Charlotte Pride Magazine - August 2019 - Inaugural Edition

charlottepride

The new Charlotte Pride Magazine makes its inaugural edition debut! An annual publication profiling Charlotte Pride programs, the annual festival and parade, interviews, features, community resource directory, and more! Your year-round guide to LGBTQ Charlotte.

Pride

Charlotte

MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2019

INAUGURAL EDITION

CELEBRATING

STONEWALL 50

BLACK PRIDE

Charlotte Black Pride and other

groups across the state uplift the

Black LGBTQ community

BETTY WHO

A Q&A with 2019 Charlotte Pride

headlining entertainer

Betty Who

RESOURCES

LGBTQ-affirming neighborhoods,

annual events, community

organizations and more


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Contents

INSIDE THE INAUGURAL EDITION

14

Stonewall

at 50

A primer for this year’s

landmark 50th anniversary

of the Stonewall Uprising

26

Love

Overflowing

A Q&A with Charlotte Pride

2019 Headliner Betty Who

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charlottepride.org

on the cover

The Stonewall 50th Anniversary Community Rally in

Romare Bearden Park in Uptown Charlotte, June 15, 2019

full contents

5 • Welcome

from the president

6 • Pride 365

Charlotte Pride’s Story

10 • Honors

Champions & Grand Marshals

21 • What’s New

at the 2019 festival

22 • Events

Featured Events

30 • Amara

Q&A with Amara La Negra

36 • Love Wins

Q&A with Kristin Collins

38 • Black and Proud

A look at Black Prides in N.C.

33

Love and

Harmony

Local couple Courtney

Lynn & Quinn bring love,

harmony and soul to their

indie folk sound

45 • Scholars

2019 Charlotte Pride Scholars

48 • Queer City

Photographer Nelson Morales

55 • Pregnant Dad

A trans man’s journey from

pregnancy into fatherhood

68

COMMUNITY

RESOURCE

DIRECTORY

Neighborhoods

Annual Events

Nightlife

Community Organizations

3


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Our People

THE BOARD, STAFF & VOLUNTEERS OF

CHARLOTTE PRIDE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Daniel Valdez, President

Nan Bangs, Vice President

Brisa Ramirez, Secretary

Lee Robertson, Treasurer

Riley Murray, Director

STAFF

Jerry Yelton, Programs Director

Matt Comer, Communications Director

2019 FESTIVAL & PARADE TEAM COORDINATORS

John Walton, Bearbeque Team Coordinator

Bryce Carey, Drag Team Coordinator

Travis Shannon, Entertainment Team Coordinator

Tiffany Crooks, Flourish Team Coordinator

John Simmons, Interfaith Team Coordinator

Will Martin, Operations Team Co-Coordinator

Katie Cormier, Parade Team Coordinator

Dan Foreman, Vendors Team Coordinator

Will Allen, VIP Team Coordinator

Douglas Taylor, Volunteer Team Co-Coordinator

Justin Pate, Volunteer Team Co-Coordinator

CHARLOTTE PRIDE MAGAZINE

A publication of Charlotte Pride, Inc.

© 2019, Charlotte Pride, Inc. All rights reserved.

No portion of this publication may be reprinted or otherwise reproduced

without written permission from Charlotte Pride. For reprint or reproduction

requests, contact us at media@charlottepride.org.

Charlotte Pride, Inc.

PO Box 32362, Charlotte, NC 28232 | info@charlottepride.org

Charlotte Pride is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

2019 PROGRAM TEAM MEMBERS & VOLUNTEERS

Bearbeque

James Jenkins

Drag Events

Jeff Capel, Elaine Davis, Brooklyn Dior, Buff Faye, Aurora Nicole,

Cierra Nicole, Valerie Rockwell, Sierra Santana

Entertainment

Jairo Aviles

Finance

Jennifer Chandler, Margaret Kocaj, Bryce Moffett

Flourish

Shannon Dixon, Jenny Gunn

Interfaith

Marty Bacher, Sandy Carson, Bridgett Eble, Megan Jones, Kevin Proffit

Operations

Will Martin, Jeff Sampson

Parade

Rachel Griswold, Vanessa Kovalcik

Reel Out Charlotte

Donell Beaty, Jason Coye, Alicia Emmons, Jenny Gunn,

Heather Hudson, James Jenkins, Gary Knight, Daavonia Lee,

Will Martin, Lupe Silva, John Walton, Asia Washington

VIP

Juwan Alston, Mohammed Jibriel, Kadean Maddix

Volunteers

Allie Alu, Charles Cable, Sunny Cooper, Maurice Falls,

Jesse Kalin, Asia Washington

Magazine Editing & Production: Matt Comer

Contributors: Judith Barriga, Denise Coleman, Charlotte is Creative,

Anna Douglas, Maurice Falls, Wes McNeely, Stonewall 50 Consortium,

Daniel Valdez, Jerry Yelton

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charlottepride.org

FROM THE PRESIDENT

welcome

Welcome to our first edition of our Charlotte Pride Magazine. I cannot think of a

better time to debut this inaugural issue than during the 50th anniversary of

Stonewall. This magazine, much like all our Charlotte Pride programs, is a labor

of love, passion, and intentionality. We are beyond excited to share it with you.

It has been said before, in numerous ways, our Movement for Queer Liberation has come a

really long way since Stonewall, yet there’s so much more that we must continue to fight for. I

couldn’t agree more. I moved to North Carolina in 1998 and have seen our queer community

change drastically in the past twenty years. We are multi-racial, multi-generational, and nonbinary.

We are black, immigrant, and Muslim. We’re entrepreneurs, teachers, construction

workers, lawyers, and low-income workers. We want affordable housing, living wages,

economic opportunity, a brighter future for our kids and our environment. In many ways

these identities and experiences may seem new, yet we’ve always been all of these things.

The difference now is that these voices and these experiences are becoming more visible, are

being valued, and brought forth. We must continue to challenge our community about what it

means to be queer and create spaces for those voices and stories to be shared.

It is this diversity of lived experiences, perspectives, and identities that make our community

and our organization stronger! I’m extremely thankful to our Charlotte Pride staff, Matt Comer

and Jerry Yelton, for all they have done to guide our work, including for leading our amazing

volunteers and Board of Directors into a more equitable, diverse, and intentional organization.

Much like our broader movement, we have a long way to go but we are headed in the right

direction. I look forward to seeing our community celebrate and increase the visibility of the

unique lives and experiences of our LGBTQ+ community, not just during the annual Charlotte

Pride Festival and Parade, but throughout the year. My hope for Charlotte Pride and for all of

you is to feel comfortable sitting at the intersection of celebrating our accomplishments and

not losing sight of the continued struggle for the liberation of all of our communities.

Enjoy this magazine, celebrate our community, and think about how you can contribute to a

more equitable and brighter future for all!

With Love,

Daniel Valdez

President, Charlotte Pride Board of Directors

he/him/his

Photo Credit Top: Gina Esquivel

Photo Credit Bottom: Jack Stuts


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF

charlotte pride

When many Charlotteans think of Charlotte Pride, it’s understandable that the first thing to pop in their minds might be

our annual festival and parade. After all, the Charlotte Pride Festival & Parade is the region’s largest and most visible

LGBTQ event. Each year’s festival and parade offers the single-greatest opportunity for LGBTQ people in Charlotte

and the Carolinas to connect with their friends, their family, community resources, and LGBTQ-owned or -affirming business. In

2018, more than 165,000 visitors attended the event. But Charlotte Pride isn’t only active in August. Like most other community

nonprofits, we have programs and projects throughout the year. We take our mission seriously — to empower, strengthen, and

make visible the unique lives and experiences of LGBTQ people — not just once a year, but on each and every day throughout the

year.

Charlotte Pride’s board, staff and volunteers have been hard at work ensuring that our programs intentionally reach as many

people as possible across the wide and beautiful spectrum that comprises the local and regional LGBTQ community. With the

intersectionality of our collective, lived experiences in mind, we’ve reshaped existing programs or crafted entirely new outreach

projects to better connect with our city.

Last spring, we worked with PFLAG Charlotte and Transcend Charlotte to present a special film screening for Trans Day of Visibility.

The film, “Becoming More Visible,” focused on the unique experiences of several transgender people. Following the film, a panel

discussion of local trans community members discussed the film and their own personal experiences. 2018’s Trans Day of Visibility

event marked a new beginning for Charlotte Trans Pride, a trans outreach and visibility program of Charlotte Pride.

Charlotte Trans Pride has gone on to present several other projects and activities. In October 2018, Charlotte Trans Pride supported

the inaugural International Pronouns Day by creating a series of online educational and awareness resources designed to be shared

on social media networks. Also in the fall, Charlotte Pride was honored to support a community-wide event for November’s Trans

Day of Remembrance. And, this spring, Charlotte Trans Pride reprised its Trans Day of Visibility event by presenting a larger, more

community focused event with partner PFLAG Charlotte. The March 2019 event included more than two dozen organizations in a

community resource fair and the talents of trans artists and entertainers.

Over the past two years, our annual LGBTQ film festival, Reel Out Charlotte, held its 10th annual event. In 2018 and again this

spring, our focus was to dramatically increase the number of LGBTQ-centered films highlighting the new and diverse viewpoints and

experiences, including those of people of color, trans and gender-nonconfirming, people, youth, elders, immigrants, and more.

Charlotte Latinx Pride continued its programming throughout 2018 and into the new year. In the summer of 2018, Latinx Pride,

a program of Charlotte Pride, gathered community members together to remember the lives lost in 2016’s tragic Pulse Orlando

shooting. In December, Latinx Pride partnered with the Arts & Science Council to host photographer Nelson Morales and his photo

exhibit of local LGBTQ Latinx community members during the program’s annual Latinx Pride Expo. Later, this May, Latinx Pride again

showcased Morales’ work alongside visual and other artistic talents from performers at the Latinx Pride Arts Showcase. (Read more

about Morales and his photography work on page 48.)

Charlotte Pride’s commitment to LGBTQ visibility in the arts was also felt in our support this year of local artist-activist Andrea

Downs’ women’s-focused “Airing Out The Dirty Laundry” project, expanded community auditions for each year’s festival stages,

and increased resources for Flourish: A Celebration of LGBTQ Arts and Culture, Charlotte Pride’s mini- arts festival within the larger

Charlotte Pride Festival.

As we headed into Pride season this year, Charlotte Pride was honored to work with a variety of community organizations and

community leaders to present the June 15, 2019, Stonewall 50th Anniversary Rally in Romare Bearden Park. With two dozen

speakers, the event was a true call to action — in keeping with the spirit of Stonewall and our shared Queer Liberation Movement.

Throughout the year, Charlotte Pride has also striven to increase its volunteer outreach and community involvement efforts by

offering new and imaginitive events with structured social activities. Our Interfaith Programs have expanded beyond each year’s

Interfaith Service to support a wide range of intersectional faith programs. Outside of Queen City, Charlotte Pride has continued

to support the efforts of InterPride, the International Association of Pride Organizers, through donations to support smaller Pride

organizations who seek to attend InterPride conferences and other events. In March 2020, Charlotte Pride will host a joint regional

conference bringing together Pride organizers from both the Northeastern and Southeastern regions of InterPride.

Be it in August, October, February or March — the Charlotte Pride team is always hard at work fulfilling our mission to make our

community more empowered and more visibile. Want to join us in our important work? We are always welcoming new volunteer

leaders and will soon open applications for team coordinators for the 2019-2020 year. Learn more at charlottepride.org/apply/.

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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Champions

OF PRIDE

Our Seventh Annual Champions of Pride Awards seek to recognize those whose work and dedication

exemplify the spirit of Pride. Our Champions endeavor to empower and unite LGBTQ and allied

people through their leadership, service and support. Champions understand the importance of

celebrating our past, present and future while advancing LGBTQ rights and visibility.

JAMES RICE III

Harvey Milk Award

he/him/his

James Rice III has served Charlotte’s LGBTQ community in various roles over the

past seven years, including as a board member and director of communications

for the Charlotte LGBT Chamber of Commerce and Charlotte Black Pride. James

currently serves as assistant director of programs and service for Time Out Youth

— a position he calls his “dream job,” having worked his way from intern in 2013

to full-time employee in the fall of 2017. James is only the second black gay male

to hold a full-time position with the agency. When not working with LGBTQ youth,

you will find James ministering at St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church or hosting

events as Semaj The Real M.C., his drag alter-ego. James is engaged to his “African

Prince” Warren Radebe and together they have adopted one son Mduduzi.

ASHLEY NURKIN

Outstanding Ally Award

she/her/hers

For the past two years, Ashley has served as the president of PFLAG Charlotte.

Under her leadership, the chapter was recognized among 400 chapters nationwide

as the 2017 “We Are The Change” Outstanding Chapter Award. Ashley also cofounded

Transparents of PFLAG Charlotte, helping local parents navigate the

unique healthcare, social, educational and safety issues associated with raising

their transgender children. Since its inception four years ago, this group has

grown to support more than 70 Charlotte families. Ashley has worked with the

Charlotte-Mecklenburg School System, Atrium Health, Novant Health and others

to educate and advocate for transgender youth. Ashley, a native Charlottean, and

her husband Matt are the proud parents of daughters Taylor (10) and Harris (12).

AUDREY ANSEL

Young Catalyst Award

she/her/hers

Audrey Ansel is 15 years old and identifies as a lesbian. Originally from Ohio, she

has lived in Charlotte for three years. Over the past year, she has strived to create

change within the LGBTQ community. She is a part of Time Out Youth’s speaker’s

bureau and has appeared on their podcast, “Out With It.” She is active within her

school’s GSA and will serve as an officer this coming school year. Audrey has also

created and facilitated an event in her church where members of the congregation

can learn more about the LGBTQ community and how to be better allies. Audrey

will continue to endeavor to create a better world for everyone. She wants all

LGBTQ youth to be heard and loved for who they are. Audrey’s goal is to see a

world where LGBTQ youth are not afraid to be themselves.

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charlottepride.org

Grand Marshals

2019 BANK OF AMERICA CHARLOTTE PRIDE PARADE

CHARLOTTE BLACK PRIDE

Founded in 2005 by Damon Blackmon, Jermaine Nakia Lee, Monica

Simpson and Korey Handy, Charlotte Black Pride is a local nonprofit

organization consisting of volunteers interested in promoting

a positive image of LGBTQ people of color. The vision of Charlotte

Black Pride is to empower the hearts, minds and spirits of all

LGBTQ people, while embracing diversity, uplifting the community,

and working to bring social change.

From its first event 15 years — attracting 7,000 patrons from all

over the Carolinas and the Southeast — Charlotte Black Pride

has continued to reach more members of the African-American

LGBTQIA community and its allies. Average attendance at Charlotte

Black Pride events has grown to 25,000 people each year.

The LGBTQ Community continues to grow in prominence & visibility

throughout Mecklenburg County and the state of North Carolina,

especially in the African-American community. In 2017, the Black

LGBTQ-focused, Center for Black Equity recognized The Queen City

as one of the top five cities for Black LGBTQ growth & prosperity.

Charlotte Black Pride’s mission is to promote LGBTQ Pride

primarily for, but not limited to, members of the Black community.

It does so while building social awareness, embracing spirituality

and celebrating the diversity that exists within the community.

THE HONORABLE JOHN S. ARROWOOD

Judge John S. Arrowood (he/him/his) was the first openly LGBTQ

person to win a statewide race in the South when he won his race to

remain on the North Carolina Court of Appeals in 2018.

Judge Arrowood is a North Carolina native. After obtaining his law

degree at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, he clerked,

and served as a staff attorney and head of the Court of Appeals

Central Staff. He then relocated to Charlotte, where for a total of

26 years he practiced with the firm of James, McElroy & Diehl, P.A.

doing complex civil litigation, employment and administrative law.

Judge Arrowood was initially appointed as a Special Superior Court

Judge in 2007 by Gov. Michael Easley. Later that year Gov. Easley

appointed him to the Court of Appeals. When Judge Arrowood lost

his election to retain the seat, he returned to his old firm.

In 2017, Gov. Roy Cooper reappointed Judge Arrowood to the Court

of Appeals. In 2018, he was elected to a full eight year term and was

the leading vote-getter in the state.

Judge Arrowood has served as the Chair of the Equality NC PAC,

served for many years on the board of the Gay and Lesbian (now

LGBTQ) Victory Institute, and serves on the board of One Victory.

11


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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

YOUR GUIDE TO

Stonewall

compiled by the Stonewall 50 Consortium

Fifty years ago, the LGBTQ movement would be forever changed. Decades in the making, the riots at the Stonewall

Inn beginning in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, would end up being the spark which launched the Queer

Liberation Movement. Historians and community members — even those who were present at the uprising — have

differing, sometimes conflicting accounts of what happened and why. But one thing is clear: the riots and the

community organizing that launched immediately afterward would reshape our community and its movement for

equality forever. The following primer has been compiled by the Stonewall 50 Consortium. It’s simple Q&A format

about these special events five decades ago will give you something fresh to ponder — from the new learner to

those who think they know all there is to know about Stonewall.

What was the Stonewall uprising or the Stonewall riots?

In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, homeless LGBTQ teens, trans

women of color, lesbians, drag queens, gay men, bisexuals, and allies all

decided to take a stand. What started out as an all-too-routine police raid

of the Stonewall Inn gay bar in New York City turned into a multi-night

uprising on the streets of Greenwich Village. It wasn’t the first time LGBTQ

people fought back and organized against oppression, but the Stonewall

uprising ignited a mass movement that quickly spread across the U.S. and

around the globe.

When did the Stonewall Inn open?

The Stonewall Inn was opened in 1967 by Mafioso Fat Tony Lauria as a

“private” gay club—one of the few in Greenwich Village where patrons

could dance. Gay bars often operated as “private” clubs to circumvent the

New York State Liquor Authority regulation that prohibited gay people

from being served alcoholic beverages.

What was there before 1967?

The two storefronts occupied by the original Stonewall Inn at 51-53

Christopher Street were constructed as stables in the mid-19th century. In

1930, the buildings were combined with one facade to house a bakery. In

1934, Bonnie’s Stonewall Inn opened as a bar and restaurant and operated

until 1964, when the interior was destroyed by fire. The building’s existing

50-foot-wide facade looks much as it did at the time of the uprising in 1969.

Since Stonewall was a “private” club, what were the requirements for

getting in?

To get in, you had to get past a bouncer, pay an entry fee ($1 on weekdays

and $3 on weekends), and sign a club register. It was common for people to

sign in with joke names such as Judy Garland or Donald Duck.

What was Stonewall like inside?

Beyond the front door, which was located in the 53 Christopher Street

building, you entered a small vestibule. To the left was a coat check and

to the right, through a doorway into the 51 Christopher Street building,

was a long rectangular room. On the right side of the room was a long bar

and beyond that was a dance floor and a jukebox. Opposite the bar was a

small entrance back into 53 Christopher where there was a second dance

floor, with a jukebox and a small bar at the rear, which was adjacent to

two bathrooms. The Stonewall’s interior was painted black as a quick and

inexpensive way to mask the fire damage the space sustained in 1964.

The large front windows were painted black and backed by plywood. The

Stonewall Inn’s main bar had no running water and there were no fire exits.

Who went to the Stonewall Inn?

It drew a diverse, young clientele, although only a small number of

lesbians. Some patrons dressed in various forms of drag, including “scare

drag,” and there were also people who wore business attire or jeans and

flannel shirts. As Stonewall veteran Martin Boyce once said, “Stonewall

was like Noah’s ark. There was two of everything.”

Why was the Stonewall Inn raided by the police?

Starting in 1934, after the end of Prohibition, the New York State Liquor

Authority regulated liquor licenses, which prohibited the serving of alcohol

in “disorderly” establishments. The presence of gay people was considered

de facto disorderly. This led to routine police raids of gay bars and clubs.

They’d selectively arrest patrons and managers, impound the cash register

and alcohol, and padlock the front door. Management typically bribed the

police, Mafia, and State Liquor Authority officials for protection, so they

were tipped off in advance of an imminent raid and would sometimes turn

up the lights to warn patrons to stop any open displays of affection or slow

dancing, which could risk arrest.

Who started the confrontation with the police?

A number of eyewitnesses have offered differing accounts, but, as with

almost any riot or spontaneous confrontation with the police, no one

knows for certain what exactly sparked the confrontation or who threw the

first punch or object.

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charlottepride.org

@ 50

How long did the confrontations with the police last?

The confrontations with the police unfolded over the

course of six nights, with the most intense clashes

occurring on the first and sixth nights.

How many people participated?

Accounts vary, but according to eyewitnesses the first

night brought out five to six hundred people, the second

night about two thousand, and the sixth and final night

five hundred to a thousand. The third and fourth nights

were relatively quiet.

How many people were arrested?

On the first night of the uprising 13 arrests were made, on

the second night three, and on the sixth night five.

Was anyone killed?

There were no fatalities among the rioters or the police,

although on the second night a group of rioters swarmed

a cab on Christopher Street, rocked it back and forth, and

the driver died later that night from an apparent heart

attack.

Was it a riot, an uprising, or a rebellion? Was there

any looting?

What took place at the Stonewall Inn is variously

described as a riot, uprising, rebellion, or all three. A

handful of Greenwich Village shops were looted on the

final night of the uprising.

What happened to the Stonewall Inn after

the uprising?

The Stonewall Inn went out of business shortly after

the uprising and was leased as two separate spaces to a

number of different businesses over the years, including a

bagel shop, Chinese restaurant, and clothing store. From

1987 through 1989, a bar named Stonewall operated

out of 51 Christopher Street. When it closed, the historic

vertical sign was removed from the building’s facade.

None of the original Stonewall Inn’s interior finishes

remain.

What about the current Stonewall Inn?

When did it open?

In 1990, 53 Christopher Street was leased to a new bar

named New Jimmy’s at Stonewall Place and about a year

later the bar’s owner changed the name to Stonewall. The

current management bought the bar in 2006 and have

operated it as the Stonewall Inn ever since. The buildings

at 51 and 53 Christopher Street are privately owned.

continued on page 16 >>>

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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE


charlottepride.org

How can I learn more about Stonewall?

• David Carter’s exhaustively researched Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution (2004) is a definitive book on the Stonewall uprising.

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/stonewall-david-carter/1117391845#/

• The PBS documentary Stonewall Uprising (2010) can be streamed on the American Experience website here: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/

americanexperience/films/stonewall/. It features several Stonewall uprising participants as well as Deputy Inspector Seymour Pine, who led the police

raid on the Stonewall Inn. (Please bear in mind that all of the film and video used in the documentary that depicts riots comes from other riots or is a

contemporary reenactment.)

• In the fall of 2017, the National Park Service hosted a scholars’ roundtable on the significance of Stonewall. Read essays from multiple perspectives by

participants David Carter, Lillian Faderman, Emily Hobson, Jen Manion, and Eric Marcus here: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?parkID=565&

projectID=75123&documentID=85195.

• Love and Resistance: Out of the Closet into the Stonewall Era (2019), Jason Baumann, Editor. https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/love-and-resistanceroxane-gay/1128958954?ean=9781324002062#/

• The Stonewall Reader (2019), New York Public Library, Editor.. https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-stonewall-reader-new-york-public-library/1129

244929?ean=9780143133513#/

• In Search of Stonewall: The Riots at 50, The Gay & Lesbian Review at 25, Best Essays, 1994-2018 (2018), The Gay & Lesbian Review. https://glreview.org/

product/in-search-of-stonewall-paperback/

• Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution (2019), Rob Sanders, Author; Jamey Christoph, Illustrator (Age Range: 5–8 years). https://www.

barnesandnoble.com/w/stonewall-rob-sanders/1129198783?ean=9781524719524#/

• NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission Designation Report for the Stonewall Inn (2015). http://s-media.nyc.gov/agencies/lpc/lp/2574.pdf

• Stonewall National Historic Landmark Nomination (1999). http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/eresources/exhibitions/sw25/gifs/stonewall_national_

historic_landmark_nomination.pdf

• NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project Website. http://www.nyclgbtsites.org/

• National Park Service’s Stonewall National Monument Website.

https://www.nps.gov/ston/index.htm

To find out how the New York City media reported on the Stonewall

uprising back in 1969, check out the links below.

• New York Mattachine Newsletter (by Dick Leitsch). https://www.

advocate.com/society/activism/2012/06/29/our-archives-1969-

advocate-article-stonewall-riots#article-content

• New York Daily News. https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/gayrights-wrongs-article-1.2628050

• Village Voice. https://www.villagevoice.com/2009/06/24/stonewall-at-

40-the-voice-articles-that-sparked-a-final-night-of-rioting/

• New York Times: June 29, 1969: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/

timesmachine/1969/06/29/89004281.pdf; June 30, 1969: https://

timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1969/06/30/78384817.

pdf; July 3, 1969: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/

timesmachine/1969/07/03/78385244.pdf

Stonewall at 50, reprinted with the permission of the Stonewall 50

Consortium. © 2019 Stonewall 50 Consortium. This project by the

Stonewall 50 Consortium has been made possible through a generous

grant from the New York Community Trust. Consortium members and

partners include: NYC LGHBT Historic Sites Project, Making Gay History,

New York Public Library, GLSEN, and National Parks Conservation

Association.

get involved!

The story of Stonewall and our five

decades of LGBTQ Liberation can be

quite inspiring and motivating. Do you

want to be part of keeping the Spirit

of Stonewall alive in Charlotte and

throughout the year?

Charlotte Pride is currently looking

for awesome, talented and dedicated

volunteers and leaders just like you.

Come join us as a team coordinator and

help us plan our programs and events,

including the festival and parade, during

the 2019-2020 season.

learn more:

charlottepride.org/apply/


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charlottepride.org

What’s new in

2019

The Charlotte Pride Festival & Parade continues to grow

year over year with new and exciting additions! Check out

some of our new additions and expansions for this year’s

event in Uptown Charlotte, August 17-18, 2019.

GET NEIGHBORLY

Levine Avenue of the Arts bursts with neighborly pride

during this year’s event inside the PNC Bank Festival Zone.

Stop by our new Neighborhood Market to shop with an

array of local arts and crafts vendors. Further down Levine,

visit with our neighboring Pride organizations from across

the region and learn more about their events. Engage with

local first responders from across Mecklenburg County. On

Saturday, Aug. 17, 1-4pm, Campus Pride presents its annual

LGBTQ-Friendly College Fair.

GET CHARLIT

Expanded festival bars and beverage ticket booths

will streamline your festival experience.

GET HEALTHY

Stop by the Charlotte Pride Health Zone presented by

Amity Medical and RX Clinic Pharmacy near the intersection

of MLK Blvd. & S. Tryon St. inside the PNC Bank Festival

Zone. Vendors include HIV organizations, trans healthcare

providers, reproductive healthcare and justice resources,

substance abuse resources, and more!

GET GROOVY

Charlotte Pride presents an historic number of openly

LGBTQ artists and entertainers on festival stages this year.

Stop by either of the two stages to dance, sing, clap, and

party the day away!

21


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

featured

events

A

sampling of featured and special events in the lead

up to this year’s Charlotte Pride Festival & Parade.

For a full events schedule, see our mobile app or visit us

online at charlottepride.org

Name/Date/Time

Charlotte Pride Drag Pageant

Sunday, August 4, 2019

6-9pm

Out with Dance - Youth Pride Dance

Friday, August 9

Uni-Tea Queerlesque/Candidate Forum

Saturday, August 10, 2019

6:30-9pm

Charlotte Pride Interfaith Service

Sunday, August 11, 2019

4-6pm

Charlotte Trans Pride Job Fair

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

11am-3pm

Trans Pride Mixer

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

6-9pm

Queen City Connects Mixer

Thursday, August 15, 2019

5:30pm

Charlotte Pride Women’s Takeover

Friday, August 16, 2019

8pm-until

Description

Charlotte Pride’s annual Drag Pageant, crowning the next Ms. Charlotte Pride, Mr. Charlotte Pride and Mx.

Charlotte Pride for the 2019-2020 season. Hosted at the Levine Museum of the New South.

Time Out Youth Center presents its annual Youth Pride Dance. Hosted at Time Out Youth Center.

A fun, speakeasy-style “queerlesque” show by troupe Queerly Beloved will also include a laid back and

relaxed candidate meet-and-greet and forum. Hosted at C3 Labs.

Charlotte Pride’s annual LGBTQ-affirming Interfaith Service is open to all people of all faith backgrounds

in the community. This year, in recognition of Stonewall, the Interfaith service “comes home” to its

original host, Caldwell Presbyterian Church.

Trans-affirming employers will be present to discuss career opportunities for transgender community

members. Other folks from the LGBQ community are welcome. Hosted at the Leon Levine Opportunity

Center on the Goodwill Opportunity Campus. Presented in partnership with Bank of America.

Join Charlotte Trans Pride for a social mixer at Resident Culture in Plaza Midwood following the Trans

Job Fair earlier in the day.

Queen City Connects hosts a Pride-themed cross-company and professional mixer. Expand your

business network with over 45 Charlotte area organizations and employee resource groups. Hosted at

Bar Argon.

Calling all women! Begin Charlotte Pride weekend with a special party and takeover just for you! Open

to all women-identified people. Drink specials and other goodies at Taproom Social in Uptown! For the

latest information, visit us online at charlottepride.org.

22


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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Everyone different. All Equal.

As an employer, Daimler stands for a culture of appreciation

and respect, irrespective of origin, gender, age, or sexual

orientation.

We are thrilled to add Charlotte to our 2019 Daimler Pride

Tour. With 13 stops around the globe, the Tour shows our

commitment to diversity and inclusion.

#iamdaimler #daimlerpride

24


charlottepride.org

Lowe’ss iss Love

Lowe’s Companies, Inc. is committed to fostering an environment

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daily, feel respected and included.

25


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Love

Overflowing

by Jerry Yelton

BETTY WHO TALKS IDENTITY,

ART, PRIDE — AND THE

IMPORTANCE OF QUEER

REPRESENTATION

Over the past few years, Betty Who has gained incredible prominence,

especially with LGBTQ audiences. From her first single, “Somebody

Loves You,” inspired by a goal of bringing joy back to pop music after

the loss of Whitney Houston (also known for going viral after its use in a

same-sex proposal video), to her most recent record of gender-bending

pop tracks about love, life and loss, Betty is one of the most exciting

and visible queer artists in pop music in 2019.

This year, we are excited to have Betty Who join us as our headliner

for Charlotte Pride because we acknowledge the importance of

representation on our stages and the importance of storytelling

through music. Read on to learn a little bit more about the person

behind the buoyant, joyful pop you’ll hear on the Wells Fargo Stage:

Charlotte Pride: Especially important this year with the Stonewall

50th Anniversary, Pride festivals are the opportunities for LGBTQ

folks to see themselves visible and proud of their identities. What

does Pride mean to you?

Betty Who: Pride, to me, is about community. It’s about representation

and seeing people who are living their lives authentically and proudly

continued on page 28 >>>

26


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Afrolatina con

Bandera de Colores

por Judith Barriga

Con candela y tumbao, Amara La Negra, ha cautivado los escenarios y la pantalla,

desde muy corta edad, convirtiéndose en la Afrolatina más controversial del

momento. De padres dominicanos, nacida y criada en los Estados Unidos,

Amara inició su carrera a los cuatro años en el famoso programa ‘Sábado Gigante’, en

donde como ella misma lo dice creció “como artista y como ser humano”.

“Siempre estoy agradecida con mi madre, por mi carrera y mi vida. Tengo raíces latinas y

afro y estoy orgullosa de eso” comentó la exótica artista que deslumbra con su color canela

y afro en cada una de sus presentaciones.

SU MUSICA

Con un gran carisma, dejando huella en el escenario, en una nueva etapa en su carrera,

Amara La Negra empodera y hace bailar a la mujer con su álbum ‘Unstoppable’.

“Mi música es jocosa, divertida, te anima a pasarla. Muchas veces la gente distorsiona la

idea de un estilo o letras, yo creo que como mujeres podemos tomar poder y disfrutarlo”

expreso la cantante.

Defendiendo su identidad y estilo, la cantante de Hip Hop and R&B, Amara ha tomado una

posición que defiende su latinidad, cultura y lenguaje.

“Tomo mucho poder y mucho orgullo cuando represento a la comunidad latina en el

mercado americano y en el mundo, meto mi spanglish aquí y allá y levanto en alto la

bandera dominicana” dijo La Negra, quien ha estado en los Latin Grammys además de

haber acompañado en el escenario a grandes íconos de la música como Celia Cruz, Tito

Puentes y La India.

Con un carácter fuerte y con un gran carisma, la fuerza de Amara La Negra les da voz a las

causas de la Bandera de Colores, identificándose con la comunidad LGBTQ.

“De alguna manera nos identificamos, somos liberales, entienden mi energía, quieren ser

libres de expresarse sin ser juzgados, y así mismo me siento yo” dijo Amara quien se ha

presentado en el World Pride en Nueva York y San Francisco Pride.

Irreverente, rebelde como ella misma se describe, con todo el corazón agradece la

confianza y apoyo que recibido de la comunidad LGBTQ en Estados Unidos y el mundo.

“Estoy tan agradecida y enamorada de la comunidad, por tanto cariño que me ha

brindado, por creer en mí. Con mucho ‘Orgullo’ por la oportunidad de darle mi talento,

mi música, mi arte y energía y seguimos con más” concluyó Amara La Negra quien

emocionada anunció su participación en el Charlotte Pride el 17-18 de agosto.

Read the English translation

of this feature on page 43.

30


charlottepride.org

“Estoy tan agradecida y enamorada de

la comunidad, por tanto cariño que me

ha brindado, por creer en mí.”

AMARA LA NEGRA

31


charlottepride.org

Love & Harmony

LOCAL COUPLE COURTNEY

LYNN & QUINN BRING

LOVE, HARMONY AND

SOUL TO THEIR INDIE

FOLK SOUND

by Matt Comer & Wes McNeely

It’s strange the way life works. People float in and out of

your social circle — acquaintances, friends, co-workers,

lovers. But, every once in a while, a special person comes

into your orbit. Something clicks. A new friendship or close

relationship blooms.

So it was with Courtney Lynn and Quinn Henderson in Los

Angeles in 2012. Courtney, originally from small-town Indiana,

and Quinn, originally from Wilmington, N.C., met by chance

while the two were testing out new lives in Los Angeles.

“Quinn and I were both couch surfing and trying to see if L.A. was

a good spot for us,” Courtney recalls. “We met surfing the same

couch, basically, and we were friends for four years.”

Both women are natural-born performers. Quinn has been

dancing and singing since she was a child. Courtney has also

always felt the tug of the entertainment life.

“I basically told her,” Quinn says, “that you’re way too talented to

sit in your bedroom and do this. You’re gonna get on a stage.”

Their shared love of song was one of the first connections the

two new-found friends discovered in L.A.

“When we met in L.A., [singing was] one of the first things we did

together. We actually have this old — now, looking back, very

terrible — video of us singing together,” Courtney says, with a

laugh. “I think we both felt that musical connection immediately

and just the personal connection with each other. We became

instant friends.”

Courtney would later move to Phoenix — where Quinn would

join her shortly thereafter in 2015, taking a job in social work

while the two continued to sing and create together .

Flash forward just three years later, the pair found themselves in

Charlotte — and married. The two have since spent their time in

the Queen City exploring the local music scene and continuing to

pour their heart and soul into the harmonies that are so familiar

to their fans now.

Courtney and Quinn are among several LGBTQ and local

performers at this year’s Charlotte Pride Festival and Parade. We

had an opportunity to catch up with them for a short Q&A about

their music career, relationship, thoughts on Pride, and more.

The following conversation with Courtney and Quinn has been

edited for clarity and brevity.

Charlotte Pride: How did you both find yourselves drawn to

music as a career?

Courtney: I think at different times in our lives we have both

pushed each other towards pursuing music because, yes, at

the heart of ourselves, we both from a very early age were very

passionate about it. I was very passionate about writing and

singing and playing the guitar. Quinn, she’s just an all-around

performer. But I don’t think I ever really would have pursued

music if it weren’t for Quinn. It was really like a “for me” kind of

thing. Quinn challenged me and pushed me to step outside of

my comfort zone and I just fell in love with it.

Quinn: For me, it was something that I’d been doing since I was

three years old. I’d been dancing since I was two-and-a-half. I’ve

continued on page 60 >>>

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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

LOVE WINS

A Q&A fit for a Queen

2018 MS. CHARLOTTE PRIDE KRISTIN COLLINS

CHATS ABOUT HER ART AND COMMUNITY SERVICE

by Matt Comer

Mix up a little bit of southern charm, a love for Dolly Parton, an intense

passion for entertainment and dedication to community service — the only

possible result is Bryce Carey and his drag persona, Kristin Collins.

Carey, who grew up just outside of Charlotte in Lincolnton, has brought

a special visibility to his role as Ms. Charlotte Pride since being crowned

at the 2018 pageant. Once described by a local drag critic as having the

“prettiest smile” at another local pageant contest, Carey can brighten up

a room when he walks in. And when he performs as Kristin, you’d best

believe his unique style — clogging it out to the classic “Rocky Top,” among

them — brings people to their feet.

We had an opportunity to catch up with Kristin and chat a bit about her

work as a drag artist, her thoughts as a volunteer with Charlotte Pride and

more.

Charlotte Pride: What is your favorite character to perform as?

Kristin Collins: My character, Kristin Collins, is a blonde, fun, loving lady

that exudes southern charm. Much like my favorite character tribute that

I love to do, I love Dolly Parton. I’ve been a fan of hers as long as I can

remember. Her message of love, helping others and giving back are all

things I strive to emulate.

What is your favorite “Pride anthem”?

“I Am What I Am” and “This Is My Life” speak to who I am. I’ve enjoyed

them for years. However, more recently, “Love Wins” by Carrie Underwood

has become my favorite. It speaks to the message I’ve wanted to deliver

during my reign as Ms. Charlotte Pride.

When was it that you first starting doing drag, and why? What attracted

you to the art form?

I first became interested in drag while I was a theatre student at Western

Carolina University, in the early ‘90s. I was attracted to the art form,

because it allowed me to express myself creatively and in an arena that

was accepting of it.

What are some lessons you’ve learned from doing drag?

I’ve learned a lot in the past 25 years as a drag performer. I’ve learned

that competition brings out the worst in some and the best in others. I’ve

learned that everyone has a place on the stage and that at the end of the

day, we’re all here to make you smile, laugh and have a good time. Don’t

take yourself so seriously and step away from the art form when it’s no

longer fun. It’s okay to pull back and do a reboot.

What do you say to people who don’t view drag as a form of art or

dismiss drag performers and their place in our community’s history?

I take the opportunity to share and educate on what drag performing is,

how it played an integral role in our history, both mainstream and queer,

and how it remains relevant today.

What are two or three key accomplishments during your reign as Ms.

Charlotte Pride?

Visibility: It was important for me to be a positive, visible person in

the community, and using my platform to promote pride though drag

entertainment. Inclusion: Charlotte has a wide variety of drag performers

and its been a priority for me to let them know that everyone who

considers themselves a drag entertainer, has a place on our stage. For

me, doing drag is being more than a nightlife entertainer. While there’s

absolutely nothing wrong with that — in fact it’s how I spent most of my

drag career — in this season of my drag career it was imperative that I

ventured out into new territory and connect with new audiences and

venues as well as multi-media.

Why was it important for you to become involved in Charlotte Pride as

a pageant contestant and volunteer organizer?

For me, it was a way to connect with a part of the community that I didn’t

know. I wanted to use my drag performing talents to meet, network

and engage new audiences in an effort to give back to the wonderful

community that has given me so much over the past two decades. I’ve

met some wonderful people over the past year, and have worked with

some amazing organizations that will continue long after my time as Ms.

Charlotte Pride.

What advice would you give to drag performers who want to get more

involved in their community?

My advice is to look beyond your comfort zone, try something new, and

use that to better yourself as an entertainer and as a community member.

For me, I wanted to be the person I needed when I was younger. I took that

statement and a charge to mentor younger entertainers and queer kids,

volunteering with Time Out Youth and doing my part to make the LGBTQ

community in Charlotte a better place.

— Be sure to follow Kristin Collins on Instagram at @MissCLTPride

36


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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

say it loud:

I AM BLACK AND I AM PROUD

by Maurice Falls | QNotes

In 2019, being both black and an

LGBTQ person can still seem like a

revolutionary act. For those of us

who are dialed into current events, we

see the violence toward black and

queer bodies.

Unarmed black men and women are still

being killed by police, and transgender

women of color appear to be turning

up dead weekly. To paraphrase James

Baldwin, “To be black and LGBTQ and to

be relatively conscious is to be in a rage

almost all of the time.”

To compound matters, many people

of color who identify as LGBTQ, often

feel like our community can default to

following the same path as the broader

society. Thus, Black Prides offer safe

spaces where people who identify as

black and LGBTQ can celebrate their

unique identities. In North Carolina,

Fayetteville, Raleigh, and Charlotte

have all had Prides focused on the black

community.

Alvernian Davis is a Philadelphia, Penn., native and founder

of Fayetteville Black Pride. Davis’ impetus for starting Black

Pride in Fayetteville was similar to the stories of other

organizers. Being from Philadelphia, he participated in

Pride festivals in other cities. So, when he moved to North

Carolina in the early 2000s, he noticed that there were not

many Prides in North Carolina at the time.

Davis’ first event was in 2003, and was hosted at the only

two gay clubs in the area, Alias and Spectrum. Davis said

that these were places which attracted many different

segments of the gay community in the area. All of these

segments of the community were able to participate in the

first Pride.

Unfortunately, after this beginning, the event took a hiatus.

He moved away from the area and after coming back, the

landscape had changed. The only gay club in the area

burned down in that time, and Davis’ connections with

Some members of the all-volunteer board of directors and leadership team

of Charlotte Black Pride, from left to right: Shann Fulton, Starr Johnson,

Gladece Knights, Gelisa Stitt, and Quandrico Rutledge-Wade.

the local military community were gone. These challenges

did not deter him from starting another Pride celebration

in 2015, one that would come to be known as Fayetteville

Black Pride.

However, Davis has broadened his vision to include

providing greater resources for the area. He noted that the

Fayetteville area doesn’t have many resources for the gay

community, and he would like to have greater buy-in from

local services, including the health department which he is

trying to partner with this year. Additionally, Davis is looking

to help boost participation of young people in the area by

moving the date of the event so that it may accommodate

their return to school. He is hopeful that these changes will

increase participation in the future. Since Davis began his

Pride, the area has seen another Pride begin in Fayetteville,

one that attracts more whites. He says he supports that

Pride as well, but he feels that Black Prides provide a place

to celebrate black culture, which he feels is still important

today.

continued on page 41 >>>

38


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charlottepride.org


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charlottepride.org

Afro-Latina with a

Rainbow Flag

by Judith Barriga

With candela and tumbao, Amara La Negra has captivated crowds at concerts

and on the screen during her early years, making her the most controversial

Afro-Latina of the moment. She was born and raised in the USA to Dominican

parents, beginning her career at only 4 years old in the popular show “Sabado Gigante”

where she shares with us that she matured as an artist and as a person.

“I’m forever grateful to my mother for the life I have and for my career. I have Latino and

Afro roots and I’m very proud of it”, said the exotic performer that radiates energy on all her

performances with her brown skin color and afro background.

HER MUSIC

With lots of charisma, she leaves her mark on the stage, in a new phase of her career, Amara

La Negra empowers and makes today’s woman dance on her album ‘Unstoppable’.

“My music is lively, fun and it cheers you up. Many times people distort the idea of one’s

style or lyrics, but I believe that as women, we can take ownership of what we do and enjoy

the ride” said the singer.

Defending her identity and style, the Hip Hop and R&B singer, Amara has taken a position

that defends her Latinidad, culture, and language.

“It gives me a lot of pride to represent the Latino community in the English speaking

market and internationally. I stick my Spanglish here and there and raise the Dominican

flag up high”, said La Negra, who got to be a dancer in the Latin Grammys also sharing the

stage with big music icons like Celia Cruz, Tito Puentes, and La India.

With a strong personality and big charisma, the force of Amara La Negra give voice to the

causes of the Rainbow Flag, identifying herself with the LGBTQ community in the US and in

the rest of the world.

“In a way I identify with them, we’re liberal, they understand our energy, they want to be

free to express themselves without being judged and that’s how I feel” said Amara

who has performed at the World Pride in New York and San Francisco Pride.

Irreverent, rebellious, as she describes herself, she wholeheartedly thanks

everyone for the trust and support she has received from the LGBTQ

community and from the international community.

“I’m so grateful, and in love with the community, for so much love

that they’ve given me, for believing in me. With a lot of Pride for

the opportunity of giving talent to my music, my art and

energy and we still have so much more to give” concluded

Amara La Negra who announced her participation

at the upcoming Charlotte Pride on August 17-18.

This English translation of our feature on

page 30 was provided by Denise Coleman.

43

43

“I’m so grateful, and in

love with the community,

for so much love that

they’ve given me,

for believing in me.”

AMARA LA NEGRA


charlottepride.org

Charlotte Pride

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

The Charlotte Pride Scholarship Program aims to improve economic mobility for LGBTQ

and ally college students from the Charlotte metro area by funding college scholarships.

Congratulations to the 2019 cohort of Charlotte Pride Scholars!

ABENA ATIEMO

UNC Charlotte ‘22

Pronouns: she/her they/them

Hometown: Portland, Ore.

Major: Architecture

ASHLEY CASTRAJON

NC State University ‘22

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Hometown: Charlotte, N.C.

Major: Graphic Design

JAIRE CLARIDA

NC A&T University ‘21

Pronouns: he/him/his

Hometown: Charlotte, N.C.

Major: Social Work

IMOKHAI JAMES

NC A&T University ‘22

Prounouns: he/him/his

Hometown: Charlotte, N.C.

Major: Legal Studies

This scholar has chosen to remain anonymous

since they are not yet fully out. We respect the

coming out journey of all our scholars.

EMIL MARANCHELLO

UNC Asheville ‘23

Pronouns: they/them/theirs

Hometown: Charlotte, N.C.

Major: History

DAPHNE REYNOLDS

Ringling College of

Art & Design ‘22

Pronouns: she/her they/them

Hometown: Kannapolis, N.C.

Major: Computer Animation

The Charlotte Pride Scholarship Program awards scholarships to LGBTQ and ally students in the

16-county metro region around Charlotte. Applications open each spring. For more information

or to bookmark our application page for next year’s scholarship applications, visit

charlottepride.org/scholarship/

45


equally human.

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zevia_CharlottePrideAd_051319_FNL.pdf 1 5/16/19 10:02 AM

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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

queer

city

Photographer Nelson Morales explores

Charlotte’s LGBTQ community through

compassionate lens

by Charlotte is Creative

Taking the stage to share his story with 350 Charlotteans, photographer Nelson

Morales didn’t know if his family was alive or dead. Just hours earlier, a massive

earthquake activated near his native home in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Nevertheless, Morales took the stage and spoke of his evolution as a photographer which

started as curiosity, and has resulted in a very intimate and compassionate relationship

with a community within Oaxaca – the muxe (pronounced “moo-shay”), who are recognized

as a third gender.

“A muxe is a homosexual who adopts female roles and is accepted by society,” said Morales.

“He dresses as a woman, acts as a woman and people say that it is a blessing for the parents

since when they grow old, a muxe will stay at home to take care of them.”

Morales was introduced to the muxe when a friend invited him to a group of muxes who

were participating in a beauty contest. When reviewing his photographs, Morales found

a true connection and compassion for his subjects. He dove into their community and

continued chronicling their lives, which fluctuated between exuberant flamboyance and

loneliness.

Soon, he found that not everyone shared his passion for the muxe.

continued on page 51 >>>

48


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Calling All Gays, Girls, and Grannies!

AUG. 27-SEPT. 8

BOOTH PLAYHOUSE

NOV. 22-23

BOOTH PLAYHOUSE

BlumenthalArts.org

Out on the Town is an LGBT social group sponsored by

Blumenthal Performing Arts. Members enjoy special

ticket discounts as well as FREE mixers before or after

select performances throughout the year. It’s the perfect

place to network with fellow arts lovers!

For more info and to join:

BlumenthalArts.org/OutontheTown


At West Elm, we believe

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We’re proud to sponsor

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join us in sharing the love!

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come say hi! west elm charlotte | 1100 metropolitan ave | charlotte, nc 28204

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y Anna Douglas | @ADouglasNews

#TeamPregnantDad

A TRANSGENDER

MAN’S JOURNEY

FROM PREGNANCY

TO FATHERHOOD

The texts and phone notifications just kept coming. for hours

after Duane wrote, “Well, looks like I’m gonna be a daddy” on

Facebook, friends showered Liam and Duane with hundreds of

“likes” and “Congratulations!”

“That’s gonna be one gorgeous and beloved baby,” one friend said.

“Children are a blessing! Enjoy,” said another.

But then, someone admitted: “I’m confused.”

“Who exactly is pregnant and how does all that stuff work?”

And below that, a woman asked, “How did this happen?!”

Duane wrote back, explaining how they conceived: “Well the sperm

fertilized the egg and now ... Liam is pregnant. He is a transgender man.”

Weeks later, they shared pictures of Liam’s first trimester. One was of Liam

on the couch with their cat, Biscuit resting on his growing belly. Another

showed Liam holding his phone near his stomach, playing bluegrass music

for the baby.

Above all the photos, Duane wrote: #TeamPregnantDad.

Their friends were supportive. But at work, Duane was peppered with

questions.

“Do you think once Liam has the baby he’ll become a woman again and

transition back,” one person asked. Duane, annoyed, told her: “No.”

Photo Above: Liam Johns, right, and his husband

Duane Danielson, left, at a recent Charlotte Pride

Festival and Parade in Uptown Charlotte.

Photo Credit: Diedra Laird/Charlotte Observer.

Then another asked more pointed, personal questions — prompting Duane

to write angrily on Facebook:

“Just FYI it’s rude to ask me what genitals my spouse has.”

continued on page 56 >>>

55

55


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE


Walmart is a proud sponsor

of Charlotte Pride.

Like Charlotte Pride we believe in connecting all persons with

opportunities to achieve their dreams. For our communities,

living better means greater access to opportunity for all.

Together we can make a difference.

blog.walmart.com


JOHNNYFLYCO.COM

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CELEBRATING

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The Hartford is proud to celebrate

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Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

Love & Harmony


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WE VALUE EQUALITY

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The successes of Charlotte Pride depend on the generous support of our

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Pride with a one-time or ongoing donation today. 7/20/17 10:04 A

Your generous gift will go toward supporting the important work of

Charlotte Pride programs throughout the year!


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Quicken Loans is building on the progress made by the

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Sing with us!

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Questioning, Intersex, Asexual & Allied Chorus

www.onevoicechorus.com

New singers welcome Tuesdays, September 3, 10 & 17

7:00pm - Unitarian Universalist Church of Charlotte


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ALL FREE TO ATTEND


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

charlotte’s lgbtq-friendly neighborhoods

You might be familiar with some of the more famous, historic “gayborhoods” of cities larger than Charlotte — Greenwich

Village in New York City, Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C., the Castro in San Francisco or Midtown in Atlanta may come to

mind. Charlotte doesn’t necessarily have the same kind of LGBTQ hot spot as larger cities, but what we lack in a centralized

LGBTQ neighborhood, we more than make up with a variety of LGBTQ-friendly areas spread across the city. Here’s a

snapshot of just a few of the more welcoming and affirming “queer neighborhoods” of Charlotte.

UPTOWN

Encompassing all of the area

within the I-277 loop, Uptown

Charlotte is the artistic, cultural,

nightlife, dining, business and

government center of Charlotte.

Five-star restaurants, swanky

hotels, the city’s premier nightlife

venues and more are wedged

into the city’s burgeoning Center

City district. Home to a growing

number of LGBTQ residents and

businesses, Uptown also plays

host to each year’s Charlotte

Pride Festival & Parade, the single

largest gathering of LGBTQ people

in the Carolinas and the largest

LGBTQ Pride event between

Atlanta and Washington, D.C.

PLAZA MIDWOOD

Centered at the bustling

intersection of The Plaza and

Central Ave., Plaza Midwood

is a growing commercial and

residential district with both

established and up-and-coming

restaurants, antique shops and

galleries, retail, nightlife and

more. The neighborhood’s large

residential areas feed into the

commercial district’s lively center

— increasingly finding itself more

populated with denser and newer

apartment developments. The

neighborhood also includes a

variety of LGBTQ-owned and

-friendly dining, nightlife and

retail establishments, as well as

a plethora of other bars, shops

and restaurants known for their

friendly, mixed and diverse

crowds. The nearby NoDa and

Elizabeth neighborhoods also

offer a fun mix of restaurants,

bars and other attractions. Top

LGBTQ and friendly destinations

in Plaza Midwood include Petra’s

Piano Bar, Snug Harbor, Dish, and

Common Market.

NODA

Praised as Charlotte’s eclectic arts

district, NoDa encompasses a a

stretch of N. Davidson St. lined

with art galleries, coffee shops,

restaurants, bars, performance

and concert venues, apartments,

condos and business offices.

Home to the Neighborhood

Theatre, NoDa also boasts other

event and music venues like

Evening Muse and Wine Up. With

its historic charm, walkability,

LGBTQ-friendly nature and diverse

crowds NoDa is the perfect place

to shop, wine, dine or party! Top

LGBTQ and friendly destinations

in NoDa include Chasers and the

24-hour coffee and pastry shop,

Amelies.

SOUTH END/DILWORTH

Stretching south from Uptown

along South Blvd. and extending

eastward on East Blvd., South End

and Dilworth offer a New South

mix of urban sophistication, small

town hospitality and historic

charm. Tree-lined streets are

dotted by a mix of new condos,

mid-rises and historic homes

and bungalows. Fun and popular

restaurants, shops, galleries

and nightlife make a trip south

of town worth it. Within a short

walking distance or LYNX Light

Rail line of all points in Uptown,

South End and Dilworth continue

to experience extraordinary

growth. Top LGBTQ and friendly

destinations in South End include

The Bar at 316, the long LGBTQowned

Paper Skyscraper, and

— further down South Blvd., Bar

Argon and Sidelines Sports Bar.

— compiled by Matt Comer

68


donate!

The successes of Charlotte Pride depend

on the generous support of our sponsors,

partners, and donors, just like you!

You can support Charlotte Pride with a

one-time or ongoing donation today.

Your generous gift will go toward

supporting the important work of

Charlotte Pride programs throughout

the year, including Charlotte Latinx

Pride, Charlotte Trans Pride, and Reel

Out Charlotte, the Queen City’s Annual

LGBTQ Film Festival.

learn more and donate today:

charlottepride.org/donate/

Discover thousands of LGBT-supportive

businesses, places and events near you.


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

annual community events

JANUARY

Martin Luther King Jr. Parade

charlottenc.gov/crc/MLKevents/

Charlotte’s annual celebration of

the life and legacy of Dr. Martin

Luther King, Jr. Events include

a wide variety of community

activities, as well as the annual

parade down Tryon St.

FEBRUARY

HRC Carolina Gala

hrccarolina.org

An annual formal fundraising affair

for the Human Rights Campaign,

the nation’s largest LGBTQ

advocacy organization.

MARCH

St. Patrick’s Day

www.charlottestpatsday.com

An annual festival and parade

celebrating everything green! The

morning parade gives way to an

afternoon festival and pub crawl.

APRIL

Reel Out Charlotte

reelout.org

A program of Charlotte Pride, Reel

Out Charlotte is the Queen City’s

AnnualLGBTQ Film Festival.

House of Mercy AIDS Walk

thehouseofmercy.org/

This fundraiser contributes

financial support to House of

Mercy’s clients. Held annually in

Downtown Belmont.

MAY

The Happening

fftc.org/clgf

The Charlotte Gay and Lesbian

Fund’s luncheon, hosted annually

as a local fundraiser. The event also

features the announcement of each

year’s grant recipients.

AIDS Walk Charlotte

aidswalkcharlotte.org

Taking place in Uptown Charlotte,

this HIV/AIDS awareness and

fundraising event is the largest of

its kind in the Carolinas region.

Speed Street/600 Festival

600festival.com

Center City Charlotte is taken over

by this celebration of NASCAR.

JUNE

Taste of Charlotte

tasteofcharlotte.com

You’d better come hungry! Taste

of Charlotte is the city’s annual

toast to some of the best culinary

offerings Charlotte has to offer.

Time Out Youth Platinum Gala

timeoutyouth.org/gala

Time Out Youth’s annual fundraiser

— an evening of music, food, fun,

and inspiration.

JULY

Charlotte Black Pride

charlotteblackpride.org

An annual celebration of the Black

LGBTQ community. Each year

includes a town hall discussion,

social events, a Jazz Brunch and

a Saturday Expo with community

vendors and entertainment.

AUGUST

Charlotte Pride Festival & Parade

charlottepride.org

Charlotte’s annual Pride festival

and parade colorfully takes over

Uptown Charlotte. Latinx Pride

and Trans Pride (both programs of

Charlotte Pride) are also part of the

event — the single largest gathering

of LGBTQ people in the Carolinas!

Flourish: A Celebration of LGBTQ

Arts and Culture

charlottepride.org

A miniature arts festival within

the larger Charlotte Pride Festival

hosted at the Bechtler Museum of

Modern Art, Flourish showcases the

talents of the Queen City’s LGBTQ

artists, including choral and dance

groups, spoken word artists, visual

artists and more!

LGBT-Friendly College Fair

campuspride.org

Campus Pride holds its regional

LGBTQ-Friendly National College

Fair in the Queen City as a part of

the Charlotte Pride Festival.

SEPTEMBER

Festival in the Park

festivalinthepark.org

Charlotte’s yearly arts festival

engulfs Freedom Park.

Yiasou Greek Festival

yiasoufestival.org

Celebrate authentic Green culture,

history, community, cuisine and

entertainment at Charlotte’s annual

Greek Festival.

OCTOBER

OUTSpoken

caps.uncc.edu/outreach-andeducational-programs/outspoken

UNC Charlotte’s annual LGBTQ

speaker series with the purpose of

fostering a positive environment

for the LGBTQ community at the

university.

NOVEMBER

Thanksgiving Day Parade

novanthealththanksgivingparade.

com

More than 70 years of tradition rolls

down Tryon St. in celebration of

Thanksgiving Day and the start of

the annual winter holiday season!

One of the city’s largest parades.

— compiled by Wes McNeely


charlottepride.org

lgbtq and lgbtq-friendly nightlife

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Bar Argon

4544 South Blvd

Charlotte, NC 28209

barargon.com

Charlotte’s newest and most

hopping dance bar features a

spacious outdoor patio, the most

popular beats, and large-scale

video screens running music videos

along with each night’s musical set

from their resident VJ.

The Bar at 316

316 Rensselaer Ave

Charlotte, NC 28203

bar316.com

One of the oldest, continuously

operating LGBTQ+ bars in the city

(though under differing names

since the late 1980s), The Bar at

316 is a favorite among locals for its

second-floor deck, weekly karaoke,

drag shows and special events.

Chasers

3217 The Plaza

Charlotte, NC 28205

facebook.com/

chaserscharlottenoda

Charlotte’s once-hopping male strip

club has transformed itself into a

drag showcase bar with visiting and

local queens and vying regularly for

audience applause. When the drag

shows end each night, stick around

for dancing and a show from the

bar’s male go-go dancers.

Common Market

2007 Commonwealth Ave

Charlotte, NC 28205

commonmarketisgood.com

An eclectic mix between a deli,

convenience store, and bar,

Common Market is a popular Plaza

Midwood hangout beckoning

everyone in the community. Long

known for its LGBTQ-inclusive

owners and staff, anyone in the

community is bound to find

a welcome place at Common

Market’s outdoor picnic tables.

Hattie’s Tap & Tavern

2918 The Plaza

Charlotte, NC 28205

hattiescharlotte.com

Teetering on the edge between

Plaza Midwood and NoDa, this

LGBTQ+ owned bar invites you in

with regular concerts and shows,

board games, vintage video games,

and a spacious outdoor patio with

large-scale Jenga!

Petra’s

1919 Commonwealth Ave

Charlotte, NC 28205

petrasbar.com

What was once an exclusively

LGBTQ hangout has blossomed

along with the rest of its

surrounding Plaza Midwood

neighborhood. LGBTQ-inclusive

and eclectic to its core, Petra’s

hosts a wide variety of cabaret

and piano shows, theatre, special

events, dance parties and more!

NoDa Company Store

3221 Yadkin Ave

Charlotte, NC 28205

thecompanystorenoda.com

Crafted out of the renovated

remains of an old mill house, NoDa

Company Store aims to offer “a

little something for everyone to

enjoy.” Owned by local couple Scott

Lindsley and Joey Hewell, the bar

features a variety of local brews and

special events throughout the year.

The Scorpio

2301 Freedom Dr

Charlotte, NC 28208

thescorpio.com

Charlotte’s longest-running LGBTQ

night club, The Scorpio has been

serving up strong drinks and sick

beats for more than 50 years!

Famed for its drag casts and

regular drag pageants, The Scorpio

is a must-see and a trip back in

time. The bar itself predates the

Stonewall Riots in 1969!

Sidelines Sports Bar & Billiards

4544 South Blvd

Charlotte, NC 28209

thesidelinesbar.com

Next door to Bar Argon, cool off and

relax at this casual sports bar. with

large-screen TVs, four pool tables,

darts, and more.

Snug Harbor

1228 Gordon St

Charlotte, NC 28205

snugrock.com

Plaza Midwood’s edgy venue

offering live music, DJs, drag

shows, karaoke and more. While

not exclusively LGBTQ, Snug Harbor

has been rockin’ it out with an

intense LGBTQ-inclusive vibe for

years, including annual parties in

the lead up to Charlotte Pride each

year.

The Woodshed Lounge

4000 Queen City Dr

Charlotte, NC 28208

woodshedlounge.com

Let loose and be free in this

judgment free zone that is The

Woodshed. Charlotte’s local leather

and kink bar, The Woodshed

regularly plays host to a wide

variety of special events throughout

the year and is the home bar of the

Charlotte Tradesmen, the Queen

City’s local leather club which

hosts a club night there on the first

Saturday of every month.

— compiled by Wes McNeely &

Matt Comer


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

community organizations - advocacy-arts-media-faith

ADVOCACY

ACLU of North Carolina

acluofnorthcarolina.org

Charlotte LGBT Chamber of

Commerce

clgbtcc.org

Elder Law Clinic at Wake Forest

University

elder-clinic.law.wfu.edu

Equality North Carolina

equalitync.org

Human Rights Campaign Carolina

hrccarolina.org

Mecklenburg LGBTQ Political

Action Committee (MeckPAC)

meckpac.org

North Carolina AIDS

Action Network

ncaan.org

The Freedom Center for

Social Justice

fcsj.org

ARTS

Actor’s Theatre of Charlotte

atcharlotte.org

Charlotte Pride Band

charlotteprideband.org

Gay Men’s Chorus of Charlotte

gmccharlotte.org

One Voice Chorus

onevoicechorus.com

Reel Out Charlotte

reelout.org

MEDIA

Charlotte Agenda

charlotteagenda.com

Charlotte Five

charlottefive.com

Charlotte Magazine

charlottemagazine.com

Charlotte Observer

charlotteobserver.com

QCityMetro

qcitymetro.com

QNotes

goqnotes.com

Queen City Nerve

qcnerve.com

FAITH

Caldwell Presbyterian Church

1609 E. Fifth St.

Charlotte, NC 28204

704-334-0825

caldwellpresby.org

Charlotte Atheists and Agnostics

charlotteatheists.com

Charlotte Buddhist Vihara

3423 Stonehaven Dr.

Charlotte, NC 28215

charlottebuddhistvihara.org

First Christian Church

1200 East Blvd.

Charlotte, NC 28203

704-334-3771

fcc-charlotte.org

First United Methodist Church

501 N. Tryon St.

Charlotte, NC 28202

704-333-9081

charlottefirst.org

Havurat Tikvah

2821 Park Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28209

980-225-5330

havurattikvah.org

Holy Covenant United

Church of Christ

3501 W. WT Harris Blvd.

Charlotte, NC 28269

704-599-9810

holycovenantucc.org

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church

1900 The Plaza

Charlotte, NC 28205

704-377-5439

htlccharlotte.org

Interfaith Equality Coalition

facebook.com/

InterfaithEqualityCoalition

M2M: Matters to Mission

The Evening Muse (Meeting

Location)

3227 North Davidson St.

Charlotte, NC 28205

m2mcharlotte.org

MeckMin

3900 Park Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28209

704-565-5455

meckmin.org

MCC Charlotte

7121 Orr Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28213

704-563-5810

mymcccharlotte.org

Missiongathering Charlotte

420 E. 15th St.

Charlotte, NC 28206

704-412-4028

mgclt.com

Myers Park Baptist Church

1900 Queens Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28207

704-334-7232

mpbconline.org

New Life Metropolitan

Community Church

1201 S. New Hope Rd.

Gastonia, NC 28054

704-334-0350

newlifemccnc.org

continued on next page >>>


charlottepride.org

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

community organizations - faith

Park Road Baptist Church

3900 Park Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28209

704-523-5717

parkroadbaptist.org

St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church

1600 Norris Ave.

Charlotte, NC 28206

704-375-9650

stlukembc.org

South Park Christian Church

6650 Park South Dr.

Charlotte, NC 28210

704-554-1066

southparkchristian.net

Trinity United Church of Christ

38 Church St. N.E.

Concord, NC 28025

704-782-1024

commachurch.com

Piedmont Unitarian

Universalist Church

9704 Mallard Creek Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28262

704-510-0008

puuc.org

ReBirth Cathedral

2229 Village Lake Dr.

Charlotte, NC 28212

980-819-2636

rebirthcathedral.org

St. John’s Baptist Church

300 Hawthorne Ln.

Charlotte, NC 28204

704-333-5428

stjohnsbaptistchurch.org

St. Martin’s Episcopal Church

1510 E. 7th St.

Charlotte, NC 28204

704-376-8441

stmartins-charlotte.org

St. Peter’s Catholic Church

507 S. Tryon St.

Charlotte, NC 28202

704-332-2901

stpeterscatholic.org/index.php/

community-outreach/gaylesbianministry

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church

115 W. 7th St.

Charlotte, NC 28202

704-332-7746

st-peters.org

Temple Beth El

5101 Providence Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28226

704-366-1948

templebethel.org

The Avenue Presbyterian Church

100 Beatties Ford Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28216

980-201-8955

theavenueclt.org

Temple Or Olam

5300 Poplar Tent Rd.

Concord, NC 28027

704-720-7577

or-olam.org

Unitarian Universalist Church of

Charlotte

234 N. Sharon Amity Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28211

704-366-8623

uuccharlotte.org

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship

of Lake Norman

484 Presbyterian Rd

Mooresville, NC 28115

704-765-6088

uulakenorman.org

Unity Fellowship Church

4800 Wedgewood Drive

(Fellowship Hall)

Charlotte, NC 28210

704-567-5007

ufccharlotte.org

continued on next page >>>

Happy Pride!

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relationships allows us to help meet the financial needs

of the LGBTQ+ community. Contact me today.

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Financial Advisor

6733 A Fairview Road

Charlotte, NC 28210

704-366-5811

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Member SIPC


Charlotte Pride MAGAZINE

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

community organizations - faith-philanthropy-health-HIV

Watershed Charlotte

2101 Shenandoah Ave.

Charlotte, NC 28205

704-644-0919

watershedcharlotte.com

Wedgewood Church

4800 Wedgewood Dr.

Charlotte, NC 28210

704-604-0556

wedgewoodchurch.com

PHILANTHROPY

Charlotte Lesbian and Gay Fund

fftc.org/clgf

Hearts Beat as One Foundation

heartsbeatone.org

HEALTH & HIV

Affinity Health Center

455 Lakeshore Pkwy.

Rock Hill, SC 29730

803-909-6363

affinityhealthcenter.org

Amity Medical Group

6010 East W.T. Harris Blvd.

Charlotte, NC 28215

704-208-4134

ballantynefamilymedicine.com

Anuvia Prevention &

Recovery Center

100 Billingsley Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28211

704-376-7447

anuvia.org

Carolinas Care Partnership

5855 Executive Center Dr.

Suite 102

Charlotte, NC 28212

704-531-2467

carolinascare.org

Charlotte Transgender

Healthcare Group

cthcg.org

House of Mercy

100 McAuley Cir.

Belmont, NC 28012

704-825-4711

thehouseofmercy.org

Infectious Disease (ID) Consultants

& Infusion Care Specialists

4539 Hedgemore Dr

Charlotte, NC 28209

704-331-9669

atriumhealth.org/locations/idconsultants

Lake Norman Community

Health Clinic

14230 Hunters Rd.

Huntersville, NC 28078

704-316-6611

lnchc.org

Mecklenburg County Health

Department, Southeast Campus

249 Billingsley Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28211

704-336-6500

mecknc.gov/HealthDepartment/

ClinicServices

Mecklenburg County Health

Department, Northwest Campus

2845 Beatties Ford Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28216

704-336-6500

mecknc.gov/HealthDepartment/

ClinicServices

Planned Parenthood Charlotte

Health Center

700 S. Torrence St.

Charlotte, NC 28204

plannedparenthood.org/

health-center/north-carolina/

charlotte/28205/charlotte-healthcenter-2703-90860

PowerHouse Project

1420 Beatties Ford Rd.

Charlotte, North Carolina 28216

980-999-5295

facebook.com/

ThePowerhouseProject

continued on next page >>>

Free, Confidential, Walk-in

HIV / HepC / STD Testing

M- Th 8:30 am - 6 pm,

F 8:30 am - 4 pm

PrEP & PEP

Primary Care

HIV Specialty Care

Hep C Treatment

Onsite Dental

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Appointments

803-909-6363

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AFFINITYHEALTHCENTER.ORG/GET-TESTED


charlottepride.org

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

community organizations - health-social-sports-youth

RAIN

601 E. 5th St. Suite 470

Charlotte, NC 28202

704-372-7246

carolinarain.org

Rosedale Medical

103 Commerce Centre Dr.

Suite 103

Huntersville, NC 28078

704-948-8582

rosedaleid.com

SOCIAL & SUPPORT

Alpha Psi Kappa Fraternity

alphapsikappa.org

Carolina Bear Lodge

carolinabears.org

Carolina Transgender Society

carolinatransgendersociety.com

Charlotte Black Pride

charlotteblackpride.org

Charlotte LGBTQ Elders

charlottelgbtqelders.org

Charlotte Pride

charlottepride.org

Charlotte Tradesmen

charlottetradesmen.org

Genderlines

genderlines.org

PFLAG Charlotte

pflagcharlotte.org

Prime Timers of Charlotte

primetimersww.com/charlotte

Southern Country Charlotte

southerncountrycharlotte.com

Transcend Charlotte

transcendcharlotte.org

SPORTS

Charlotte Rainbowlers

charlotterainbowlers.com

Charlotte Roller Girls

charlotterollergirls.com

Charlotte Royals Rugby

charlotteroyalsrugby.com

Queen City Tennis Club

qctc.org

Stonewall Sports

stonewallcharlotte.leagueapps.com

YOUTH

Campus Pride

campuspride.org

GLoBAL

Winthrop University

https://www.winthrop.edu/

studentorgs/global.aspx

Pride Alliance Club

Central Piedmont Community

College

facebook.com/groups/

CPCCPrideAlliance/

Queers & Allies

Davidson College

davidsonqanda.weebly.com

Time Out Youth Center

3800 Monroe Rd.

Charlotte, NC 28205

704-344-8335

timeoutyouth.org

UNC Charlotte Office of Identity,

Equity and Engagement

Popp Martin Student Union 210 &

King 210

704-687-7121

identity.uncc.edu

— compiled by Wes McNeely

Notice a directory listing that needs

to be updated or a resource that’s

missing and needs to be

added to future directories?

Email us the details to

media@charlottepride.org

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