more cows. Although it was the

right solution at that time, retrofitting the

barn was not a viable option to accommodate

the new milking system, which they installed

in 2015.

They also wanted to be able to house all

their animals under one roof, so they made

the decision to construct a brand-new facility.

With funding through a Dairy

Improvement Grant from the Vermont Farm

and Forest Viability Program and the

Vermont Economic Development Authority,

they built a new 24,000-sq.-ft. freestall barn

for about $400,000, doing all but the steel

framework themselves.

Each 4 x 8-ft. stall in the well-ventilated

barn has sand bedding for cow comfort with

bedded pack in the maternity area. To avoid

overcrowding, 10 stalls are always left empty.

The facility also houses the robotic milking

system, providing easy access for the milkers.

The cows are fed round bales and 18

pounds of grain and two pounds of molasses

a day in addition to free-choice sodium bicarbonate,

minerals, salt and kelp for better hair

condition. The farmers have 295 acres of hay,

which provides about 60 percent of their

herd’s needs, and 120 acres of pasture.

The Churchills also have a maple sugaring

operation, producing an average of 700 gallons

of syrup a year from their 400 buckets

and 2,300 taps on pipeline. This year they

planted four acres of hemp, which they will

sell to a local buyer for oil.

University of Vermont Extension and the

Vermont Dairy Industry Association present

the award annually to an exemplary dairy

farm. The winner is honored at an awards

banquet at Eastern States Exposition in West

Springfield, Massachusetts, in September,

and at the VDIA banquet at the Vermont

Farm Show in Essex Junction in January.

Other finalists for the award, listed alphabetically,

were the Choiniere Family Farm,

Highgate (Guy, Beth and Matt Choiniere);

Savage View Farm (Dwight, Ryan and Travis

Bullis); and Strafford Creamery, Strafford

(Amy Huyffer and Earl Ransom).

page 2 The WORLD August 7, 2019


L-R: Jenn White, Salvation Army of Barre Accepted Candidate; Lt. Heather West of the Barre Salvation

Army: and Michelle Tansley, Salvation Army of Barre Advisory Board Member.

The Salvation Army Teams Up

With Walmart to “Stuff the Bus”

Volunteers and community members support local

children with school supply donations nationwide

Walmart and The Salvation Army have collaborated

for more than 30 years with a common

mission: to meet needs in their local communities.

Supporters like Walmart help The Salvation

Army serve more than 23 million Americans

each year through a range of social services to

help them overcome poverty and economic

hardships.

The simple act of providing school supplies

to students in need provides them a boost of

self-confidence and sets them up for a positive

and successful school year. All donations made

at “Stuff the Bus” campaign events will remain

in the local community and will help The Salvation

Army provide back-to-school support to

children in need.

Walmart shoppers will receive a list of suggested

supplies to help fill The Salvation Army’s

bus or collection bin during the “Stuff the Bus”

campaign event. The goal is to provide new

school supplies to children in need of a fresh

start to the school year.

All donations will make a lasting impact on

families. This simple act of kindness serves Central

Vermont Preschoolers-College students.

The Salvation Army will continue to collect

school supplies through the month of August. If

you would like to donate or are in need please

contact The Salvation Army and speak to Lieutenant

Heather West (802)476-5301.

®

OF BARRE

HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

WHAT’S NEW IN BUSINESS

Saturday, August 10 th

Ice Cream Social &

Back-to-School Specials!

Chris Russell, Owner; Mesa, Dog

Complete automotive detailing service.

Inside & Out!

Protect your vehicle for life!

Long Lasting Beauty!

Authorized System X

Ceramic Protection Dealer.

Located at Vt. Crossroad Auto

145 Codling Rd., E. Montpelier

223-3393 • Mon-Fri. 8-5

August 8 - 14

286 Waits River RD Bradford, VT 05033

800-222-9316 Open Mon-Sat 8:30-5:30

Friday Nights ‘til 8 PM, Closed Sundays

25% OFF

La-Z-Boy

Up to 20% OFF

Outdoor Furniture

FREE Tastings

from 12-3 PM

Enter to Win

Door Prizes from

Vera Bradley &

Baggallini!

Drawing held August 10 th

FREE Vera Bradley Lunch Bag

with Full Priced Back Pack

Purchases.

(Excludes Hadley Backpack)

FREE Gift with $50-75 purchases

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 3


OFFICIAL VERMONT ANTIQUE AND CLASSIC CAR MEET PROGRAM • AUGUST 9, 10, 11, 2019

CELEBRATING

101 YEARS

IN MEMORY OF

GAEL BOARDMAN

shown here with

his 1918 Locomobile

KEEP ON TRUCKING !!!

WITH VERMONT FLANNEL

MADE THE GOOD

OLD FASHION WAY

28 CHURCH ST. BURLINGTON

162 VT RT. 15E JOHNSON • 13 ELM ST. WOODSTOCK

5467 RT. 7 FERRISBURGH • 128 MILL ST. EAST BARRE

VERMONTFLANNEL.COM

See You At

The Show!

Since 1974

SERVICES

802-223-6577

407 BARRE ST. MONTPELIER

Professional

Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

or your money back.

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

FASHION SHOW JUDGING

10:30 am at Farr Field.

Costumes must be same era as year of vehicle.

Changing room available.

Downtown

Waterbury

STREET DANCE &

ANTIQUE CAR

PARADE

Saturday, August 10

3:30-5:30 pm Antique Car Parade through downtown

6:00-9:00 pm Street Dance at Rusty Parker Park

LIVE music from WDEV, beer garden,

food trucks, dancing & kids activities

This is a FREE event for the community. Sponsored by

Revitalizing Waterbury and our partners at the Waterbury

Rotary Club. Come on down for food, dancing and a

great time at Rusty Parker Park.

page 4 The WORLD August 7, 2019

244-5062

52 North Main St.

Waterbury

Store Hours:

MON.- FRI. 5:30am-10pm

AT. & SUN. 7am-10pm

WE ARE A

VERMONT STATE

LIQUOR STORE

Mon.-Fri. 10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Closed Sun.

Clothes • Music • Household Items

Furniture • Cheap Art

Jewelry • Books

Antiques • Jerry T-shirts

Jeezum Crow T-Shirts

970 Rt. 2, Middlesex • Exit 9 on I-89 • 802-223-3302


Just a Sample of Many Just Good Autos!

1984 LINCOLN

MARK VII

auto., sunroof, 5.0L HP V8,

loaded, low miles, 110K

$3,995

1973 MERCURY

COUGAR XR7

CONVERTIBLE

auto., PW, 88K

$11,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD AUTOS

Trades Welcome • Prices Negotiable

296 E. Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

OFFICIAL VERMONT ANTIQUE AND CLASSIC CAR MEET PROGRAM • AUGUST 9, 10, 11, 2019

A permanent “Vermont Antique and Classic Car” show planning committee” of over 20 VAE

members meets monthly year ‘round to bring fresh ideas to each year’s edition of the Show.

These same volunteers will spend upwards to a week or more at Farr’s Field as well, preparing the

show field for the influx of antique vehicles of all types. Marking the field for 400 + automotive

flea market vendors takes more than a day with a crew of six running line and driving stakes. Most

are on duty throughout the three days, living in campers or RVs at the field. Food is prepared on

site at the “compound” for work crews. It may not be gourmet, but its fresh and satisfying. Come

Sunday morning, there’s a free Judges Breakfast at the Firemen’s food tent. Upwards to 100 volunteers

are recruited to be judges in order to complete the task of technical inspections for 300-400

qualifying vehicles in time for an early afternoon awards program. Yes, there’s a lot of camaraderie

each August at Farr’s Field. Consider volunteering while at the show.

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 10,500

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

2019 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Spectator admission $12 US Funds per day

Friday, August 9, 2019

7:00 am - 6:00 pm Food concession on the

field.

8:00 am - 6:00 pm Eligible vehicles register

and pick up registration packet at Farr Field.

8:00 am Flea Market and Car Corral open for

business.

8:00 am - 5:00 pm Car Corral spaces available

for $40 per vehicle at show. Vehicles

must be driven into the car corral.

11:00 am Judges’ training at the Judges’ tent.

Saturday, August 10, 2019

7:00 am - 6pm Food concession on the field.

8:00 am - 3 :30 pm Show Vehicle Registration.

Show cars remain on the field until the

parade starts at 3:30 pm.

8:00 am Flea Market and Car Corral open for

business.

10:30 am Fashion Show Judging at Farr Field.

(Costumes must be same era as year of vehicle.)

Changing room available.

11:00 am Hot Wheels Racing

WE GUARANTEE YOU WILL

SAVE $1,000 IN CREDIT CARD

PROCESSING FEES OR WE

WILL PAY YOU $1,000

CALL DAN AT 802-249-0606

CENTRAL VERMONT RESIDENT

DATAINSURE.COM

Children 12 and under Free

Saturday, August 10, 2019 continued

11:00 am Judges’ training at the Judges’ tent.

1:00 pm Senior Class Judging and Youth

Judging Program.

3:30 pm Parade vehicles leave the field on

the parade route, passing the reviewing stand

in Waterbury Village.

6:00 pm- 9:00 pm Street Dance in Waterbury

Village at the Rusty Parker Park near the

restored 1875 Railroad Station.

Sunday, August 11, 2019

7:00 am - 4:00 pm Food concession on the

field.

7:00 am Judges Breakfast.

8:00 am Judges Training.

8:00 am - 2:00 pm Flea Market and Car Corral

open for business.

9:00 am Technical Judging begins; all Vehicles

to be judged MUST be parked in class

on field by 9:30 am.

11:00 am Valve Cover Racing.

1:30 pm Senior Awards, to be followed by

Class Awards.

SPECIAL EXHIBITS!!

ANTIQUE RACE CARS

& TRACTORS

“Best

Maple

Creemees

in New

England”

-Yankee

Magazine

NOW

OPEN

DAILY

9-8

Great food

at great prices!

Serving

Breakfast, Lunch& Dinner

All-You-Can-Eat

Pasta Night

Fridays 5-8 pm

$9.99

At the Park in Waterbury Village

7 Park Row, Waterbury

(802) 244-5111

COOL OFF

with a Morse Farm

Real Maple

and Chocolate

CREEMEES!

802.223.2740 www.morsefarm.com

1168 County Road Montpelier

just 2.7 miles up Montpelier’s Main St. from the roundabout...

“The Talk of the Town”

Sunday Buffet

8-Noon

$9.99

PLUS Sundaes,

Milkshakes,

Waffle Cones

& New Maple

Creemee

Canollis!

Need A Good Used SUV, Car Or Truck?

WE HAVE 80 IN STOCK - Starting at $4000

VINTAGE RESTORED

CARS & TRUCKS

SEE US HERE AT THE SHOW OR AT...

EAST BARRE AUTO SALES

864 EAST BARRE RD | EAST BARRE, VT

EASTBARREAUTOSALES.COM

802-476-5370 | CELL: 802-272-2003

LOTTERY &

SCRATCH OFF

TICKETS

Vermont Travelers’ Service Center

STORE • DELI • INFORMATION

BEER CAVE • CLEAN FACILITIES

Conveniently located off

Exit 7 of I-89 - Berlin, VT

Look for Our Other Maplewood Locations in Central Vermont

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 5


CENTRAL

VERMONT’S

BEST

COUNTRY

UB_2019CommercialAd_TheWorld_5x5.5_OUTPUT.pdf 1 4/2/19 2:14 PM

“I value working with people, first & foremost,

who you can trust.” — David Marvin, Butternut Mountain Farm

Dan Driscoll

FREE

Estimates!

Direct Repair For

Most Major Insurance

Companies

CAPITOL H CITY’S

• Green Technology

• Guaranteed Repairs

• Certified Technicians

• Free Estimate

• Expert Collision Repair

• Courtesy Shuttle Available

• State Of The Art Spray Booth

• Wash & Vacuum Included

page 6 The WORLD August 7, 2019

Commercial Banking

800.753.4343

GO.UBLOCAL.COM/commercial

Banking local can get you there faster.

WOODBURY

AutoBody

Rte. 2 • 1/2 mile E. of the Roundabout • Montpelier, VT

In the Capitol City Kia Building

223-6283

Mon.-Fri. 7:30AM-5PM CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-691-3914

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Yes, we’re still here with the

same quality service we’ve

offered for over 30 years.

Our experienced staff

does it right and we

guarantee our

repairs 100%.

Let us repair your vehicle

and you get a

$

100 COUPON

to put towards your

deductible or

unrelated damage.

Capstone Community Action Hires New

Director of Community Economic Development

Capstone Community Action announced

that Elizabeth “Liz” Scharf was hired as the

new community economic development

director. As a member of Capstone’s leadership

team, Liz will work to support and grow

programs that advance economic security

for low income Vermonters through financial

coaching, asset building, micro-business

and workforce development.

Liz has a background in the banking and

credit union industry, and worked as

Capstone’s savings and credit program coordinator

as an AFCPE® Accredited Financial

Counselor for the last five years. She brings a

wealth of knowledge in personal finance and

asset building to help Vermonters achieve

economic well-being.

Sue Minter, executive director of Capstone

Community Action stated “I am delighted to

VCIL Director Elected to Prestigious Post

Sarah Launderville, executive director of

a statewide disability rights organization,

was elected president of the National

Council on Independent Living recently.

She ran unopposed for the position and

was voted in for a two-year term at NCIL’s

annual meeting on July 24 in Washington,

D.C.

Launderville said, “Our work at VCIL

over the past 40 years has been to work in

the community so people with disabilities

can live as they choose. So many systems and

policies have a bias toward people with disabilities.

We, as people with disabilities,

need to help shape these systems at the local,

state and national level. Through NCIL we

band together as advocates across the nation

to work on policy priorities important in

dismantling ableism and creating a world

that allows for greater independence.”

She added, “I’m honored to serve as NCIL

president and look forward to the work

ahead.”

The Williamstown resident has headed up

the Vermont Center for Independent Living

since 2009. VCIL, a nonprofit organization

directed and staffed by individuals with disabilities,

works to promote the dignity, independence

and civil rights of Vermonters

with disabilities.

NCIL is the longest-running national

cross-disability, grassroots organization run

Leahy: Vermont Receives $98,918 to Connect

Schools and Local Farms Under Leahy-Authored

Farm to School Program

A program long championed by Senator

Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) will invest $98,918 in

bolstering efforts to bring local agriculture

into the classrooms and cafeterias of Vermont

schools. The U.S. Department of Agriculture

(USDA) has announced Farm to School

grants to connect child nutrition programs

with local farmers.

Leahy said: “Tying local agriculture to

our schools not only provides our children

with healthy meals and improved nutrition,

it encourages a long standing connection to

the farms that define our Green Mountain

State. Every student deserves equal access

to healthy meals, and I’m proud that our

school nutrition leaders will use these funds

to help all children gain a better understand

about where their food comes from. This

announcement is another example of how

Vermont continues to lead the nation in

implementing this effective strategy.”

The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food

and Markets received a $98,918 grant to

strengthen farm to school programing in 20

schools in Franklin and Grand Isle counties.

Project partners, including Hunger Free

Vermont, VT FEED, and the Healthy Roots

Collaborative, will work with schools to integrate

farm to school activities into curriculums.

Together, these activities will

strengthen the local agricultural economy in

northwestern Vermont and increase the

health and wellness of students. This grant

builds on the Agency’s 2015 Farm to School

training grant focused on encouraging

Vermont supply chain partners to engage in

agriculture learning in schools.

“This important support is great news for

the people living and working in Franklin

and Grand Isle Counties,” said Vermont

Secretary of Agriculture, Food, and Markets

Anson Tebbetts. “This important project

will help schools, students and Vermont’s

farmers. We look forward to working with

all the partners on this project.”

This award was part of more than $9 million

in grants for 126 projects across 42 states

• • •

• • •

have Liz as part of our senior management

team and leading the organization’s community

economic development department. I

know she will bring great talent and dedication

to champion successful and innovative

programs that grow Capstone’s impact

throughout Central Vermont.”

Capstone Community Action was founded

in 1965 and works to move Vermonters

out of poverty and create economic opportunity

and strong communities. Capstone’s

programs include: emergency food, heat and

housing assistance, financial empowerment

and workforce development, child and family

development programs in Early Head

Start/Head Start, and weatherization. It provides

over 16,000 services to central

Vermonters through these programs each

year. http://www.capstonevt.org.

by and for people with disabilities. Founded

in 1982, NCIL represents thousands of individuals

with disabilities and organizations,

including centers for independent living,

statewide independent living councils and

other organizations that advocate for the

human and civil rights of people with disabilities

throughout the United States. NCIL

carries out its mission by assisting member

CILs and SILCs in building their capacity to

promote social change, eliminate disabilitybased

discrimination and create opportunities

for people with disabilities to participate

in the legislative process to effect

change.

that were announced this week as part of a

program that Leahy championed in the creation

of the child nutrition bill of 2010, the

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. These projects

are expected to serve more than 3.2 million

students in over 5,400 schools nationwide.

Since the program began awarding

grants seven years ago, Vermont has received

more than $585,000 in federal funding.

Results from the 2015 USDA Farm to School

Census showed that schools with strong

farm to school programs are seeing reductions

in plate waste, increases in school meal

participation rates, and an increased willingness

on the part of children to try new foods,

notably fruits and vegetables. Students at

Vermont schools with Farm to School programs

were above the state and national

averages for fruit and vegetable consumption.

The Leahy-authored USDA Farm to

School program receives $5 million per year

in annual appropriations. As Vice Chairman

of the Senate Appropriations Committee,

Leahy has been instrumental in securing

additional discretionary funding for this

important program through annual appropriations

bills. Earlier this year, Leahy and

Senator David Perdue (R–GA) introduced

bipartisan legislation to raise the program’s

funding level from $5 million to $15 million,

and increase the maximum grant award to

$250,000. The legislation also expands the

scope of the program to include pre-schools,

summer food service programs, and afterschool

programs, and it enhances access to

tribal foods and other farming, such as aquaculture.

The legislation also helps grantees

improve procurement and distribution of

local food.

Leahy added: “In Vermont we’ve long

seen the benefits of farm to school programs

in addressing child hunger. Since we started

the USDA program, grant applications have

far exceed the funds available. It is time we

provide additional support to this commonsense

strategy.”


VT Educational Employee Statewide

Bargaining Reaches Impasse

• • •

Students in the News

The Employer and Employee

Commissioners on Public School Employee

Health Benefits met again yesterday to try to

reach agreement on the relative shares of

health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket

expenses that will be paid by Vermont

taxpayers and education employees.

Unfortunately, despite the school board

commissioners presenting a new proposal

that incorporates additional union requests

and reflects our commitment to balancing

high quality, generous benefits that are sustainable

and affordable for taxpayers, the

Commission was unable to reach agreement.

The two parties will now go to mediation.

The school employers’ team’s proposal

will provide high quality benefits while containing

health care costs. The union representatives

on the commission have so far not

provided data on how much their proposal

will increase costs to taxpayers, despite previous

requests for this crucial information.

The school employers’ team is unwilling

to agree to any proposal without fully understanding

its cost and evaluating whether it is

affordable for Vermont’s school districts and

their supporting taxpayers.

The meeting today marks the end of the

scheduled negotiating process. We will now

enter into mediation with school employee

commission representatives on August 1st,

and continue to work to reach an agreement

that provides generous healthcare benefits to

school employees while ensuring these benefits

are financially sustainable and affordable

for Vermont taxpayers.

While we are disappointed the

Commission was unable to reach an agreement

via direct bargaining, we remain committed

to working for a resolution through

the mediation process.

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1284 Barre-Montpelier Road

(U.S. Route 302 / In the Twin City Plaza)

Berlin, VT

(802) 479-4307

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Local Student Graduates

from Bryant University

Caitlyn Bashara of Montpelier, VT, graduated

Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts

degree in Communication. Bashara joins a

powerful network of more than 50,000

alumni who are inspired to excel and have

distinguished themselves as leaders in their

organizations and communities around the

world.

Montpelier Student

Named to Dean’s List at

Lawrence University

Lawrence University released its 2019

Dean’s List, an annual honor roll of students

demonstrating exemplary academic performance.

Harriet Porter of Montpelier, VT, was

among the Lawrence students earning

Dean’s List recognition for the 2018-19 academic

year.

The Dean’s List is compiled at the end of

the academic year once all grades have been

recorded. To make the Dean’s List, a student

must have earned at least 36 units in

Lawrence courses during the year and have

earned a GPA of at least 3.5.

Local Student Named to

Dean’s List at

University of Rochester

Fiona Nichols-Fleming, a senior majoring

in physics & astronomy at the University of

Rochester, has been named to the Dean’s

List for academic achievement for the spring

2019 semester.

Nichols-Fleming, a resident of West

Berlin, Vt., is the child of James Nichols-

Fleming and Diane Nichols-Fleming, and a

graduate of U-32 High School in Montpelier,

Vt.

The University of Rochester, founded in

1850, is a private research university located

in Rochester, N.Y., (pop. 212,000) on the

south shore of Lake Ontario. The University

offers a unique undergraduate curriculum,

with no required courses, that emphasizes a

broad liberal education through majors,

minors, and course “clusters”—a Rochester

innovation—in the three main areas of

knowledge: humanities, social sciences, and

physical sciences/engineering. The

University (on the Web at www.rochester.

edu) is also home to the world-renowned

Eastman School of Music as well as graduate

professional schools of business, education,

medicine, and nursing.

Local Students Graduate

from University of Utah

The University of Utah congratulates

8,465 students who received their academic

degrees on May 2, 2019. The following local

students earned degrees:

Brennan Degen of Moretown, VT, graduated

with a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical

Engineering.

John O’Shea of Waitsfield, VT, graduated

with a Bachelor of Science in Quantitative

Analysis of Markets and Organizations.

Local Students Named to

Dean’s List at

Worcester Polytechnic

Institute

The following local residents were among

1,598 students from Worcester Polytechnic

Institute (WPI) named to the university’s

Dean’s List for academic excellence for the

spring 2019 semester.

• Benjamin Slattery of Richmond, Vt., is a

member of the class of 2021 majoring in

computer science, and humanities and arts.

• Evan Llewellyn of Waterbury, Vt., is a

member of the class of 2022 majoring in

computer science.

The criteria for the WPI Dean’s List differs

from most other universities as WPI

does not compute a grade point average

(GPA). Instead, WPI defines the Dean’s List

by the amount of work completed at the

A-level in courses and projects.

UMF Announces Dean’s

List for Spring 2019

Semester

The University of Maine at Farmington is

proud to announce its Dean’s List for the

spring 2019 semester. Located in the heart

of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational

region, UMF is nationally recognized for its

academic excellence, affordability and graduates’

positive career outcomes.

UMF maintains a Dean’s List each semester

for those students completing a minimum

of 12 credits in courses producing

quality points. Students whose grade point

average for the semester is equal to or greater

than 3.8 are listed with high academic

achievement. Students whose grade point

average for the semester is less than 3.8 but

equal to or greater than 3.5 are listed with

academic achievement. Any incompletes

must be satisfactorily completed before the

student is honored with Dean’s List status.

Brattleboro: Vanessa Brown,

Essex Junction: Colleen Messier,

Grand Isle: Bailey Blow,

Graniteville: Haley Kerin,

Lyndonville: Alyssa Leonard,

North Springfield: Breanna Vittum,

Pittsfield: Colby Stevens,

Saint Johnsbury: Jessica Brink,

South Burlington: Daniel Terhune,

Williston: Kyla Antonioli,

STOP

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HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 7

12/21/18 2:21 PM

CLIENT

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Route 5, Lyndonville, VT

Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed

1-800-439-5996

296 Meadow St., Littleton, NH

4584 U.S. Rte. 5, Newport, VT

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PUBLIC LIBRARY

Again the Friends of the Aldrich Library have had a successful

summer Book Sale held during the Barre Heritage

Festival! As usual many people worked very hard to make

this another big event for the Friends and the library. We all

have been sorting books all year long with donations cheerfully

received from so many people! We thank you for

remembering us when you cleaned out the books in your

homes. Even the weather cooperated!!

There were so many people who helped us including L.

Brown who let us store boxes of sorted books at their business

during the year, Jerf ’s Tent Rental, Jeff Bergeron who

supplies tables from the BOR, Price Chopper for the paper

93 South Main Street, Northfield, VT 05663

Tel: (802) 485-4621 Fax: (802) 485-4990

Email: bplibdirector@gmail.com

http://www.brownpubliclibrary.org

Don’t Miss Our Annual Labor Day Raffle!

Stop in for tickets on various prizes in our Labor Day

Raffle on sale NOW thru Labor Day weekend. Prizes include

a twin size quilt (made by Cynthia Bushey), Soup of the

Month (made & donated by Gail Hall), Ukulele & lesson

donated by Larry Garland, gift basket with misc. gifts

(donated by Sherri Brickey) and more to come. Tickets are

$5.00 each or 3 for $10.00.

Come check out the prizes, buy some tickets & support

your library.

Attn: Middle and High Schoolers!!

Celebrate the Universe of Books with our Summer Book

Group.

What: Read The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

The Cutler Memorial Library

has new and improved hours!

Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday 2-8pm •Fridays 10am-6pm

People, Animals & Monsters!

Reusing stuff from our everyday lives, we’ll put our imaginations

to work to craft animals, monsters, and people from

buttons, bottle caps, fabric scraps, etc.! A craft workshop for

kids 3-13, with a recycling message and a story book. With

John Jose, School Zero Waste Coordinator for the Central

Vermont Solid Waste District.

FREE! Friday, August 16th from 4:30 to 6 pm

Zookeepers Concert for Jeudevine

Expansion Fund

The indie rock band David Rosane & the Zookeepers won

the 2019 Tammy Award for the best Vermont Album. They

will be performing at the Hardwick Town House on Saturday,

August 17 at 7pm by donation at the door. All proceeds will

go to the Jeudevine Expansion Fund. This is a high energy

band which should rock the hall!

For the second summer in a row they are touring Vermont

libraries, donating their creativity to 16 libraries. This year’s

tour title is “Across the Zoo-niverse,” paralleling with the

Summer Reading Program theme used by libraries all over

the country: “A Universe of Stories.”

The trio includes frontman David Rosane with partners in

crime musicians and community activists Don Sinclair &

Jennifer Grossi, of Bradford, Vermont. Bandmate Jennifer

Grossi said “In many communities in Vermont, libraries are

the only places some people can access the Internet. And

we’re lucky in Vermont - there are more libraries here per

capita than in any other state!” They describe their music as

Indie folk-rock/pop and rather ‘nerdy,’ as they are academics,

teachers and community activists by day, hence the

library tour. Watch a video they made for the tour: https://

w w w . y o u t u b e . c o m / w a t c h ? t i m e _

continue=5&v=IYdi1rSAXYE

6 Washington Street

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: (802) 476-7550

www.aldrichpubliclibrary.org

Brown Public

Library

Cutler Memorial Library

151 High Street (Route 2), Plainfield

info@cutlerlibrary.org • 454-8504

Jeudevine

Memorial Library

Hardwick

• • •

• • •

bags (at noon on Saturday it’s “Fill Your Bag for $1”),

CVSWMD who leave recycling boxes for us on Saturday

after the sale. The library staff were big supporters and

encouraged donations. Then, of course, there are the Friends

and their friends who worked throughout the year sorting,

boxing, carrying books and storing them! Then moving all

the books from downstairs in the library out to the lawn! A

BIG job!

There are too many names to include here, but we all are

so grateful to everyone who helped make this a wonderful

and profitable event - over $3400, all going to the library.

It was a wonderful celebration for Barre - congratulations

to the Barre Heritage Festival organizers and congratulations

to our terrific library. We all should be proud to have this

library in our great city!

Christine Litchfield, Friends of the Aldrich Public Library,

President

When: Then join us in August for a night of pizza and discussion.

How: Start reading & contact Rebecca by email, note or

come to the Youth Services Desk at the library.

Contact: bplyouthlib@gmail.com

Looking for something fun to do this summer? Stop in &

ask about our passes to ECHO Museum, Billings Farm &

Museum, Shelburne Farms and VT State Parks!

Don’t Miss Storytime on Mondays and Thursdays with our

new youth librarian, Rebecca Pearish.

Storytime is from 10-11am. We read a story & do a craft.

Bring your children/grandchildren.

Everyone is Welcome!!! You do not need a library card

to enjoy our Storytimes!

Storytime Themes:

• August 8: Community

• August 10: Storytime at DOG RIVER PARK @ 1PM

• August 19: Vegetables

• August 22: Singalong

When visiting the library, stop in to our BPL Book Store.

We have some great donated books for all interests. When

the library is open, the bookstore is open.

• • •

• • •

Zookeepers, left to right: Don Sinclair, David Rosane, Jennifer

Grossi

There will be an opening set by Kyle Woolard of West

Glover who is part of the band The Anatomy of Frank. He

was recently featured at the Highland Center for the Arts.

Find him at www.theanatomyoffrank.com.

For a full list of locations and libraries, visit the band’s

website www.davidandthezoo.com or Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/davidrosaneandthezookeepers/

There will be refreshments! For more information call the

Jeudevine Library at 472-5948.

page 8 The WORLD August 7, 2019

Jaquith Library Summer Concert Series

August 15 Big Hat No Cattle plays old and new songs with a

vintage western vibe. Danceable and fun, western swing is a

rich melting pot of styles, including swing-era jazz, honkytonk

country, frontier fiddle tunes, cowboy songs, and more.

The band is: Kevin Macneil Brown (vocals, steel guitar, guitar),

Michael Ricciarelli (vocals, guitar, fiddle, mandolin),

David Blythe (bass, vocals), Danny McHugh (drums). Food

vendor: Papagyros

Old Schoolhouse Common

122 School St. Room #2

Marshfield, Vt 05658

802-426-3581

Jaquith Public Library Family Fun Nights

for People of all Ages

Wed, August 7 at 6:45 p.m. - Space Cowboy Sing-a-long:

Harness your horse or spaceship and come on down for

some vittles, yarns and songs.

Fri., August 16 at 7 p.m. – Zookeepers: Spend a summer

evening with David Rosane and the Zookeepers to fill your

heart and soul with meaningful melodies and mirth.


Vermont Veterans Welcome the LEGION Act

The signing of the LEGION Act by

President Trump immediately laid out the

welcome mat to thousands of Vermont veterans

who previously were deemed by

Congress to be ineligible to join The

American Legion. Now the LEGION Act

offers membership eligibility in The

American Legion to any U.S. military veteran

who served at least one day of active military

duty since Dec. 7, 1941, and was honorably

discharged or is currently serving. In

effect, the Act extends the “war period” from

Dec. 7, 1941 to a time when Congress determines

that the United States is no longer at

war.

Implementation of the LEGION Act (Let

Everyone Get Involved In Opportunities for

Statewide Alliance Plans for 2020:

100th Anniversary of Women’s Right to Vote

National Service Act) opens the door giving

thousands of Vermont veterans access to

American Legion programs and benefits for

which they previously had not been eligible.

Moreover the eligibility for membership in

other elements of the Legion Family - the

Sons of The American Legion and American

Legion Auxiliary - will also change with

more veterans eligible to join The American

Legion. For example, any son or grandson of

a veteran now eligible to join, The American

Legion member would be able to join the

SAL program. Similarly membership in the

American Legion Auxiliary would be open

to grandmothers, mothers, sisters, wives,

and adopted female descendants of veterans

now eligible to join The American Legion.

Women got the vote in 1920: that’s within

our grandparents’ or great-grandparents’

lifetimes - not so long ago.

Next year, 2020, marks the 100th anniversary.

The Vermont Suffrage Centennial

Alliance (VSCA), an energetic and expanding

statewide group of volunteers led by the

League of Women Voters of Vermont, is

dedicated to informing Vermonters of the

history and outcomes of women’s suffrage

and engaging them in the ongoing quest for

equal rights and citizenship.

The work of VSCA is guided by the talents

and expertise of a wide variety of writers,

educators and historians volunteering their

time to mark this important milestone.

Along with historian Lyn Blackwell, Rachel

Onuf of the Vermont Historical Records

Program, based at the State Archives and

Records Administration, heads up VSCA’s

History and Research subcommittee.

Describing our state’s final push for women’s

suffrage, Onuf stated, “Thanks to an unreceptive

Governor, Percival Clement,

Vermont missed the chance to be the

‘Victory State,’ the final state needed for ratification

of the 19th Amendment to the

Constitution. This wasn’t due to a lack of

effort on the part of supporters of the suffrage

movement. Governor Clement

received over 1,600 telegrams and letters

urging him to call a special session of the

legislature to vote on ratification, and 400

women marched to Montpelier to make that

appeal in person, but the anti-suffrage

Governor was unmoved, claiming Vermont

couldn’t afford the expense of a special legislative

session. Thus, the way was opened for

Tennessee, which became the ‘Victory State’

in August of 1920.”

The VSCA intends to share the stories of

Vermont Equal Suffrage Association members

who marched on the capitol on that

rainy day in April, as well as their predecessors

in the movement. “Along with telling

the Vermont suffrage story,” reflects Sue

Racanelli, League President and director of

the Alliance, “we recognize the complex

racial and economic schisms within the suffrage

movement. In addition to the history

we explore how the fight for voting rights,

particularly for women of color, continues to

this day. The Alliance has developed a

pledge to support all the ways Vermont

makes voting easy and accessible. We want

to inspire voters to appreciate and exercise

their right to vote.”

VSCA encourages Vermonters to discover

and contribute their own family stories, and

to remind their local historical societies,

libraries, museums and schools to incorporate

this important centennial in events,

exhibits and programs. Joining other statewide

efforts across the nation, VSCA will

host a major event in August 2020 in

Montpelier, featuring a parade and gathering

with speakers, music and performances on

the State House lawn. Leading up to that,

they will host Fun Runs, lectures, and arts

events around the state. They will also feature

centennial-themed events of other organizations

on their events calendar. Find

them at vtsuffrage2020.org and @

VTSuffrage2020.

The Summer of 1969 from Easy Rider to Woodstock

On Thursday, August 15th , Allan Mackey

will present a workshop titled The Summer

of 1969, from Easy Rider to Woodstock, at

the Montpelier Senior Activity Center

(MSAC) Community Room from 1:00 PM

to 3:15 PM. Mackey still remembers his

excitement when he first heard Little Richard

belt out “Long Tall Sally” at the first Rock ‘n’

Roll concert in Philadelphia in 1956. Ever

since he has called himself a “Prisoner of

Rock ‘n’ Roll”.

Mackey taught one of the first courses in

Rock ‘n’ Roll history in America at the

Community College of Vermont in 1973.

Since then he has developed presentations

on artists from the 1970’s and 80’s including

Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, Van Morrison

and Neil Young. In 2017 he presented a program

at MSAC celebrating the release of the

Beatles’ “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts

Club Band” album, the Haight-Ashbury

scene and the “Summer of Love - 1967”.

He observed, “The middle of the summer

of ‘69 between July 14 and August 18 provided

some of the most intense cultural

moments of any summer in the 20th century.

Woodstock began on August 15, 1969 and we

are now celebrating that momentous event

Montpelier Senior

Activity Center

58 Barre Street, Montpelier • 802-223-2518

exactly fifty years later! For this participatory

presentation, we will focus on all the earth

shaking events of that tumultuous summer

and the widening divide between mainstream

America and the counterculture

movement.”

“From the release of the film Easy Rider to

the Woodstock Festival, we will talk about

the musical, cultural and political events of

that summer,” he continued. “These events

will be highlighted with several video clips.

Participants will be encouraged to share

their reminiscences with those who missed

that summer.”

A donation of $5 for MSAC members and

$10 for the general public is suggested but no

one will be turned away for lack of payment.

For more information visit http://www.

montpelier-vt.org/msac or call (802) 223-

2518.

The Montpelier Senior Activity Center, a

division of the City of Montpelier, provides

older adults in Central Vermont with lifelong

learning opportunities, fitness and movement

programs, cultural events, and nutritious

meals. For more information, visit

www.montpelier-vt.org/msac.

Hunter Ed Courses Are Being Held Now

Vermont Fish & Wildlife says anyone

interested in taking a hunter education

course should consider doing so this summer,

because fewer courses will be available

later in the year.

“Invariably many people are disappointed

when they can’t find a hunter education

course being given in the fall,” said Nicole

Meier with Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s Hunter

Education Program. “We actually have more

courses available now because many of our

certified volunteer instructors have more

time to give the courses before hunting seasons

begin.”

• • •

• • •

• • •

“While more classes will be added through

September, if a course opens up now, this is

the time to sign up for it! Don’t wait until the

last minute.”

Completion of a free course is required

prior to purchasing a person’s first Vermont

hunting, bow hunting or trapping license.

Upcoming courses and information are

listed on the Vermont Fish & Wildlife website

(https://vtfishandwildlife.com/

node/129) as they are scheduled by instructors.

For more information about hunter

education in Vermont call 802-828-1193.

This Week at Bragg Farm

Cate Farm

Tomatoes

have arrived!

Organic & Picked Fresh Daily!

Local Blueberries Have Arrived

NOW OPEN DAILY

8:30 - 8:00

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL TOMORROW

WHAT YOU CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~ Central Vermont’s Newspaper

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

2019

Farm Critters &

Children's Play Area!

BRONZE

www.braggfarm.com

Awarded the 2019

Bronze Quality Award

A COMMITMENT TO QUALITY

We are grateful to our providers, staff,

volunteers, and patient and family advisors for

their efforts to support the delivery of high-quality,

person-centered resident care and services.

ABOUT THE AWARD

The 2019 Bronze - Commitment to Quality Award is given by

the American Health Care Association and National Center for

Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL). The award honors long term

and post-acute care providers that have demonstrated their

commitment to improving the quality of care for seniors and

individuals with disabilities. Woodridge Rehabilitation and Nursing

is one of four facilities to receive this Bronze Quality Award.

UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Woodridge

Enjoy Our "Cool"

Summer Treats

• “World’s Best” Maple &

Chocolate Creemees

• Maple Blueberry and

Maple Strawberry

Milkshakes

• Maple and Maple Apple

Drizzle Sundaes

• Hot Fudge Sundaes too!

1-800-376-5757

or 223-5757

Exit 8 off I-89

5 miles on US Rt 2E, bear left,

1 mile on Vt. Rt. 14N,

1005 Vt. Rt. 14N

East Montpelier 05651

HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 9


Charles (Charlie) Edward Wiley

Montpelier, VT - Charles

(Charlie) Edward Wiley

died on Sunday July 28, 2019 at

Westview Meadows in Montpelier,

VT at the age of 89, just shy of his

90th birthday.

Charlie was born in Rutland, VT

on September 19, 1929 to Clarence

and Celia (Ritchie) Wiley. His youth

was spent living between Porter St.

in Rutland, on the flats in the North Clarendon, the

home of his mother’s family, and at Tip Top Inn on

Crown Point Rd. in Shrewsbury. The Inn had been

his father’s family farm until 1937 when his parents

began the seasonal Inn.

He graduated from Rutland High School in 1947

and from the University of Vermont in 1952. At UVM,

he enrolled in the ROTC program and was commissioned

in the U.S. Army as a 1st Lieutenant upon

graduation. Before his honorable discharge in 1955 he

was stationed in France during the Korean Conflict.

Charlie married Carolyne (Eaton) Wiley on

February 24, 1952 and remained a devoted husband

until her death in 2014. They had one daughter, Dana

McCarthy, and two grandchildren, Kerry, and her

partner Sarah with great-grandson Kiernan, of Berlin,

VT.; grandson, Collin and his wife Mary of Boston,

Mass.

Charlie worked in Real Estate in Montpelier for

over 35 years, starting at Century 21 and later joining

Heney Realty. He retired in 2007. His business career

had a sales and hospitality theme; starting with Tip

Top Inn, later with Burroughs Corp for 15 years in

regional sales of business storage systems and office

equipment in VT and NH, to Assistant Secretary of

the Agency of Development and Community Affairs

under Governors Phil Hoff and Deane C. Davis. He

was part of the creation and management of the

Vermont Pavilion at the Montreal Expo 1967 World’s

Fair, to promote tourism in Vermont.

For 46 years, Charlie served on the Board of

Trustees for the Gary (Home) Residence actively

involved in the care of senior women residents and

was one of the creators and founders of Westview

Meadows, an Independent and Residential Care

Community, in Montpelier.

He was involved with economic development

through the Vermont Industrial Financing Arm and

early efforts of affordable housing.

Charlie was a member of the Montpelier Kiwanis

Club, Bethany Church, Montpelier Senior Center,

Trinity Methodist Food Pantry, was an AARP instructor

for the Driver Safety Program for six years, served

on the Montpelier Board of Adjustment overseeing

zoning for eight years, and the Montpelier Cemetery

Commission for ten years. He was awarded Citizen of

the Year in 2012.

He was a vital part of the Montpelier community

and will be remembered for his commitment to

Montpelier, his sense of humor, and outgoing personality.

Calling hours were at Guare & Sons Funeral Home

(30 School St., Montpelier) from 6-8 pm on Friday,

August 2. A memorial service was held at Bethany

United Church in Montpelier at 11 am on Saturday,

August 3.

Those wishing to make a memorial contribution

may do so to: Westview Meadows and The Gary

Residence in care of O.M. Fisher Home, Inc. 149 Main

St., Montpelier, 05602. Or, to the Montpelier Kiwanis

Club P.O. Box 741 Montpelier, 05601.

Those wishing to make condolences online may do so

at www.guareandsons.com.

AGNES M. ALLEN, 85, died July 31, 2019, at the Dartmouth-

Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Arrangements are pending at the Boardway and Cilley

Funeral Home, Chelsea.

loved time spent at the family camp on Lake Champlain

where she enjoyed fishing, kayaking, swimming, campfires,

watching the beautiful sunsets and good times with family

and friends. She loved cooking, gardening and adopting pug

dogs from pug rescue. She was predeceased by her parents;

husband Larry Alexander; and sister-in-law Susan O’Neil.

She is survived by her brother, David Corliss; and her companion,

Ziggy Kowalskey; also by many family and friends

who loved her dearly. Private service will be held at the convenience

of the family.

PHILIP EDWIN DODGE, 83, of Powder Spring Road, died

at his home Tuesday, July 30, 2019. He was born in Topsham,

Dec. 30, 1935, the son of Charles Edwin and Ellen Amanda

(White) Dodge, and attended the local elementary school in

Topsham and graduated from Bradford Academy in 1954.

Philip was married to Louise Gagne in Barre on Sept. 26,

1964. Philip was active in community affairs and was generous

with his time in helping his family and friends along life’s

journey. Philip is survived by his wife of 54 years, Louise,

daughters, son, brother, grandchildren, and extended family.

There will be no calling hours. A celebration of his life will be

held at the Topsham United Presbyterian Church at a future

date with burial in the family lot in the Topsham town cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made to either the

Topsham United Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box 61,

Topsham, VT 05076; or to the Tri-Village Fire Dept., P.O.

Box 67, West Topsham, VT 05086. For more information or

to sign an online condolence, please visit www.rickerfh.com.

Ricker Funeral Home & Cremation Care of Woodsville is in

charge of arrangements.

ANNETTE ROSE COUTURE HERNANDEZ On

Wednesday, July 24, 2019, Annette, loving wife, mother,

grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt, sister and sister-inlaw,

passed away at age 88. Annette, the eldest of eight children,

was born to Romelus and Adrienne Jacques Couture

on Feb. 14, 1931, in Barre. She married William Hector

Hernandez Jr. on Sept. 15, 1951. Annette graduated from

Spaulding High School and Barre School of Nursing. She is

survived by her sisters and brothers, children, grandchildren,

great-grandchildren, nieces and newphews. A Mass of

Christian Burial to honor Annette’s life was celebrated on

Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019, at 11 a.m. in St. Monica’s Catholic

Church, Barre. Burial followed in St. Sylvester Cemetery in

Lower Websterville. In lieu of flowers, please consider a

donation to the Alzheimer’s Association, 300 Cornerstone

Drive, Suite 130, Williston, VT 05495 (or www.alz.org).

Arrangements are in the care of the Pruneau-Polli Funeral

Home, 58 Summer St., Barre. Those wishing to send online

condolences may do so at: www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.

com.

ROBERT BARTHOLOMEW LYNCH, 38, of Moretown,

passed away on June 28, 2019, in Austin, Texas, after a long

struggle with drug and alcohol addiction. He recently had

been released from an alcohol recovery program, and was

preparing to return to Vermont. Robert was born April 20,

1981, in Burlington. He attended the Moretown Elementary

School, Harwood Union High School and the University of

Vermont. By his mid-20s, Robert had lost his footing, and

couldn’t find his place in this life. His health issues became

severe and he joined the millions who are addicted to opiates.

His parents hope that somehow Robert’s death will

encourage others to reach out and show friends who are in

trouble that they are loved. Robert is survived by his parents

John and Vee Lynch, and his brother, Mac. A celebration of

his life will be held at Mad River Glen on Aug. 17, from noon

to 3 p.m. Friends are invited to sing, play music or tell stories

in remembrance of Robert. Please bring food to share.

Contributions in Robert’s memory may be made to the

Central Vermont Humane Society in Montpelier.

SHELDON H. MILLER, born June 2, 1926, the son of

Webster and Eleanora Mills Miller, died July 25, 2019, at

Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. He is survived by

three sons and their families. Shelly married Sybil Dodge on

Nov. 13, 1960. Shelly was a lover of nature and depicted

scenes of the ocean where he spent summers as a young person,

Vermont hills and streams where he fished and hunted

with great success, and “Woodbury Park,” his own piece of

nature where he often walked. He was on the Mad River Ski

Patrol for many years. Many of his good friends, including

Peter Sykas and “Fuzz” Taylor, predeceased him. Those

wishing to make condolences online may do so at www.guareandsons.com.

JEAN MINKIN, 93, of Heaton Street passed

away peacefully after a brief illness on Friday,

July 26, 2019 surrounded by her family and

with her beloved dog Obie by her side. She

lived life to the fullest and died with no regrets. She enjoyed

her family, her scientific career, travel and seeing the world

on a bicycle. Jean was born in Philadelphia in 1925. She married

her wartime GI pen pal Max, settled in Philadelphia and

had two children. She pursued a career in science where

women were rarely seen at that time. Survivors include her

sons, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The family

would like to express its gratitude to the Heaton Woods staff

for all their support and care. The Hooker and Whitcomb

Funeral Home, 7 Academy Street, Barre assisted the family

with the arrangements. For a memorial guestbook, visit

www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

ROGER E. MORGAN—The Memorial Service for Roger

Morgan, who died December 13, 2018 will be held at 10 am,

August 10th at the Berlin Corner Cemetery. Reception following

at the Morgan home. Arrangements by Boardway &

Cilley Funeral Home, Chelsea.

JOE PIRO passed away on April 20, 2019. A time for gathering

in his memory is set for Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:00

p.m. at the Barre Fish and Game Club. Come ready to share

your “Joe memories” and join the family in light refreshments.

Feel free to wear your sportsman gear or favorite

sports team t-shirt.

RICHARD A. POPE passed peacefully at his

home in Lake Wales, on July 15, 2019. He and

his wife, Susan, resided there for 23 years. In

Vermont, he was born in 1934 to Hester Pope in

Burlington, raised in Roxbury and attended

Northfield High School. He served 14 years

with the Vermont National Guard and Army

Reserves. He was employed by UPS as a driver from 1967

until retirement in 1996. Dick is survived by his wife, son,

daughter, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A graveside

service was held in the Berlin, Vermont, Cemetery on

Friday, Aug. 2, 2019, at 3 p.m.

FERNANDE CECILLE YORK, 87, a longtime Barre resident,

passed away peacefully on Tuesday, July 23, 2019, at

the Mayo Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Northfield.

Born on Aug. 2, 1931, in Washington, Vermont, she was the

daughter of George and Mary Louise (Sylvain) Soucy. She

attended the Catholic Convent School in Barre for her elementary

education and graduated from Spaulding High

School in 1949. In 1975, she married Harold York Sr. in a

beautiful ceremony in Barre. The two made their home in

the Barre area and eventually moved to Zephyrhills, Florida.

Harold passed away in 1999. Throughout her life, Fernande

had many hobbies and interests. The most important of

those were quilting, going for long walks, traveling, playing

cards and spending quality time with her family and friends.

Survivors include her three sons, grandchildren, sisters,

brother, nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service to

honor and celebrate Fernande’s life will be held on

Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019, at 11 a.m. in the Hooker and

Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. Burial will

follow in the Hope Cemetery in Barre. For memorial guestbook,

visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

• • •

Founding Executive Director

Victor R. Swenson Dies at 84

It is with great sadness that we share the news that Victor

R. Swenson, the founding Executive Director of the Vermont

Humanities Council, died on Thursday, July 25 at age 84. A

memorial service has tentatively been scheduled for

September.

As the organization’s founder, Victor started many of our

flagship programs, including our Speakers Bureau, Reading

and Discussion, Annual Fall Conference, and Literacy programs.

After his retirement in 2002, the Vermont Humanities

Council board created an award in Victor’s honor that recognizes

an outstanding Vermont educator in grades 6 through

12. The Victor R. Swenson Humanities Educator Award is

presented each year at our Fall Conference.

We sat down with Victor in February 2019 to discuss his

recollections of the Council’s early years. In the article,

Victor said, “I started in January 1974 on New Year’s Day…I

moved a picnic table into the office, which was empty, and a

folding chair and got to work.”

We at the Vermont Humanities Council—and the many

thousands of Vermonters whose lives were changed because

of the programs that Victor founded—are deeply grateful

that Victor approached that work with such grace, intelligence,

compassion, and vision. We are honored to have

known him.

PRUNEAU-POLLI

FUNERAL HOME

Serving All Faiths

Family Owned & Operated

58 Summer Street • Barre, Vermont

802-476-4621

Proud Member

National Funeral Directors

Association

BETH ANN CORLISS, age 62, of Middlesex,

passed away on July 23, 2019, at UVM Medical

Center in Burlington, surrounded by family

and friends. Born in Springfield to Foster and

Barbara (Carr) Corliss on Feb. 24, 1957. Beth

Handicap Accessible

page 10 The WORLD August 7, 2019

Mayo Healthcare Welcomes New Administrator

After the retirement in April of longtime leader Christine

Scott, Mayo Healthcare has welcomed Tim McAdoo, an

award-winning consultant, executive and author in the field

of long-term care, as its new administrator.

Formerly the founder and CEO of McAdoo Healthcare, a

consulting firm in Washington, D.C., McAdoo has over 25

years’ experience in senior housing and long-term care. The

Tennessee native has served as interim executive director for

extended-care facilities in several southern states, and he was

vice president of a Virginia group that provides physical,

occupational and speech therapy services in some 16 states.

It was a big jump for McAdoo, coming from the national

scene to Mayo, a 50-bed long-term care and rehabilitation

facility, and 45-bed residential care facility, that has won a

number of national and state quality awards.

“I’d never worked for a nonprofit before — and Mayo

works at a different pace,” he explained. “We’ve turned

health care into a machine, but everything here is on a more

• • •

human scale. Mayo has a continuum of care, and you can

work to spearhead specific programs that can enrich residents’

lives.”

One key challenge McAdoo hopes to address at Mayo is

the ongoing need to recruit and retain highly qualified, motivated

staff. That’s a concern that, he said, long-term care

providers around the nation are working to address.

“I’ve always said we take care of our patients by taking

care of our staff,” he said. “People normally join an organization

because they want to make a difference. I want to feed

that and grow it, with lifelong learning and more.”

McAdoo is a fellow of the ACHCA, and serves on its

Board of Directors in both Texas and Kentucky. He’s living

now in Northfield, a quick walk from his new professional

home. He has already experienced a Vermont mud season

— and he has learned that he needs to buy a good pair of

boots.

“I’m told that’s a must,” he said.


18 licensed nursing assistants from Central Vermont Medical Center attend orientation for new LNA-to-LPN pilot program.

Low Unemployment Rates Spur Innovation and

Opportunity for Central Vermont Medical Center Nurses

Central Vermont Medical Center (CVMC) – in partnership

with the Community Colleges of Vermont (CCV) and

the Vermont Technical College (VTC) - is launching a new

workforce development program aimed at addressing the

shortage of nurses in Vermont. The new program will make

it easier for employeed Licensed Nursing Assistants (LNAs)

to train to become Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) by

reducing the two biggest barriers to higher education: time

and money.

“Right now, we have the lowest unemployment rate in

Vermont’s history,” says Robert Patterson, Vice President of

Human Resources and Clinical Operations. “That makes it

challenging to find skilled nurses. We realized that we

couldn’t just wait for qualified people to apply for jobs, and

the alternative of hiring traveling nurses is expensive. We

needed to look at how we could invest in our staff to move

them into key positions.”

Eighteen LNAs from the medical center will start down

the path of becoming LPNs by taking prerequisite courses

this fall through CCV. After, the pilot group will go through

an 11-month LPN training program through VTC. Students

in the program will continue to work part-time but receive

full-time pay and benefits during their training hours.

The staff at CVMC are deeply rooted in our community,”

says Anna Tempesta Noonan, President and Chief Operations

Officer. “They’re committed to our organization and the

patients, residents, and families that we serve. Supporting

their career development is one of the best investments we

can make.”

One of the newly enrolled students, Sydney Konopka, an

LNA at Woodridge Rehabilitation and Nursing, is optimistic

about how this program will impact her life and allow her to

keep serving her residents. “I want to expand the ways I can

help our residents,” says Sydney. “This program is an opportunity

to grow while gaining knowledge that I can use to help

them more.”

Like many hospitals, CVMC offers tuition reimbursement,

but they found that many staff – including LNAs – still

couldn’t balance the demands of a full-time job, family, and

schooling all at the same time.

“When we were creating this program, we sat down with

our LNAs,” says Matt Choate, Chief Nursing Officer. “We

asked them, ‘what are the barriers preventing you from

growing your career?’ What we heard was that we need to

pay people while they’re learning, and we need to make the

school and the classroom content really easy to access.” The

program will be held on weekends at Central Vermont

Medical Center’s main campus. Funding for the LNA-to-

LPN program comes from CVMC and a combination of

Making Progress Against the Number One Cancer Killer

• • •

state and federal grants.

About The University of Vermont Health Network -

Central Vermont Medical Center

Central Vermont Medical Center (CVMC) is the primary

health care provider for 66,000 people who live and work in

central Vermont. We provide 24-hour emergency care and

offer a full spectrum of inpatient and outpatient services at

the main hospital and CVMC’s 20 community-based medical

group practices. These include two ExpressCare clinics,

open 7 days a week, and CVMC’s Woodridge Rehabilitation

and Nursing, a 153-bed long- and short-term care facility.

Our professional staff includes more than 200 physicians and

70 advanced practice providers representing 25 medical specialties.

We employ more than 1,700 full- and part-time employees

and depend upon hundreds of volunteers and donors who

help carry out our mission of working collaboratively to

meet the needs and improve the health of our community.

Central Vermont Medical Center is a member of

OneCareVermont, the statewide accountable care organization.

About The University of Vermont Health Network

The University of Vermont Health Network is an academic

health system that is comprised of six affiliate hospitals,

a multi-specialty medical group, and a home health

agency. We serve the residents of Vermont and northern

New York with a shared mission: working together, we

improve people’s lives. Our partners include:

• The University of Vermont Medical Center

• The University of Vermont Health Network Medical Group

• The University of Vermont Health Network – Alice Hyde

Medical Center

• The University of Vermont Health Network – Central

Vermont Medical Center

• The University of Vermont Health Network – Champlain

Valley Physicians Hospital

• The University of Vermont Health Network – Elizabethtown

Community Hospital

• The University of Vermont Health Network – Porter

Medical Center

• The University of Vermont Health Network – Home

Health and Hospice

Our 4,000 health care professionals are driven to provide

high quality, cost-efficient care as close to home as possible.

Strengthened by our academic connection to the University

of Vermont, each of our hospitals remains committed to its

local community by providing compassionate, personal care

shaped by the latest medical advances and delivered by

highly skilled experts.

Lung cancer death rates in the U.S. have decreased 11.5

percent since 2013, according to recent data from the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For World

Lung Cancer Day on August 1, the American Lung

Association in Vermont is highlighting recent lung cancer

advancements that save more lives.

“Even with the decrease in deaths, lung cancer remains

the number one cancer killer of both men and women in the

U.S. Here in Vermont it is estimated that 510 people will be

diagnosed with lung cancer and approximately 370 will succumb

to the disease in 2019,” said Justin King, executive

director for the American Lung Association in Vermont.

“However, we are making huge strides in our fight against

lung cancer and the decrease in lung cancer deaths motivates

us to continue our efforts.”

Awareness

Through its LUNG FORCE initiative, the Lung Association

raises awareness about lung cancer in both women and men.

In the most recent Lung Health Barometer survey, the organization

saw positive increases in their efforts to raise awareness

about the disease. Since the inception of the Lung

Health Barometer, women have become eight percentage

points more likely to speak to their doctor about lung cancer

(26 percent in 2017 vs. 18 percent in 2014). However, there

is more work to do as only three percent of women cite lung

cancer as a top-of-mind health concern.

Early Detection

Unfortunately, most lung cancer cases are still diagnosed

in the later stages when treatment is less likely to be curative.

People diagnosed at early stages of lung cancer are more

than four times more likely to survive five years, but currently

only 16 percent of lung cancer cases are diagnosed

early.

The Lung Association is working to change that. Through

the Saved By the Scan campaign, the organization raises

awareness of lifesaving low-dose CT scan lung cancer screening.

The scan is the only lung cancer screening tool that

reduces the mortality rate for lung cancer by detecting the

disease before it spreads. Today, there are an estimated eight

million Americans who are at high risk for lung cancer and

qualify for screening. If everyone eligible were screened, an

estimated 25,000 lives would be saved. To see if you qualify

for a lung cancer screening, take a two-minute quiz at

SavedBytheScan.org.

Investments in Research

In the last five years, LUNG FORCE has raised money and

advocated for more lung cancer research funding to help

develop new treatments and better methods of early detection.

The Lung Association has funded over $14 million in

lung cancer research since the launch of LUNG FORCE in

2014. Additionally, the organization advocated for a 69 percent

increase in lung cancer research funding at the National

Institutes of Health.

“We are excited to see that lung cancer deaths have

decreased, but there is still so much more that we need to do

to end this terrible disease,” said King, “Anyone with lungs

can get lung cancer, so we encourage everyone to educate

themselves and their loved ones about risks, early detection

and symptoms.”

To learn more about lung cancer, volunteer or donate,

please visit Lung.org.

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HAVE YOU LEFT YOUR JOB? RETIRED? RETIRING?

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Washington County Mental Health Services, Inc.

Agency Open House

& Career Fair

Children, Youth and

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579 South Barre Road

Barre, VT 05641

Tuesday, August 13th 2019

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

963 Paine Turnpike North, Unit 3-G

Berlin, VT 05602

(802)371-5011

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Investment adviser representative and registered representative of, and securities and investment

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WCMHS

Where Hope and Support Come Together

WCMHS is a leader in providing compassionate, quality,

trauma-informed services to our communities. Come learn

about our programs and services and discover how you

could join us in bringing hope and support to those in need

in central Vermont. Program information, on-site interviews

for open positions and refreshments will be available.

· Tour our facility and learn fi rst-hand how we are

improving lives

· Learn about open positions across the agency

· Gain details on how to connect with our services

and programs

Please stop by anytime between

4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Open to the public

For more information call: (802) 229-1399

wcmhs.org

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 11


HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Washington Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No. 420-6-19 Wnpr

IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

RUTH M. WATSON

LATE OF:

East Montpelier, Vermont

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of RUTH M. WATSON,

late of East Montpelier, Vermont.

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having claims

against the decedent or the estate must

present their claims in writing within

four (4) months of the first publication

of this notice. The claim must be

presented to me at the address listed

below with a copy sent to the Court.

The claim may be barred forever if

it is not presented within the four (4)

month period.

Dated: August 1, 2019

Signed: Laurie W. Justis

Eexcutor/Administrator:

Laurie W. Justis

1765 Center Road

Montpelier, VT 05602

Phone: (802) 461-5602

Email: LWJustis@gmail.com

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: August 7, 2019

Vermont (Washington) Superior Court/

Probate Division

65 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

Contacting Congress

U.S. Rep. Peter Welch

Mailing address:

128 Lakeside Ave, Suite 235

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.welch.house.gov

Phone: (802) 652-2450

I wanted to go to college

but I didn’t think I could

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The WORLD assumes no financial

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If you have any question please call (800)262-6392.

U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders

Mailing address:

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Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 862-0697

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Burlington office:

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Burlington, VT 05401

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Phone: (802) 863-2525

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning

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Twelve Reasons We Need Sane Health

Care for Everybody

Health industry lobbyists keep claiming to wonder why

we need Medicare for All when, they insist, we have such a

wonderful system already. Well, here are 12 reasons:

• 9/11 first responders wouldn’t have to beg for health care

• People in horrible accidents wouldn’t have to resort to

online begging

• People with diabetes wouldn’t have to risk amputation to

save money on insulin

• People with huge medical bills wouldn’t have to file for

bankruptcy

• Poor people wouldn’t have to search for a doctor who takes

Medicaid

• Doctors, hospitals, etc., wouldn’t have to spend millions of

hours dealing with insurance companies

• Americans wouldn’t have to spend millions of hours trying

to choose the right Medicare Part D prescription drug plan

• Employers wouldn’t have to spend many thousands of

hours deciding what insurance their employees will have to

use for the next year

• People wouldn’t have to weigh the need to see a doctor

against the need to pay the utility bill, rent, grocery bill…

• People wouldn’t have to wonder for months how much

they will end up paying for a visit to the doctor or hospital

• No one would ever again care about “in network” & “out of

network”

• No one would wonder how large a rate increase the health

insurance companies were going to request each year.

I’m sure most readers will have no trouble coming up with

others.

Lee Russ

Bennington, VT

President Trump is Providing Hope

for Kidney Patients

President Trump has promised to fight for the forgotten

men and women of America—those whose needs and suffering

have been too often unheeded by their government. One

forgotten group in healthcare is the millions of Americans

with some stage of kidney disease—especially the more than

700,000 Americans suffering from the final, deadly stage of

the disease, kidney failure. That includes 826 patients here in

Vermont, most of whom must go through the incredibly

draining experience of receiving kidney dialysis several

times a week, for several hours each time.

But there is good news. President Trump recently signed

an executive order launching a revolutionary initiative at the

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services called

• • •

“Advancing American Kidney Health.” The initiative aims to

help prevent Americans from experiencing kidney failure in

the first place, provide more options for treatment once that

has occurred, and deliver more life-saving transplants.

This is especially important because kidney disease particularly

burdens our low income and minority citizens.

Kidney failure is three times more common among African-

Americans than among whites, and low-income Americans

are 50 percent more likely to suffer from it than those with

higher incomes. Black and Hispanic Americans are also less

likely to receive the transplants that represent the best treatment

for kidney failure.

To prevent kidney disease and provide more treatment

options, we’re launching new ways for Medicare to pay for

kidney care. For example, nephrologists will soon be able to

receive bonuses for preventing the progress of kidney disease

in their patients. We’ll give providers a financial stake in

getting their patients healthy, as opposed to just paying them

for performing more procedures.

We have also proposed a Medicare initiative to give about

half of America’s dialysis providers new incentives to provide

patients with dialysis at home or even in their beds at night,

rather than having them travel to dialysis centers. Today,

only 4.6 percent of kidney patients in Vermont receive dialysis

at home, an option that’s much more common in other

countries. Home treatment is especially important for individuals

and communities struggling to provide for their

families—patients who cannot afford to leave their jobs and

families several times a week for dialysis.

To provide more kidney transplants, we will be revising

how kidneys are obtained from deceased organ donors,

allowing better identification of kidneys for transplant. The

executive order also calls for us to expand support for the

generous living donors who choose to donate organs.

Changing how we identify transplantable kidneys from

deceased donors, by itself, could produce life-saving organs

for an additional 17,000 Americans each year—including

some of the 59 individuals currently waiting for a kidney in

Vermont.

The President’s kidney initiative also includes working

with the private sector to develop artificial, implantable kidneys,

and continuing support for research into precisionmedicine

treatments designed to target kidney disease in the

populations who are more likely to be genetically predisposed

to the disease, including African Americans. We’ll also

undertake a national awareness campaign about kidney disease,

which is often undiagnosed in its early stages, like

breast cancer and prostate cancer once were.

Too often, Washington focuses on some of the same tired

fights in healthcare, year after year—doing nothing for

decades to improve how we cover and treat something like

kidney disease.

President Trump is shaking that up, and delivering

American patients the affordability you need, the options

and control you want, and the quality you deserve—especially

to patients, like those with kidney disease, who have

been forgotten for too long.

Alex M. Azar II

Secretary of Health and Human Services

AT CCV, I CAN.

ccv.edu/ican

page 12 The WORLD August 7, 2019


DFR Orders Unlicensed Entities to Cease and Desist

On July 31, 2019 the Department of Financial Regulation

issued a cease and desist order against four entities and one

individual alleged to be violating state law by deceptively

marketing and soliciting unlicensed health insurance to

Vermonters.

The order requires the following respondents to immediately

stop soliciting or offering the unlicensed health insurance

in Vermont:

• Vermont Alliance for Health Care Alternatives (VAHCA);

• Small Association Leadership Alliance (SALA);

• National Association of Senior Move Managers (NASMM);

• Sedera Health, Inc.;

• Susan Stasny.

Commissioner Michael Pieciak found the respondents

had targeted Vermonters through email and web solicitations

attempting to induce them into purchasing unlicensed

health insurance products in violation of state law.

The advertising purports to be offering a “VAHCA healthcare

program” (the SALA/VAHCA product), providing

preventive care coverage and “medical cost sharing” provided

by Sedera Health. The advertising misleads consumers

to believe that the SALA/VAHCA product is legitimate

State Begins Testing Public Water Supplies for

PFAS as Part of Act 21 Requirements

As part of the state’s expanded effort to identify sources of

PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemical contamination

in the environment, the Vermont Agency of

Natural Resources (ANR) sent letters to public drinking

water system operators to begin testing for PFAS.

Act 21, which was passed by the Vermont Legislature and

signed into law by Governor Phil Scott in May, requires all

public and noncommunity water systems to conduct monitoring

for PFAS by December 2019. If monitoring confirms

PFAS contaminants in excess of 20 parts per trillion (ppt),

the water system is required to implement treatment to

reduce PFAS contaminants below that level.

“We are pleased to have worked with the legislature to

advance these next steps in the state’s nation-leading PFAS

response,” said Agency of Natural Resources Deputy

Secretary Peter Walke. “I want to thank all of the public

water suppliers for moving forward expeditiously with this

important work. We all share the goal of protecting

Vermonters from the impacts of PFAS and other contaminants.”

PFAS is a large group of human-made chemicals that have

been used in industry and in many consumer products since

the 1950s because they are resistant to heat, water, oil, grease

and stains. PFAS chemicals include PFOA (perfluorooctanoic

acid) and PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid).

PFAS can be found in drinking water, food, indoor dust,

many consumer products, and in the workplace. Some PFAS

do not break down easily and therefore stay in the environment

for a very long time, especially in water. There are

currently five PFAS chemicals regulated by the State of

Vermont.

According to the Vermont Department of Health, virtually

everyone is exposed to PFAS chemicals, some of which can

have adverse effects on human health. Although more

research is needed, studies in people have shown that certain

PFAS may:

• Affect growth, learning and behavior of babies and older

children

• Lower a person’s chance of getting pregnant

• Interfere with the body’s natural hormones

• Increase cholesterol levels

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

HHH1/2

Who is the greatest living American director?

…Scorsese, Stone, Nolen, Payne, Wes Anderson,

Paul Thomas Anderson?

I don’t know. All I know is that Quentin Tarantino has to

be in the mix. And he’s still in the prime of his career.

“Django Unchained” is one of the best movies of all time.

“The Hateful Eight” is not quite as good but it’s even more

meaningful. “Eight” is about two very different people who

survive a violent standoff because they are the only ones savvy

enough to recognize when other people around them are

lying. In this world of scams, charlatans, and fake news, being

able to discern lies using your common sense is one of the

most valuable skills for a person to have.

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” is neither as magnificent

as “Django Unchained” nor as intellectually focused as

“The Hateful Eight.”

It’s still a Tarantino film, though. So it’s inspired, unique,

funny, occasionally ultra-violent, and amazing.

It’s Hollywood 1969. Leonardo DiCaprio is magnificent

as fading star Rick Dalton. Dalton is still a household name

because of the cowboy show he did years ago. But now his

star power is gone and he plays bad guys in TV episodes and

B movies.

We’ve seen aging actors fretting about losing their looks

and their fame. The neat thing about Dalton is what troubles

him the most is losing his talent and professionalism. Di-

Caprio’s Dalton is not a vain Hollywood phony; he a working

American like us who just wants to be great at his job.

When Dalton nails a scene and his costar and director

compliment him, you see a single tear of relief and joy drip

down his cheek. I doubt that was in the script. That was Di-

Caprio feeling the beautiful triumph of the moment.

While Rick Dalton plays cowboys on screen, Brad Pitt’s

Cliff Booth is a real-life cowboy. He’s a happy-go-lucky tough

guy who keeps his emotions close to the vest.

Years ago, Cliff was making good money as Rick’s stunt

• • •

• • •

insurance and can serve as a reasonable replacement for

“traditional” health insurance while lessening a consumer’s

financial risk. The advertising materials obscure the fact that

there is no guarantee that consumers will actually be paid for

any healthcare costs.

“These products claim to save Vermonters money and

reduce their risks related to healthcare expenses, but they

actually do neither,” said Commissioner Pieciak. “The

department will be taking a very serious look at these products

and the entities that sell them, and I encourage

Vermonters to reach out to us or the Department of Vermont

Health Access if approached by anyone selling similar products.”

If you are aware of the respondents engaging in activity

related to the business of insurance in Vermont or have purchased

any products from the respondents, please report

immediately to the Department of Financial Regulation

Consumer Services Section at 802-828-3302 or dfr.insuranceinfo@vermont.gov.

Connect with the Vermont Department of Financial

Regulation on Twitter, Facebook, and on our website.

• Affect the immune system

• Increase the risk of cancer

ANR has already begun to implement many of Act 21’s

requirements. In July 2019, the agency finalized its statewide

sampling plan for PFAS. The plan outlines ANR’s monitoring

approach to test PFAS levels in a variety of sectors,

including car washes and landfills.

Before December 1, all public community water systems,

schools and other water systems that serve the same 25

people for more than six months of the year will be required

to test for PFAS substances in drinking water. In total, samples

will be collected from approximately 650 public water

systems. If a system has levels above the 20 ppt state standard,

the system operator will post “Do not drink” (DND)

notices, and find a solution to reduce contamination.

In instances where contamination is found, the state will

quickly work with water system operators to identify potential

PFAS sources and provide guidance to those communities.

The state will also investigate the source in order to

identify any party responsible for the contamination. ANR is

also developing an emergency response manual for communities

and engineers to use during the response.

Over the next five years, the Agency of Natural Resources

(ANR) will embark on a series of steps to safeguard the public

from PFAS contamination:

• The testing of all public drinking water systems by

December 1, 2019

• The further investigation of additional potential sources

and impacts of PFAS

• The finalization of a drinking water standard

• The development of the scientific basis for and eventual

setting of water quality standards for lakes, ponds, rivers,

and wetlands

As part of Act 21, ANR will also be evaluating PFAS as a

class of chemicals, and whether it is possible to regulate

them as a class. The new law requires ANR to adopt water

quality standards for the regulated PFAS contaminants.

Learn more about the state’s response and actions to identify

PFAS contamination at dec.vermont.gov/pfas. For information

about PFAS and public health, visit healthvermont.

gov/water/pfas.

double. But Cliff did something terrible in his private life and

now he’s blacklisted in Hollywood and hated by many. Rick

keeps Cliff around as his driver, his handyman, and his pal.

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” features Roman Polanski

as a small but perfectly likable secondary character.

Quentin Tarantino had a positive working relationship with

Harvey Weinstein for decades. With Cliff Booth, Tarantino

is arguing that even the most disgusting, unforgivable creeps

can be good guys sometimes. He’s saying that it’s possible

to want Harvey Weinstein deported to Siberia to starve and

freeze but also admit that he was a loyal friend and a caring

dog owner.

I found “Hollywood” to be fun and engrossing. I know

for a fact that some will find it boring and miserable because

my wife did. And, in her defense, the paper-thin plot moves

slowly and most of the scenes are style over substance. If you

are bored, though, please don’t walk out before the surprise

ending.

I love the ending to this movie. How the heck do you make

a film that features Sharon Tate and Charles Manson end joyfully?

Leave it to Mr. Tarantino.

Oh, another warning: if you are a hippie, were a hippie, or

have a soft spot for hippies, you will be offended by this film.

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” is to hippies what “Birth

of a Nation” was to black people.

I do not recommend “Hollywood” to everyone. But I sure

liked it. I think Quentin Tarantino is a national treasure and

every new movie he makes is a celebration.

Lung Cancer?

Asbestos exposure in industrial,

construction, manufacturing jobs, or

the military may be the cause. Family

in the home were also exposed.

Call 1-866-795-3684 or email

cancer@breakinginjurynews.com.

$30 billion is set aside for asbestos

victims with cancer. Valuable settlement

monies may not require filing a lawsuit.

Weekly Construction Update

Interstate 89 Ledge Removal, Exit 6

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Berlin IM 089-1(62) project

consists of a 1400 foot ledge face where rock overhangs

the roadway, and periodically falls onto the roadway. This

rock slope was identifi ed as an “A” cut. “A” ranked slopes

represent slopes where rockfall is expected to occur and

reach the roadway.

TRAFFIC IMPACTS: I-89 Northbound has been reduced

to one lane within the vicinity of the construction zone. This

will remain in effect until the project has been completed.

Exit 6 has been reopened to traffi c.

CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES:

The I-89 northbound Exit 6 off ramp is open to traffi c.

Blasting operations will continue throughout the

week next week. Rolling road blocks will continue to

be utilized during blasting operations at times of offpeak

commuter traffic. Message boards will indicate

when rolling road blocks are in progress.

Crews will continue removing and hauling away the ledge

material.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Natalie Boyle, 802-855-3893, nboyle@eivtech.com

To learn more about VTrans Construction Projects, visit our

projects website. https://vtrans.vermont.gov/projects

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT CIVIL DIVISION

Washington 2 x 4.75 Unit Docket No. 240-4-18 Wncv

Robert W. Phillips II,

Plaintiff

v.

John Clement and Callie Buck, Defendants

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

By virtue of the Amended Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure by

Judicial Sale (“Foreclosure Judgment”) filed January 3, 2019 and

the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage granted by John

Clement and Callie Buck (“Mortgagors”), to Robert W. Phillips II

dated June 4, 2014 and recorded on June 5, 2014 in Book 126 at Pages

164-166 of the Town of East Montpelier Land Records, for breach

of the conditions of the mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing

the same, the undersigned will cause to be sold at public auction

(“Sale”) at 11 a.m. on August 16, 2019, the lands and premises

known as 365 Mays Way in the Town of East Montpelier, Vermont

(“Mortgaged Property”), Town Parcel Identification No. 08-013.100,

and more particularly described as follows:

Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to John Clement

and Callie Buck by Warranty Deed of Robert W. Phillips ii dated

June 4, 2014 and recorded in Book 126 at Pages 162-163 of the Town

of East Montpelier Land Records.

TERMS OF SALE: The Sale will be held at the Mortgaged Property.

The Mortgaged Property will be sold “AS IS, WHERE IS, WITH

ALL FAULTS, WITH NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRAN-

TIES OF ANY KIND”, subject to easements, rights of way, covenants,

permits, reservations and restrictions of record, superior

liens, if any, encumbrances that are not extinguished by the sale, title

defects, environmental hazards, unpaid real estate taxes and other

municipal liens (delinquent and current, including penalty and interest),

to the highest bidder.

The successful bidder shall pay a deposit of at least $10,000 of the

purchase price in cash or bank treasurer’s/cashier’s check at the time

of Sale. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid within ten

days after entry of a confirmation order. The successful bidder will

be required to sign a purchase and sale contract with NO CONTIN-

GENCIES except confirmation of the sale by the court. Title will be

transferred by Confirmation Order. The Sale may be postponed one

or more times for a total time of up to thirty (30) days, by announcing

the new sale date to those present at each adjournment or by

posting notice at a conspicuous location at the place of the Sale. Notice

of the new sale date shall also be sent by first class mail, postage

prepaid, to the Mortgagors at the Mortgagors’ last known address at

least five days before the new sale date.

Other terms to be announced at the Sale or contact:

Terry L. Owen, CAI, AARE

Sr. Vice President

Thomas Hirchak Company

1878 Cady’s Falls Road

Morrisville, VT 05661

1-800-634-7653

www.THCAuction.com

The Mortgagors, or their personal representatives or assigns, may

redeem the Mortgaged Property at any time prior to the Sale by

paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including postjudgment

expenses and the costs and expenses of sale.

Dated at Montpelier, Vermont, this 15th day of July 2019.

ROBERT W. PHILLIPS II

/s/ David R. Bookchin

David R. Bookchin, Esq.

Bookchin & Durrell, P.C.

2 Spring Street

Montpelier, Vermont 05602

(802) 229-9829

bookchin@lawofficevt.com

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 13


Glider Rocker Chairs

FROM

STARTING AT

$399

Locally Owned & Operated • Mon -Fri 10-6, Sat 10-4

97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Rd • 802-479-0671

Thank You

for the Cards,

Gifts, Calls,

and Emails on

My 90th Birthday.

Beverly Conti

Happy Birthday!

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

August 3

Lila, 55, Plattsburgh, NY

August 4

Emma Rae Baker, 4, East Barre

Valery Weston, 21

August 6

Gloria Mills, Bethel

Roland & Irene

Lafayette

are celebrating their

60th Wedding Anniversary

August 15, 2019

Send cards to:

81 Blackberry Lane

Waterbury, VT 05676

August 7

Colby Jones, 19, Barre

Jocelyn Batchelder, 28, Plainfield

August 8

Vanessa Weston, 12, Williamstown

Katie Weston, 24

Lester Felch Jr, 53, Barre

Gary Hass, East Montpelier

Shirley Combs, Chelsea

August 9

Bob Evans, 65, Woodstock

August 11

Joshua Campbell, 24, Phoenix, AZ

August 12

Thomas Neddo, 33, East

Montpelier

Dustin Poitras, 33, Barre

Sarah McDonald, 16, Randolph

August 13

Jade Nutbrown, 6, Barre

Emilly Squier, 22, Maine

This Week’s Cake Winner:

Jade Nutbrown of Barre will be 6 on August 13

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, August 8 to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week

for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks

prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE ___________________________________________

NAME ________________________________________________

AGE (this birthday) ______________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________ _____________

page 14 The WORLD August 7, 2019

Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival at Chandler

The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival will kick off

its 27th season at Chandler Music Hall in Randolph on

August 12 and offer world-class performances and events

through August 25.

Founder, Music Director, and cellist Peter Sanders has

once again packed the two week residency with music - both

traditional and intriguing.

The first Saturday evening concert, on August 17 at 7:30

features two viola quintets - Felix Mendelssohn’s penultimate

work, the String Quintet #2, Opus 87 in B flat and

Johannes Brahms’s first string quintet, Opus 88 in F Major.

Also on the program will be a motet, Ave Maria, attributed

to the Renaissance French composer Josquin des Prez and

arranged for string quartet by the musicologist and late

father of Sanders, Ernest H. Sanders. The musicians will be

violinists Joanna Maurer and Derek Ratzenboeck, violists

Katarzyna Bryla-Weiss and Michael Roth, and cellist Peter

Sanders.

The second Saturday evening concert on August 25 at 7:30

will be devoted to works by Beethoven, with the Violin

Sonata #5 in F, Opus 24, the “Spring Sonata,” the Sonata for

Cello and Piano in D, Opus 102, #5, and the “Ghost” piano

trio in D, Opus 70, #1. Artists for this second week will

include violinist Arturo Delmoni, cellist Peter Sanders, and

pianist Adrienne Kim. This concert will be performed as an

encore in Woodstock at the

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Happy

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Unitarian Universalist

Church on Sunday afternoon,

August 25 at 4:00.

Sunday tickets are available

through the presenter,

Pentangle Council on the

Arts, at their website www.

pentanglearts.org or by calling

(802) 457-3981.

The 9th annual popular

Breakfast with Bach will be

held on Sunday, August 18,

with breakfast in the Esther

Mesh Room of the Chandler

Upper Gallery at 11:00, with

food provided by Shari

Dutton and Friends of the

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 214 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Forget Me Not

Flowers & Gifts

214 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

Mon.-Fri. 9-6 | Sat. 9-1

We belong to the Flower Shop Network!

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Please Send Us Your Anniversaries

And Be Automatically Registered To Win A 1/2 Dozen Wrapped,

Red Roses From Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

On August 8, Louise and Russ Hoermann of

Barre, Vermont will celebrate 27 years!

On August 10, Mary and Terry Van Veghten of

East Calais, Vermont will celebrate 23 years!

On August 10, Lester and Lisa Felch of

Barre, Vermont will celebrate 28 years!

On August 13, Celine and George Johnson of

Montpelier, Vermont will celebrate 25 years!

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.

Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 214 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone

calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________

_________________________________________

PHONE___________________________________

former Three Bean Café. At 12:30 the Festival artists will be

joined at Bethany church across the street by members of the

Vermont Youth Orchestra, led by VYO Music Director,

Yutaka Kono in a performance of Bach’s Concerto for Two

Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D minor, BWV 1043 and

Sinfonia in B minor, H. 661, Wq. 182, #5 by Bach’s son CPE.

Soloists for the Concerto will be VYO students Lucas

Parascando and Joe Balkan.

A very special event is planned for Wednesday evening,

August 21 at 7:00. Sanders has invited the prize winning

Klezmer quintet Big Galut(e) to perform on the Chandler

main stage for a rollicking evening, with a very eclectic variety

of Jewish music styles, spanning five continents and six

centuries, including Klezmer originals and takes on traditional

classical works. Winner of the Simcha Prize at the

2017 International Jewish Music Festival in Amsterdam, Big

Galut(e) has been described as ‘soulful and unselfconsciously

poignant’, ‘jubilant’, ‘a real treat for open minds,’ and ‘a

serious band with lousy American humor.’

The Friday Night in the Gallery this year on August 23 at

7:00 p.m. will be an opportunity to Meet Your Musicians. All

are invited to come and enjoy an informal chance to meet,

ask questions of, play for (bring your instruments!) our resident

Artists for the week. All ages are encouraged to be part

of this session and light food and drink will be offered, provided

again by Shari Dutton. An All About Community

event, the evening is free and a festival thank you to its supporters

and friends.

Open rehearsals are being held on Thursdays August 15

and 22 beginning at 7 p.m. Admission is free and the public

is invited to come and go, getting a taste of professional

musicians at work.

It is tradition for Festival musicians to be on the air with

Walter Parker, host of VPR Classical, in the new studio in

Colchester. The public is invited to enjoy the program which

begins at 11:00 a.m. on August 16, in the studio or on all VPR

Classical stations.

For more information and to buy tickets online, visit the

Festival website at www.cvcmf.org. Tickets for the Chandler

concerts are also available by calling the Chandler box office

at (802) 728-6464 weekdays 12 to 5:00 p.m.

Chandler Music Hall is fully accessible and equipped for

the hearing impaired.

Whoever said being

a parent is easy?

For help call

Circle of Parents TM

1-800-CHILDREN

1-800-244-5373

HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

ARIES (March 21 to April 19)

Dealing with a difficult person

can be the kind of challenge you

Aries Lambs love. Or it could be

an energy-draining exercise in futility.

Be certain your goals are worth your efforts.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Divine Bovine might

be seeing red at having your crisis-resolution efforts

overlooked. But others know the truth, and they can be

expected to step forward when the time comes.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You should be well on your

way to finally making that important decision. Having

the support of loved ones will help when crunch time

comes. Keep a positive attitude.

CANCER ( June 21 to July 22) Feeling uneasy about a

move might not mean you’re having a case of Cancerian

wavering. It could be your inner sense is warning you to

reassess your situation before taking action.

LEO ( July 23 to August 22) Your pride could get in the

way of admitting you might have erred. Best to ‘fess up

now before a small mistake turns into a big misunderstanding.

Make the weekend a special family time.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Trying to please

someone with a less-than-glowing opinion of something

you value could be a waste of time. If you like it, stay with

it. The week’s end brings an answer to an old mystery.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) There might be

time to make a change. But be honest with yourself: Is

it what you really want, or one you feel pressured into

making? Your answer should determine your next move.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Change is dominant,

but so is caution: Proceed carefully, checking each

step along the way to avoid encountering any unwelcome

surprises that might be lurking along your path.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) It could

be a mistake to rely on someone to keep his or her promise

without checking out previous performances. What

you learn now could save you from a painful lesson later.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Taking a

strong stand on an issue you feel is too important to ignore

could inspire others to follow suit. The weekend is a good

time to socialize with old friends and make new ones.

AQUARIUS ( January 20 to February 18) Your sensitive

nature gives you an insight into the problems of someone

close to you. Your offer of support could be just what this

person needs to start turning his or her life around.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Financial matters continue

to need even more careful analysis than usual. Use

caution with investment possibilities. A personal relationship

might take an unexpected turn by the week’s end.

BORN THIS WEEK: You appreciate the wonders of the

world and enjoy sharing your delight with others.

(c) 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.


Fact: Americans eat about 50 billion beef

burgers a year.

Fact: Every year, the average American

eats enough red meat to make 800 quarterpound

burgers!

Fact: Red meat such as hamburger delivers

health risks from too much carnitine, lecithin

and choline, which change the bacteria in

your gut to produce inflammation in your

body. That can lead to an increased risk of

heart attacks, strokes, cancer and brain dysfunction.

A large study published in JAMA

Internal Medicine found that eating one additional serving a

day of unprocessed red meat over the decades-long course

of the study raised the risk of mortality by 13%. An extra

daily serving of processed red meat (bacon, hot dogs, salami)

raised the risk by 20%.

Enter the processed, meat-imitating veggie burger.

Sounds like a good idea. After all, it’s made from plants.

Because some of the most popular versions are designed to

imitate the taste of beef -- for example, through the genetic

engineering of heme (aka soy leghemoglobin), which conveys

a meaty flavor -- red-meat lovers might be persuaded to

reduce or eliminate beef burgers from their diet.

But these processed patties have as much saturated fat

and calories as an equivalent-sized 85% lean beef burger!

And we don’t know if these substitutes are just as bad for

your long-term health as a beef burger. They contain coconut

oil, and Dr. Mike thinks the data showing that coconut

oil is an accelerator of brain inflammation and dementia is

substantial. Plus, these veggie burgers are doing nothing to

promote veggie love. Instead they are saying veggies are only

good if they taste like red meat. Not true!

So, here are the facts about the two most popular brands

of “veggies masquerading as meat” burgers:

Beyond Meat Burgers contain water, pea protein isolate,

expeller-pressed canola oil, refined coconut oil, rice protein,

natural flavors, cocoa butter, mung bean protein, methylcellulose,

potato starch, apple extract, salt, potassium chloride,

vinegar, lemon juice concentrate, sunflower lecithin, pomegranate

fruit powder and beet juice extract (for color).

Four ounces delivers 250 calories, 18 total grams of fat,

with 6 grams of saturated fat, 390 milligrams of sodium, only

2 grams of fiber, 20 grams of protein and 25% of your recommended

daily value for iron.

• • •

Listening to Heart Murmurs

Parents have been sounding

off to me with lots of questions

about heart murmurs in their

children. Let me get to the

heart of the matter to provide

some information on this topic.

What is a heart murmur,

exactly?

A heart murmur is simply a

noise heard between the beats

of the heart due to the flow of

blood through the heart. In fact, it sounds

like water flowing through a hose. While the

term heart murmur may sound scary, for

most children it’s extremely common and

doesn’t mean anything is wrong. Usually, it

means that blood is whooshing through the

pipes and sounds louder.

Should I worry about the murmur?

So, when do we most worry about murmurs?

We worry most about infants at birth

and in the first few months of life. This is

because the murmur might be a signal that

there is a congenital abnormality involving

the heart. There may be an abnormal connection

between chambers, problems with

valves controlling blood flow in the heart, or

the major blood vessels coming from the

heart. If a baby appears blue in the face and

has a murmur, which occurs rarely, your

doctor will do other tests such as a chest

x-ray and an electrocardiogram. These are

used to diagnose whether or not a heart

problem exists. If the murmur does exists,

you doctor will refer your child to a pediatric

heart specialist. That specialist will do an

echocardiogram or ultrasound of the heart

to determine the diagnosis and further treatment.

The rise of the veggie burger

BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.

Social Isolation Linked to Bone Loss in Women

If you ever wanted a compelling

reason to join a group

or get out more, here it is: A

new study shows that poor

social relationships contribute

to bone loss in senior

women.

This wasn’t a small, brief study. In this

Women’s Health Initiative, researchers studied

the bone health of 11,000 women over six

years and included information about social

support and social functioning.

The bottom line: Over those six years,

high social stress equated to lowered bone

mineral density in the femoral neck (where

most hip fractures occur), the lumbar spine

and the whole hip. They assigned a rating to

levels of “social strain,” and found that each

additional point added to the lowered bone

density.

There’s more to this than how many

groups we meet with each week. It turns out

it’s the quality of our relationships rather

than the quantity. Life satisfaction and our

sense of optimism play a part, which might

• • •

The Impossible Burger ingredients are

water, soy protein concentrate, coconut oil,

sunflower oil, natural flavors, 2% or less of:

potato protein, methylcellulose, yeast extract,

cultured dextrose, food starch modified, soy

leghemoglobin, salt, soy protein isolate,

mixed tocopherols (vitamin E), zinc gluconate,

thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1),

sodium ascorbate (vitamin C), niacin, pyridoxine

hydrochloride (vitamin B6), riboflavin

(vitamin B2) and vitamin B12.

One 4-ounce patty contains 240 calories,

14 grams of total fat, with 8 grams of saturated fat, 370 milligrams

of sodium, 3 grams of fiber and 19 grams of protein,

plus 1 gram added sugar, and weirdly 5.3 milligrams of the B

vitamin thiamine -- 2,350% of your recommended daily

value (a high intake is 50 milligrams a day) -- and 130% of

B12.

Four ounces of 85% lean, all-beef burger contains 260

calories, 15.6 grams of total fat with 6 grams of saturated fat,

88 milligrams sodium, between 1 and 13% of daily values for

many vitamins (except A and C) and minerals.

So, while you can opt for a meaty-flavored veggie burger

occasionally, they may not be the healthy alternative you’re

seeking. Here are some substitutes:

-- When eating out, opt for a veggie meal that’s upfront

about what it is: A kale salad with walnuts and avocados or

vegetable pasta with 100% whole-wheat spaghetti, garlic

and olive oil (skip the cheese).

-- At home, why not whip up a tasty Quinoa Black Bean

Burger (recipe at www.doctoroz.com/recipe/quinoa-blackbean-veggie-burgers)

that’s loaded with protein and fiber

from the beans and quinoa, plus egg whites, and seasoned

with garlic, onion, tomato and extra-virgin olive oil.

-- And if you want some animal protein, try Dr. Mike’s

favorite salmon burger made with canned wild salmon,

Dijon mustard, onions and whole-wheat breadcrumbs. Get

the recipe at www.doctoroz.com/recipe/salmon-burger.

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike

Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness

Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into

“The Dr. Oz Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.

(c)2019 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.

Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

When a child reaches preschool

age and is noted to have

a murmur, this is usually less

cause for concern. By examining

your child and listening to

the sound, your child’s health

care professional should be

able to determine if further

testing is needed, but most of

the time it is not.

Is treatment necessary?

If the murmur is just due to blood flowing

noisily through the heart, treatment is not

needed. We call this an “innocent murmur”

due to noisy blood flow.

However, a follow-up visit or two may be

requested to make sure the sound is not

changing or has gone away. If the flow is

stronger because your child is anemic and

needs to make more red blood cells, iron

therapy might be required. If no therapy is

indicated, restricting your child from sports

or other physical activities is not necessary.

When do we otherwise worry about a murmur

in an older child? We do this only if it is

accompanied by rapid breathing, chest pain,

or an older child being very tired or passing

out. These are very rare occurrences.

Hopefully tips like these will mean you

won’t miss a beat when it comes to knowing

more about heart murmurs.

Lewis First, MD, is chief of Pediatrics at

The University of Vermont Children’s Hospital

and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at

the University of Vermont College of Medicine.

You can also catch “First with Kids” weekly on

WOKO 98.9FM and WPTZ Channel 5, or visit

the First with Kids video archives at www.

UVMHealth.org/MedCenterFirstWithKids.

well be tied in with the quality

of the relationships we do

have.

That’s scary, and for those

of us who don’t have much

time for socializing, it serves

as a wake-up call. What are we going to do

about it?

The first thing that comes to mind is any

activity that encourages interaction with

others. Even a weekly reading group at the

library, with participants commenting on

the book they read and adding thoughts to

others’ comments, has the potential to

evolve further into coffee afterward, phone

numbers swapped and invitations to other

activities.

The same goes for dog walking at the animal

shelter, bus trips with the senior center,

walking clubs around town, board-games

night at the library and neighborhood yard

sales.

As a place to look for local activities,

search online for the Red Hat Society (www.

redhatsociety.com). (c) 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

CVMC PEDIATRIC PRIMARY CARE - BARRE

Welcomes new provider, Jolanta Amblo, MD

Jolanta immigrated from Poland to Brooklyn, NY with her

parents at the age of thirteen. “My mother was a midwife in

Poland,” said Dr. Amblo. “She let me accompany her on home

visits, and that feeling never left me. I always felt a calling to

medicine.” Dr. Amblo first received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry

from the University of Vermont, but she still felt that desire to

practice medicine. At the age of 36, with three children and

an encouraging husband, Jolanta moved her family back to

Poland to study medicine in Krakow. She recently finished her

three-year residency in internal medicine in Connecticut.

(802) 479-3302

We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:

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Saturday 9am-2pm.

Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!

We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for

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(802) 479-3302

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 15


Governor Phil Scott, State Agencies Join Forces

Around Systematic Tick Surveillance Program

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How to Find Answers to Your Gardening Questions

page 16 The WORLD August 7, 2019

GARDENING & OUTDOORS

Route 302

Between Barre

and

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(802)-479-1445

Jackie Abts, Owner

~LIPSTICK PLANTS~HYDRANGEA~A FEW ROSES~

It’s June! As we finish up planting our vegetable and

flower gardens, it’s a good time to start thinking about how

you will address your inevitable garden problems and questions

that pop up each year like weeds.

Fortunately, Vermont has incredible resources right at

your fingertips.

One excellent place to start when you’re stumped is the

free University of Vermont (UVM) Extension Master

Gardener Hotline. Volunteers are available to take phone

calls on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to

noon at (802) 656-5421. Or you can submit your question

online at www.uvm.edu/extension/mastergardener/

helpline.

I called the hotline for the first time when I found flea

beetles on my turnips, wondering if I should to do something

about them. Their advice was simple and practical. Look at

the extent of the damage on my plants and use that to determine

the scale of my intervention.

In my case, my plants were large and healthy, and the damage

(tiny holes in the leaves) was minor, so I didn’t need to

do anything in the short term. In the long term, I looked to

online Cooperative Extension resources to understand the

life cycle of flea beetles to help anticipate their tendencies in

future seasons.

To find answers to my garden questions online, I strategically

use the search bar in my internet browser to get the

most relevant and scientific results.

For example, last year I planted strawberry plants.

Strawberry plants do their best fruit production in the second

year, so I needed to know how to care for them during

the first year to ensure a great strawberry harvest. I typed

“strawberry extension Vermont” into the search bar.

This strategic combination of words quickly narrowed

down the search results to research-based resources published

by the UVM Extension. I quickly found that I needed

to pinch all of the flowers off the strawberry plants during

their first year.

The idea behind structuring a search like this is to find

Preliminary spring data is in from the

Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food &

Markets (VAAFM) and Vermont

Department of Health’s systematic tick surveillance

program. A total of 1,924 ticks were

collected in this year’s spring sampling.

“Tickborne diseases are on the rise in

Vermont,” said Governor Phil Scott. “Any

time a tickborne illness appears in a community,

it’s a cause for concern. The good news

is we can still enjoy outdoor activities by

knowing how to protect ourselves from tick

bites.”

The systematic tick surveillance program

was initiated in 2018 by the Health

Department in partnership with VAAFM to

track blacklegged ticks and the pathogens

they carry around the state. In 2018, a total of

1,239 ticks were collected during the spring,

although due to a change in the way ticks are

collected, data from 2018 can’t be compared

to this year’s figures.

The program focuses on the blacklegged

tick, which is responsible for transmitting

over 99% of all tickborne diseases reported

in Vermont. Through this program, ticks are

collected in the spring and fall from locations

around the state. Once all data has been collected,

VAAFM and the Health Department

collaborate to calculate blacklegged tick densities,

in order to determine the likelihood of

human encounters with ticks that can transmit

disease.

After each collection period, ticks are sent

to the Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention (CDC) for identification and

testing of blacklegged ticks for five tickborne

pathogens: Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen

that causes Lyme disease), Anaplasma

phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia

miyamotoi, and Powassan virus. Pathology

results from the CDC for 2019 are pending.

The best way to prevent tickborne diseases

is to prevent tick bites. VAAFM and the

Health Department encourage farmers, outdoor

workers, recreationalists, and all

Vermonters to “Be Tick Smart.”

Prevent tick bites

• Wear an EPA-registered insect repellent

(choose the right one for you) and talk with

your veterinarian about tick prevention

products for your pets.

• Wear clothing treated with permethrin,

which kills ticks on contact and protects

through several washings.

• Do a daily tick check after outdoor activity.

• Shower soon after being outside.

• Place clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10

minutes to kill ticks on clothing.

• Promptly remove any ticks that you find on

your body. Learn more about how to properly

remove a tick.

To learn more about Vermont’s Tick

Surveillance Program, visit https://agriculture.vermont.gov/public-health-agricultural-resource-management-division/planthealth-and-pest-management/ticks.

To review previous reports from the statewide

tick survey, another VAAFM project

that looks at ticks in Vermont , visit VAAFM’s

Annual Tick Reports webpage.

To learn more about preventing tickborne

diseases, visit: http://www.healthvermont.

gov/disease-control/tickborne-diseases/

prevent-tick-bites-tickborne-diseases

• • •

~MINTS~SNAKE PLANTS~FERNS~

Keeping Ahead of Powdery Mildew

By Gordon Clark

Extension Master Gardener, UVM

If you’ve ever lost a nice zucchini plant or a

crop of cucumbers or melons to this white

fungus, then you know the heartbreak of powdery

mildew.

It is a plant disease that looks like its name.

It starts as small white circles that look like

talcum powder, circles that will spread and

eventually cover your plant, reducing the

amount of photosynthesis and fruit production

if left untreated.

Powdery mildew is actually not one single

fungus, but a family of closely related fungal

species that affect a range of trees, flowers and

vegetables, including apple, rose, ash, birch,

grapes, zinnia, lilac, beans and tomatoes, but

are particularly fond of cucurbits. Fortunately,

the different family members are fairly host

specific, so that the powdery mildew on your

rose won’t spread to your cukes.

This disease is persistent. It loves to grow in

humid conditions, but the spores also will

spread in dry conditions via breeze or insects.

The best prevention, as usual, starts with

good cultural practices. If you have mildewresistant

strains available, plant those. Make

sure that you plant in a sunny location, water in

the morning so the plants have time to dry, and

space the plants far enough apart so there is

good air circulation. (I am often guilty of overplanting

myself, but leaves laying on top of

leaves is the perfect environment for fungal

growth.)

Inspect your plants regularly. If you see any

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resources about the specific topic (strawberries), but filter

the results to find local (Vermont) resources and resources

that are research-based and developed by an extension

office.

It is best to start by reviewing resources published in your

own state, but if you need more information, looking at

Cooperative Extension websites in states with similar climates

can help, too. What I love about Cooperative Extension

offices is that they present scientifically tested information in

an easy-to-read format, explain difficult scientific concepts

in a simple way, emphasize practical and sustainable methods

and are free to access with a computer or mobile device.

Depending on the topic you are researching, U.S. government

resources also can be very useful, such as the U.S.

Department of Agriculture or U.S. Environmental Protection

Agency. Including these in your search may yield some fruitful

recommendations and best practices.

In addition, you can ask the experts at your local garden

center or nursery for answers to your gardening questions

including recommendations for plants and pest and disease

control. Or check out the “Gardening Resources” section on

the UVM Extension Master Gardener website (www.uvm.

edu/extension/mastergardener) or the eXtension website

(https://impact.extension.org/search) that searches hundreds

of Cooperative Extension websites.

So the next time you find yourself standing in the middle

of your garden with a question, try looking into some of the

free, local, extension resources in your area.

small white circles start to form, remove the

affected leaves immediately. You can then treat

the rest of the plant with one of a number of

organic (OMRI-listed) fungicides, including

sulfur, copper and others, as well as horticultural

oil.

Milk solutions have been studied to some

degree and are especially intriguing. It is

thought that these work as a powdery mildew

deterrent by changing the basic pH of the leaf

surface to something inhospitable to the fungus--like

vinegar but in the opposite direction-

-although other studies suggest that other special

properties of milk might be responsible for

its effect.

However, keep in mind that using a milk

solution would actually be an illegal use of the

product, since it has not been reviewed and

approved by the Environmental Protection

Agency. Instead, it is always best to use the

fungicides that have been reviewed and tested

for efficacy. These formulated fungicides also

may contain additives (spreaders and stickers)

that help the efficacy of the spray.

Whichever spray you use, the key is to start

BEFORE you see the circles forming and to

use it regularly. It works best as a preventative,

not a cure.

Spray the plants thoroughly (undersides

too!) once a week, but not before it rains, and

not in midday sun. If the disease does appear,

clip off affected leaves and keep spraying regularly.

Your plants may still succumb eventually,

but you will give them weeks of extra life and

productivity.

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SENIOR LIVING | STAYING FIT

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7 Healthy Habits for Seniors

If your age is catching

up to you, there may be

some lifestyle changes

you can make to give

you a boost in energy

and better overall health.

Try to incorporate a few of these

healthy habits, recommended by

Parent Giving, to feel better and live

longer.

QUIT SMOKING

Smoking tobacco can cause cancer,

stroke and heart failure. It also affects

your skin by causing excessive wrinkling

weakening skin elasticity.

If you’re having difficulty quitting

cold turkey, try cutting back with the

aid of nicotine gum or patches.

STAY ACTIVE

You should do something that

boosts your strength, flexibility and

balance. Participate in activities that

help you stay at a healthy weight to

prevent heart issues, sleep better and

reduce stress.

EAT WELL

The right diet will make it easier to

remain active. Schedule an appointment

with a nutritionist to find the

eating plan that will benefit you the

most. Dietary changes and exercise

can prevent or control illnesses such

as heart disease, obesity, high blood

pressure and diabetes.

MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT

Carrying around excessive weight is

dangerous for your heart and promotes

diseases such as diabetes. Find

out what your ideal weight is for your

body type and work to achieve it. You

can maintain it by staying active and

eating right.

PREVENT FALLS

Analyze your home for fall risks and

eliminate them. Things such as loose

carpets or rugs, cluttered walkways

and unlit hallways should all be

addressed. According to the National

Council on Aging, falls are the leading

cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries

for older Americans. In most cases,

they can be easily avoided.

STAY UP-TO-DATE

ON IMMUNIZATIONS

AND SCREENINGS

Staying on top of your health is crucial,

especially as you age. Follow

your doctor’s orders and receive the

immunizations and life-saving

screening schedule they provide to

watch for serious health problems.

MANAGE STRESS

Try to limit the amount of stress you

put yourself through. Exercising and

meditation have shown to relieve

pent-up frustration. You also should

make time to socialize with friends

and peers, as positive thinking has

beneficial effects on our health.

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page 18 The WORLD August 7, 2019

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SENIOR LIVING | HEALTH BASICS

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The Importance of Good Sleep

A good night’s sleep affects

much more than how you

feel the next day. With age,

it’s not uncommon for

sleep habits to change.

Most seniors notice they

are ready to fall asleep

earlier in the evening and

wake up at later hours.

As we age, our bodies produce less

melatonin, which can lead to slight disruptions

throughout the night.

However, if you experience disturbed

sleep, are tired when you wake up or

experience other aspects of insomnia,

there may be serious underlying issues.

Learn more information regarding

your sleeping patterns and if you

should visit a specialist, from the

American Geriatrics Society.

COMMON SLEEP

PROBLEMS IN SENIORS

Problems with sleep can lead to

numerous issues for older adults. Here

are a few of the most common types

they experience.

Insomnia: a condition which causes

you not to fall asleep when you think

you should, causes you to stay asleep or

gives the feeling you have not slept

enough once you wake up.

Sleep apnea: a condition that may

cause seniors to stop breathing during

sleep. A lack of oxygen causes some to

wake up gasping for air. This condition

may lead to diseases such as high blood

pressure and heart conditions.

Restless Leg Syndrome: a condition

that causes people to repetitively kick

their legs during sleep. While it may not

wake you up, it’s likely your legs will be

sore in the morning and it will affect

your comfort and ability to rest.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Your actions throughout the day can

play a huge role in how well you sleep.

Take the advice from the group Health

in Aging to set yourself up for a full

night’s rest.

• Avoid caffeine, tobacco and alcohol

in the later part of the day;

• Eat smaller portions before bedtime;

• Follow a strict sleep schedule and

routine; and

• Exercise regularly, especially early in

the day.

REACH OUT FOR HELP

If you have tried to make yourself

tired and are still having difficulty sleeping,

visiting a specialist is the next step.

Through tests and studies, they can find

what is keeping you awake.

They may choose cognitive-behavioral

therapy, medical management or

sometimes prescription medicine to

help you get a better night’s sleep.

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August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 19


SENIOR LIVING | MEDICAL DEVICES

Hearing Better for a Happier Life

According to the

National Institute on

Deafness and Other

Communication

Disorders, about one

in three people

between the ages of

65 and 74 have

hearing loss and

nearly half of those

older than 75 have

difficulty hearing.

If you are experiencing a

decline in how you hear, it may

be time to invest in a hearing

aid. There are several considerations

you should make before

committing to a certain model.

Make sure to get your doctor’s

opinion on the option that is

most efficient in your situation.

Here are some factors to

consider before you begin

shopping.

KEY FEATURES

Hearing devices typically

consist of four basic components:

a microphone, a processor,

a receiver and a power

source. The microphone recognizes

the sounds you hear and

transfers them to the processor.

Those sounds are enhanced

by the processor, which then

amplifies them to your ear

canal via the receiver, or speaker.

The system is powered by a

power source, or battery.

While most operate the

same, you can find units with

other high-tech features. Here

are some to look for.

• Automatic gain control

picks up on soft sounds while

maintaining loud noises at

comfortable levels.

• A feedback manager is

helpful to minimize annoying

whistling, while boosting

amplification.

• Noise reduction is great for

reducing background noise so

you can concentrate on speech

intelligibility.

SET REASONABLE

EXPECTATIONS

A hearing aid won’t completely

restore your hearing, so

it’s important to understand

what you should expect.

Most users experience a better

quality of life by picking up

on sounds they couldn’t hear

in the past and enjoying conversations

without asking

someone to repeat themselves.

You also should allow yourself

time to adjust to the new

type of hearing experience.

There may be a short period

before you feel comfortable

with your new earpiece and its

capabilities.

ASSISTIVE

LISTENING DEVICE

In addition to a hearing aid,

© ADOBE STOCK

take advantage of assistive listening

devices that can make

an aid more effective. Installing

wireless systems or neck loops

in rooms in which you have

difficulty hearing can make the

sounds more prevalent to

someone with a hearing aid.

Before making a purchase,

check with your insurance policy

to see if they help cover the

cost. Some high-end models

can be expensive.

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Vermont Audiology has been proudly serving the

Central Vermont community for over 15 years. We

accept Medicare and most other major insurance carriers.

Schedule a visit today...

Better hearing is possible!

Marcia A. Dion, MS, CCC-A, FAAA

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81 River Street, Montpelier

802.229.5868

mdion@vermontaudiology.com

www.vermontaudiology.com



No Dog Bites, No Divorces

NO DUIs

3 Pitkin Court, Suite 102

Montpelier, VT 05602


SENIOR LIVING | DISEASE PREVENTION

Skin Cancer Awareness

The Skin Cancer

Foundation reports

the odds of

developing skin

cancer rise as you age.

In fact, about 50 percent of

Americans who live to age 65

will have experienced at least

one type of skin disease.

Before enjoying the summer

outdoors, don’t skimp on the

sunscreen.

WHAT IS SKIN CANCER

This type of cancer develops

in one of the tissues in

the skin. When caught early,

most instances are considered

minor problems and are easily

removed. However, if left

unresolved, they can lead to a

fatal disease.

Regular annual checkups

are encouraged by the

American Geriatrics Society.

They report that more than 2

million cases of skin cancer

are discovered annually in the

United Sates.

There are three common

types that experts look for

during examinations.

• Basal cell carcinoma: The

most common type in the

country, starts in the outer

layer of the skin and slowly

grows in its original location

without spreading;

• Squamous cell cancer:

Developed from flat squamous

surfaces on the skin, it

is commonly caused by exposure

from the sun. It’s more

likely to spread than basal cell

but chances are still relatively

low; and

• Melanoma: This is the

most dangerous form of skin

cancer, which often spreads

to important parts of the

body. It occurs by affecting

specialized cells in the skin

that produce melanin. If

caught early, 97 percent of

melanomas can be cured, but

it becomes more difficult to

treat in later stages.

PROTECTING YOURSELF

The most important thing

to do to lessen the risk of skin

cancer is to avoid staying out

in the sun. When going outdoors,

wear long-sleeved

shirts and pants when temperatures

permit. During

sunny days, make sure to liberally

apply sunscreen with a

UPF of 30 or higher on

exposed skin.

Don’t forget to reapply sunscreen

after every few hours if

you will be outside for long

durations.

TREATMENTS

If you find yourself diagnosed

with skin cancer, a specialist

may offer different

treatment methods based on

its severity.

Sometimes surgical

© ADOBE STOCK

extraction can be performed

to easily remove the growth.

For early cases, an incision

usually eradicates the disease.

However, for more advanced

stages, extensive surgery may

be required to eliminate deeper

lesions.

Serious cases which have

spread may require chemotherapy

and radiation to

shrink or eliminate the cancer.

What is SPF?

When shopping for sunscreens, consumers will no

doubt notice each bottle lists its SPF number. Numbers

tend to be as low as 4 or as high as 100. But what

is SPF? And what does it have to do with protecting

the skin from the sun’s harmful rays? According to the

Skin Cancer Foundation, SPF, which stands for sun

protection factor, is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability

to prevent the skin against ultraviolet B, or UVB, rays

from the sun. The Skin Cancer Foundation notes that

SPF works in a way that might surprise even the most

devoted of sun worshippers. If it takes 20 minutes for

unprotected skin to start redding, then a sunscreen

with an SPF of 15 will theoretically prevent redding

for 15 times longer than that — or about five hours.

While that’s impressive, the Skin Cancer Foundation

notes that the SPF model does spark some concern.

For example, no SPF sunscreen, regardless of its number,

should be expected to remain effective for longer

than two hours without reapplication. In addition,

reddening of the skin is a reaction to UVB rays alone

and indicates little about any damage caused by ultraviolet

A, or UVA, rays. To protect themselves against

both UVB and UVA rays, the Skin Cancer Foundation

recommends consumers use only broad-spectrum

sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher. Wearing protective

clothing, staying out of the sun between the

hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and reapplying sunscreen

after sweating or going into the water are other ways

to protect the skin from the sun’s harmful rays.

Estate Planning Services

Providing Estate Planning Services

including legal counsel and

drafting of Wills, Durable Powers

of Attorney, Advanced Healthcare

Directives, Trusts, as well as

Estate Administration and

representation in Probate litigation.

Law Office of Caroline S. Earle, PLC

107 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

(802) 225-6495

cse@caroline-law.com

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 21


SENIOR LIVING | ESTATE PLANNING

What Could Possibly Go Wrong? Choosing the Wrong Executor

Among my workshops my clients most

appreciate is the one called “Thrills, Chills, and

Probate-Related Horror.” The probate process

can seem deceptively simple to people who’ve

never been through it. But in probate, seemingly

minor errors or omissions can have major

consequences – delays that drag on not just for

months, but for years; signifi cant dollars that could

have made life more pleasant for the beneficiaries

expended on legal fees or court battles; and,

worst of all, permanently damaged relationships

among family members. So much can go wrong

that, as an estate-planning attorney, I’m passionate

about educating the unwary about the pitfalls that

surround the probate process.

By Claudia Pringles, Esq.

Among the most common source of problems in probate

is the will-maker’s choice of executor – or, rather, the process

the will-maker used to make that choice.

First, let’s clarify some of the terminology. “Probate” is

the court-supervised process of determining the final destination

of the assets of a person who has passed away, such as

finding the deceased person’s assets and determining their

value; paying the deceased’s outstanding debts and taxes;

identifying the rightful beneficiaries and ensuring they

receive the amount due them. The driver of the probate train

is the Executor, who is nominated for this office in the will of

the deceased, then formally appointed by the probate judge

as the probate process begins.

WHAT DOES AN EXECUTOR DO?

The Executor is legally responsible for the many tasks

that make up the probate process. He/she must understand

probate law well enough to be able to comply with it yet

have enough humility to get expert help (paid for out of the

estate) regarding legal and/or financial areas as needed. The

Executor is responsible for filing a variety of documents

with the court properly and on time; for all communications

regarding the affairs of the deceased and the probate process;

for keeping excellent records of work performed and

information gathered, including detailed financial records.

The Executor must also adopt an appropriate, respectful

demeanor when dealing with the probate judge and other

court officials. Given the many responsibilities that come

with this office, a good Executor comes supplied with good

organizational skills and a great deal of patience.

Executors are nominated in the Last Will and Testament

of the person who passed away and formally appointed by a

probate judge as part of the probate process.

CHOOSING AN EXECUTOR

Who makes a good executor? An executor has one job:

to lead the charge with probating your estate through the

court while remaining loyal to your wishes and being fair

to your beneficiaries. As the list of duties above suggests, a

good executor is someone who is organized, fair-minded,

responsible, and has the time to do the work.

It’s not uncommon for clients to walk into their estateplanning

attorney’s office with the assumption that they

had to finish a self-imposed homework assignment before

they’ve even said “Hello.” More often than not, new clients

come to my estate-planning practice with a list assigning

individuals to key estate-planning roles from Executor to

Trustee. Almost without fail, the roles will be assigned to

their children, and will be assigned by birth order, from

eldest to youngest, without regard to the individual’s

strengths, weaknesses, or willingness to undertake their assigned

job. It’s as if they were living in Downton Abbey, with

the rules of primogeniture in force.

Let’s take a fictional family, Mr. and Mrs. Traditional. The

Traditionals have three children: Peter the Ph.D. Physics

Professor, Dana the Doctor, and Eddie the Electrician. The

Traditionals announce they’ve decided to name Peter the

Executor, Peter as their alternate agent for Powers of Attorney

and Advance Directives, and Peter as Successor Trustee.

AS THE PROBATE TURNS...

Never mind the wisdom, much less the fairness, of asking

one person to do all these roles, which would likely occur

close in time. Peter could find himself as: the agent under

his incapacitated parent’s power of attorney and Advance

Directives; the trustee of their trust; and, after the parents’

death, the executor.

Back at the planning stage, would Peter make a good

choice for executor?

As a physicist with a specialization in black hole theory,

Peter is surely smart enough to figure out how to do probate.

His parents admit, however, that Peter tends to be

arrogant, thinks he has all the answers, is unlikely to ask

for help, and would refuse

to step down from the role

of Executor no matter how

overwhelmed he was nor

how poorly or slowly he

performed the job. While

Peter has infinite patience

calculating Absolute v.

Apparent Magnitude, with

other human beings – not so

much. He doesn’t get along

well with his family members

– especially his siblings.

The Traditionals’ secondeldest

child, Dana, also has

some characteristics that

may not be ideal for an

executor. Dana is not financially

responsible and lives

way above his means. He

struggles with keeping his

finances organized and paying

bills on a timely basis. As

one of the most important

responsibilities an executor

has is managing the finances of the decedent, including

clear, detailed, accurate record-keeping and the timely

paying of bills, increasing the amount of such responsibility

Dana must handle will almost certainly overwhelm him.

Finally, there is Eddie. Eddie has been an electrician for

20 years. He runs his own successful business, including

managing its finances. He deals with many customers and

other professionals and has good personal skills. He has

been a keen observer of the family drama triggered by Peter

and Dana, and has managed to remain on cordial terms with

everyone while staying out of the fray.

If the law required the Traditionals to select one of their

children as their Executor, clearly the youngest, Eddie, would

be the best choice. But the law has no such requirement. And

given his desire to stay as far away from family drama as possible,

Eddie might prefer not to serve as Executor.

Knowing this, the Traditionals begin considering a wide

variety of other people well suited to the role – other family

members and friends, or professionals such as attorneys or

accountants. But this time, they base their choice for each

role on how well any individual’s skill set and temperament

match the needs of the job.

Choosing your executor and other persons who will

play key roles in managing your assets can be a far more

important – and more challenging! – aspect of the estateplanning

process than deciding who gets Grandma’s pearls

or the grand piano. Don’t feel you need to have made these

decisions prior to meeting with your estate-planning attorney,

who’ll be able to help you identify objectively persons

well suited to these demanding roles.

Claudia Pringles is an estate planning attorney based in

Montpelier, Vermont. She can be reached at 802-223-0600 or

via her website at www.EstatePlanningVermont.com.

Complimentary

retirement plan

reviews.

Kristin Dearborn

Financial Advisor

89 Main St City Center

Suite 10

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-223-1617

Member SIPC

Seniors

Living Well

Barre Area

Senior Center

Health & Wellness, Exercise Programs

Arts & Crafts Classes

Dancing & Entertainment Programs

Activities, Workshops & Events

Trips & Tours and much more . . .

Call or stop by for more info!

www.edwardjones.com

MKT-5894I-A

page 22 The WORLD August 7, 2019

A locally owned nonprofit.

Celebrating 80 years of providing

exceptional health care

Northfield, VT • (802) 485-3161

Mayohc.org

Sign Up Today

in the month of August and

get a month’s worth of Free Lunches!

Lunch is served every Tuesday at 12:00pm.

$30 annual membership

Age 50 or older

802-479-9512 131 South Main St. #4


SENIOR LIVING | STAYING SAFE

Protect Yourself from Extreme Heat

With warmer

temperatures on the

horizon in most areas

of the country, now

is the time to prepare

your home and body.

According to the Centers

for Disease Control and

Prevention, more people in

the United States die from

extreme heat than earthquakes,

hurricanes, lightning,

floods and tornadoes combined.

With age, our bodies

become less able to cool

down when temperatures are

extreme. Fortunately, there

are several proactive steps

seniors can take to keep

themselves safe this summer.

Don’t underestimate the

impact heat can have on your

health. Remember these tips

as the temperatures increase.

AIR-CONDITIONING

INSPECTION

Before the heat is in full

force, have a certified HVAC

service analyze the integrity

of your air-conditioning system.

Ensuring it will perform

when you need it most is

good peace of mind.

They will test it and perform

preventative maintenance

so it’s running in peak

condition.

If your AC system breaks

down in the middle of the

summer, you may face delays

before a specialist can make

repairs as it is the busy season.

If you should find yourself

in this situation, have a

back-up plan to stay with a

loved one or an emergency

fund to check into a hotel

until the unit is fixed.

REMAIN HYDRATED

A key to keeping safe

during the summer is to stay

hydrated. Drinking plenty of

water is always important but

especially crucial during the

heat. If you find yourself outside

for extended periods, be

sure to take numerous sips,

not just when you’re thirsty,

as thirst isn’t a good indicator

of hydration.

Signs to look for include

headache, muscle cramps

and dry mouth or tongue. If

these symptoms persist, it’s

important to seek medical

attention before they become

worse.

BUDDY SYSTEM

OR CAREGIVER

Call on a friend or loved

one to check in on you every

few hours during days of

extreme heat. You will have

© ADOBE STOCK

peace of mind that if something

goes wrong, you will

have someone looking out for

you.

If you need more constant

care, consider hiring an

in-home caretaker. They can

help ensure you are remaining

hydrated and determine if

the heat is beginning to affect

your health.

Let SR Services Help With Your Spring Cleaning!

Call Now For An Appointment

223-6577

Professional Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

407 BARRE STREET

MONTPELIER

223-6577

*** We’ve been creating Raving Fans since 1974 ***

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed or your money back

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

Turning 65? New to Medicare?

CVCOA Offers Free Workshops!

Learn about your

Medicare options

TwoWorkshops

Per Month in Barre

Call for Schedule and to

Register: 479-0531 or email

medicareworkshops@cvcoa.org

Central Vermont Council on Aging

59 N. Main Street - 2 nd Floor - Barre

Senior HelpLine - (800) 642-5119

IONIC FOOT

DETOXIFICATION

$25 first Treatment

$75 for 3-treatment (Package)

$35 each re-visiting treatments

Ionic Detox Therapy pushes

your body back in line

naturally through the

introduction of negative ions

into your cells. This helps to

balance your body and

enhance its natural processes.

enefits

Boosting & Reviving Cell Function

Reinforcing Collagen

Boosting Metabolism

urifiation o loo

Boosting Immune System & Autonomic

Nervous System

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August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 23


What distinguishes ales from lagers?

Beer is a subject many people would

happily expound on if given a chance.

Some beer drinkers may be quick to

name a specific beer if ased to pic

a favorite, while others may say they simply

prefer an ale or a lager without naming a

particular beer. But what distinguishes ales

from lagers?

Flavor is one thing that distinguishes ales from lagers.

Lagers are often described as “crisp.” When attaching that

descriptor to lagers, people typically mean the lager goes

down smooth without too complicated a flavor profile. Ales

tend to produce a fruity, aromatic and more complex flavor

than lagers. Some, but not all, ales are characterized by a

bitter flavor, while lagers are generally not. It’s important

to note that these flavor profiles are not set in stone. As a

result, it might be possible to find ales and lagers with flavor

profiles that are wholly unique to the style. This might be

even more possible now thanks to the craft beer movement,

which has inspired many talented brewers to experiment

with ingredients in an effort to expand the flavor possibilities

of their beers, regardless of which style of beer they’re

brewing.

Popular Science notes that the most fundamental difference

between ales and lagers is the type of yeast used

to create the beers. The yeast used affects the flavor of the

beers, so it’s no wonder that ales and lagers tend to taste so

different from one another.

The yeast used to create lagers and ales is different, but

Popular Science notes that the lager yeast genome shares

• • •

What makes a brewer a craft brewer?

Craft beer has never been more popular or lucrative.

According to The Brewers Association, a trade association

that represents small and independent craft brewers in

the United States, small and independent brewers collectively

realized 4 percent total growth in 2018. The retail

dollar value was estimated at $27.6 billion, proving that craft

beer is not just flavorful but also a great way for people with

a passion for brewing to share that passion while earning a

pretty penny.

As popular as craft beer has become over the last decade,

even the most ardent craft beer enthusiasts might not know

just what qualifies a brewery as a craft brewery.

The Brewers Association issues a seal that certifies a

brewery as a craft brewery. Breweries that earn the seal

annually produce six million barrels of beer or less, which

many similarities to the ale yeast genome. So while the yeast

is different, ultimately the difference in flavors between the

two has as much to do with the fermentation process as

it does with the yeast. How the two yeasts behave is a big

reason behind the differences in flavor. Lager yeast works

best in cold temperatures. If employed in those same temperatures,

ale yeast would go dormant. Ales are, according

to “Beer for Dummies,” traditionally fermented at temperatures

between 55 and 70 F, while lagers are fermented

at considerably colder temperatures (38 to 50 F). It’s that

cold environment during the fermentation process of lagers

that prohibits the production of fruity aromas, producing a

lager’s clean, more mellow taste.

Beer afficionados tend to be partial to ales or lagers. And

while ales and lagers differ greatly in terms of taste, the two

are not necessarily as different as some may think.

equates to roughly 3 percent of annual beer sales in the

United States. In addition, a brewery must be deemed

“independent” to earn the seal. That means less than 25

percent of the craft brewer can be owned or controlled by

a beverage alcohol industry member that is not itself a craft

brewer. Finally, to earn the seal, a brewer must have his or

her Brewer’s Notice, which is issued by the Alcohol and Tobacco

Tax and Trade Bureau, a division of the U.S. Department

of the Treasury.

Many craft brewers started out as hobbyists brewing

beer in their garages or sheds. Those who take that passion

to the next level and end up sharing that passion and their

finished product with others may one day earn the right to

be deemed an official craft brewer.

AUGUST 2019

First Quarter Aug. 7, We 01:32 PM

Full Moon Aug. 15, Th 08:31 AM

Third Quarter Aug. 15, Th 08:31 AM

New Moon Aug. 30, Fr 06:38 AM

Full Sturgeon Moon: Some Native American tribes knew

that the sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain

were most readily caught during this full Moon. Others

called it the Green Corn Moon.

Thu, Aug. 1 National Mahjong Day

Fri, Aug. 2 National Coloring Book

Day

Sat, Aug. 3 National Watermelon Day

Sun, Aug. 4 National Coast Guard

Day

Mon, Aug. 5 National Underwear Day

Tue, Aug. 6 National Root Beer

Float Day

Wed, Aug. 7 National Raspberries N’

Cream Day

Thu, Aug. 8 National Frozen Custard

Day

Fri, Aug. 9 National Rice Pudding

Day

Sat, Aug. 10 National S’mores Day

Sun, Aug. 11 National Presidential

Joke Day

Mon, Aug. 12 National Middle Child

Day

Tue, Aug. 13 Left-Handers Day

Wed, Aug. 14 National Creamsicle

Day

Thu, Aug. 15 National Lemon

Meringue Pie Day

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Fri, Aug. 16 National Roller Coaster

Day

Sat, Aug. 17 Black Cat Appreciation

Day

Mon, Aug. 19 National Soft Ice

Cream Day

Tue, Aug. 20 National Radio Day

Thu, Aug. 22 National Tooth Fairy

Day

Fri, Aug. 23 National Sponge Cake

Day

Sat, Aug. 24 National Peach Pie Day

Sun, Aug. 25 National Banana Split

Day

Mon, Aug. 26 National Cherry

Popsicle Day

Tue, Aug. 27 National Just Because

Day

Wed, Aug. 28 National Bow Tie Day

Thu, Aug. 29 National Chop Suey

Day

Fri, Aug. 30 National Toasted

Marshmallow Day

Sat, Aug. 31 National Trail Mix Day

- Weird

OPEN EVERY DAY 9AM to 8PM

802-223-2740 www.morsefarm.com

1168 County Rd., Montpelier

STATE LIQUOR STORE

SALES FOR AUGUST

Items on sale for the month of August 2019 Only!

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This ad paid for by Vermont Liquor Brokers or individual companies.

Most liquor stores are open on Sunday • 75+ Convenient Locations Throughout Vermont

For a Complete Price List Visit 802spirits.com• Not responsible for typographical errors

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 25


amant.org

Adamant Music School

OUR 77TH SEASON

Master Classes

with Menahem Pressler

August 18 – 22

Five daily Master Classes will be held

August 18-22 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

Master Classes are open to

members and the public at a cost of $50.00 per day.

Participant Piano Concerts

August 21 & 22 at 7:30 pm

All concerts are free for members, guest admission is

$10.00. Seniors & Students $6.00.

Susan Wahlrab will be our showcased artist.

For general information call 802-223-3347

or visit adamant.org

Dress Rehearsal for Murder (original mystery)

August 8-11 & 15-18

Evening performances are Thursday, Friday, and

Saturday at 7:30 pm. Matinees are at 2:00 pm

Saturday and Sunday.

All QuarryWorks performances are FREE.

Call 802-229-6978 to make reservations.

For more information visit quarryworks.org

Adamant, Vermont

Find us on

CANADIAN CLUB

BINGO

•Flash Ball 1: $200

•Flash Ball 2: $450

•Mega Jackpot: $2,500

•Jackpot: $1,300

Thursday Night

•Doors Open at 4:00 PM

•Premies at 6:00 PM

CONCESSION

•Regular Games at 7:00 PM

CANADIAN CLUB

ROUTE 14 • 479-9090

Just outside of Barre

OPEN!

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.

Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for

free/low cost/non-profit community events.

Ongoing Events

BARRE—Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont,

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Granite Center Garden Club, the Barre Congregational Church.

Runs Apr.-July & Sept.-Nov., 2nd Mon., 6:30PM. Info: www.

facebook.com/@granitecentergardenclub.

Church of God of Prophecy, 241 Quarry Hill Rd. Sunday

School: 9:30AM; Service: 10:30AM; free potluck dinner: 12PM

on 2nd Sun. Info: (814) 428-2696.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings, Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Wed. of each month. 6PM.

Women & Children 1st: Senior Day, Every Wed. Seniors 55 &

older receive 10% off their purchases. 114 N. Main St.,

Central VT Adult Basic Education, Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group, Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm.

479-9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild, meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont, Thurs. at The

Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 6:30-8:30PM.

Additional Recycling Collection Center, Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main

St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Jabbok Christian Center Prayer Meeting, 8 Daniel Dr. 6:30-

8PM. 1st & 3rd Thurs. Info: 479-0302.

Medicare & You, Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd & 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Wheelchair Basketball, Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 S.

Main St., Every other Tues., 5:30-7PM. Info: 498-3030 (David)

or 249-7931 (Sandy).

Central Vermont Business Builders, Community National

Bank, 1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime, Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main

St., Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Play Group, St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thurs. during

school year, 9:30-11AM

Vermont Modelers Club, Building and flying model airplanes

year-round. Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast, First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

THE AMERICAN

LEGION

BARRE POST 10

320 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT

Fri., August 9 7-11pm

TWANG

CASTERS

$6 COVER

Sat., August 10 7-11pm

LEGEND

$6 COVER

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 21 & OVER

For information, call the Post at

479-9058

HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Circle of Parents, Confidential support group for parents and

caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers, Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous, Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Al-Anon Family Groups, Turning Point, 489 South Main St. Use

back door of parking lot. Older children friendly. Sat. 5-6PM.

Info: vermontalanonalateen.org

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings, 40

Washington St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Free Community

Supper: Fri. 5:30-6:30PM; Community Service & Food Shelf

Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center, 489 N. Main St., Barre. Safe

and supportive place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM;

Wed/Fri: 10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info and programs,

call 479-7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter, National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group, Central Vermont Home

Health and Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is

open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one.

Group 1 Meets every 3rd Wed. 10AM-11:30AM, Group 2 meets

every 2nd Mon. 6PM-7:30PM. Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local

permanent safe disposal sites.

Granite City Grocery Volunteers, every 3rd Wed./month at

6PM at The Quarry Kitchen & Spirits, second floor. Info: gaylepoinsette@gmail.com.

Granite City Grocery’s Board Meeting, every 2nd Tuesday at

6PM. Open to public.

Community Movie Night at the Barre Universalist Church. Join

us for a family-friendly film each Sunday evening throughout the

summer. All are welcome - doors open at 4:00 pm, popcorn will

be served, details can be found at the church or online at http://

www.FirstChurchBarreUU.org/ or https://www.facebook.com/

FirstChurchBarreUU/ . Donations are always appreciated.

BERLIN- Contra Dance No experience and no partner needed.

All dances are taught plus an introductory session at 7:45.

Everyone welcome! The dance takes place at the Capital City

Grange Hall, 6612 Rt 12, Berlin, VT just 1 mile south of

Montpelier. Please bring clean, soft-soled shoes. Admission is

$10 adults, $5 kids and low income, $15 dance supporters.

Questions? Call Tim Swartz at 802-225-8921, visit: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing.

Every 1st, 3rd, and

5th Saturday year round.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, United

Church of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info:

728-7714.

BRADFORD- Rockinghorse Support Circle. Grace Methodist

Church. For young women w/ or w/o kids, childcare and transportation

available. Wed., 1-2:30PM. Info: 479-1086.

New Hope II Support Group, Grace United Methodist, Mon.,

7-9PM. Info: 1-800-564-2106.

BROOKFIELD- Mothers of Preschoolers, Meal and childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

Health-focused Group, Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Wed.,

7-8PM. Info: 276-3142.

Deonne Myrick Yoga, Tuesday evenings 6:30-7:30. $5 adult,

children under 18 are free.

Morning Strengthen and Tone exercise classes led by personal

trainers Emma Manion and Shannon Kelly. Monday and

Thursday mornings beginning June 24th 7:30-8:30AM.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot

Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups, County

Road, Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Story Time, For ages 0- 5. Chelsea Public Library,

Wed., 1:15PM. Info: 685-2188.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Nonprofit support grp. United

Church of Chelsea, North Common, Wed., 5:45PM. Info: 685-

2271.

continued on next page

SPEAKING OUT | The WORLD

What was your first car?

Uncork Your Creativity!

with acclaimed artist Arthur Zorn

$25 inclusive (in advance - $30 day of)

no experience necessary.

Just Bring Yourself - LNT provides the rest!

Sat. August 10

lostnationtheater.org 229-0492

Ruth, Barre

1960 Ford Falcon

Don, Barre

1953 Nash Ambassador

Doug, Chelsea

1961 Karmann Ghia

David, Plainfield

1963 Plymouth Valiant

Joy, Barre

1995 Chevy Corsica

Marcie, Middlesex

1981 Chevy Monte Carlo

Ray, So. Barre

1952 Chevy Convertible

Chris, Middlesex

1977 Chevy Monte Carlo

page 26 The WORLD August 7, 2019


Chronic Conditions Support Group, Chelsea Senior Center, in

the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Fri.

8:30-11AM. Info:728-7714.

Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum, Open 3rd Sat.

May-Oct., FREE, 10AM.-12PM. Info: 685-4447.

E. HARDWICK- Bible Study, Touch of Grace Assembly of God

Church, Tues. 10AM; . Bible study (call for info); Wed. Youth

Group, 5PM dinner, 6PM activity. Info: 472-5550.

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, East Montpelier Elementary, Sundays, 4-5PM.

Info: zabundancejoy@gmail.com.

Men’s Ministry, Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM.

Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info:

476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing & info: 223-3322.

GLOVER- Shape Note Sing Early American 4-Part Hymns in

the Fa-Sol-La-Mi tradition. Every Tuesday evening at 7:30

through August 27th. All welcome, no experience or skill necessary.

In the Paper Maché Cathedral at Bread and Puppet

Theater, 753 Heights Road, Glover, VT. Free. For more information

call Elka Schumann at 802-525-6972.

GREENSBORO- Introductory Class in the Yang style of T’ai

Chi Ch’uan 6-week class with Alan Erdossy. $65.00 Fee for

6-Week Class. To register call Alan at 802-223-5125 or 802-249-

2902 (cell). Email him at alanerdossy@gmail.com. At Highland

Center for the Arts 2875 Hardwick St. Thursdays, August 1 -

September 5 @ 10:30 am

GROTON- YA Book Club, 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon.,, 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group, Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace & Justice Coalition, G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup, Twinfield Preschool, Mon.,

8:15AM-9:45AM (except when school not in session).

MIDDLESEX- Food Shelf, United Methodist Church, Sat.,

9-10:30AM.

Camp Meade Eat Up at The Green Live music, local food, craft

beer every Sunday 4-9PM.

MONTPELIER- Elders Together, a Free, drop-in support

group for older elders, meets monthly on the First Friday.

1:00PM to 2:30 PM, Montpelier Sr. Activity Center, 58 Barre St.

Call 223-8140 for info.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday School welcomes

children for Sunday school to learn how to feel close to god

everyday. 10:30AM. 223-2477.

Free Coffee House Potluck, 1st Fri. at the Trinity Methodist

Church. 7PM-9PM.

Healing Rhythms - Drumming Through Grief, 4th Tues. of the

month through Oct. Christ Episcopol Church. Registration

required, call 224-2241. No drumming experience is neccesary.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series,

Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Free snacks.

LGBTQ Veterans Group, Christ Episcopal Church.

6PM-8:30PM. 2nd & 4th Wed. Info: 825-2045.

2nd Friday Folk Dancing, Montpelier Senior Activity Center.

Donation: $5. November-March. Info: 223-2518.

Irish Session, Sat.,2PM-5PM, Bagitos, 28 Main St.

Southern Old Time Music Jam, 2nd & 4th Sun., 10AM-12:30PM.

Bagitos, 28 Main St.

Sunday School, Christian Science Church, 145 State St., Sun.,

10:30AM.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup, North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club, Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library, 46 Barre St. Over 85 tools.

Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Friday Night Group, Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.

Pizza and social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.

Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation, Mon.,1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults,

Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State

St. Info: 272-8923.

Open Library, Resurrection Baptist Church. Sun. 12:30-2PM.

Capital City Farmers Market 9AM-1PM every Saturday at 60

State St. Dozens of local vendors with delicious and wholesome

wares. EBT, SNAP and Crop Cash accepted.

Celiac Support Group, Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

MSAC Public Activities, Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58

Barre St. FEAST Together: Tues. & Fri.,12-1PM (EXCEPT July

24, July 27, July 31, August 3). RSVP 262-6288. Living Strong:

Mon. 2:30-3:30PM. & Fri. 2-3PM; Crafters Group: Wed.,

12-2PM. Photography Club: Thurs., 12-1PM; Ukulele Group:

Thurs., 6-8PM; Walks with Joan: Tues., 10-11AM; Italian Group:

Tues., 1:15-2:45PM; Trash Tramps: Tues., 2-3PM.For info on a

listing: 223-2518. Elders Together First Friday of the month

1-2:30PM.

A Course in Miracles, at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up, Connect with local parents to share

advice and info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm, 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Families Anonymous, For families or friends who have issues

with addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany Church,

2nd floor youth room, Mon., 7-8PM. Info: 229-6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights, Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89

Barre St., Wed. 4-6PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals, Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Calico County Quilters, All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities, 135 Main St., Story Time:

Tues/Fri, 10:30AM. Info:223-3338.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group, Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-

5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events, 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM.

Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT, 174 River St. Drop-In Hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support:

3rd Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

continued on next page

CAPITOL MONTPELIER 229-0343

PARAMOUNT BARRE 479-9621

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343

or www.fgbtheaters.com

CALL OR LOG ON FOR CURRENT

SHOW TIMES AND LOCATIONS!

WELCOME

Motorcycles & Buses

(Bicycles & Boats, Too)

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At Joe’s Pond (Beside

the

Beach)

Take A Drive & Enjoy the Best Seafood, Beef &

Summer Foods on Beautiful Joe’s Pond!

FOR SAMBEL’S CATERING 249-7758

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BUY

TICKETS

ONLINE

MATINEES DAILY

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THURS.-SUN. 11AM-8PM

Dining Room & Window Service Available

2678 River Street, Bethel (2.6 mi. on VT Rt. 107)

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Shop, Dine & Discover...

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Email: info@mariasbagels.com

M-Th. 5am-6pm, Fri. 5am-8pm, Sat. 7am-8pm,

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Sunday Brunch

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August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 27


Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St.,

Sun., 6:15-7:30PM. Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon, Bethany Church basement, 115 Main

St., Tues. & Thurs. 12-1PM., Wed. 7-8PM.

Info: 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA, 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship

problems. Bethany Church, Wed.,

5PM. Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous, Bethany

Church parlor, 115 Main St., Mon., 5PM.

Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group, Unitarian

Church, 3rd Thurs., 1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-

856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM.

& Sat., 9:30-11AM, at Family Center of

Washington County. Held during school year

only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer

Support, for patients and caregivers. Info:

1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation, Christ Church, Mon.,

12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group, 149 State

St., Last Entryway, First Floor. Peer and professionally

led support for people coping with

mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-

1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin Court, 223-3445 at

Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites.

Memory Cafe, is no longer at the Montpelier

Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St. It is now

called MEMORABLE TIMES CAFE hosted

Central Vermont Council on Aging and the

State of Vermont ABLE Library and will be

held the 3rd Wednesday of each month October

through March at the Vermont History Center,

60 Washington St., Barre, VT. Contact Barb

Asen, CVCOA Family Caregiver Support

Director, at basen@cvcoa.org or 802-476-2681

Community Song Circle, Center for Arts and

Learning, 46 Barre St. 1st Sun. except July/

Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@gmail.

com.

Capital City Band plays free outdoor concerts

every Wednesday evening from 7-8PM on the

State House lawn throughout the summer.

Come enjoy a picnic with neighbors or meet

some new friends while enjoying this delightful

Vermont musical tradition. Or, bring an

instrument and play along with the band.

Concerts are held on Wednesdays starting on

June 12 and ending on August 14. For more

information call 456-7054.

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals

at Harwood Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info:

496-2048.

MORRISVILLE- “The Role of Power,

Authority & Control in Groups” Monthly

Meeting, Morristown Centennial Library, 20

Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info:

gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous, 12-step program for

people who identify as overeaters, compulsive

eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc.

All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place &

time: 863-2655.

River Arts Events, Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd

Thurs., 6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo, Northfield Senior

Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, Ages 12-18.

Readiness and Regional Technology Center,

Norwich campus, Tues., 6-8:30PM. Info: capitalcomposite@yahoo.com.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons, W/Green

Mountain Cloggers, ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM.

Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup, United Church of Northfield. Wed.,

9:30-11AM. Held only when school in session.

Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Northfield Police, 110 Wall St., 485-9181. Get

rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

PLAINFIELD- Farmers Market, Fri., 4-7

P.M., Mill Street. Local produce, plants, crafts,

maple syrup, teas and service, and more.

Community Supper Support Group, Grace

United Methodist Church. 4th Tues.,

6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. the Community Center.

Fri., 5-6PM. Info: email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities, Classic

Book Club: 1st Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night

Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info: 454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group,

Everyone welcome. The Health Center conf.

room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-6600.

Community Film Series, The Health Center

will be hosting a Community Film Series on

Tuesday evenings at the Plainfield Opera

House starting on July 9th and going through

August 13th. This summer film series is a free

community event with snacks available at

5:30pm, film at 6:00pm and with a community

discussion from 7-7:30pm. The Health Center

157 Towne Avenue.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups, Maple

Leaf Room at Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco

Cessation Program regularly offers four-week

“Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-

7714.

Caregiver Support Group, Gifford Medical

Center. 2-3PM. Meets 2nd Wed. of the month.

Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program, Kingwood

Health Center (lower level conf. room), 1422

VT Route 66. Thurs., 10AM-12:30PM. Six

week program for people diagnosed with type-

2 diabetes. Info/register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum, Vermont Tech

Enterprise Center, 1540 VT Rte 66, 2nd Weds.,

11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Yoga Classes. All ages and levels. Donations

benefit Safeline. VTC Campus Center, last Sun.

of month, 2-3:30PM.

Cancer Support Group, Gifford Conference

Ctr, 2nd Tues., 9:30-11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages

2-5; Toddler-time, Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering

for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6PM.

THETFORD- Summer Dances Fourth

Saturday Dances at the East Thetford Pavilion

140 Pavilion Road, - near Cedar Circle Farm.

Admission: $12 adults, under 16 - $5. more

info: uvdm.org/ contact Bill Shepard (802)

785-2855 continued on next page

fall guide

The 2019 Fall Guide offers you fresh ideas and

opportunities to generate business.

Profit through dynamic advertising in this

informative

seasonal guide, with a 3 month shelf life and

distribution of 10,000 copies to your local

customers and out of town visitors.

The 2019 Fall uide includes extensive editorial

that will boost awareness of your advertising.

Advertising Deadline: August 12, 2019

Calendar Deadline: August 12, 2019

Distribution: September 18, 2019

Email calendar listings:

editorvt-world.com

To reserve advertising space:

479-2582 or email salesvt-world.com

2019

403 U.S. RT. 302-BERLIN • BARRE, VERMONT 05641-2274

802-479-2582 • VT & NH Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 • Fax: 802-479-7916

sales@vt-world.com or editor@vt-world.com

page 28 The WORLD August 7, 2019


WAITSFIELD- Community Acupuncture

Night, Free assessment and treatment.

Donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM.

RSVP: 272-3690.

WARREN- Knit & Play, Warren Public

Library. Bring your kids and your projects. All

levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club,

Washington Fire Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM.

Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities, Art and

Adventure w/ April: 3rd Sat., 1AM; Storytime:

Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In: Sat.,

10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY- Waterbury Public Library

Activities, Preschool Story Time: Thurs.,

10AM. Baby and Toddler Story Time: Mon.,

10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group,

Waterbury Ctn Grange. Sun., 5-6PM. Bring

bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Safe Disposal of

Prescription Drugs, Barretown Police, 149

Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old or

unused meds at these local permanent safe disposal

sites.

Weekly Guided Nature Walks, Barre Town

Forest. 9AM. Meet at 44 Brook St. Websterville.

All ages and dogs on leashes welcome. Easy to

moderate. Tues. (unless it’s raining enough for

an umbrella) through September. Info: 476-

4185.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study, New Hope

Methodist Church, 2 Gendron Rd. Wed.,

6:30PM.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Bible Study, Christian

Alliance Church, Sun., 6PM. Info: 476-3221.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night, The Wool

Shed, Tues., 6:30-8:30PM.

Wednesday, August 7

BARRE- Dave Keller Band live concert presented

by Barre Partnership in Currier Park.

7PM.

GREENSBORO- The Book of Life Mid-week

movie $5 Tickets, Kids 12 and under are free.

AT the Highland Center for the Arts

2875 Hardwick Street. 7-8:30PM.

MONTPELIER- Parent Support Group with

Theo Lagerstedt of Prevent Child Abuse

Vermont 5:00-6:30pm. To sign up for this

workshop, email your name and contact information

to info@hungermountain.coop. All

workshops are held in the Hunger Mountain

Co-op community room.

Downstream film screening. A one hour documentary

film featuring the compelling stories

of those left behind when a parent goes to

prison. This event is free and open to the public.

At the Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 6:30-8PM.

Thursday, August 8

CABOT- BBQ at Cabot United Church BBQ

pulled pork, baked beans, macaroni and cheese,

salads, rolls, desserts and beverages. 5:30-

7:00PM. Adults $10 and kids $5. Take out available

at 5PM.

GREENSBORO- Chicken Pie Supper at St

Michael’s Church Hall 270 The Bend Rd. Menu:

chicken pie, assorted casseroles, baked beans,

cole slaw, rolls, pie and beverages. Prices:

adults - $10.00 children under 8 - $5.00. No

reservations—take out available. 5PM. For

more information, please contact Jeannine at

cfli443@gmtmom.com or 802-586-2899

Christine Malcolm & Jasper Hill Farm Garden

Party Christine Malcolm, a mom and singer,

songwriter, and musician living in Elmore,

Vermont, teams up with Greensboro’s Jasper

Hill Farm at the Hardwick Street Cafe. 4-6PM

MONTPELIER- East Bay Jazz plays Brown

Bag Concerts in Montpelier City Hall Plaza.

Time TBD.

Friday, August 9

GLOVER- Bread and Puppet Presents: The

Essential Furthermore 7:30 p.m. in the Paper

Maché Cathedral at Bread and Puppet Theater,

753 Heights Road. Suggested donation $10-20,

no-one turned away for lack of funds. For information:

www.breadandpuppet.org.

RANDOLPH CENTER- Pancake Supper at

Silloway Maple from 5:00 - 7:00, 1303 Boudro

Road. 802-272-6249 Hayrides, farm animals,

tours, supper $5/Adult, Children


BARRE- Eye Spy: Watch out, you’re being observed in this fun

show focused on the eye, perfect for visual arts lovers. July 9 –

August 23, 2019. Reception: Thurs., July 11, 6-8 PM. Studio Place

Arts 201 N. Main St.

Seriality: Artwork by Lisa Myers. Seriality is a psychoanalytic

concept used to describe sibling relationships, the same but different

and it is explored in these etching/chine-colle/mixed

media pieces based on old photographs of the artist’s grandmother

and her siblings. July 9 – August 23, 2019. Reception:

Thurs., July 11, 6-8 PM. Studio Place Arts 201 N. Main St.

Orah Moore: Everyday, Someone – 365 Days in Black &

White. A visual diary of black and white iPhone photographs.

July 9 – August 23, 2019. Reception: Thurs., July 11, 6-8 PM.

Studio Place Arts 201 N. Main St.

Plane Geometry by Linda Maney An exploration of some of the

more common Geometric Shapes, sometimes complicating

them, sometimes not. June 26 – September 28, 2019 at Studio

Place Arts 201 N. Main St.

BERLIN- Resurfaced paintings by Emilia Olson in The Gallery

at Central Vermont Medical Center June 23 - August 17. Opening

reception and artist talk Thurs. June 27, 4:30 - 6PM.

CHELSEA- Sadie’s Fancy Work - Embroidery by Sadie

Kennedy on display at the Chelsea Public Library July 1 - August

31, chelsealibrary.com, 685-2188.

Kathleen Kolb: Night and Day, Now and Then exhibit runs

from July 24 – September 8 at the Highland Center for the Arts

with opening reception Aug. 2 5pm. Free.

Vermont Authors Lecture Series Thursday evenings, 6:30 – 8:00

PM, mid-July through August. Enjoy summer evenings with

Vermont Authors in an intimate setting at the Highland Center

for the Arts.

MONTPELIER- Lois Eby at the VT Supreme Court Gallery

Her exhibit, titled Studies in Rhythmic Vitality, will be on view

from July 2nd through September 27th.

Annual Summer Juried Art Exhibit at T.W. Wood Gallery, July

5th – August 30th. The opening reception will take place on July

11th , from 5-7PM.

The Vermont Supreme Court Gallery presents Studies in

Rhythmic Vitality: Paintings by Lois Eby. July 2nd through

September 27th , with an Opening Reception on July 11th from

4:00-7:00 PM.

MORRISVILLE- Morriville Mosaics, the culmination of a

community collaborative project, exhibits through Sept. 25th.

Reception Aug. 8, 5-7PM. At River Arts 74 Pleasant St.

Undercover: Work by Open Studio Figure Drawing exhibits

through September 25th in the Copley Common Room at River

Arts 74 Pleasant St. Reception Aug. 8 5-7PM.

NORTHFIELD- 200 Years–200 Objects, Norwich University’s

Sullivan Museum and History Center, free & open to the public

Mon-Fri., 8AM-4PM. Runs until 12/21. Info: www.norwich.edu/

museum.

RANDOLPH- Rendering: Cause to Become. Chandler Center

for the Arts, Group exhibition open 6/29-9/1. Artist open house

7/27 noon-6PM.

Paintings by Emily Burkholder at the Gifford Gallery, 44 S. Main

St. Through Aug 7.

ROCHESTER- Vermont Paintings. Big Town is delighted to

welcome three new exhibitions to the Main, Center, and Projects

Gallery spaces this summer. From June 26 - August 11, Celia

Reisman’s series “The Vermont Paintings” will reside in the main

gallery space, and Helen Matteson’s “The Geometric Exercises of

Helen Matteson” will feature in the center gallery. Rob Fish, a

new artist to the gallery, will be exhibited in the Projects space

from June 19 - July 21.

STOWE- Suzy Spence: On the Hunt Public Program Suzy

Spence and Christa Kemp In Discussion 5:00pm at the Helen Day

Art Center. Discussion on the history of fox hunting.

STOWE- Exposed Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition. his year’s exhibition

will feature nationally renowned sculptors Tom Fruin and

David Stromeyer. July 20 - October 19. At the Helen Day Art

Center, 90 Pond St.

WAITFIELD- The Art Among Us will be presented by the

Waitsfield United Chturch of Christ Village Meeting House during

the 2019 Vermont Festival of the Arts. Sat and Sun. 12-4. Now

thru Aug. 18. The Opening Reception will be Sunday, August 4

from 12-2 pm

page 30 The WORLD August 7, 2019

oncert

Connections

Beck – Cage The Elephant @ Bank of

NH Pavillion

August 16 @ 6:00 pm - 10:30 pm

Pat Benatar, Neil Giraldo & Melissa

Etheridge @ Champlain Valley Fair

August 31 @ 7:00 pm - 10:30 pm

Grand Point North @ Waterfront Park

September 14 @ 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Grand Point North @ Waterfront Park

September 15 @ 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Dr. Dog & Shakey Graves @

Shelburne Museum

September 17 @ 7:00 pm - 10:30 pm

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at

www.pointfm.com

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 15

10:00a Vermonters for Justice in Palestine 6:00p Great Streets BTV

ORCA Media Channel 17

Public Access

11:00a Green Mountain Transit

7:00p Abenaki Heritage Weekend

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 8:00p Wash Central Union School Board Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Aug 7

1:00p Celluloid Mirror

Friday, Aug 9

Wed, Aug 7

1:30p Octagon St. Laveau

6:00a Goddard College Faculty Readings

12:00p Wash Central Supervisory Union 7:00a Bethel Selectboard

2:00p Vermont Historical Society

7:00a Moccasin Tracks

3:30p Berlin School Board

11:00a Green Mountain Care Board

3:00p Democracy Now!

8:00a Democracy Now!

5:30p Creative Communities Exchange: 3:00p Randolph Selectboard

4:00p Moccasin Tracks

9:00a Celluloid Mirror

Clemmons Family Farm

6:30p Montpelier City Council

5:00p History of Adamant Music School

9:30a Octagon St. Laveau

6:30p North Branch Nature Center:

and Piano Recital by AMS Students

Thu, Aug 8

10:00a Bread and Puppets

Caterpillar Lab

7:00p Moving Light Dance Co.

7:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

8:00p U-32 School Board

8:00p Into the Issues

9:00a PEG Access Study Committee

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

10:30p Game of the Week

8:30p Close The Camps

12:00p Vermont Fish and Wildlife

1:00p Waterbury Historical Society - The

Saturday, Aug 10

9:00p Waterbury Historical Society - The

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

Yankee Brass Band

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

Yankee Brass Band

8:00p Waterbury Selectboard

3:00p Democracy Now!

2:00p North Branch Nature Center:

11:00p The Science of Effective Prevention

Fri, Aug 9

4:00p For the Animals

Botanical Art with Susan Sawyer

11:30p House at Pooh Corner

7:00a Berlin Selectboard

4:30p Juneteenth Celebration

3:30p North Branch Nature Center: Emerald

7:00p VT Physicians for a National Health

Tuesday, Aug 13

10:00a Berlin Development Review Board

Ash Borer

Program

6:00a Hunger Mountain Coop

12:00p Moretown Selectboard

4:00p Lake Score Cards Highlight Restoration

Progress and Protection Needs

7:30p Montpelier Senior Activity Center

8:00a Democracy Now!

3:00p Central Vermont Fiber

9:30p Close The Camps

9:00a Juneteenth Celebration

6:00p Rochester Selectboard

5:30p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

11:30a Close The Camps

8:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

10:00p Hunger Mountain Coop

District

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 9:00p U-32 School Board

Sat, Aug 10

Thursday, Aug 8

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

11:00p Astronomy for Everyone

6:00a Central Vermont Regional Planning

6:00a VT Physicians for a National Health

2:00p David Pakman Show

11:30p VT Master Anglers

Commission

Program

3:00p Democracy Now!

Sunday, Aug 11

8:30a Vermont State House

6:30a House at Pooh Corner

4:00p Car Guy Channel

12:00p Orange SW Supervisory Union

12:00p Randolph Selectboard

7:00a Green Mountain Transit

4:30p House at Pooh Corner

2:30p ArtSynergy

5:00p Calais Selectboard

8:00a Democracy Now!

5:00p The Science of Effective Prevention 3:30p East Montpelier School Board

8:00p Green Mountain Care Board

9:00a David Pakman Show

5:30p Abled and on Air

5:00p North Branch Nature Center: Sun, Aug 11

10:00a Waterbury Historical Society - The

6:30p Abled to Cook

Botanical Art with Susan Sawyer

7:00a Waterbury Selectboard

Yankee Brass Band

7:00p Joe Davidian Trio

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board 9:30a Berlin Selectboard

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

8:30p Delia Robinson

10:00p Waterbury Library

12:00p Vermont State House

1:00p Hunger Mountain Coop

9:00p Bear Pond Books Events

3:00p Democracy Now!

Monday, Aug 12

4:00p Montpelier Development Review

10:30p Bread and Puppets

12:00p Middlesex Town School District

Board

4:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

11:30p Green Mountain Transit

Board

6:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

5:30p Comedies with a Conscience

7:00p Open Door Theater

ORCA Media Channel 16

3:00p Waterbury Library

9:00p Montpelier City Council

9:00p Senior Moments

Education Access

5:30p Astronomy for Everyone Mon, Aug 12

6:00p VT State Board of Education 7:00a Moretown Selectboard

11:00p Moccasin Tracks

Weekly Program Schedule

Friday, Aug 9

Wednesday, Aug 7

Tuesday, Aug 13

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

12:00p Bethel Selectboard

6:00a Senior Moments

12:00p North Branch Nature Center:

District

3:30p Middlesex Selectboard

8:00a Democracy Now!

Caterpillar Lab

4:00p Orange SWt Supervisory Union

5:30p Montp Planning Commission LIVE

9:00a Abled and on Air

2:00p VT Master Anglers

7:00p Middlesex Town School District Board Tue, Aug 13

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

2:30p First Wednesdays

10:30p Tuesday Talks

7:00a Calais Selectboard

11:00a Talking About Movies

4:30p Tuesday Talks

10:00a CV Regional Planning Commission

12:00p Brunch with Bernie

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

12:30p Vermont State House

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Goddard College Faculty Readings

3:00p Democracy Now!

Thursday, Aug 8

12:00p Harwood Unified

4:00p Berlin School Board

5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

7:00p Montp Development Review Board

10:30p PEG Access Study Committee

4:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

5:00p Montpelier Senior Activity Center

7:00p Comedies with a Conscience

8:30p Gay USA

9:30p Juneteenth Celebration

Saturday, Aug 10

6:00a Comedies with a Conscience

7:30a Abled to Cook

8:00a Moving Light Dance Co.

9:00a Into the Issues

9:30a The Science of Effective Prevention

10:00a Joe Davidian Trio

11:30a Delia Robinson

12:00p Senior Moments

2:00p Green Mountain Transit

3:00p Bear Pond Books Events

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p Bread and Puppets

7:00p Vermont Historical Society

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Vote for Vermont

10:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, Aug 11

6:00a Open Door Theater

8:00a Bear Pond Books Events

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a Vermont Historical Society

12:00p Moving Light Dance Co.

1:00p Into the Issues

2:00p Joe Davidian Trio

3:30p Delia Robinson

4:00p VT Physicians for a National Health

Program

4:30p Close The Camps

5:00p Vote for Vermont

6:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

6:30p Lifelines

7:00p Goddard College Faculty Readings

8:00p Octagon St. Laveau

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Abled to Cook

10:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Monday, Aug 12

6:00a Kellogg-Hubbard Library

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vote for Vermont

Habitat Diversity Workshop with North Branch Nature Center,

1-4PM. Experience the biological diversity of New England

habitats.

Thursday, August 15

BROOKFIELD- Roger Hill talks climate change in Vermont 7

pm at Brookfield Old Town Hall.

HARDWICK- Teen Ensemble III at the Heartbeet Cummunity

Hall. 7:30 PM. $5-15 sliding scale.

John Emil at the Hardwick Street Cafe! 2875 Hardwick St. 6:30-

8:30PM. Free.

MONTPELIER- The Revenants play Brown Bag Concerts in

Montpelier City Hall Plaza. Time TBD.

Get to Know Your Co-op: Sustainable Shopping with members

of the Co-op’s Green Team. 5:30-6:30pm. To sign up for this free

workshop, email your name and contact information to info@

hungermountain.coop. All workshops are held in the Hunger

Mountain Co-op community room unless otherwise noted

STOWE- Tango Music Festival at 1056 Mountain Road in

Stowe. 7:30PM-10PM. Feel free to bring instruments and dance

shows, all experience levels welcome. Completely free. Dance

Workshops every day that week. Call 802-760-4634 for details.

Friday, August 16

HARDWICK- 7:00 pm at Knights of Columbus Hall 206 Rt. 14

South in Hardwick. Pre-owned and new items; gifts & services

from local businesses. For more info contact Joe at 586-2899

MONTPELIER- The Wiz Weekend at Lost Nation Theatre

8/16-8/19. 7PM Friday, 2 and 7PM Saturday, 3PM Sunday. Ease

on down the road with this rip-roaring dance musical inspired by

L Frank Baum’s The Wizard of Oz! $5-$15.

RANDOLPH- Last Mile Ride, 5K and Walks Aug. 16-17. 14th

annual event benefits end-of-life patients, families. The LMR

walks and 5K run begin at 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, with registration

starting at 4:30 p.m., at Gifford Medical Center. The registration

fee is $25 per person. Participants are encouraged to

create teams with friends and family.

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net

Saturday, August 17

BROOKFIELD- Chris Shoelen Guitar Duo 7PM at Brookfield

Old Town Hall.

MONTPELIER- Capital City Farmers Market 9AM-1PM every

Saturday at 60 State St. Dozens of local vendors with delicious

and wholesome wares. EBT, SNAP and Crop Cash accepted.

PLAINFIELD- Edible Landscapes for the Homesteader/

Gardener. Join Nicko Rubin for a workshop at East Hill Tree

Farm and discover their extensive edible landscape. 2-5PM. 3499

East Hill Rd. Cost: $30 NOFA-VT members, $40 for non-members.

QUECHEE- Guided Orchard Walk: Summer Varieties at

Whitman Brook Orchard. Come taste late summer fruits like the

Yellow Transparent and the Duchess. 2-4PM.

RANDOLPH- Last Mile Ride, 5K and Walks Aug. 16-17. 14th

annual event benefits end-of-life patients, families. Registration

for the motorcycle ride begins at 8:30 a.m. at Gifford Medical

Center. The entrance fee is $50 per driver; $75 per driver and

passenger. The ride, which starts at 10 a.m., takes participants on

an 80-mile journey through central Vermont.

Sunday, August 18

BROOKFIELD- “What’s the Dog Saying?” Canine

Communication with Deb Helfrich of Gold Star Dog Training.

4PM at Brookfield Old Town Hall.

GLOVER- Bread and Puppet Presents: The Diagonal Life

Circus & The Normality Rebellion Pageant At the Circus Field

at the Bread and Puppet Farm on Rt. 122, 3PM, Suggested donation

$10-20. For information: www.breadandpuppet.org.

GREENSBORO- Circus Smirkus Finale. High-flying feats from

performers ages 10-18. Presented by The Circus Barn. 1PM and

6PM. 1 Circus Rd.

Monday, Augutst 19

GREENSBORO- Caspian Monday Music returns to the Main

Stage this summer for a chamber concert. At the Highland

Center for the Arts 7:30PM. Tickets are $23, Students $10, and

Seniors $20.

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Board Meeting

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Board Meeting

10:00PM - Barre Unified Union

School Board Meeting

Friday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

Board Meeting

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday

9:00AM - Abled and On Air - Special Needs

Students and Transition into College

9:31AM - House at Pooh Corner - O, Say,

Can You See Pt. 2

10:00AM - News

11:00AM - Authors at Aldrich Library -

07/31/19

11:42AM - Hero in U: Tribute to Bill

Carpenter

12:00PM - Betty St. Laveau’s House of

Horror - “Night of the Living Dead”

1:42PM - Join hosts KJ Traynor, and Mitch

Fortier as they desperately miss Terry

Traynor, and interview Steve Blackwood,

director and star of “Meet The Author!”

2:45PM - The Story of the Lost Boys of

Sudan

3:30PM - Barre heritage Festival - 07/27/19

4:30PM - Car Corner - Oil Leaks

5:30PM - A discussion with Tim Shea,

Executive Director of the Champlain Valley

Exposition in Essex Junction

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - The Struggle

7:30PM - Africa on the Horizon

9:00PM - Abled and On Air - Special Needs

Students and Transition into College

9:31PM - House at Pooh Corner - O, Say,

Can You See Pt. 2

10:00PM - VT Dept of Libraries Tuesday

Talks - 20th Century VT Development

Paradox

11:00PM - Authors at Aldrich Library -

07/31/19

11:42PM - Hero in U: Tribute to Bill

Carpenter

Thursday

8:14AM - Artful Word: Left Eye Jump Band

-- Concert of the Left Eye Jump Band.

9:00AM - Join hosts Terry Traynor, KJ

Traynor, and Mitch Fortier as they interview

Lisa Carter, head of Drinkwater

Productions!

10:00AM - News

11:00AM - Author and comedian Joey

Voices is the guest. Mike Cherone hosts

12:00PM - Sidewalks Entertainment

12:30PM - Dennis Wholey speaks with H.E.

Domingos Fezas Vital, who currently

serves as the Portuguese Republic’s

Ambassador to the United States.

1:00PM - How flowers can transform

Vermont’s 21st century FARM economy

with Walt Krukowsk

1:45PM - NH’s WildSide - Catfishing

E0719A

2:00PM - Guests include Mark Correia of

ILC; executive director Terri Guenard of

Forestdale Park Assisted Living; Compass

Program director Denise Thorud; performances

by Takz & Papi Shampoo. Ron Cox

hosts.

3:00PM - JD Green Aired Out

4:00PM - State House Programming

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Here We Are with guest Marjorie

Pivar

7:30PM - No cliches, the effects of war on

individuals & communities

8:00PM - Artful Word: Summer Solstice

Longest Day of the Year

8:14PM - Artful Word: Left Eye Jump Band

-- Concert of the Left Eye Jump Band.

9:00PM - Join hosts Terry Traynor, KJ

Traynor, and Mitch Fortier as they interview

Lisa Carter, head of Drinkwater

Productions!

10:00PM - Presidental Candidate Series:

Warren

9:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

Board Meeting

12:00PM - Barre Unified Union

School Board Meeting

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - Washington Baptist Church

5:00PM - Barre Congregational

Church

7:00PM - News

08:00PM - First Presbyterian Church

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

6:00AM - Barre Congregational

Church

8:00AM - COPC SERMON

9:00AM - Washington Baptist Church

11:00PM - JD Green Aired Out

Friday

9:00AM - The Time is Now

9:30AM - Into the Issues - Vermont Council

on Rural Development

10:00AM - News

11:00AM - Gay USA

12:00PM - Hate Free Vermont Community

Forum - July 25, 2019

2:00PM - Think Free or Die

3:00PM - Barre heritage Festival - 07/27/19

4:00PM - Thunder Road Race - 07/18/19

5:45PM - Extinction Rebellion Vermont -

Direct Action

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - JD Green Aired Out

8:00PM - The Cinemaniacs! - 072919

9:00PM - The Time is Now

9:30PM - Into the Issues - Vermont Council

on Rural Development

10:00PM - Authors at Aldrich Library -

07/24/19

11:00PM - Gay USA

Saturday

9:00AM - Energy Week - 7/18/19

10:00AM - Washington Baptist Church

11:00AM - A Year in the New Hampshire

Forests

12:00PM - Sidewalks Entertainment

12:30PM - Americans with Disabilities Act

1:00PM - On this program Dennis Wholey

speaks with H.E. Domingos Fezas Vital

1:30PM - EmpoweringWomenEverywhere

AmyWohl

2:00PM - Barre Congregational Church

3:30PM - Part one of an interview with

Woody Guthrie’s daughter Nora.

4:00PM - JD Green Aired Out

5:00PM - Car Corner - Oil Leaks

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Dennis Wholey speaks with H.E.

Albert Muchanga who currently serves as

Commissioner for Trade and Industry of

the African Union Commission.

7:30PM - Maternal Health

8:00PM - Authors at Aldrich Library -

07/31/19

8:42PM - Hero in U: Tribute to Bill

Carpenter

9:00PM - Ghost Chronicles-Next

Generation - #65

10:00PM - Thunder Road Race - 07/18/19

11:45PM - NH’s WildSide - Catfishing

E0719A

Sunday

9:30AM - Not Just Rock and Roll 34th

Anniversary

10:00AM - EmpoweringWomenEverywhere

AmyWohl

10:30AM - Americans with Disabilities Act

11:00AM - Doing Life

12:00PM - Barre Congregational Church

1:30PM - Foreign Students in America

2:00PM - New England Cooks

3:00PM - Barre heritage Festival - 07/27/19

4:00PM - Washington Baptist Church

5:00PM - Into the Issues - Vermont Council

on Rural Development

5:30PM - ReasonandRevelation027615

6:00PM - SPEL Howards Grove

7:00PM - Your Disability Connection

(Vocational Training)

7:32PM - Wood Artist Shares How He

Thinks

8:00PM - Forty Plus Fitness - ep 4

9:00PM - Ludlow Baptist Church

10:00PM - Barre Congregational Church

11:30PM - A discussion with Tim Shea,

Executive Director of the Champlain Valley

Exposition in Essex Junction

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

10:00AM - First Presbyterian Church

12:30PM - Barre Congregational

Church

2:30PM - Washington Baptist Church

6:00PM - SPEL Howards Grove

8:00PM - Barre Congregational

Church

10:00PM - Ludlow Baptist Church

Monday

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House Programming

3:00PM - Plainfield Select

6:00PM - State House Programming

7:00PM - Plainfield Select

10:00PM - Plainfield Select

Tuesday

5:00AM - News

6:00AM - Plainfield Select

9:00AM - Plainfield Select

12:00PM - Plainfield Select

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

10:00PM - Barre City Council

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Monday

9:00AM - All Things LGBTQ+ Youth Edition

- The Word “Queer”

9:35AM - Diverge Wrestling 6

10:00AM - Sound Off 20190611

11:02AM - Dukes of Sports 7-23-19

12:00PM - Sidewalks Entertainment

12:30PM - Hate Free Vermont Community

Forum - July 25, 2019

2:30PM - Part two of the interview with

Nora Guthrie.

3:00PM - Brett Hughes and Lowell

Thompson 1st SET July 21, 2019

3:50PM - Performing “Know You” and

“Tequila Little Time” as part of the

Songwriter Circle Series.

4:00PM - Presidental Candidate Series:

Warren

5:00PM - Forty Plus Fitness - ep 4

6:00PM - Energy Week - 7/25/19

7:00PM - Hunger Mountain Coop Workshop

- Self-Care Practices for Rejuvenation

7:30PM - Ep 53 - Science360: Dispatches

from the Cutting Edge

8:00PM - Talking With Henrietta - Vaping

9:00PM - All Things LGBTQ+ Youth Edition

- The Word “Queer”

9:35PM - Diverge Wrestling 6

10:00PM - Sound Off 20190611

11:02PM - Dukes of Sports 7-23-19

Tuesday

Veteran

9:22AM - Performing “Know You” and

“Tequila Little Time” as part of the

Songwriter Circle Series.

9:30AM - Felix the Fox A Detective Solving

Mysteries in A Roman Fantasy Realm

10:00AM - News

11:00AM - HavanaFairfax005515

12:00PM - A Year in the New Hampshire

Forests

1:00PM - The Story of the Lost Boys of

Sudan

1:45PM - Extinction Rebellion Vermont -

Direct Action

2:00PM - The Vermont Abortion Law is Bad

Legislation

2:32PM - Cape Conversations D. Webster

3:00PM - Foreign Students in America

3:30PM - Songwriter Daniel Boling talks

about his life and songs.

4:00PM - Sing Along Fun with Miss Miriam

4:22PM - Dennis Wholey speaks with H.E.

Albert Muchanga who currently serves as

Commissioner for Trade and Industry of

the African Union Commission.

4:50PM - John Bacon Jr. - Korean War

Veteran

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - International Education Exchange

7:30PM - Your Disability Connection (Early

Intervention)

8:02PM - Darby Reynolds - Vietnam

Veteran

9:22PM - Performing “Know You” and

“Tequila Little Time” as part of the

Songwriter Circle Series.

9:30PM - Felix the Fox A Detective Solving

Mysteries in A Roman Fantasy Realm

10:00PM - Dennis Wholey speaks with H.E.

Domingos Fezas Vital, who currently

serves as the Portuguese Republic’s

Ambassador to the United States.

10:30PM - Songwriter Daniel Boling talks

about his life and songs.

11:00PM - HavanaFairfax005515


SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Vermont’s Migratory Bird Hunting Seasons Are Announced

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department has announced

the 2019-2020 migratory bird hunting season dates and bag

limits.

A printable copy of the Migratory Bird Syllabus can be

downloaded from the Vermont Fish & Wildlife website

(www.vtfishandwildlife.com) under “Hunt” – “Hunting

Regulations and Seasons.” A printed version also will be

available from license agents and post offices by late August.

A statewide Vermont open hunting season for resident

Canada geese will occur September 1-25. The daily bag limit

is five Canada geese in the Connecticut River Zone and eight

in the rest of the state during this September season. The

purpose of the September season is to help control Vermont’s

resident Canada goose population prior to the arrival of

Canada geese migrating south from Canada.

A second Canada goose hunting season for resident and

migrant geese will be held October 10-November 8 in the

Lake Champlain and Interior Zones with a daily bag limit of

two Canada geese.

In the Connecticut River Zone, the second Canada goose

season will be October 2-November 3, and November

20-December 16 with a daily bag limit of two Canada geese.

Duck season this fall opens on October 10 in the Lake

Champlain and Interior Vermont Zones and on October 2 in

the Connecticut River Zone. The Lake Champlain Zone has

a split season (October 10-November 1 and November

23-December 29). The Interior Vermont Zone has a straight

season (October 10-December 8). The Connecticut River

Zone has a split season (October 2-November 3 and

November 20-December 16).

Vermont’s youth waterfowl hunting weekend will be

September 28 and 29. Resident and nonresident hunters 17

years of age or younger on those dates may hunt ducks and

geese within the Lake Champlain and Interior Vermont

Governor Phil Scott Joins Nation’s Governors to Launch

Outdoor Recreation Learning Network to Promote

Economic Growth Through the Outdoor Industry

The National Governors Association (NGA) announced

Wednesday the launch of the Outdoor Recreation Learning

Network to help governors and their staffs leverage their

unique natural, cultural and historical resources to advance

economic, workforce, health and environmental benefits.

The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that the

outdoors industry employed more than 4.5 million people

nationally in 2016, and generated more than $730 billion in

economic impact.

Vermont outdoor recreation accounts for 34,000 direct

jobs and brings $2.5 billion into the economy.

“As my Administration thought about how to grow our

economy, it became clear we could do more by leveraging

our natural and recreational assets – those closely aligned

with our outdoor recreation brand,” said Governor Scott. “In

2017 I established the Vermont Outdoor Recreation

Economic Collaborative by executive order to advise me and

my administration on how to enhance outdoor business

opportunities, improve participation, strengthen our recreation

infrastructure, protect our natural resources, and grow

Vermont’s economy,” Governor Scott said.

“While we have made progress, there is so much more we

can do and we’re looking forward to hearing from other

Governors and States here to learn more because it’s so

important to our economy and the overall health of our communities

– and ultimately a part of our identity as Vermonters”

Governor Scott added.

NGA Solutions: The Center for Best Practices will partner

with state outdoor recreation directors through the network

to convene governors’ office staffs and other state officials.

Through peer-to-peer exchanges, the network will spotlight

strategies states can use to advance outdoor recreation. It

will focus on key issue areas, including conservation, stewardship,

education, workforce training, economic development,

infrastructure, public health, equity and wellness.

Governors launched the network at NGA’s annual Summer

Meeting, where state leaders share best practices and hear

from experts in various fields. This year, the meeting is being

held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from July 24-26. Participants

included Utah Governor Gary Herbert, Maine Governor

Janet Mills, Oregon Governor Kate Brown, Vermont

Governor Phil Scott, Montana Governor Steve Bullock,

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak and outdoor recreation

directors from many states. The launch was held at the

Natural History Museum of Utah’s Rio Tinto Center at the

University of Utah and included a guided walk in nearby Red

Butte Garden featuring a narration by Dr. David Strayer of

the University of Utah, a leading researcher in the cognitive

Vermont State Parks Announces New Bike Rental

Partnership at Burton Island State Park

Vermont State Parks is excited to announce a partnership

with Local Motion, Inc. to provide bike rentals at Burton

Island State Park. New for the 2019 season, a fleet of rental

bicycles will be provided for park visitors to use while visiting

the island.

“Burton Island has always been a fantastic place to explore

by bike,” says Ryan Baker Dunn, Marine Operations

Supervisor for Vermont State Parks. “The 253-acre island

has miles of trails and park roads on picturesque Lake

Champlain with views of the Green and Adirondack mountains.

Aside from a few staff work vehicles, there are no cars

on the island, making it a safe, quiet environment for biking.

Vermont State Parks has also invested in work tricycles to

further minimize vehicles in the park, making Burton Island

a great place for the whole family to ride.”

• • •

• • •

Zones during this weekend while accompanied by an adult

18 or older. In the Connecticut River Zone, youth must be

15 years of age or younger on those dates. Both adult and

youth must have Vermont hunting licenses. The adult may

not hunt or carry a firearm. Youth ages 16 and 17 must have

a Vermont Migratory Waterfowl tag and federal duck stamp.

Woodcock hunting season is October 1- November 14

statewide with a three-bird bag limit.

In addition to a hunting license, a waterfowl hunter 16 or

older must carry a current federal duck stamp and Vermont

Migratory Waterfowl tag in order to hunt waterfowl in

Vermont. Federal stamps are sold at post offices, federal

refuges, or online at www.fws.gov/birds/get-involved/duckstamp/buy-duck-stamp.php.

State Migratory Waterfowl

tags are available on Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s website

(www.vtfishandwildlife.com) and from license agents. The

hunter must sign the federal duck stamp.

All migratory game bird (woodcock, ducks and geese)

hunters must also be registered with the Harvest Information

Program (H.I.P.) in each state they hunt. You can register on

Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s website or call toll-free 1-877-306-

7091. After providing some basic information, you will

receive your annual H.I.P. registration number, which you

then need to record on your hunting license.

The hunting season dates, bag limits and related regulations

for all migratory birds are set annually within a framework

established by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and in

coordination with New York and New Hampshire.

Waterfowl season dates and bag limits are set in three

zones: Lake Champlain, Interior Vermont, and Connecticut

River. The New Hampshire Fish & Game Department sets

the season dates and bag limits for the Connecticut River

Zone.

benefits of outdoor recreation.

“This effort hearkens back to the founding of the organization,”

observed Nikki Guilford, NGA interim executive

director and chief of staff. “In 1908, President Theodore

Roosevelt hosted the first meeting of the nation’s governors

at the White House to discuss conserving America’s natural

resources.”

Following that inaugural meeting, governors decided to

form an association through which they could come together

to discuss mutual concerns and act collectively.

The founding sponsors of the Outdoor Recreation

Learning Network include REI Co-op, the Outdoor Industry

Association and the Outdoor Recreation Roundtable.

“At REI Co-op, we believe a life outdoors is a life welllived.

So, we applaud NGA’s launch of the Outdoor

Recreation Learning Network. And we’re grateful to the

dozen-plus states that have created offices of outdoor recreation,

as well as to states considering them,” said Eric Artz,

REI’s president and CEO. “There are tremendous opportunities

for maximizing the social and economic benefits of

time outdoors – whether that’s improving stewardship,

access, equity, youth development or health outcomes.”

“We have seen states with offices of outdoor recreation

take great steps forward promoting and bolstering outdoor

recreation – bringing more jobs and revenue to rural and

gateway communities and coordinating amongst government

agencies while helping to get more children and families

outside and into healthier lifestyles,” said David

Weinstein, state and local policy director for Outdoor

Industry Association. “The Outdoor Recreation Learning

Network will be a great resource for existing outdoor recreation

offices and for states looking to develop new offices to

collaborate on and improve outdoor programs and initiatives

– OIA looks forward to helping build it.”

“Outdoor recreation is a crucial part of America’s economy,

contributing 2.2 percent of the gross domestic product

and growing faster than the economy as a whole,” said Jessica

Wahl, president of the Outdoor Recreation Roundtable.

“ORR is proud to partner with the National Governors

Association to launch the game-changing Outdoor

Recreation Learning Network. This partnership will ensure

that the outdoor recreation sector has the support it needs to

continue to grow in states across the country, providing outdoor

access for all, jobs, and health and quality-of life benefits

for generations to come.”

For more information about the Outdoor Recreation

Learning Network, see www.nga.org/outdoors.

Local Motion is a non-profit organization dedicated to

“helping Vermont communities become more walkable,

bikeable, and livable.” Their mission and experience with

bike rentals made them an ideal partner to work with

Vermont State Parks on this initiative.

The fleet of adult and kids bicycles will be available for

half-day, full-day, and multi-day rentals. Bike rentals start at

just $15 dollars for half days and $25 for full days, with additional

days for $15. Rentals will be first come, first served,

and helmets will be provided with each bike rental. Many of

the bikes also have baskets that come in handy for beach gear

or store purchases.

For more information on Burton Island State Park:

https://www.vtstateparks.com/burton.html For more information

on Local Motion: https://www.localmotion.org/

H

H

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H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

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H

Barre Fish & Game Club

ANNUAL CHICKEN

& Mostaccioli Dinner

includes Salad, Roll,

Beverage & Ice Cream

Thurs., Aug. 8

5 to 7 PM

Adults $12.00, Kids $6.00

Tickets available from

McLeod’s Spring & Chassis, Backwell St., Barre or Club Directors

Barre Fish & Game Club • Gun Club Road, Barre

BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY!

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

H

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HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

ANOTHER THURSDAY NIGHT OF

EXCITEMENT AT THE ROAD!

Thursday, August 8th!

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CADILLAC NIGHT!

Featuring the 3rd Race of

THE MYERS CONTAINER

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A 75 Lap Flying Tiger Event!

Post Time:

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Free Parking!

Late Models & Street Stocks Features!

GO TO: THUNDERROADVT.COM

NIGHTLY SPECIAL

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August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 31


Security Officers

PT- $12.50-$15.00/h

Hiring areas:

Milton

Barre

Montpelier

Georgia

Call (800)638-0437

Or visit:

www.smgcorporateservices.com

CLASSIFIEDS

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM

DISPLAY ADS THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916

Email: sales@vt-world.com

Journeyman Electricians &

Apprentices Sought

Commercial Electrical Contractor seeking

Licensed Electricians to join team.

Competitive wages and growth potentials.

Call 802-223-3221

or email resume plizzari@selectricvt.com

DAYTIME BUILDING FACILITIES LEAD

Full time-year round position, excellent benefi ts package,

generous paid time off and participation in the Vermont

municipal employees retirement system.

Pay is $21.47 per hour.

Lead works with the Nighttime Facilities Lead,

Director of Facilities and School Principals:

to help ensure safe, effective, and effi cient operation of the schools;

to be responsible for the overall maintenance;

and care of the school facilities and grounds.

For complete job description and requirements email

lpapibsu@buusd.org

Send cover letter, resume, 3 reference letters to

Jamie Evans, Facilities Director

120 Ayers Street

Barre, VT 06541

Community Banker

Central Vermont - Floating

There is no better time to join NSB’s team!

Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest

banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We are

looking for a professional to join our team as a Community

Banker – Floating for Central Vermont. As a Community

Banker – Floating you will have the opportunity to work in

multiple branches within the Central Vermont region. This

position offers an excellent opportunity to work for a premier

Vermont mutual savings bank.

Job Responsibilities & Requirements

• The Community Banker will be responsible for receiving

and processing customers’ financial transactions, matching

customers’ needs with appropriate products and services,

protecting customer information and maintaining customer

confidentiality. We are looking for someone who will

consistently provide outstanding customer service, has

excellent communication skills, and will build rapport

and develop relationships with our valued customers. A

high school diploma, general education degree (GED) or

equivalent is required.

Opportunity for growth

• The Community Banker position offers room for growth

and the opportunity to learn about the banking industry. The

successful candidates will enjoy a wide variety of changing

duties and build relationships with our valued customers. We

offer a comprehensive Community Banker training program

to assist with learning the fundamentals of this position.

Find your place with us at NSB

• NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits

package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching

401(K) retirement program, professional development

opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by

a team culture.

Northfield Savings Bank hours of operation are Monday –

Thursday, generally 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Friday 8:00

a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Please submit your resume and application in

confidence to:

Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred)

Or mail:

Northfield Savings Bank

Human Resources

P.O. Box 7180

Barre, VT 05641-7180

Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

page 32 The WORLD August 7, 2019

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route

302-Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

AIRLINE

CAREERS

Get FAA approved maintenance training at campuses

coast to coast. Job placement assistance.

Financial Aid for qualifying students. Military friendly.

Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

800-481-7894

COACHING VACANCIES

Spaulding High School is seeking the

following FALL 2019 Coaches:

JV BOYS’ SOCCER

JV GIRLS’ FIELD HOCKEY

Interested candidates are invited to

submit a letter of interest, resume, and

three references to:

Natalie Soffen, Director of Athletics

Spaulding High School

155 Ayers Street; SUITE 1

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: 802-476-6334

TO VIEW OR APPLY POSTED ON SCHOOL SPRING

Barre Unified Union School District

recruiting positions for

2019-2020 school year.

Barre Town Middle and Elementary School:

Licensed Math Interventionist

Custodian (year round position)

Licensed Kindergarten Special Educator

Licensed Middle School Special Educator

Licensed 6th Grade Teacher to Specialize in ELA

Barre City Elementary and Middle School:

Licensed PK Special Educator

Perm PreK Substitute

Spaulding High School:

Building Facilities Lead (year round position)

Permanent Substitutes

Athletic Coach

Central Vermont Career Center:

Automotive Tech Lab Assistant

BUUSD:

Communications Specialist

Substitute Teachers

Paraeducators

Behavior Interventionists

EOE

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS,

General Salvage Yard Laborer,

Part or Full Time. Flexible

Pay. 802-685-7799

INDEPENDENT GARAGE IN

Central Vermont LOOKING

for a eerienced and certifi ed

Auto Technician with a mini-

u of yrs eerience

ery ood ay and enefi ts

all --

JOURNEYMAN ELECTRI-

T

SOUGHT -

Commercial Electrical

Contractor seeking Licensed

lectricians to oin tea

Competitive wages and

growth potentials. Call

- or

email resume to

plizzari@selectricvt.com

Apply through our employment page at buusd.org

BUUSD Contact: Linda Papineau, (802) 476-5011

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

DUMP TRUCK OWNER$ —

what do you do when sum-

er wor ends

ENERGY has winter work

for you ee your actie

and oney owin into

your $checkbook$ November

through March! Contact

us now so you have all your

licenses and certifi cations in

tie euires or

taner haat endorsements

(we can help you get

them), clean driving record,

ability to drive in winter weather

refer you to e located

in Montpelier, Waterbury or

aitsfi eld areas ewards

Competitive pay, paid holidays

aid tie off easonal

onu iscount

nifor local coany

cares about our employees,

customers, communities and

the environment PREFER

YEAR-ROUND WORK? With

the right location, licenses and

experience we might be able

to fi t you into a fulltie reular

position. Apply at www.

BournesEnergy.com, visit

your local ournes nery

offi ce or send your resue to

annette@bournes.net

Currently Seeking

rtfi ars

Must have reliable

transportation.

Willing to train.

as ca

802-505-3859

or a traccotroaco

Everybody Wins! Vermont

Site Coordinators

Barre City Elementary & Middle School (10 hrs/wk, W & F)

Waterbury—Thatcher Brook Primary School (14 hrs/wk, T-W-Th)

Experience the joy of bringing children and volunteer mentors

together to read every week in Barre City (10 hrs/week, W & F)

or Waterbury (14 hrs./week, T-W-Th). Successful applicants have

exceptional people skills and love to be organized!

More information & job description: everybodywinsvermont.org

Apply with cover letter/resume: info@everybodywinsvermont.org

Equal Opportunity Employer

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

SEASONAL FARM LABOR.

NICHOLS TREE FARM Orford

has nine oenins for

hristas Tree far worers

3 months minimum experience

ro

hearin fi rewood trees and

tips harvest, wreath making

and other far laor as needed.

Tools provided. Full Time

27 Hours average per week

guaranteed over the work period

er hour ousin

ay e aailale for worers

not living in work area.

Transportation subsistence

expense may be paid to the

o site after of the wor

contract. Send resume to NH

Employment Security.

o rder

603-353-4832

45 South Fruit Street, Concord

-

STEWART ROSE Farms

Randolph Center VT, Part-

Time leading to Full Time

on 280 acre Farm, Farm

Workers Needed. For more

info contact araret ordon

802-728-4806 or

--

stewartrosefarsco

Drug Free Work Place

EOE

continued on next page

EVERYBODY WINS! VERMONT

Bookkeeper

10 hours/week, Montpelier

Statewide literacy organization seeks experienced

part-time bookkeeper. Responsibilities include payroll,

invoicing, receiving payments, deposits, preparing

annual ta fi les for accountant

ore inforation o descrition

everybodywinsvermont.org

Apply with cover letter/resume to

info@everybodywinsvermont.org

Equal Opportunity Employer


JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

The Williamstown United

Federated Church is seeking

an organist to play our

fully restored 1868 Nutting

Tracker organ during Sunday

worship services and

special occasions during the

liturgical year. Please send a

resume to the Williamstown

United Federated Church,

PO Box 438, Williamstown

VT 05679, or contact Kay

Poirier at 802-433-6695

WANTED:

FULL-TIME

COUNTERPERSON

2 Years Experience As An

Auto Parts Counterperson

Required.

Stop In and See Peter at

NAPA of Barre

44 South Main St.

WORK AT HOME AND EARN

BIG BUCKS!

Earn up to $1,000 a week

at your leisure in your own

home? The probability of gainin

i rofi ts fro this and

many similar at home jobs is

slim. Promoters of these jobs

usually require a fee to teach

you useless and unrofi tale

trades, or to provide you with

futile information. TIP: If a

work-at-home program is legitimate,

your sponsor should

tell you, for free and in writing,

what is involved. If you question

a roras leitiacy

call the ATTORNEY GEN-

-

TANCE PROGRAM at 1-800-

649-2424.

BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITIES

LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-

LION$? Watch out for business

opportunities that make

outrageous claims about

otential earnins ont

get fooled into get rich quick

scams. There are legitimate

business opportunities, but

be cautious of any business

that cant re ect in writin

the typical earnings of previous

employees. TIP: Investigate

earning potential claims

of businesses by requesting

written information from them

before you send any money,

or y callin the TT

GENERAL CONSUMER AS-

SISTANCE PROGRAM, at

1-800-649-2424.

CLASSES &

WORKSHOPS

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAIN-

ING — Get FAA Technician

certifi cation roed for

ilitary enefi ts inancial id

if ualifi ed o laceent assistance.

Call Aviation Institute

of Maintenance 866-453-6204

INTERESTED

IN CDL?

Classes

ongoing in Barre

Information:

476-4679

461-8089

Visit Our Website:

www.cdlschoolinvt.com

PERSONALS

MAKE A CONNECTION. Real

People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles

right now! Call LiveLinks.

Try it FREE. Call NOW 1-888-

909-9905 18+.

FREE ITEMS

$ A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

T

FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.

FREE “BEWARE OF THE

VERMONT LAND TRUST”

Bumper Stickers, Call

802-454-8561

HEALTH CARE

DENTAL INSURANCE from

Physicians Mutual Insurance

Company. NOT just a discount

plan, REAL coverage for (350)

procedures. Call 1-877-308-

2834 for details. www.dental50plus.com

/ cadnet 6118-

0219

DIAGNOSED WITH LUNG

CANCER? You may qualify

for a substantial cash award.

oliation risee

recovered millions. Let us help

you!! Call 24/7. 855-845-8269

DO YOU HAVE CHRONIC

KNEE OR BACK PAIN? If

you have insurance, you may

qualify for the perfect brace at

little to no cost. Get yours today!

Call 1-800-217-0504

GO*GO SCOOTER — Comes

a part in 3 pieces, 1 1/2 years

old, $600.00. 802-622-0339

HEAR AGAIN! Try our hearing

aid for just $75 down and $50

per month! Call 800-426-4212

and mention 88272 for a risk

free trial! FREE SHIPPING!

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER

Town of Barre

The Town of Barre is accepting applications for a parttime

(not more than 15 hrs./wk.) Animal Control Officer

(ACO). This is a year-round part-time position reporting to

the Barre Town police chief. The ACO works on a complaint

received basis which would include follow-up. Applicants

must: have a valid driver’s license; have a vehicle suitable

for transporting animals; be mobile on their feet; be able to

read, understand and apply the animal nuisance ordinance

to complaints and write tickets, if needed; be able to write

clear case reports; be able to communicate effectively with

the public; and pass a department background check.

Starting hourly rate is $14.50 with increase for satisfactory

performance after 1 year. The ACO will be reimbursed for

use of their personal vehicle. Applications are available at

the Barre Town Manager’s Office, 149 Websterville Road or

call 479-9331. Applications are due for review by 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019.

~ Equal Opportunity Employer ~

BARRE TOWN

Administrative Assistant

Planning & Zoning Department

This position provides clerical and administrative

support to the Planning & Zoning Administrator by

typing, composing documents, copying, filing and

recordkeeping. Extensive computer use is required. The

Administrative Assistant will answer phone calls and

serve the public at the counter.

The person filling this position will also serve as the

Clerk to the Planning Commission and the Development

Review Board (DRB), requiring attendance at each

board’s monthly nighttime meeting. The Clerk will

prepare meeting minutes and write decision letters for

the DRB and Planning Commission.

The Planning & Zoning administrative assistant will

assist other departments with similar office/clerical

work as assigned.

Minimum qualifications include high school

diploma. Successful candidates should be personable

and friendly, be able to interpret ordinances and

policies and give the public clear and accurate answers,

be able to write accurate letters and minutes, and

demonstrate attention to detail. Working knowledge

of Microsoft Word and Excel and the ability to learn

department software is required. This position is

available immediately. Competitive wages and benefits

via a union contract. For an application, contact

the Town Manager’s Office at 479-9331 or offices@

barretown.org or download from www.barretown.org/

Permits_Forms/employmentapplication.pdf. Resumes

may supplement the application. Deadline to apply is

4:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 14, 2019.

~ Barre Town is an Equal Opportunity Employer ~

CLASSIFIEDS

HEALTH CARE

LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE /

Lose 20 pounds in one

week? This is almost impossible!

Weight loss ads must

re ect the tyical eeriences

of the diet users. Beware

of programs that claim

you can lose weight effortlessly.

TIP: Clues to fraudulent

ads include words like:

“breakthrough,”effortless,”

and “new discovery.” When

you see words like these be

skeptical. Before you invest

your time and money call the

TT

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-

2424.

OXYGEN — Anytime. Anywhere

o tans to refi ll o

deliveries. Only 2.8 pounds!

FAA approved! FREE info kit:

Call 1-800-732-0442

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Suffering from an ADDIC-

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1-855-866-0913

continued on next page

to manage my schedule

HIRING: LICENSED NURSING ASSISTANT

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August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 33


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page 34 The WORLD August 7, 2019

CLASSIFIEDS

HEALTH CARE WANTED ANTIQUES/ MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

WANT A CURE-ALL?

Health fraud is a business

that sells false hope. Beware

of unsubstantiated claims for

health products and services.

There are no “Quick Cures”

— no matter what the ad is

claiming. TIP: DO NOT rely

on promises of a “money back

guarantee!” Watch out for

key words such as “exclusive

secret,”amazing results,” or

scientifi c reathrouh or

more information on health related

products or services, call

the TT

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM at 1-800-649-

2424, or consult a health care

provider.

WANTED

$$OLD GUITARS &

AMPS

WANTED$$

GIBSON*FENDER*MARTIN.

ALL BRANDS. TOP DOL-

LAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE

---

COIN COLLECTOR will Pay

Cash for Pre-1965 Coins and

Coin Collections. Call Joe

802-498-3692

HOUSE PAINTERS

Call Brian at

02-258-8010

OLD LICENSE PLATES

If you have old VT plates

before 1920 that you might

sell d lie to hear aout

them. Lifelong cash buyer.

Conrad Hughson, Box 1,

Putney, VT 05346

chughson@svcable.net

--

Please leave message.

WANTED FREON R12.

We Pay CA$H.

R12 R500 R11.

Convenient.

ertifi ed rofessionals

wwwrefrierantfi nders

com / ad

312-291-9169

WANTS TO purchase minerals

and other oil and gas interests.

Send details to: PO Box

ener

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AM

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on Monday will receive credit for the remaining paid weeks.

The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error

please notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be

responsible for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM

403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274

479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916

BUYING ANTIQUES

Furniture and Smalls.

G.S. Antiques

802-461-3004

Last Time Around Antiques

114 No. Main St. Barre.

--

MISCELLANEOUS

“GREEN MOUNTAIN

BARGAIN SHOP”

--

We Buy-Sell-Barter

“Lets Make a Deal”

Williamstown VT

$ A1-CASH PAID

T

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

--

2 PERSON NECKY Hard Blue

plastic kyak $250 802-345-

0042

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

TOTAL COST __________________

$ FULL PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY THIS FORM

MasterCard

Visa

Credit Card

Number ____________________________________________________ Discover

CVC#______

Signature __________________________________________Exp. Date ___________________

2005 CEDAR CREEK 5TH

WHEEL CAMPER, 3 slideouts,

added screen room,

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Bought New. Asking $10,500.

Call 802-461-8695

A PLACE FOR MOM. The

nations larest senior liin

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trusted, local experts today!

Our service is FREE / no obli-

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A PLACE FOR MOM. The

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Applying for Social Security

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Assoc., Social Security Attorneys,

1-855-498-6323! FREE

Consultations. Local Attorneys

Nationwide [Mail: 2420

N St NW, Washington DC.

ffice roward o T

NM Bar.)]

Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER

and call 479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

CHECK HEADING:

Animals-Farm ......................500

Animals-Pet .........................430

Antiques/Restorations .........144

Baby/Children Items ............140

Bicycles ...............................220

Boating/Fishing ...................210

Building Materials ................300

Business Items ....................080

Business Opportunities .......060

Camping ..............................205

Childcare Service ................030

Christmas Trees ..................370

Class & Workshops .............103

Clothing & Accessories .......130

Computers/Electronics ........100

Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410

Free Ads ..............................108

Furniture ..............................180

Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145

Health ..................................113

Home Appliances ................160

Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305

Insurance/Investments ........090

Job Opportunities ................020

Lost and Found ...................110

Miscellaneous .....................150

Musical ................................200

Personals ............................105

Professional Services .........540

Rideshare ............................125

Snow Removal Equip. .........355

Snowmobiles/Access. .........360

Sporting Equipment ............250

Storage................................235

Support Groups ..................107

Tools ....................................330

Wanted ................................120

Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350

Work Wanted .......................040

AUTOMOTIVE

Campers/Motor Homes .......845

Cars & Accessories ............875

Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850

Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870

Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873

Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855

REAL ESTATE

Apts./House for Rent ...........630

Camps for Sale ...................650

Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605

Condominiums ....................680

Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685

Homes .................................690

Land for Sale .......................670

Mobile Homes .....................600

Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645

Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610

APPLYING FOR SOCIAL SE-

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1-800-508-2824

COLLECTION of Black Figurines

rones ideos

other items. 802-883-9351

Cross Country Moving, Long

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out of state oe on

Distance Movers. Get Free

quote on your Long distance

move 1-800-511-2181

CROSS COUNTRY MOVING

Long distance Moving com-

any out of state oe

Long Distance Movers. Get

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move 1-855-839-3808.

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fi led for and denied our

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Free Voice Remote. Some

restrictions aly all --

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As Low As $14.95 /

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Get a SMARTPHONE for $0

DOWN* with AT&T Next and

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PLUS Stream on Up to

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T ---

GO*GO SCOOTER — Comes

a part in 3 pieces, 1 1/2 years

old, $600.00. 802-622-0339

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deliery to eniors --

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Have your product idea developed

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KENMORE 55 GALLON Electric

Hot Water Heater. Used

only 2 summers. $125 will

dicker. 62” wide 4 Kitchen

Cupboards hooked together 2

upper and 2 lower with Butcher

block countertop 8 doors

and 4 drawers. $125. 802-

565-0990

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris

Sprays, Kits, Mattress Covers.

Hardware Stores, The Home

Depot, homedepot.com

T ne ress

of a button sends help FAST!

Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even

if you cant reach a hone

FREE brochure. CALL 800-

-

Lung Cancer? Asbestos exposure

in industrial, construction,

manufacturing jobs, or military

may be the cause. Family in

the home were also exposed.

all --- or eail

cancer@breakinginjurynewslcom.

$30 billion is set aside

for asbestos victims with cancer.

Valuable settlement monies

may not require a lawsuit.


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youre oe or way or

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WE CAN remove bankruptcies,

judgments, liens, and

ad loans fro your credit fi le

forever! The Federal Trade

Commission says companies

that promise to scrub your

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information for a fee are

lying. Under FEDERAL law,

accurate negative information

can be reported for up to

seven years, and some bankruptcies

for up to 10 years.

Learn about managing credit

and debt at ftc.gov / credit. A

message from The World and

the FTC.

BICYCLES

LIKE NEW, IPED “Cruiser”

Womens pedal bicycle, sharp

red, No gears, cost New $250,

oo ary --

ORIGINAL ENGLISH RA-

LEIGH BICYCLE. Needs new

tires. $90 or best offer. 802-

-

HUNTING/GUNS/

ARCHERY

LIVE BAIT

Perch bait, Shiners, Crawlers,

Tackle.

OPEN EARLY — OPEN LATE

call anytime.

Route 12, Putnamville.

802-229-4246

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

FIREWOOD

Let Stephen keep you warm

this winter.

802-498-3159

continued on next page


June 29-July 7

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

your fi ners when you are

done. 802-454-8561.


FIREWOOD

reen easoned

802-454-1062

FIREWOOD All Hardwood

cut, split and delivered in

ontelier and arre reen

$235 / cord. 802-485-8525 or

1-800-707-8427

FIREWOOD

lit eliered

reen

easoned

Dry $290

Paul Poulin

802-883-5563

T eront and

Trust ells oin and

harleys oin with The

T T T

Ashley $500. And Harmon

ie ew or est offer

802-272-7892

CAMPING


T

slideouts, added screen

room, air conditioning, ceiling

fans, Queen size bed. One

wner ouht ew sin

all --

SNOW REMOVAL/

EQUIPMENT

T-T

BLOWER. 8HP, electric start

all ay

802-309-3986

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN


WILL TRAVEL

Free Quote!

all rian

802-839-6527

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

100% Organic

Clean

Top Soil

12 YD. LOAD $295

802-272-7422

oers

$1.00 each.

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519

ARE YOU TIRED OF

T T

T T T

We have the answer.

12 colors of landscape stone

for your yard projects.

We Deliver

andscae tones of ermont

lac oc oal

East Montpelier

802-223-4385

1-800-639-3197

landscapestonesofvermont.

com

-

ER. Briggs engine, 1yr old,

all ay

802-309-3986

arrels totes

We have over 700 in stock

fro al al totes

all for nfo icnell arrels

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519.

ANIMALS/PETS

-

et chec st

shots. Available 8/17. Parents

on reises all or tet -

763-7971

T -

T -

wees old ales

and eales ealth certifi -

cate et heced shots etc

lue erles Tris ost with

lue eyes -

467-3025

CLASSIFIEDS

reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse

•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recy

cle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•re

use•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•r

Secondhand News

ecycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycl

e•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reuse•recycle•reu

Save money, save the planet: Shop secondhand and recycle

your own goods at these thrift shops and consignment stores.

Sponsored by

Auxiliary

15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309

Weekdays 10 AM to 4 PM • Saturday 9 AM to 1 PM

LOTS OF CLOTHING FOR

THE WHOLE FAMILY AT

UNBEATABLE PRICES!

New Items Daily-Shop Often!

~ This message sponsored by ~

Affordable Hair

Styling for Men

and Children

at The Master’s Edge

223-7361 • 100 State St., Montpelier

ANIMALS/PETS


Home Raised,

Well socialized,

Parents on Premises,

Vet checked,

Health guarantee,

References available

802-229-0114

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

-

UP TO $300+

T

For More Info, 802-522-4279


Paying for Junk Vehicles,

Barre VT

802-476-4815 Bob

T

T

erlin ond d orthfi eld

all aurie erey eswic

802-522-9111

Odd Jobs, tree removal,

Landscaping-very reasonable

rate-call for free estimate.


are or all reas

hett aoie

802-272-7130.

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

FULL QUALITY

T

eoal ull Tree erices

tu rindin ede

and hrus triin for free

estimates call Randy 802-

479-3403/802-249-7164 35+

years eerience ully nsured.


tartin at

Free Estimate,

Bob Morin

802-522-9753

-

tartin at ree stiate

ince o orin

802-522-9753

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

T -

T T

-


Mulch Bedding

Tree Trimming

Pressure Wash

and More!

oercial esidential

ocpmvt@gmail.com

802-565-0038

T

-

aintin tainin

Metal Roof Painting

ressure ashin

inyl idin

ree stiates ully nsured

802-793-2363

802-229-0694

aintin nterior terior

ec leanin eairs

rywall eairs arentry

and more.

Quality Work.

Free Estimates

Insured

802-793-1017



done in Barre / Montpelier

area ree stiates all oe

802-498-3692.

T -


call 802-272-7892

itty cra etal

uyin oer rass aluinum,

etc. 802-439-6081.

T

Hazardous tree removal /

lean u ot clearin elective

falling, Viewing improvement

/ Emergency storm

damage for residential or

commercial, Fully insured /

enior discounts

Floyd Beede

802-433-1118

Williamstown, VT

Email Us!

sales@vt-world.com

Check for our

FLASH SALES!

Great Time To Shop

For Back-To-Schoolclose For Vacation

Women &

Children First

Your Community Clothing Store and More

114 No. Main • Ste. 2 • Barre • 476-4413

Mon.-Fri. 10:00am-5:30pm; Saturday 10:00am−2:00pm

GARAGE SALES FLEA MARKETS

RUMMAGES


T


Paperbacks, Hard backs,

istory hildren wood carin

as Tools hristas

udio Taes s s

Toys.

9 to 5

Thurs ri at

ollow ins ro leees

aine Tr erlin


erythin riced to o

20 Years of Misc items.

aturday a-

ounty oad alais

T

T

T

ere oin to the

Berlin Mall

Treasures Unburied

o ain treet

Barre VT

Country

Pampered

Paws

Pet Grooming &

Boarding

East Montpelier

802-229-0114

Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,

Air Conditioning In Summer

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

HAPPY

TAILS

BOARDING

KENNEL

Jim & Shelly Roux

802-485-5296

Roxbury, VT 05699

• modern facility

• radiant floor heat

• air conditioning

• fresh air system

• indoor kennel

• outdoor

exercise

area

Cat boarding

is also

available.

SALES & SERVICE

THE EASY DR ® WAY

TO TRIM & MOW!

6.75 PREMIER

Our lightest & easiest

handling model

$399 95

15 Models In Stock

OCCASIONAL USE SAW

Ideal for

Home

Use

Rugged

Farm

Use

START AT

$

179 95

MS 170 Stihl Homeowner TM

MIDRANGE SAW

PROFESSIONAL SAW

Tough High

Performance

PET OF THE WEEK

T and T

Tools and gadgets, antiques

and decorative items. 26

herrywood rie arre

a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Friday and

aturday hec out years

of accumulation in the storeroo

oethin for eeryone.


Antique Furniture and

Vintage items, Linens, Down

blankets, Duvet covers,

household items.

5208 Hollister Hill Road

arshfi eld aturday

8 AM

Rain Date 8/11.


arre ity

oward t

8/9-8/10, 9am-4pm. Household

ites eer rill ollectiles

ids dult clothin

orts euient

CLASSIFIED AD AND KIT!

YARD/GARAGE SALE CLASSIFIED AD

Up To 15 Words (each additional word is 35¢)

KIT INCLUDES:

•Fluorescent Signs

•Price Stickers

•Inventory & Tip Sheet

FOR

ONLY

$9.95

For only $1.00 more, purchase

"Rain Insurance" (if it rains on your sale,

The WORLD will run your ad the following

week for FREE. Must call by 9:00 AM

Monday to run your ad again.

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin Barre, VT 05641 (802) 479-2582

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

START AT

$

409 95

MS 271 Stihl Farm ®

START AT

$

759 95

MS 362 CM Stihl Professional TM

85 SOUTH MAIN ST. • BARRE, VT

802-476-5400

Mimi is a sweetheart feline who came to CVHS

when she was not playing nicely with her

housemates in her home. She prefers to be an

indoor only cat, with room to explore, and humans

to boss around. She currently is tolerating her cat

colony roommates but would prefer a home

without another cat, or a house big enough for

two personalities.

1589 VT Rte 14S, East Montpelier

476-3811 • centralvermonthumane.org

Tues.-Fri. 1pm-5pm,

Sat. 10am-4pm

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 35


Kevin E. Hudson

Free junk car removal in

Central Vermont Area

Huds Transport LLC

SERVICE

DIRECTORY

(802)249-7112

khidigforyou@aol.com

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 10,500

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

Grant’s Trash Removal

Call/Text: Heather: 802-279-3469

Visit us on Facebook

esiential mall

ommerial lean uts

Junk, Metal &

eris emoal

Slate/Gravel/Top Soil

Landscaping

Excavation/Loader Work

Snow Plowing

Sanding

GOT MUD? NEED STONE?

Septic & Mound Systems

Fully Insured

IF IT’S DIRT, WE DIG IT!

Tool Sharpening

Services

Knives

Scissors & Shears

Woodworking Tools

Regular Drill Bits

Lawn & Garden

Plus Small Engine Repair &

Chain Saw Sharpening and Tune-ups

DAVE GUILMETTE’S

Tool Sharpening Services

85 Barnes Road Montpelier, VT (802) 477-2406

Email: dguilmette49@gmail.com

Weekly Trash & Recycling Drop

SATURDAYS 8AM-NOON

t la ear io iesel in lainfiel

Local, Friendly & Family Owned/Operated for 24 Years!

Worth’s Seamless Rain Gutters, Inc.

Bob’s Creative Landscaping

*Trees, Shrubs,

Evergreens

*Patios, Walls,

Walkways, Decking

*General

Maintenance,

Planting

*Designing

& Consulting!

Specializing

in

Concrete

Pavers

Bob Richardson, Owner

Tel: 802 472-8877

Cell: 802 249-8448

GREG’S

PAINTING & STAINING

CARPENTRY

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

An

Investment

You Can

Hang On

To!!

In Your Area

To Serve!

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL,

WITH QUALITY YOU CAN HANG ONTO!

• Copper and Aluminum Gutters

• K Style & Half Round Gutters

• 5” and 6” Commercial & Residential Gutters

• Gutter Toppers • Snow & Ice Restraint Systems

• Hott Topper (prevents ice damming)

Over 31 Years in Business

FREE ESTIMATES ~ FULLY INSURED!

3165 U.S. Route 5

P.O. Box 732, Derby VT 05829

Toll Free 800-870-2113 • Phone 802-766-2113

joanne@worthgutters.com

Come visit us at www.worthgutters.com

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

G.M. Bowen Excavating

Contractor, Inc.

Gene M. Bowen/Donald W. Mucherino, Jr. Owners

East Calais, VT

Commercial / Residential

Site Work - Foundations - Water & Sewer

New Septic System Installation & Repair

Roads, Driveways, Drainage &Ponds

BWContrCalais@aol.com

DonaldMucherinoGMBowen@gmail.com

802-456-7049, 802-456-1332, 802-793-0895

Please call for Free Estimates

SUNKEN SLAB? UNEVEN WALKWAY?

DON’T REPLACE IT

RAISE IT FOR HALF THE COST OR LESS

CONCRETE LIFTING

owner Bill Marsha cell 802-272-7150 email bill@liftaslab.com

Check our website for more details www.LiftaSlab.com

Gendron

Building

Since 1974

SERVICES

802-223-6577

407 BARRE ST. MONTPELIER

Professional

Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

or your money back.

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

Quality In

Concrete

Concrete business since 1972.

eairs ew oors and walls ecoratie concrete

rane wor onsultin foundations

Three ile ride d iddlese T

- endronconcreteco

CENTRAL VERMONT PAINTING

~Interior ~Exterior ~Pressure Washing

~5 Year Guarantee ~Quality Work

~Commercial/Residential ~Free Estimates

~Insured ~EMP Lead Removal Certified

15 Years Experience

802-793-6351CELL

OF PROFIT

5% GOES TOCHARITY

OF YOUR

CHOICE

Business Technology & Cyber-Security Services

Located in the historic Hangar Building

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South 802.223.4448

East Montpelier, VT 05651

rbtechvt.com

Troy West

Carpet Cleaning

SEE THE DIFFERENCE!

802-498-3718

Dry Low Circular Moisture Foam

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

https://www.facebook.com/TroyWestCarpetCleaning/

FREE Estimates

Fully Insured

MARIO'S SEAMLESS GUTTERS

GUTTER DONE

• Custom Made On Site & Installed

• Tough Gutters Made for Tough Weather

• Installation & Material GUARANTEED

Compare Quality, Price & Workmanship

MARIO VERDON 802-476-3331 or 1-800-463-7311

337 VT Route 110, Orange, VT 05641

TOP TO BOTTOM CHIMNEY SERVICES

Richard Dickinson

(802) 479-1811

Chimney Building, Repairs, Caps

Stainless Steel Liners and Cleaning

Free Estimates/Insured

Full Service & Installation of Plumbing,

Gas, Oil, Pellet & Air Conditioning

FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED

www.lloydplumbingandheating.com

24-HOUR

EMERGENCY

SERVICE

(802) 426-2092

TRUCK FOR HIRE!

In Need Of A

Pickup Truck And

Helping Hand?

• Hauling

• Dump Run

• Landlords,

Residential

Clean-outs

Call Us!

Tom Moore

T&T Truck For Hire

Montpelier

802-224-1360

page 36 The WORLD August 7, 2019


YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI

FIRESTONE GENERAL UNIROYAL NOKIAN

AUTOMOTIVE

CAMPERS

MOTOR HOMES

2005 CEDAR CREEK 5TH

WHEEL CAMPER, 3 slideouts,

added screen room,

air conditioning, ceiling fans,

Queen size bed. One Owner.

Bought New. Asking $10,500.

Call 802-461-8695

MOTORCYCLES/

ATVS

2003 YAMAHA V-STAR

1100cc 2-cycle motorcycle.

Gray with chrome and

leather accents, windshield.

$2,795.00. No reasonable offer

refused. Harland, Orange,

Vermont

802-439-5607.

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

2001 F-250 FORD — Excellent

condition. No Rust, wintered

in Florida. 7.3 diesel engine,

extended cab, cap, tow package,

good rubber, clean interior,

$7500.00 call

802-249-0764

2002 CHEVROLET SIL-

VERADO 1500HD $6,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 or (866) 928-9370.

For more details text 16D8 to

27414

CARS / TRUCKS WANTED!!!

All Makes / Models 2002-2018!

Any Condition. Running or

Not. Top $$$ Paid! Free Towin

ere ationwide all

Now: 1-888-985-1806

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

$ A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

1977 CHEVY EL CAMINO,

Exta Clean, rust free, Texas

car, $8500. 802-272-6959

2003 MINI COOPER $2,695

East Barre Auto Sales (866)

928-9370 / 802-476-5370 For

more details TEXT 1P1V TO

27414

2005 Black MUSTANG Low

Milage 34,000, Good Condition,

Leave message. 802-

479-9605

New & Good Used Tires

Passenger, Performance & Lt. Truck

TIRE

WE DO

FLAT

REPAIR

STORE HOURS

Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30

Saturday 8:30-1:00

Closed Sunday

FRED BUDZYN

TIRE

Corner No. Main &

Seminary Sts., Barre

479-1819

CALL FOR PRICES

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

2007 HONDA ACCORD EX-L

122.500 Miles, AM / FM / Multi

CD, Sunroof, Heated Leather

Seats, New Rims. $5200.00.

Text / Call

207-730-1595(Barre)

2010 SUBARU IMPREZA

$5,500 East Barre Auto Sales

802-479-5370 OR 866-928-

9370 For more details text

4D35 to 27414

2013 HONDA CIVIC $8,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 or 866-928-9370

For more Details Text 0PLN

TO 27414

2013 TOYOTA PRIUS III,

72129 miles, black, automatic,

solar roof package, reliable

car, great mpg, $2,000, kegatv@mailtds.com,

802-419-

8345

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all

cars! Junk, high-end, totaled

it doesnt atter et free

towing and same day cash!

NEWER MODELS too! Call

844-813-0213

ERASE BAD CREDIT

FOREVER!

Credit repair companies make

false claims and promises to

erase a trail of unpaid bills or

late payments from your credit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

credit information. In addition,

federal law forbids credit repair

companies from collecting

money before they provide

their service. TIP: If you have

questions about your credit

history or you want to know

how to get a free copy of your

credit report call the ATTOR-

-

ER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

at --- ont

send any money to a credit repair

company until you check

it out.

FREE JUNK CAR REMOVAL,

Move Equipment in Central

Vermont Area, Reasonable

Rates, Fully Insured. 802-249-

7112

NEW & USED TIRES ALL

SIZES, Used Rims,

802-883-5506

TOYOTA CAMRY, HYUNDAI

ACCENT, Both 3/4 for Enduro

or Scrap metals, $200 each or

$375 for Both. Call 802-479-

1210, Ask for Dave.

DEALING WITH WATER

DAMAGE requires immediate

action. Local professionals

that respond immediately.

Nationwide and 24/7. No Mold

Calls. 1-800-506-3367

CHANGEOVERS

Mounted &

Computer Balanced

Your Tires Or Ours

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

WE

ACCEPT

EBT

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

ALL SIZES BF GOODRICH GENERAL

By Chris Richcreek

1. In 2019, Pittsburgh’s Josh

Bell became the third player

in National League history to

have at least 12 doubles and

12 home runs in the same

month. Name either of the

other two to do it.

2. When was the last time

before 2018 (Cincinnati’s

Bryan Price) that a majorleague

manager was fired in

the month of April?

3. How many years went by

before the Buffalo Bills

returned to the NFL playoffs

in the 2017 season?

4. When was the last time

before the 2018-19 season

that the Tennessee men’s basketball

team won at least 15

games in a row?

5. How many times have the

Florida Panthers made the

NHL playoffs during their

first 25 seasons (through

2018-19)?

Answers

1. Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson.

2. It was 2002, when four managers

(Colorado’s Buddy Bell, Milwaukee’s

Davey Lopes, Detroit’s Phil Garner

and Kansas City’s Tony Muser) were

fired in April

3. Eighteen years (last in playoffs in

1999).

4. It was 1915-17.

5. Five times.

(c) 2019 King Features Syndicate,

Inc.

JUST GOOD AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2012 FORD FOCUS SE

HATCHBACK

4-dr., auto., PW, PL, AC, sunroof,

low miles

$5,995

2006 CHEV SILVERADO 1500

auto., 4x4, PW, PL

$6,995

2009 CHEV. COBALT LS

2-door, auto., low miles

$4,995

2009 BUICK LUCERNE

auto., PW, PL, AC, leather & heated

seats! sunroof, low miles

$6,295

2008 FORD F250 XL

auto., PW, PL, AC, low miles, 36K, 8

1/2 ft. Fisher SS V plow, one owner

$15,995

2007 BUICK LUCERNE CXL

auto., PW, PL, AC, leather, heated

seats, sunroof, low miles

$5,495

2005 SUBARU FORESTER

LL Bean, auto., PW, PL, cruise,

sunroof, leather, low miles, 108K

$5,995

2005 BUICK LACROSSE

auto., PW, PL, low miles

$4,495

2005 MERCURY MONTEGO

auto., AWD, PW, PL, low miles

$2,995

2003 FORD CROWN

VICTORIA

auto., loaded, low miles (81K)

$3,495

1984 LINCOLN

MARK VII LSC

auto, PW. PL, AC, 501 liter HP-V-8,

SR, low miles, 110K

$3,995

1973 MERCURY COUGAR

XR7 CONVERTIBLE

auto, PW, PS, tilt, 351-V8, low miles

88K miles

$11,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

Trades Welcome

Prices Negotiable

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

REACHING

OVER

30,000

READERS

WEEKLY

Montpelier, Barre,

Northfield

Waterbury &

Surrounding Towns

Always Good News

JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

BACK TO SCOOL

SERVICE SPECIAL

• QUICK WASH •QUICK VACUUM

•CHECK A/C PERFORMANCE

•CHECK AND TOP OFF MOST

$

19

FLUIDS

95

•CHECK TIRES AND

BRAKES

•CHECK STEERING AND

SUSPENSION

•CHECK WIPERS AND

ALL LIGHTS

•CHECK ALL FILTERS

BELTS AND HOSES

•CHECK BATTERY

PERFORMANCE

OIL &

FILTER CHANGE

• Up to 5 qts. 5W30

Offer Good With This Coupon Through 8/31/19

$

34.95

Plus

Tax

Heavy duty trucks, diesels &

synthetic higher

ONE STOP TRAILER CENTER

HRegistration HInspection HBrake Controllers

Offer Good With This

Coupon Through 8-31-19.

HWiring HHitches HParts HService

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403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin • Barre, Vt 05641-2274

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax: 802-479-7916

e-mail: sales@vt-world.com or editor@vt-world.com

We Sell TIRES

• We Service All

Makes & Models

• Fleet & Commercial

Accounts Welcome

• We Honor All

Extended Warranties

BACK TO SCHOOL

FREE BRAKE

CHECK

Charge For Parts & Service Only If Needed

SEE SERVICE ADVISOR FOR DETAILS

Offer Good With This Coupon Through August 31, 2019.

VERMONT STATE INSPECTION

• Most Cars

& Light Trucks

$

24 95

• Pass or Fail

See Service Advisor

for Details

Plus

Offer Good With This

Tax

Coupon Through 8/31/19.

OFFERS VALID AT THIS DEALERSHIP ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS. TAX & SUPPLIES EXTRA.

Call Toll Free 802-223-0001

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7 - 5 • SATURDAY 7 - 12. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TIL 6/30/19.

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 37


Hunter Heavy Duty

ALIGNMENTS

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

For All

Sizes

of RVs

Trucks,

Trailers &

Buses

“Your Truck

Chassis

Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

WORLD AUTOMOTIVE

How Seniors Can Safely Stay Behind The Wheel

A greater sense of independence is often cited as the reason

so many young people anxiously await the day they earn

their drivers’ licenses. But the connection between driving

and independence is not lost on seniors, either.

Aging can take its toll on drivers, prompting such drivers’

families to feel as if their loved ones’ ability to safely operate

motor vehicles has been compromised. However, many

seniors can still safely operate motor vehicles, and those who

do can take steps to ensure they’re as safe as possible behind

the wheel.

• Avoid driving on days when aches and pains are strong.

Aches and pains are common side effects of aging, and seniors

know that some days are better than others. Seniors’

ability to control their vehicles may be compromised on days

when stiffness, aches or pains seem particularly strong, so it’s

best to avoid driving during these times. Fatigue may set in

on days when aches and pains require extra effort to perform

relatively simple tasks, and drivers of all ages should avoid

driving while tired.

• Don’t skip medical checkups. Few seniors may look

forward to their medical checkups, but visits to the doctor

can reveal issues that can help seniors be safer on the road.

Schedule routine vision exams so eyeglass prescriptions are

always up-to-date. In addition, seniors should discuss hearing

screenings with their physicians so they can ensure they

can always hear sirens and other motorists while on the road.

Great strides have been made in regard to helping people

with fading hearing hear better, and seniors would be wise to

take advantage of such advancements, which include hearing

aids that can be connected to smartphones.

• Familiarize yourself with medication side effects. Whether

they do so temporarily or permanently, many seniors take

medications, and every medication comes with side effects.

When filling a new prescription, carefully read the dosage

and description label to ensure that it’s safe to drive while

taking the medicine. Make note of how you feel when taking

a new prescription, avoiding driving if the medication makes

you feel fatigued or drowsy or affects your motor functions.

If the side effects of a new prescription are making it difficult

to safely operate a vehicle, discuss potential alternatives with

your physician.

• Avoid driving in certain conditions. Driving in inclement

weather, during rush hour and at night makes many drivers

uncomfortable, regardless of their age. But such conditions

can be especially dangerous for aging drivers whose vision

and reaction times might be fading. Seniors who avoid driving

in harsh conditions and heavy traffic may be more comfortable

behind the wheel, thereby reducing their risk of accident

or injury.

Seniors need not give up their drivers’ licenses at the first

signs of aging. But adjusting certain behaviors and exercising

extra caution can help these men and women stay safe

behind the wheel.

SPRING SAVINGS

LUBE, OIL

& FILTER

CHANGE

ONLY AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

CAPITOL CITY KIA

YOUR VERMONT

CHOICE

STATE

INSPECTION

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

BRAKE SERVICE

15 % DISCOUNT

- May not be

combined TO ALL ACTIVE & INACTIVE

with any

other offer MILITARY PERSONNEL

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS

You Don’t Have To Purchase Your Vehicle Here To Take Advantage Of Our Quality Service!

The best service at the best prices. Period.

page 38 The WORLD August 7, 2019


$

24 95

• Most cars & light

trucks • Inspection

only, repairs extra

• May not be

combined with any

other offer

VERMONT

INSPECTION

• Up to 5 qts.Standard Motor Oil

• Genuine Factory OIl Filter

Plus Tax

8

• Multi-Point Inspection

DUE

• Top off All Fluids

FREE CAR WASH WITH ANY SERVICE

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON AT CAPITAL CITY KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer good thru 8/31/19.

CAPITOL CITY KIA

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON AT CAPITAL CITY KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer good thru 8/31/19.

QUICK WASH, QUICK VACUUM

CHECK A/C PERFORMANCE

CHECK AND TOP OFF MOST FLUIDS

CHECK TIRES AND BRAKES

CHECK STEERING AND SUSPENSION

CHECK WIPERS AND ALL LIGHTS

CHECK ALL FILTERS BELTS AND HOSES

CHECK BATTERY PERFORMANCE

15% OFF

CAPITOL CITY KIA

VACATION SERVICE SPECIAL

$

19 95 Please

present

coupon

at vehicle

write-up.

Offer good

through

8/31/19.

CORNER OF

RT. 2 & GALLISON HILL RD.

MONTPELIER, VT

Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7-5

Wed. 7-7 SAT. 8-2

Service & Parts

Call toll free: 802-262-2174

www.captiolcitykia.com

• • •

Helliwell Takes Advantage of Late

Tangle to Win Midsummer 250

oer s ayne elliwell ature te to rie in te

isummer ater te leaers tangle wit our las to go. ar

lan umner oto

Dover, NH’s Wayne Helliwell

Jr. was in the right place

at the right time to score the

victory and the $10,000 top

prize in the American-Canadian

Tour (ACT) Midsummer

250 at N. Woodstock,

NH’s White Mountain Motorsports

Park (WMMP) on

Saturday, August 3. Helliwell

took the lead with four laps

remaining after Jimmy Hebert

and Scott Payea tangled

on a restart, then held off a

last-lap bid by Graniteville,

VT’s Stephen Donahue for

the win.

Helliwell’s sudden rise to the top spot was

just the latest twist in a race that was full of

them. The three-time ACT champion had

been running in the top-five through the late

stages, but Hebert seemed to have the race in

hand as the laps wound down – a feat made

even more impressive by going the whole

way on the same four tires.

But Trent Goodrow spun in turn two to

bring out the event’s 11th caution on lap 246.

The yellow allowed Payea – who had already

led 40 laps after starting 23rd – to draw to Hebert’s

outside. The first two attempts at the

restart were waved off, and on the third try,

the lead duo got together entering turn two.

Payea spun and both drivers were sent to the

rear. That put Donahue and Helliwell on the

front row for the restart, and when the green

flag waved again, Helliwell made the outside

groove work to grab his 12th career ACT

Late Model Tour win.

Donahue was the dominant driver early,

taking the lead from polesitter Scott Dragon

on lap four and staying out front for more

than 70 laps. A competition caution for a fuel

stop on lap 75 closed the field back up, and

after the caution came back out three laps

later for Jonathan Bouvrette’s spin, Groveton,

NH’s Quinny Welch drove past him to take

the top spot. During the caution, ACT point

leader Rich Dubeau was one of a handful of

drivers to change tires as strategy began to

play itself out.

Donahue and Welch swapped the lead

twice more after another pair of quick cautions

before the field settled into a long green

flag run. Welch, the WMMP Late Model

point leader, proceeded to lead 87 straight

laps before Mark Jension hit the turn-two

wall on lap 170 to bring out the sixth caution.

During that yellow, all lead-lap cars except for

Hebert, Dubeau, and Adam Gray came to the

pits for tires. At that point, Williamstown’s

Hebert was the only driver in the field still

on the same tires he started with, and he assumed

command for the restart.

Hebert led the next nine laps until another

yellow flew for Gray’s turn-two crash. The

outside had been the place to be on restarts

all night, and this time, it was Payea’s turn to

ride the rim, completing his drive to first after

needing to qualify through the B-Feature.

Payea led the next 40 laps, but on the race’s

next restart at lap 219 for Jesse Switser’s spin,

Payea succumbed to the inside curse as Donahue

took the lead back.

During this time, Hebert had hung with

the leaders even on his old tires. As Donahue

and Payea diced for the point, Hebert

saw a chance and made a daring three-wide

move into turn three with 22 laps to go. Just

seconds after Hebert crossed the line in first,

Corey Mason spun in turn two to bring out

the ninth caution, locking the pass into the

record books. Mason was subsequently disqualified

from the event for intentionally hitting

another car under the caution.

All the while, Helliwell was lurking. The

veteran started 15th and spent the first twothirds

of the event hanging around the back

half of the top-10. Once the mass tire stop occurred

on lap-170, he started creeping closer

and closer to the front. Helliwell broke into

the top-three for the first time on lap 206 and

bounced between the third and fourth spot

for the next 40 laps, waiting for an opportunity

to strike.

That opportunity finally arrived with four

laps to go. Hebert had managed to make the

inside work on a lap-236 restart from a debris

caution, but Goodrow’s spin put Hebert and

Payea side-by-side one more time with Donahue

and Helliwell right behind. The contact

between the leaders opened the door for

Helliwell, and while Donahue tried to sneak

back through in the final corners, “The Punisher”

brought home the win. It was Helliwell’s

second straight victory at WMMP after

taking the New Hampshire Governor’s Cup

the week before.

Donahue earned an ACT career-best

second-place finish. Barre, VT’s Jason Corliss

was quiet most of the night but also took

advantage of the late tangle to come home

third. Milton, VT’s Scott Dragon took fourth

with Plainfield, NH’s Dubeau rounding out

the top-five. Welch, Ryan Kuhn, Payea, Joel

Hodgdon, and Hebert finished sixth through

10th.

Jonathan Bouvrette, Dylan Payea, and Dubeau

won the qualifying heats. Helliwell and

Christopher Pelkey were victorious in the

consolation rounds while Cody LeBlanc captured

the last-chance B-Feature.

The ACT Late Model Tour next travels to

Maine’s Oxford Plains Speedway on Saturday,

August 24. The Oxford Plains 150 is part of

the “Night Before the 250” that also includes

events for the Tri-Track Open Modified Series,

North East Classic Lites, NELCAR

Legends, Oxford Street Stocks, and Wicked

Good Vintage Racers. Post time is 4:30pm.

For more information, contact the ACT offices

at (802) 244-6963, media@acttour.com,

or visit www.acttour.com.


REAL ESTATE

PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

MOBILE HOMES/

RENT/SALE

-

for sale by owner. 2 bed,

2 bath with many updates.

all --

for more details.

COMMERCIAL

RENTALS/SALES


or ent oerhead

doors lifts air co-

ressor o all for

ore info --

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

one ed aartent

includesheat electricity rubish,

no pets,

non-soin arin for one

car. deposit.,

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for one or two people.

Equipped kitchen, living room

with fi relace aths

nd oor edroo roane

innai effi cient heat eaceful

walin trails o

ease o ets hone -

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APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

T newly

renoated it ath arin

coin-o wd ll utilities

included except electricity.

Credit check & references.


--

T T -

nfurnished edroo

nd oor ncludes eat

hot water electricity eosit

reuired o ets nonsoin

o all -

-

T

escrie your roerty

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property and

youll alost always oey the

law.

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

T is ear

ound in rua The water

is safe and the dinin is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach.

-edroo wees aailale

lees eail carolaction

aol.com

for more information.

CAMPS FOR SALE

T TT

ast on ond oodury

shoreline acres

off the rid s ft

with s ft

and sft

outhouse, lawn, dock, and

swi raft artially furnished

Springwater to kitchen and

as aliances ie iles

from Woodbury, at the end of

a gated lane for 9 immediate

neihors ery uiet and

riate ae water is clear

for pleasant swimming and

oatin uilt in the s

udates reairs in the s

sin ee hotos

at raislist listin ostin

uer all

--

Email Us!

sales@vt-world.com

LAND FOR SALE

T off

herry Tree ill in ast ont-

elier riate road all utilities

underground. Starting at

each

--


T T -

educed for uic sale

acres, open and wooded with

power, drilled well and septic

syste deal location for your

new odular stic uilt or o-

ile hoe uiet country location

on a dead end road yet

inutes to - eit sin

all don at --


T T T ast

airy ree on iht ity

water, and sewer available.

udiision or ulti units ossile

acres o

--

T oute

T all aroed

cres ile fro -

iles fro orwich niersity

--

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

Updated Weekly

HOMES

T -riate ocation

edroo ath

oe f riacy is iortant

to you check out this home!

aed country road no neih-

ors in siht lare decsone

with a hottub(included), 2

car heated garage. The house

was completely renovated 9

years ago. Radiant heat, utility

room, 12 foot ceilings, 2,300

suare feet uch ore ont

miss this $400,000 home with

an asking price of $369,900.

all orthfi eld eal state

raisal at --

ask for Rich or Erika.

T -


Having trouble paying your

ortae The ederal Trade

oission says dont ay

any fees in adance to eople

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nations consuer rotection

agency. For more information,

call --T- or clic

on ftco essae fro

The World and the FTC.

HUNTER EDUCATION

COURSE OFFERED

Registration Monday,

August 12, 6-8 P.M. at the

Barre Fish & Game Club

Gun Club Road

Barre Town

522-2499

Home Mortgage Rates

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community National 8/2/19 3.875% 3.893% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 3.500% 3.532% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

New England Federal 8/2/19 3.750% 3.774% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union 866-805-6267 3.250% 3.292% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 8/2/19 3.750% 3.788% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank (NSB) 3.125% 3.193% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

802-485-5871

VT State Employees 8/2/19 3.750% 3.789% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union (VSECU) 3.125% 3.194% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Rates can change without notice.

***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

included in the APR calculations.

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

VIEW

“A

HOMES

common

BEING

interest

BUILT SUNDAYS

community”

1 PM – 3 PM

VIEW HOMES SHOWN BEING BY APPOINTMENT BUILT SUNDAYS ANYTIME 1 PM – 3 PM

SHOWN CALL BY 802-249-8251 APPOINTMENT OR 802-734-1920 ANYTIME

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and Duplex homes priced from $229,000

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full

basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $272,000

and Duplex homes priced from $232,000

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile

on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into

Windy Wood.

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

Foreclosure: 5.2± Acre Building Lot

Fri., Aug. 16 @ 11AM

Mays Way, E. Montpelier, VT

Walk the Land Anytime!

5.2± acre building lot in quiet and convenient

location. Close to Barre or Montpelier. 10 minute

drive to I-89. Great home site surrounded by

mountains in a peaceful setting.

From Rt. 14 in East Montpelier, turn right before Bragg Farm onto

Mays Way. Bear right at driveway. Walk the land any time.

Thomas Hirchak Company

THCAuction.com • 800-634-7653

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for 2 & 3 bedroom apartments

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site

rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, Aug. 10 • 1:00-3:00pm

Denise’s

Danville Listing

BEAUTIFUL 13 ACRE PARCEL

Danville: 13 acre lot with a mobile home that’s been used as a hunting

camp. Frontage on a class 3, town maintained road and an existing

driveway. This is a great spot to build a home or just enjoy the way it is.

$75,000--ML4755371

ST. JOHNSBURY

309 Portland St, Suite 101; 802-748-2045

DANVILLE

10 Route 2 West, P.O. Box 68; 802-684-1127

beginrealty.com

REALTY ASSOCIATES

31 Herricks Cove Rd.

Solidly built 4 season home on Woodbury Lake features full

kitchen,dining room,living room full bath. Has radiant heat,wired in

backup generator,drilled well and septic.New front deck overlooks

waterfront.Property has half acre with 120ff of direct water access and its

own "stone island" with dock. MLS #4751428 New Price of $350,000.

Visit Our Website For Details On These And Other Listings

HARRINGTON REALTY

www.harringtonvt.com

802-563-6000 or 802-595-1156

Cabot, Vermont

August 7, 2019 The WORLD page 39


Barre City - $269,000

This spacious 2-story building is perfect for your business

or residential use and is close to downtown. The upstairs

could easily be turned into a 3-bedroom unit, let the rent

pay your mortgage! There is more than sufficient parking at

this property.

MLS #4730090

Montpelier – $292,000

Country living yet only one mile from the State Capital. Lovely

farmhouse boasts 5BR and 2BA. This home offers both a

living room and bonus family room as well as a wrap-around

porch and more! Close to public transportation.

MLS #4761797

Barre City – $132,000

Looking for the Condo Life? Here it is with this 2 bedroom

1.5 bath home. Updated ½ bath on 1st fl oor. Master

bedroom with walk in closet, a spacious 2nd bedroom

and full bath. Also features garage, laundry room with new

washer and dryer, new roof, new windows, new fl ooring

and new appliances!

MLS #4758192

PRICE

IMPROVED

Barre City - $115,400

This cozy 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has nice hardwood floors,

high ceilings, large rooms and newer windows throughout.

Private back deck for grilling and relaxing.

MLS #4718634

Woodbury - $350,000

a pond with 460 feet of water frontage! Enjoy the open beach

areas, canoeing/kayaking, swimming and fi shing all just

outside the front door. The property offers 3 bedrooms, a

deck and 2.24 acres. Additional acreage available.

MLS #4750185

Barre City - $142,500

Lovely home with lots of character and charm! Natural light

and beautiful woodwork throughout this four bedroom, one

and a half bath home. This home also includes a covered

front porch, a walk-up attic that could easily be fi nished,

2-car garage and nice private backyard with deck.

MLS #4744518

PRICE

IMPROVED

PRICE

IMPROVED

arsfiel

55.9 acre parcel with tons of possibilities and lots of privacy!

There is a house site ready with state septic permit for a 3BR

home. Property includes a cozy camp that has a bunk room

and loft, comes fully furnished w/wood stove for heat and

solar panel for lights. Hunt, hike, garden or just sit on the

deck of the camp, listen to nature and enjoy the solitude!

MLS #4695781

Williamstown - $265,000

This beautifully renovated 5-bedroom 1850 Historic Farm

House has numerous updates. The kitchen boasts an antique

wood cook stove that also heats much of the home. There is

plenty of room to entertain family and friends on the front and

back decks, overlooking amazing mountain views. The large

level lawn is beautifully landscaped and is lined with large,

century year old trees.

MLS #4648832

Woodbury - $250,000

Here’s your opportunity to own your Vermont Getaway! This

camp offers just under 3.0 acres with approx 320 feet of

level water frontage with beach and grass. Plenty of storage

with your own boat house and additional outbuildings. Great

fi shing, swimming, boating and more. Come check it out!

MLS #4750187

When you buy or sell your home with us, you can use our moving truck for FREE!

“As a Vermont family business, we know what home means. Our approach is

local, personalized and unique. Local ownership and decision making combined

with the resources and strengths of one of the largest real estate brokerages in

the northeast allows us to offer our clients the best of all worlds. Call us today to

learn more about the William Raveis difference.” –John B.

Come work with a local family-owned

company that knows the market and

gets results.

BARRE • BURLINGTON ESSEX JCT. • • ST. ST. JOHNSBURY • • STOWE • • STRATTON •• WOODSTOCK

802.479.3366

BARRE • ESSEX JCT. • ST. JOHNSBURY • STOWE • STRATTON • WOODSTOCK

802.479.3366

page 40 The WORLD August 7, 2019

Independently Owned and Operated

Independently Owned and Operated

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