September 2019 253 Lifestyle Magazine

livinglocal360

September 2019 253 Lifestyle Magazine

ISSUE NO. 09

SEPTEMBER 2019

L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E

PROVIDES MULTIPLE MEANS TO

EXPERIENCE MOVIES

Q&A WITH TORYONO GREEN

FIRE CHIEF, TACOMA FIRE DEPARTMENT

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 1


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WE’VE GOT A

REBATE FOR THAT.

MARKETING

WASHINGTON MARKETING DIRECTOR

Cassie Riendeau | 360.798.3061

cassie@livinglocal360.com

EDITORIAL

SENIOR EDITOR | CONTENT MANAGER

Jillian Chandler | jillian@livinglocal360.com

STAFF WRITER

Colin Anderson | colin@livinglocal360.com

OPERATIONS

MANAGING PARTNER | Kim Russo

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | Steve Russo

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS | Rachel Figgins

DESIGN

DESIGN DIRECTOR | Maddie Horton

CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Whitney Lebsock

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Donna Johnson

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Darbey Scrimsher

CONTRIBUTORS

Justin Teerlinck, Felicia Soleil, Pamela Bolado, Darcie

Miller, Anneli Fogt, Nikki Luttmann, Marina Gunn,

Marguerite Cleveland, Patty Hutchens

253-502-8363

MyTPU.org/Rebates

252 Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and

distributed freely throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements

do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the

publisher. 253 Lifestyle Magazine is not responsible

for omissions or information that has been

misrepresented to the magazine. 253 Lifestyle

Magazine is produced and published by Like Media,

and no part of this publication may be reproduced or

transmitted without the permission of the publisher.

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PUBLISHER’S Picks

Steve Russo

Executive Director

THE AIR IS GETTING CRISP

SUMMER IS QUICKLY COMING TO AN END, and now is the time

to start preparing for the cool days of fall and all that comes with the

change of season. But … no matter what time of year it is, there is still

much happening right here in the 253.

This issue marks our ninth of the year—hard to believe!—and we’ve

compiled an array of wonderful stories and events that are sure to

leave you wanting more.

Our September cover story highlights Tacoma Fire Department’s fire

chief, Toryono Green. With more than 26 years on the department,

Toryono shares his experiences and the work he and others are doing

for the betterment of firefighters and the community as a whole.

Tacoma has reason to celebrate, as the Dune Peninsula was

completed and opened to the public this past July. After years in the

making, the 40-mile park is just another reason that makes Tacoma

a place to not only live and work but play. You can read more about

how the park came to be in this month’s Tacoma Focus.

Our feature story takes our readers to North Idaho, 10 miles south

of the Canadian border, where North America’s biggest hop farm

can be found, while our travel article will whisk you away to Alaska.

There’s nothing like fall in Fairbanks.

And of course, great area events abound. You can find out what’s

happening at this year’s Tacoma Film Festival, which takes place

the beginning of October, in this issue. You can see what fun awaits

in the arts and entertainment in our calendar of events, from the

11th Annual Stadium Art, Wine and Beer Walk to the Tacoma Moon

Festival and Oktoberfest Northwest.

We are excited to share the September issue of 253 Lifestyle

Magazine with you. Enjoy.

TACOMA FILM FESTIVAL

RETURNS

Q & A WITH TORYONO

GREEN, FIRE CHIEF, TACOMA

FIRE DEPARTMENT

16 30 60 58

FALL IN FAIRBANKS: THE

BEGINNING OF THE AURORA

SEASON

PROST! ALL

THINGS GERMAN

8

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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INSIDE

12

50

60

16

24

About the cover

FOR THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE OF

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE, we

had the privilege to interview

Toryono Green, a Tacoma native

and fire chief of the Tacoma Fire

Department. A true inspiration

and leader, we are excited to share

the incredible work he does to

benefit local firefighters and the

community as a whole.

Cover photo taken by Samantha

Elise Tillman

10 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

HOME

Injecting Personality and Interests Into

Our Homes: Transforming your house

into a home

TRENDING

Tacoma Film Festival Returns: Provides

multiple means to experience movies

TACOMA

From Pollution to Playground: Tacoma’s

Dune Peninsula, a former Superfund site,

opened to the public in July

Q&A

12

16

24

30

Q & A with Toryono Green, fire chief,

Tacoma Fire Department

HEALTH

The latest in keeping your body healthy

and cared for

FEATURED

What’s In Your Beer? Touring North

America’s biggest hop farm

ARTS &

ENTERTAINMENT

Discover your local art scene and never

miss an event near you!

TRAVEL

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38

50

60

Fall in Fairbanks: Enjoy long days with

the Last of the Midnight Sun and mild

temperatures for the beginning of the

Aurora Season


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Home

injecting personality and

interests into our homes

TRANSFORMING YOUR HOUSE INTO A HOME

BY NIKKI LUTTMANN, INTERIOR DESIGNER

One of the best parts about my profession is that I frequently get to look inside (and help decorate!)

gorgeous homes. Recently I had the opportunity to help stage a home that I had always longed to see.

Knowing that a friend of mine with excellent taste had designed it before the current owners had moved

in, I knew it would be beautiful. It did not disappoint. The interior features—tile, fixtures, paint colors,

etc.—were perfectly aligned with the beautiful Victorian-era home.

The young couple who was selling it had decorated it in a completely unexpected way, bringing in their more

modern sensibilities with hints of pop culture throughout. It really worked! And it was fun to see their personalities

and interests shine in a home that had stood for more than a century.

When decorating your home, I believe that you have to be respectful to the style and era of the house, but never

forget that it is truly your home and thus should be a reflection of you! Too often we try and make our homes look

like something out of a catalog or décor magazine, when truly our inspiration should come from something closer

to our hearts—our own interests and passions.

If you love classical music, for example, try bringing in pieces of art that reflect your interest, or even use instruments

or sheet music as art. If you love “Star Wars” (and who doesn’t?), by all means, hang movie posters, quotes or even

use a well-placed model of the Millennium Falcon as a bookend on your shelf. What keeps this look from being too

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 13


“kitch-y” is to do it well. Have the movie posters professionally

framed and keep the models to a minimum. This way, people

get fun glimpses into your hobbies and interests without

feeling like they walked into a pop-culture museum.

I have a cousin who produces amazing skateboard-style art

and posters. I have nearly an entire wall dedicated to his art,

but as they are all clustered together, the installation reads as

one piece and therefore isn’t overwhelming.

Another example might be someone who is a passionate

gardener or plant aficionado. I have seen lots of plants in a

home done well, and I have also seen it done poorly. Done

well, plants are healthy and thriving and clustered on a table

in a sunny window, or even several sunny windows. They are

potted in nice, somewhat similar pots and look cohesive. Done

poorly, the plants are scattered haphazardly through the home

with no rhyme or reason and no regard for their health. There

is nothing sadder than a half-dead plant sitting by itself in the

middle of the floor in an ugly plastic pot.

Remember, your home is and truly should be a reflection of

your life and no one else’s. While I always, always believe in

good design, I also believe in people and love getting to know

them through their homes. After all, a home is just a house if

it doesn’t have any personality!

14 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Trending

TACOMA

FILM FESTIVAL

RETURNS

Provides multiple means to

experience movies

By Justin Teerlinck

Photos Courtesy of Tacoma Film Festival

A

group of Grand Cinema members

led by Executive Director Phillip

Cowen got together in 2005 to share

a collective vision of celebrating

independent film in Tacoma. That shared

vision became the Tacoma Film Festival, now

in its 19th year. Today, it is a community fixture.

The Tacoma Film Festival soon returns to the

Grand Cinema on October 3 through 10. The

full film schedule will be published on the

festival website on September 12.

Opening night will showcase “The Infiltrators,”

co-directed by Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera.

The film features undocumented youths who

deliberately allow themselves to be detained by

immigration authorities in order to infiltrate

the Northwest Detention Center.

“The subject matter is relevant on a national

level, and with the Northwest Detention Center

a mere 2 miles away from Downtown Tacoma—

where the bulk of the festival takes place—it’s

also clearly something that’s deeply relevant

to us here, too,” says Tanya Tran, marketing

manager for the Tacoma Film Festival.

At heart, the festival is a focal point for people

who love independent film and the culture

of storytelling that surrounds it. It provides

multiple opportunities for people to not just

hear stories that are rarely told but to experience

them as well.

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“We bring filmmakers who go on to

premiere their next film at Sundance,

or go on to run an HBO show.

And we also feature filmmakers who

have created incredible films while

maintaining a day job.”

Those opportunities extend to experiences such as The Veldt,

a virtual reality simulator that honors Ray Bradbury’s short

story with the same name. The virtual reality experience

is not a gaming environment but an immersive milieu for

three-dimensional storytelling. The interface creates a

personalized experience that is directed by each user. Tran

further explains, “We’ve had VR experiences/films that are

works of journalism, for example. We’ve had narratives,

docs, comedies, horror ... like other categories of film, it’s

just that you’re experiencing it in an immersive way. In the

case of the VIVE [virtual reality hardware], you put on a

headset and you can look in every direction as well as move.

Sometimes you have controllers in your hands, too.”

Both juried and audience-choice awards will be bestowed on

filmmakers who submitted works for a wide range of genres.

$10,000 in cash prizes will be awarded in multiple categories.

The awards include Best Narrative, Best Documentary, Best

Animation Short or Feature, Best Virtual Reality, and also

awards highlighting direction, screenplay, performance and

cinematography. Both Pacific Northwest and non-Pacific

Northwest filmmakers will be honored. According to Tran,

“We bring filmmakers who go on to premiere their next

film at Sundance, or go on to run an HBO show. And we

also feature filmmakers who have created incredible films

while maintaining a day job, or who consider filmmaking a

passion and not a career.”

She goes on to say, “Past visiting filmmakers often remark

on the sense of support they feel from our festival—from

both TFF staff and the Tacoma community. We’re very

conscientious about TFF being a place free of hierarchy,

where storytellers at all levels of experience can find safe,

fun ways to connect and share. That energy is palpable.”

For members of the public wanting to get involved,

purchasing a movie pass and attending film screenings is an

obvious way to enjoy up-and-coming independent films and

support the local film community. However, you can also

volunteer! The Tacoma Film Festival is accepting volunteer

applications until September 19. They’re looking for venue

assistants, airport transport drivers (using a festivalprovided

van), information booth workers and lounge

attendants, so if you have the time, the skills, and want to be

a part of history in the making, step right up. Just go to the

Tacoma Film Festival website (TacomaFilmFestival.com),

click on the “volunteer” tab under “support” on the home

page, and scroll to the bottom for the online application.

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Another way to directly support the Tacoma Film Festival is to

host a visiting filmmaker in your own home or space. The festival

asks for a commitment of one to four days, but you can host a

filmmaker for the duration of the festival if you choose; providing

food and transportation for them is not required.

If time is not a readily available resource, but money is, you can

also help the Tacoma Film Festival reach its $10,000 goal by

September 20. Donations support free film passes for those in

need, including local students. They also support the community

housing program, which assists filmmakers with costs associated

with attending out-of-town screenings, and participating in talks

and other events which extend the reach of their creative vision.

There are many different perks offered for donations ranging from

$50 to $1,000 including one of only 20 posters highlighting the

event, signed by visual artist Art Chantry, available for donations

of $500. Check out the website for more details.

Early bird passes retail through September 12 and cost $125. VIP

regular price passes go on sale September 13 and cost $175. The

all-access passes include much more than just movies: They’ll get

you in to opening and closing night parties, as well as workshops.

Find out more by visiting TacomaFilmFestival.com.

Whether you host a filmmaker, purchase a pass, enter the virtual

world of The Veldt or attend a single movie, the Tacoma Film

Festival invites you to visit Grand Cinema and see stories come

to life.

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Separate But Equal

CREATING A SUCCESSFUL CO-PARENTING SCHOOL SCHEDULE AFTER SEPARATION OR DIVORCE

By Felicia A. Soleil, JD

In this column a few months ago, I wrote about creating a

fun, fluid and flexible summertime schedule for children

of two-home families. Now that school is back in session,

you’ll want to maximize quality time together while within

the parameters of the school schedule. However, be careful that

your own parental needs don’t negatively impact their academic

potential.

In my work as a family law mediator, I’ll often hear the following

complaints:

“My co-parent and I have a ‘50/50’ parenting plan, but I counted

the days on the calendar and he gets more than me. That’s not

fair. It should be equal.”

“We alternate school breaks and holidays, but some years she gets

more time than I do. Shouldn’t we have the same exact amount?”

“I have Tuesdays and Sundays off from work, and only one full

weekend a month, so the kids stay with their mom during school

days. But shouldn’t I be allowed to have my kids overnight on my

days off, even if they have school the next day? I should have the

experience of putting them to bed and getting them ready for

school, too.”

When parents present to mediation wanting to justify their

argument for adding “more time,” my first question to them

is, “How will this benefit their children? Have you considered

the child’s point of view?” Many times these parents are so

adamant about wanting to be “equal parents” they focus on

counting hours and days of residential time rather than focusing

on communication, joint decision-making, participation in

children’s activities and other ways to feel included in their

children’s lives when not under the same roof.

Sometimes these parents are driven by a need to control the

parenting style of the other parent or are resentful that, now

separated, the other parent is more involved with the children

than during the marriage. In other words, they don’t “deserve” to

be an “equal parent.” Other times there are parents who equate

less time with their children to being “less of a parent.” Rather

than focusing on maximizing the quality of the time they do

spend with their children, they want to increase the hours (even

if only sleeping hours) to correct any perceived “imbalance”

between them and their co-parent.

Here are things I ask them to consider:

1. Will the schedule promote or hinder the children’s ability to get

settled and have adequate sleep on school nights? This includes

decreased negative impact on healthy wake-up times.

2. Will the schedule promote or hinder the children’s ability to do

homework? This includes reducing a child’s worry they won’t get

adequate assistance or get it completed on time.

3. Will the schedule increase or decrease the number of transfers

the children make between parents during the school week? How

much of that “extra” time a parent wants will actually be spent in

a car or re-organizing school clothes, supplies, etc.?

4. Will the schedule reduce or increase a child’s anxiety about

who will be picking them up from school, who will take them

to practice or a game, who they should ask if they are invited to

a friend’s birthday party or sleepover? No child wants to give up

time with friends or activities due to a guilt trip laid on them by a

possessive parent. (“But that’s my time with you!”)

I also frequently ask parents: “Imagine you are each of your

children living the proposed schedule. With success in school

being the focus for the week, how does all the back and forth feel?

Are you rested, able to focus and confident you’ll get to activities

on time? Do you feel assured that you have the support of both

of your parents, even though you share your time with them

separately?” Sometimes putting the parents in their children’s

shoes is all it takes to resolve the issue of “separate but equal.”

Felicia Soleil is a family law attorney and mediator. She helps her

clients in achieving resolutions that foster both a compassionate

ending to their union and a healthy new beginning for them

and their families so they can focus on moving on, rather than

simply moving out. Felicia can be reached at 253.853.6940. All

consultations are strictly confidential.

22 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Tacoma

FROM POLLUTION

TO PLAYGROUND

TACOMA’S DUNE PENINSULA, A FORMER SUPERFUND SITE,

OPENED TO THE PUBLIC IN JULY

Story and Photos By Anneli Fogt

“Do you want to be my friend?” one child

asked. He was breathless from running up

five flights of stairs on the warm August

evening. “Sure!” the other child replied,

as they prepared to take a high-speed trip down one of six

polished silver slides.

They were two of nearly a dozen children that evening

enjoying the Chutes-and-Ladders-style playground built into

the 60-foot slope surrounding the Tacoma Yacht Club and

Point Defiance Ferry Terminal. The attraction is one piece

of the new 40-acre Dune Peninsula at Point Defiance Park

area, which opened to the public on July 6. The product of

three years of work and nearly $75 million, the peninsula

and surrounding elements is the culmination of Metro Parks

Tacoma’s largest project. In addition to the stairs-and-slides

playground, the area includes the 11-acre newly landscaped

Dune Peninsula, which the Frank Herbert Trail winds

through, and the 50-foot high Wilson Way Bridge, which

connects Point Defiance to Point Ruston. But the park’s

impact goes far beyond the joining of two of Tacoma’s most

popular areas.

Just three years ago, there were no children playing here. The

peninsula was one of the country’s most polluted Superfund

sites—built up from the ocean over the course of decades by

layers of arsenic- and lead-tainted waste dumped there from

the nearby ASARCO copper smelter. For 80 years, from 1905

to 1985, huge cast-iron kettles filled with glowing, molten

industrial waste—called slag—would ride on carts from the

smelter to the edge of Commencement Bay. In the shadow of

the smelter’s imposing 571-foot smokestack, the slag would

be emptied into the sound and the carts would return for

another load.

For many residents living in Tacoma at the height of the

smelter’s production, the molten peninsula combined with

the waste-laden vapor pouring out of the smokestack was

the reality of successful industry, but at least one man saw it

differently. Sci-fi author Frank Herbert was born in Tacoma

in the shadow of the ASARCO smelter and, throughout

his life, moved up and down the West Coast. He published

24 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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a legendary series of novels called “Dune,” now called some of the

greatest science fiction novels of all time, which tell the story of a rebel

group carving out life on a new planet. The series was inspired by

Herbert’s time in Tacoma.

“Frank Herbert lived over in Brown’s Point,” Metro Parks Tacoma

Manager Phedra Redifer told KING5 in July. “He had a very clear

view of the Asarco smelter and the toxic plume basically that would

continue to go up in the air, and that inspired him to write the book

‘Dune.’”

Now a replica of one of the massive cast-iron kettles that dumped slag

into the bay sits on the waterfront trail named after Fred Herbert. It’s

on the peninsula that bears the name of his books, in an area that

inspired his writing. It’s fitting, seeing as how the transformation of

the area was made possible through a process similar to the one being

used by the characters in his book.

To make the peninsula safe for the hundreds of adults, children and

dogs that now walk among its landscaped acreage, more than 20,000

truckloads of dirt had to be moved out of the area and the exposed

soil surface covered with a woven cap to keep the contaminated dirt

sealed in. “Terraforming”

is how Tacoma Metro

The peninsula was one

Parks Commissioner and

sci-fi author Erik Hanberg of the country’s most

described the process to

KNKX, the Tacoma NPR polluted Superfund

affiliate radio station, last

August. It’s a sci-fi term sites—built up from

used to describe the process

the ocean over the

of transforming a planet to

support human life and course of decades by

exactly what the rebels in

Frank Herbert’s “Dune” layers of arsenic- and

were doing to live on their

new planet.

lead-tainted waste

dumped there from

“The characters in the novel

have a goal to ‘terraform’

their planet back to its

inhabitable origins,” he

said in a July Metro Parks

news release. “That’s what

we’ve done here. We have

terraformed a polluted

wasteland into a beautiful environment for all to enjoy.”

the nearby ASARCO

copper smelter.

On a planetary scale, the process could take centuries. In Tacoma, it

took three years—two longer than expected. And while construction

began in earnest in 2016, the process to clean up the area began more

than 30 years ago.

The smelter closed, and the dumping of slag into Commencement

Bay ended, in 1985. The smokestack was demolished eight years

later, effectively removing the outward signs of pollution. But the slag

heap, at the time being used as a breakwater and parking lot for the

Tacoma Yacht Club, served as an enduring reminder of the pollution,

and remediation work presented a massive and expensive challenge.

According to a June News Tribune article, building a park on this

piece of land had been a goal for the City of Tacoma and Metro Parks

for more than a decade—Metro Parks Project Manager Roger Stanton

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 27


told the newspaper that there’s a sketch on his desk that dates

back to 2001. But it wasn’t until voters approved a new parks and

zoo bond in 2014 that the concept materialized. The following

year, Metro Parks Tacoma approved the long-range Destination

Point Defiance plan and “funding materialized and the wheels

really began to turn,” the article indicates.

The “park on the peninsula,” as it was called before being

officially named Dune Peninsula in 2018, became part of the

larger Destination Point Defiance project. Construction began in

June of 2016 under the watch of the Environmental Protection

Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology—two

of the eight agencies who shared the $74.8 million price tag—

and trucks began to haul out 400,000 cubic yards of the most

contaminated dirt destined for plastic containers in nearby

landfills.

Stanton admitted to the News Tribune in June that the

undertaking was “daunting” and “overwhelming” but now stands

as a highlight of his career and an unforgettable experience for

the residents of Tacoma.

“People won’t just see this park,” Stanton said in a July Metro

Parks Tacoma statement, “they will experience it. And they won’t

forget what they’ve experienced.”

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Q&A

TORYONO

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Toryono Green, fire chief, has more than 26 years of experience with the Tacoma Fire Department.

He and his family, which includes two young daughters adopted from China, are planning to

homestead and are in the process of building a small farm where they plan to raise chickens and

pigs and grow their own fruit and vegetables. He also volunteers extensively by serving on the

Mary Bridge Children’s Foundation Board of Directors, which focuses on providing resources

and system improvements to better meet the health-care needs of children and parents in our

community. He is a senior fellow and board member of the Tacoma/Pierce County chapter of

the American Leadership Forum, a nonprofit organization that promotes collaborative problemsolving

and relationship building amongst community leaders.

32 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


“ I HAVE SEEN A LOT

OF PAIN, SUFFERING,

LOSS AND DEATH OVER

MY CAREER. FRANKLY,

EVERY INCIDENT

HAS HAD AN IMPACT

ON ME. THIS IS AN

INSIDIOUS REALITY

FOR EMERGENCY

RESPONDERS THAT

DOES NOT GET ENOUGH

RECOGNITION.”

Q. Tacoma is known as the ‘Gritty City,’ and

downtown went through some rough times. As

a Tacoma native, what are some of the exciting

things you see happening in Tacoma?​

A. I am incredibly proud of the dramatic

changes that have occurred and continue to

occur throughout Tacoma. The revitalization

of the downtown area has made it a destination

for dining, art, conferences and entertainment.

I believe the most impactful change in the

downtown area was the addition of the University

of Washington, which brought with it all of

the amenities necessary to make the area feel

walkable and safe. Perhaps the greatest thing

I’ve seen throughout the city is the emergence

of strong neighborhood identities (i.e., Proctor,

Hilltop, South Tacoma, Eastside, etc.). I believe

this, combined with continued support from City

leadership, will lead to safer and more connected

micro communities within Tacoma. That change

is what I believe will make Tacoma shine as a firstclass

city.

Q. We have a popular local saying, “Live Like the

Mountain is Out.” What is your favorite thing to

do when the mountain is out?

A. I love the outdoors, particularly in the Pacific

Northwest. I am a bit of an introvert, and the pace

of the fire service can be overwhelming, so getting

out for a nice, quiet hike or backpacking trip is

probably at the top of my list for ways to recharge.

I also enjoy road cycling and have completed a

number of local organized rides multiple times,

including the Seattle to Portland, Courage

Classic, Chilly Hilly and the High Pass Challenge.

Ultimately, I really enjoy just being home and

preparing my property for farming.

Q. What is the worst fire or natural disaster you

have experienced in your more than 26 years

with the department? How did the department

rise to the challenge?

A. I can’t say that there is one fire that stands out

enough to identify it as ‘the worst,’ particularly

since approximately 80 percent of the emergency

work done by modern fire departments today

is related to medical emergencies, not fires.

Unfortunately, I have seen a lot of pain, suffering,

loss and death over my career. Frankly, every

incident has had an impact on me. This is an

insidious reality for emergency responders that

does not get enough recognition. If I am proud of

anything in this regard, it is that the Tacoma Fire

Department, and the fire service as a whole, has

taken the emotional and psychological impact of

this work on firefighters seriously by recognizing

and openly addressing the resulting PTSD;

contracting mental health professionals to assess

and support our responders following a significant

incident and sending a number of our personnel to

receive certified training in critical incident stress

management so they can serve as peer supporters.

With suicide being one of the leading causes

of death for firefighters today, there is probably

nothing more urgent for us as a profession.

Q. What is your advice for children, and maybe

adults too, who want to be a firefighter when

they grow up?

A. First, do well in school, and seriously consider

attending college first. While a college degree is not

required for employment with us as a firefighter,

most of our applicants come to us after having

earned a college degree and/or military experience,

both of which provide incredible life experience

and tend to help applicants interview with greater

confidence and depth. More than anything, I

would encourage potential applicants of all ages to

give serious consideration to their actual desire to

serve this community. Firefighters are truly public

servants, and those that ultimately get hired by us

have demonstrated a heart for service.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 33


Health

GETTING BACK TO YOUR SCHOOL ROUTINE

JUST FOLLOW THESE SIMPLE STEPS

BY PAMELA BOLADO

B

ack to school is a time of change for the whole

family, and it can sometimes bring out a lot of

stress. A back-to-school routine for your skin

(among every other aspect) is vital to relieving

that stress, minimizing those pesky breakouts and controlling acne.

Remember to change …

The sheets and pillowcases, that is! This is often one overlooked

place that harbors all sorts of nastiness. Every night you lay your

pretty head down on a filthy, germ-ridden, bacteria-festering sheet

and pillowcase. These bacteria and germs can contribute to acne. Do

your skin a favor and habitually wash the bedding regularly. Once a

week is a good rule to follow. Use a natural laundry detergent rather

than those scented with synthetic perfumes.

I do recommend those with acne change their pillowcase every

other night since you can turn your pillow over one of those nights.

Your skin will be able to rest, breathe and look more rejuvenated

when it has a clean place to rest every night.

Washing …

Never underestimate the benefits of washing off your makeup

before bed. Nighttime is the time for your skin to relax and breathe,

as you spend countless hours exposed to pollution, UV rays and

other environmental factors throughout the day.

Think about how dirty the surface of your cell phone can be after

touching it all day, then pressing it on your face.

Keep alcohol swabs in your purse, school bag and console of your

car for regular wipe downs. And don’t forget to clean those makeup

brushes; they touch your skin daily! Routinely cleaning the oil,

skin and debris from your makeup brushes will help as well when

dealing with breakouts.

While I don’t recommend washing your hair daily, if your hair is oily

and your bangs sit on your forehead, you may be experiencing more

breakouts than usual. If you are prone to “bang-line” blemishes, we

recommend pulling them back off your face a few times a week or

using a dry shampoo that absorbs excess oil between classes.

Don’t shower after a workout? Chances are you have sweat and dirt

sitting on your skin, possibly clogging your pores and breeding

bacteria. I recommend using a natural (alcohol-free) toner

immediately after you work out, as it removes the sweat and sebum

buildup.

Beauty sleep!

I remember pulling all-nighters too but, believe it or not, “beauty

rest” isn’t just a saying. Make sure you are getting six to eight hours

a night to keep your oil levels healthy and your skin smooth and

clear!

While I could go on and on about how best to avoid acne, some

of it is out of our control. Things like your monthly hormonal

cycle, medications, your diet and, yes, genetics can affect your skin

throughout the year. The important lesson is to do what you can to

get ahead of the curve and not to stress about it.

It doesn’t have to be a long or hard routine, but with a few simple

steps like hydrating your body, regular face cleansing and routinely

washing your sheets, your skin will be healthy and glowing and

ready to go back to school.

If it’s time to start seeing a skin professional, a deep cleansing facial

and Hydrafacial MD are excellent choices for a monthly to bimonthly

regime.

Pamela Bolado is the founder of Le Pamier Skincare Co. and master

esthetician at Nouveau MedSpas.

Nighttime is the time for your skin

to relax and breathe.

34 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Health

HAND JIVE: PART II

HAND-LE WITH CARE

BY DARCIE MILLER, LIGHT IN BALANCE

Have you ever thought about your hands as

an extension of your heart? In last month’s

article, I talked about all the amazing tasks

your hands perform and how the touch of

your hands can speak volumes.

Your hands have taken many abuses and will continue

to take even more abuse; not because you are

deliberately trying to hurt them but from simply using

and overusing them. It is inevitable that at some point

you will experience pain and stiffness in your hands—

and your hands do not have to be aged to experience

pain and stiffness.

Wearing gloves to protect them while performing

specific tasks can help, as well as applying lotion or

balm to help soothe dry and chapped skin.

Reflexology is a natural and holistic modality that can

be performed on your feet, hands or ears.

Hand reflexology may be useful as a way to help

manage pain from arthritis or osteoarthritis. It can

help boost circulation from overuse or as the result

of an injury, as well as long-term complaints such

as Raynaud’s syndrome. Other benefits may also

include improved flexibility in those who suffer from

rheumatoid arthritis and from chronic pain, which is

often associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

In addition to helping with pain and discomfort in

your hands, hand reflexology can also be beneficial

in managing any associated symptoms you may be

experiencing from irritable bowel syndrome, stress,

headaches, tension, anxiety, neck and shoulder pain,

and breathing problems.

Just like your feet, your hands contain a reflexive map

of all of your body’s systems—circulatory, endocrine,

nervous, skeletal, muscular, reproductive and urinary.

A trained and certified reflexologist will work with

you, and together you will develop a session strategy

to help you achieve your goals. Reflexology is not a

replacement for medical care, but it is a modality

which can complement treatment you may already be

receiving from your health-care provider.

Whether receiving hand, foot or ear reflexology, or

any combination of the three, it is an excellent source

of self-care. You only get one body, and it is important

to take care of you.

And at the risk of repetition, I must repeat the

importance of wearing the proper gloves for the task

to protect your hands. Remember, there are 27 bones,

27 joints, 34 muscles and over 100 ligaments and

tendons in each hand. Your hands will perform many

tasks and acts of love over your lifetime. Please, take

care of them.

You only get one body, and it is

important to take care of you.

36 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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What’s In

Your Beer?

TOURING NORTH AMERICA’S BIGGEST HOP FARM

BY COLIN ANDERSON

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ELK MOUNTAIN FARMS AND COLIN ANDERSON

38 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Feature

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 39


To brew beer you need four key ingredients:

water, yeast, malt and hops. Clean water makes

for a crisp beverage, and yeast is used to convert

sugars into alcohol. Malt is where the color and

flavor profile comes from, and hops add to the aroma and

bitterness. A stroll down any grocery store aisle and you’ll

find such a wide range of choices that it’s hard to fathom

they all come from the same four basic ingredients. If

you’ve tipped back a Bud Light, Goose Island IPA, Elysian

Dragon Tooth Stout or Ten Barrel Trail Beer, then you’ll

want to raise your glass and toast to one of the men who

supplies the beer industry with one of its key ingredients.

Ed Atkins is a fourth generation farmer whose family

continues to work the lands along the Kootenai River Valley

in the far reaches of Northern Idaho. About 10 miles south

of the Canadian border you’ll find a lush valley surrounded

by towering mountains. All kinds of crops flourish here

including hops, and Ed and his team have more than a few

plants to keep an eye on.

Elk Mountain Farms was built in 1987 and originally

covered 600 acres. In 1989, the farm was expanded by

another 600 acres, and in 1991 an additional 500 acres were

added. The 1,700 acres easily makes Elk Mountain Farms

the largest hop farm in North America. Ed is the general

manager of the massive operation, something he didn’t see

coming when he started here more than 30 years ago.

“I didn’t know anything about hops,” he recalled. In the late

‘80s Ed was in the logging industry when he was laid off

due to slowing production. He knew the person who was

starting up the farm and was asked if he wanted a job. “I

thought I’d work there for a few months then head back

into the woods again, but here I am,” he said.

Ed now oversees a full-time staff of 21 and seasonal

workers that during harvest can swell to 220. He’s held

numerous positions from mechanic to manager to business

operations, and GM for the last 11 years. From having no

knowledge of hops, Ed is now a walking encyclopedia. “We

have a rich, fertile valley here with lots of irrigation, long

summer days and cool nights. Hops enjoy the 80 degree

days and the 60 degree nights,” he explained.

Elk Mountain Farms is situated on similar latitude to hop

farms in Germany. This was taken into account when

finding a location for the massive operation. Hallertau and

Saaz are some of the oldest hops known to man and do

very well in Germany. These were the first varieties planted

at Elk Mountain and were also very successful. During the

early days of the farm, the hops were being utilized for

Budweiser’s flagship products Bud and Bud Light. As the

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40 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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The 1,700 acres easily makes Elk Mountain Farms the

largest hop farm in North America.

Ed’s job to bring in additional varieties to meet brewers’ demand for new products. “We started with

two and are now growing seven varieties,” said Ed. These include Amarillo and the newest rage Citra,

used in juicy or hazy-style IPAs. It’s a market that’s much different from when Ed began his career at Elk

Mountain. “Today’s consumers are a lot more fickle, and I see there is virtually no loyalty to brands. It

seems to always be about what’s new versus what’s good.”

With that in mind, the experimental side of the farm has also ramped up. There was a time when Ed

and his team were only experimenting with a half dozen plants; today that number has skyrocketed to

1,500. “We are always looking for the next big thing as there are two big niches today: drinking what’s

local or regional or what’s the new latest and greatest.” While the experimental side is an operation of

itself, the main farm is where the vast majority of the work comes from.

A single acre on the farm contains 889 plants, meaning at full capacity there are more than 1.5 million

plants that are tended to. “Hops are high maintenance and high labor,” explained Ed. Hop bines grow

vertically, and each bine on the farm will reach a height of about 20 feet. Elk Mountain uses a core yarn

that is made from coconut husk fibers as a way for the plant to wrap itself and grow vertically. Workers

need to put these up at the start of each year. Most plants require two strings each. This translates to

approximately 80 million feet or 15,000 miles worth of string put up by hand each and every year.

Unfortunately for the team, the bines need assistance if they are going to reach their full

potential, which means training. Each May workers go out for the first training, which

involves manually wrapping each bine around the string. About a month later it’s done

again. Keep in mind, there are more than a million plants—and this is done twice! “We

do this so that all the bines grow to an even length because we want them to all grow and

bloom at the same time.”

About 100 to 150 workers tackle these jobs in the spring and summer.

There is a small window when the hop cones are ready

to harvest. This is usually in August, and that’s when

Elk Mountain Farms really begins to ramp up. Twohundred-and-twenty

seasonal workers are brought

in to work around the clock. “We’ve done it in 17

days, but typically it’s about 20 or 21 days,” said

Ed. Each worker is set to a specific task to ensure

everything is done correctly and timely so the farm

doesn’t miss its limited window.

Hop combines are sent out into the fields. There are

only about 30 of these in the U.S., and Elk Mountain

has six of them. “You have to build them yourself,”

said Ed. “We can’t just call up John Deere and have

them make us one.” The massive machines gather

the whole bine and begin separating out the cones

from the rest of the plant. Bines are sent through

an unloader, which breaks up the clumps and starts

to separate the cones from the rest of the plant. The

first cleaning done in the field is just step one of the

process.

42 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

The harvested hops are brought into two massive

structures on property to further separate the

cones from waste materials. The cones run through

an intricate system in which they are bounced on


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mesh, blasted by air and shaken again. In all they go

through six different stations including mesh grates, arm

piercers, trammels, a harp and finally dribble tables. (If it’s

at all confusing, it should be. Just know that by the time

they come out they are cleared of any excess material.)

Materials separated from the cones are composted and go

back into the fields to be used on the next crop.

The next step in the process is drying the hops. This is

done in a massive kiln powered by a 9 million BTU

propane burner and a 75,000 CFM fan. The hops are

dried at a temperature of around 130 to 145 degrees.

Once out of the kiln a conveyor drops them into another

area atop a cloth for them to cool. These tables are filled

about 30-inches deep, and it takes anywhere from four

to 13 hours for the hops to hit their preferred moisture

level of 9.5 percent. “Operators feel by hand and read the

moisture levels. Once we hit that mark, they are sent to be

bailed,” explained Ed.

At this point the hops are ready to be used and can be

shipped to distributors and brewers around North

America. The hops are run up an additional set of belts

and dropped into a weight box. They fall into a cloth, and

once 200 pounds are in, they are sealed up by hand using

two commercial-grade sewing machines. Each bail is

labeled, and they are ready to be shipped.

When harvest is complete there is still plenty of work to

be done preparing for next season before winter sets in.

Workers stay on until around Thanksgiving time, when

things slow enough for everyone to catch their breath, if

only for a short time.

For Ed, the entire experience is something he didn’t

envision but wouldn’t change. He’s been able to work

alongside a passionate group, many of whom started

when the farm was built and retired after never leaving.

“I’ve had great mentors here; the people that help you, I

owe a debt of gratitude to them,” said Ed.

As you look around the Northwest, new breweries

continue to pop up seemingly on a monthly basis.

Competition for taps at bars and restaurants is fierce,

and brewers are altering their marketing and creating

new styles in ways they didn’t have to when the craft

beer renaissance started again in the early 2000s. While

it seems like something that’s never-ending and here to

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CRAFT DIED

IN THE

MID-‘90S

stay, Ed isn’t so sure. “Craft died in the mid-’90s and

came back again in the mid-2000s. It’s usually about

a 10-year cycle,” Ed predicted. Ed points to consumer

data showing big gains in the wine and whisky industry

taking a bite into beer sales. Hop-free spiked seltzers are

also exploding onto the scene, all products competing in

one of the biggest global industries.

Ed has been through it before, and the farm is ready

to adapt to what consumers want. If brewers continue

looking for the next new hop flavor, Ed’s team will keep

the experimental varieties going strong. If consumers

begin to pull away from a saturated craft beer market,

they’ll adjust for that too, all part of 32-years experience

in farming one of the more unique crops on earth.

The relative isolation of Elk Mountain Farms ensures

that encroachment likely will never become an issue.

Only a few thousand people call the area home, and

while there has been growth in the previous 30 years,

it’s unlikely to ever impact the farm, its space or the

river which it is reliant on. The scale of the operation

and which hops are growing might change, but as long

as there is beer, the farm will continue to supply some of

the biggest names in the industry.

With more than three decades under his belt, Ed

knows his career is coming to an end in the near future.

“At some point we have to hand this off to the next

generation, and as I’m nearing the end of my career, it’s

definitely something you think more about,” he said. Ed

credits his mentors for helping him get to the position he

is in and hopes that his mentorship of other employees

will keep that cycle going. One-and-a-half million plants

is a lot to look after, and it takes a special talent to do so.

The next time you pop the top of your favorite long neck

or order up that dry-hopped Citra bomb double IPA,

give a cheers to Ed, after all, it wouldn’t be so refreshing

without a whole lot of hard work.

46 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Services:

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acuPuncture

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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 47


Only a few thousand

people call the area

home, and while

there has been growth

in the previous 30

years, it’s unlikely to

ever impact the farm,

its space or the river

which it is reliant on.

48 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


OLYMPIC ALZHEIMER’S RESIDENCE

Is Mom having some trouble

with her memory?

There are many advantages of early detection

and diagnosis when cognitive symptoms are first

noticed, including the ability to make informed

decisions about future treatment and care.

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Don’t wait. Call to schedule a FREE and

CONFIDENTIAL cognitive screening. We

encourage anyone who is concerned about

cognitive changes to take this short, in-person

screening. Call now!

Call (253) 527-6838 to schedule your

memory screening today.

www.PrestigeCare.com

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 49


Arts &

Entertainment

WHAT’S HAPPENING

253?

50 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


“Autumn makes me want to

wear tweed, drink tea and

learn something!”

recommendation for

Autumn

Tea Time -

Mimi’s Rainy

Day Blend

Family First offers

Family First offers

compassionate,

compassionate,

quality, 24-hour care

quality, 24-hour care

in comfortable home

in a comfortable home

setting.

setting.

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early healthy early

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• Caring and experienced

• Caring and experienced

medical team.

medical team.

• Home physician and

• Home physician and

transportation to medical

transportation to medical

appointments provided.

appointments provided.

• Entertaining activities for

• Entertaining activities for

residents.

residents.

• Serving Gig Harbor and the

• Serving Gig Harbor and the

surrounding community

surrounding community

for 20 years.

for 20 years.

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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 51


The Urgency to See Anew

CULTIVATE YOUR CREATIVITY THIS FALL

By Gage Academy of Art

ART BY TIFFANY DAE | TIFFANYDAE.COM ART BY RILEY DOYLE | RILEYDOYLEART.COM ART BY RILEY DOYLE | RILEYDOYLEART.COM

We want to start with a quote by French Neo-classical artist

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) who said,

“To draw does not simply mean to reproduce contours; the

drawing does not simply consist in the idea; the drawing

is even the expression, the interior form, the plan, the model. Look what

remains after that! The drawing is three-fourth and a half of what constitutes

painting.”

Ingres’ mirthful humor captures nonetheless an unconditional truth about

the education that all Atelier and Studio Arts Intensive students receive here

at Gage: Drawing, whether from life or from cast or from photograph, is

at the foundation of Gage’s commitment to building up critical skills. I am

talking about my personal belief that in painting, like in any other craft honed

over the years, separating concept from execution is a shortsighted decision,

one that often leads to well-written artist statements (those famous verbal

crutches) to provide support to work, which doesn’t visually speak for itself.

Any aspiring artist or student who wants to pursue painting must start

with taking drawing—to build confidence and understanding of form and

composition—before delving into the world of wet media and most of all

color.

For this reason, Gage Academy of Art is excited to announce the launch of

the new Atelier Primer, a part-time program modeled after the Atelier fulltime

curriculum. Taught by Riley Doyle and Tiffany Dae, this twice-a-week

evening class teaches the classical foundations of drawing and painting from

life. The Atelier Primer is ideal for those students who cannot attend classes

during the day. There is also a host of remarkable opportunities at Gage to

jump-start or refine your drawing skills: from the workshop Alla Prima

Figure Drawing With Ink, Charcoal and White Chalk with Terry Furchgott

to the exciting drawing classes starting this fall at Gage on September 16!

Gage Academy is committed to that ‘urgency to see anew’ through painting,

as we need artists to lead us through the fog of images with their beacon

52 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Arts &

Entertainment

CULTIVATE YOUR CREATIVITY

THROUGH THE SEASONS AT

GAGE ACADEMY OF ART!

TENAYA SIMS, GEORGETOWN ATELIER

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 53


ART BY TIFFANY DAE | TIFFANYDAE.COM

pictures. This fall color is at the forefront of Gage’s

offering from Successful Painting with Acrylics taught

by one of the masters of color Terry Furchgott; to

Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Watercolor

with the amazing Tom Hoffman; Topics in Abstract

Painting: Color with Jeffrey Simmons; Layers of

Abstract Paintings with Junko Yamamoto; Dynamic

Color in Watercolor with Linda James; to finish with

Larine Chung’s Color Theory & Color Mixing as well

as Color Harmony!

KIMBERLY TROWBRIDGE, TROWBRIDGE ATELIER

Hopefully this fall you are inspired to travel to

experience art and to cultivate your very own artist

in the making. In the spirit of inviting everybody to

invest time in learning your own language through the

frequentation of your medium of choice, we leave you

with a quote from the great painter Lennart Anderson:

“People think that when they are painting their best,

that that is enough, but no … that’s just where you

start. You have to paint better than your best, and then

even better than that.”

Enroll now for fall at GageAcademy.org/fall19-classesand-workshops.

For additional information about Gage

Academy of Art, visit GageAcademy.org, Facebook.com/

GageAcademy, instagram @gageacademy, email info@

gageacademy.org or call 206.323.4243.

54 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Gage is an innovative and accessible contemporary

art school, based in personal mentorship and

skills-based studio instruction. Whether you are a

curious newcomer or a professional artist, a working

creative or a retired passion-seeker, Gage is open to

anyone interested in learning. Gage gives both adults

and kids hands-on art experience working with

talented instructors in fully-equipped art studios. We

provide scholarships and financial aid to families and

youth that need it most. Gage is a 501c3 non-profit

dedicated to building a vibrant creative community.

artwork by instructor Michelle Lassaline

REGISTER

Atelier Programs

Adult Classes

Studio Art Intensive

Register Now at: gageacademy.org

Gary Faigin Geoff Flack Tenaya Sims Juliette Aristides Kimberly Trowbridge

ADULT PROGRAMS

Gage offers numerous weekend and weeklong workshops as

well as five-week classes in drawing, sculpting, painting.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS & KIDS

Youth programs for kids at Gage inspire young artists with

challenging and fun opportunities for creative expression.

Apply now at: gageacademy.org/Fall19

Apply now at: gageacademy.org/teens

EVENTS

Drawing Jam

Dec. 7th, 2019

GALA

May 2nd, 2020

Best of Gage

June 12th, 2020

Drink & Draw

Every 2nd Thursday

Masterpiece Dinner

Check for Availability

:

:

::: :::: ::. :

WORKSHOPS Enroll Now

STUDIO CONCENTRATION: PAINTING FROM LIFE

with Max Ginsburg

www.gageacademy.org

MOVING TOWARDS ABSTRACTION

with Julie Devine

@gageacademy

SUCCESSFUL PAINTING WITH ACRYLICS

with Terry Furchgott

NATURE IN WATERCOLOR

with Michelle Lassaline

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 55


Eat & Drink

56 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


HARISSA TOMATO SOUP WITH

ZHOUG & YOGURT

Recipe & Photo Courtesy of Marina Gunn, MarinaGunn.com

COOK TIME: 30 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS:

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 yellow onion, chopped

1 leek, chopped

2 tbsp. kosher salt

2 tbsp. olive oil

½ tsp. turmeric

1 tsp. harissa

1 tsp. cumin

1 can (28 oz.) of peeled tomatoes (San Marzano are my favorite.)

2 1/2 cups chicken broth

2 cups arugula or spinach, or a mixture of the two

Goat milk yogurt

Zhoug (a spicy Middle-Eastern Pesto). I get zhoug or shoug from

Trader Joe’s, but if you’re feeling up to it, you can make your own!)

Chopped parsley

METHOD:

• In a large pot (Dutch oven or soup/stock pot), sauté garlic, onion and

leek with olive oil and salt, turmeric, harissa and cumin until soft, 3 to

5 minutes.

• Add tomatoes and turn to low. Simmer for 10 minutes, crushing

tomatoes with a wooden spoon. Add chicken broth and simmer for

an additional 5 minutes.

• With an immersion blender, blend the soup in the pot until creamy.

(You can also pour into a blender if you don’t have an immersion

blender, whatever works for you!) Add salt to taste, if needed.

• Add the 2 cups of arugula, spinach or both. Stir in on low heat until

lightly wilted but still green.

• Serve with a dollop of goat milk yogurt, zhoug and chopped parsley.

• Enjoy!

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 57


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

October

04-06

Prost!

ALL THINGS GERMAN

BY COLIN ANDERSON | PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER NELSON

Trumer Pils, Warsteiner Dunkel, Hacker-Pschorr Weisse—just a few of the

authentic German beers you can partake in at one of the biggest and best

Oktoberfest celebrations around. Mark your calendars for the weekend

of October 4 through 6, cruise up to the Washington State Fairgrounds in

Puyallup and get ready for one heck of a party. Oktoberfest Northwest is now in its

14th year, and crowds continue to swell.

Dirndls, lederhosen, beer, brats and Bavarian music fill the Festhalle Biergarten,

Washington’s largest Munich-style beer hall. Revelers drink, dance, play games and

go all out for one of the most fun weekends of the year.

Be sure to come hungry, as the food takes center stage at this Oktoberfest.

Traditional German fare like schnitzel, potato salad and bratwurst are accompanied

by various other meats, savories and sweets. You’ll want to quench your thirst and

won’t have trouble finding refreshments with taps all over the grounds. Wine and

cider are also available as are non-alcoholic drinks for kids and designated drivers.

If your competitive side starts heating up, there are plenty of ways to test your skills

against others. The Bier-lympics include events like stein holding and brat toss.

Hammerschlagen is an always popular event in which contestants gather around

a wooden stump and attempt to drive a nail fully into it using the least amount of

swings. There is a Stein Dash 5k, and kids can run in the ½-mile Root Beer Run.

Live music and other entertainment kick off at noon and continues all night. This

year you can end the night with ‘80’s cover bands Nite Wave and The Spasmatics.

Children can enjoy Kinderfest with face painting and scavenger hunts, among other

activities. Note: No one under 21 is permitted after 6pm on Friday and Saturday.

Tickets can be purchased in advance at OktoberfestNW.com. General admission,

Fest Stein and Bier, and special VIP packages are also available.

HIGHLIGHT EVENT

September

07

11th Annual Stadium

Art, Wine & Beer Walk

Saturday, September 7, you won’t want to miss the 11th Annual

Stadium District Art, Wine and Beer Walk. This night of celebration,

held 3:30 to 8pm at various locations around the Stadium District,

features a diverse selection of wines and regional and local brews for

tasting, along with an impressive list of artists who will be displaying

their creative work all over the neighborhood. Tickets to the event are

$30 each and include 12 drink tickets and a signature glass. Purchase

them online at StadiumArtWineAndBeerWalk.

September

21

Tacoma Moon Festival

Presented by the Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation and

held at the Tacoma Chinese Reconciliation Park, the Tacoma

Moon Festival celebrates the diverse cultures of the Puget Sound

region’s communities with performances, food, vendors, wine and

beer garden, and information booths. There will also be handson

activities for adults and children including tea ceremonies,

calligraphy and beyond. The event kicks off at 1pm and concludes

with a parade of lanterns led by the Moon Princess at 7pm. Find out

more at TacomaChinese Park.org.

58 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


September

01-

22

SEPTEMBER

WASHINGTON STATE FAIR

1-22

9:00am to 1:00pm

Washington State Fair Events Center

TheFair.com

DON’T

MISS!

19

SEPTEMBER

FLAVOR 2019

19

10:00am to 11:00pm

Participating Restaurants

TacomaCommunityHouse.org

07-

08

SEPTEMBER

TACOMA FALL WEDDING EXPO

7&8

9:30am to 3:00pm

Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall

BridesClub.com/Tacoma-Wedding-Expo

20

INDIA ARIE: THE WORTHY

TOUR

SEPTEMBER 20

7:30 to 9:30pm

Pantages Theater

TacomaArtsLive.org

08 SEPTEMBER

MUSIC FROM HOME

8

3:00 to 5:00pm

Lakewold Gardens

LakewoldGardens.org

28 SEPTEMBER

RICHARD MARQUIS: KEEPERS

28

All day

Museum of Glass

MuseumOfGlass.org

10

GRIT CITY THINK & DRINK: RACE

AND PEDAGOGY

SEPTEMBER 10

6:30 to 8:00pm

The Swiss Restaurant & Pub

Tacoma.uw.edu/sias/thinkndrink

28

TACOMA OKTOBERFEST 2019

SEPTEMBER 28

Noon to 11:55pm

Dystopian State Brewing Co.

DystopianState.com

DON’T

MISS!

14 SEPTEMBER

PIONEER DAYS FESTIVAL

14

Noon to 4:00pm

Job Carr Cabin Museum

GTCF.org

29

HEALTHY LOVE HEALTHY

HEART 5K

SEPTEMBER 29

8:00am

Point Ruston Waterway

App.MobileCause.com/vf/HealthyLove

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 59


Fall in Fairbanks

ENJOY LONG DAYS WITH THE LAST OF THE MIDNIGHT SUN AND MILD

TEMPERATURES FOR THE BEGINNING OF THE AURORA SEASON

STORY & PHOTOS BY MARGUERITE CLEVELAND

From September until the snow accumulates is the perfect time to visit Fairbanks,

Alaska. The summer crowds have returned home, but you can still enjoy some

of the warmer weather activities—and may even see the Aurora Borealis. Give

yourself three full days to enjoy this itinerary, which gives you a good overview

of the area. Upon arrival in Fairbanks, visit the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors

Center to find information to explore Fairbanks and Alaska’s interior. It’s more than just

a visitors’ center and more like a natural history museum. Learn about Alaska’s Native

Peoples and check out the world-class exhibits.

Day 1

Chena Hot Springs Resort is your stop for the night. It is about a 60-minute scenic drive

from Fairbanks through the Chena River State Recreation Area. The road parallels the

Chena River, and wildlife sightings, especially moose, are common along the beaver ponds

and sloughs. Insider Tip: There are limited facilities along this route, so plan accordingly.

Your stay here is a good opportunity to put away the technology and enjoy the natural

surroundings. If you want a truly authentic Alaskan experience, stay in one of the “dry

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Travel

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 61



If you are lucky you will

spot some of the bucket

list animals such as grizzly

bears, wolves, caribou,

moose and Dall sheep.

cabins” with no running water and their own outhouse. If that is too rustic, the

Moose Lodge has spacious rooms with full baths.

You won’t run out of things to do while visiting this resort. Take a short walk

to visit the dog kennels. The nearly 100 Alaskan sled dogs are a bundle of

energy and love visitors. Take a kennel tour or enjoy a dog sled ride; options

are available year-round. Next visit the Ice Museum. It’s so fun to explore this

masterpiece carved from ice. Insider Tip: Splurge for the apple martini served in

a glass made of ice. The activities center is the heart of the resort. From here you

can book activities or just hang out. It is open 24 hours a day. Lastly, don’t miss

the hot springs; what a lovely way to soak off all that stiffness from traveling.

There are two dining options at the resort: the Chena Hot Springs Restaurant

serves three sit-down meals a day and is famed for its “Chena Fresh” lettuce

and tomatoes, which are grown on-site year-round and is a real treat in the

winter months when fresh produce is scarce. The other option is the Aurora

Café, which serves soups, salads and sandwiches in the activities center.

Day 2

Plan to spend a full day exploring all Fairbanks has to offer. Stay at the SpringHill

Suites in Downtown Fairbanks. It is in the hub of the city with restaurants and

shops in close proximity. Across the street are the Chena River and the Yukon

Quest Store. It’s worth stopping in to learn about this 1,000-mile dog sled race,

which makes the famous Iditarod Dog Sled Race look like a fun run. Also

located on-site with the hotel is Lavelle’s Bistro—one of the few upscale dining

spots in Fairbanks.

Get an early start from the hot springs and book a morning tour to either

Gold Dredge 8 or the Riverboat Discovery. The Binkley family has a long

family history dating from the Gold Rush era and owns both businesses. If

you are a fan of TV shows like “Gold Rush,” then you will enjoy the train ride

to Gold Dredge 8 where you can explore a gold dredge and pan for gold. The

Riverboat Discovery will take you on a roundtrip tour of so many iconic Alaska

experiences from a bush pilot demonstration, a dog sled demonstration and a

walking tour of a Chena Indian Village, all truly memorable experiences.

In the afternoon, book a tour at the Running Reindeer Ranch, where owner

Jane Atkinson has created a one-of-a-kind experience. She will regale you with

stories of the early days of her reindeer journey and why the ranch is named

“Running”—and yes, it does involve runaway reindeer. Atkinson is a gifted

storyteller, and her tales are shared while reindeer frolic around you. Enjoy a

walk through a boreal forest with plenty of photo opportunities. By the time you

depart, you will learn everything you could possibly imagine about reindeer.

This is sure to be the highlight of your Alaskan getaway.

The Pumphouse Restaurant on the banks of the Chena River recreates the

glory days of the Victorian Gold Rush era. This Fairbanks Treasure is filled

with antiques and authentic-to-the-period furnishings, many 150 years old.

The food is cooked to order from fresh local ingredients, Alaskan salmon and

Certified Angus beef. This place is popular with locals and tourists alike because

of the great food and service.

Day 3

Denali National Park is a two-hour scenic drive from Fairbanks. As summer

facilities shut down you want to start out with a full tank of gas and plan a

substantial picnic to bring with you (enough for two meals). This is an easily

doable day trip, and on the scenic drive you are likely to see wildlife on the way

to the park.

62 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Come Celebrate

life on the water.

Gig Harbor Gondola

Board the only authentic Venetian gondola

in the Pacific Northwest and let the stress melt away.

Let Gig Harbor’s beauty be the

backdrop of your celebration.

John Synco

Gig Harbor Marina & Boatyard

3117 Harborview Drive • Gig Harbor, Washington • 253.432.0052

8 gigharborgondola@gmail.com f Gig Harbor Gondola

5 gigharborgondola.com 5 gigharborgondola

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 63


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The bus transportation in the park shuts down on September 12. After this date

you can drive to mile post 30 at the Teklanika River. The road is open yearround

to vehicles as long as conditions allow. Your first stop will be the Murie

Science and Learning Center at mile 1.5 on the park road. This serves as the

winter visitors’ center. After getting all the information you need and double

checking on the road status, head 1.5 miles up the road to the Denali Dog Sled

Kennels. (Note, they are closed on Mondays.) There are no formal programs,

but you can get up close to the dogs and learn more about their mission in the

park.

People come to Denali National Park for its breathtaking natural scenery. As

you begin your drive into the park, keep an eye out for wildlife. If you are lucky

you will spot some of the bucket list animals such as grizzly bears, wolves,

caribou, moose and Dall sheep. Bring binoculars and a camera with a zoom

lens. Watch for cars pulled over to the side of the road or just stopped, as that is

a sure sign someone has spotted an animal.

At mile 15 you will come to the Savage River, which is a good place to stop.

Restrooms are available, and there is a 1.7-mile round-trip loop trail that follows

along the Savage River for a mile before crossing over a bridge and returning

on the other side. There is just a slight elevation change, but the trail is rocky.

Unlike most national parks, you can hike off-trail in Denali—just be careful and

watch your footing. People have died when hiking off-trail here.

You can continue your drive until you reach mile 30, the Teklanika Rest Stop,

which is your turn-around point. Depending on the weather and the amount of

daylight hours, you may have the opportunity to see the Aurora Borealis. It will

make for a long day, but if you didn’t see it at the Chena Hot Springs it will be

worth it to have this special experience.

Head to Fairbanks for the night and fly home the next morning or take a lateafternoon

flight and squeeze another activity in such as the Museum of the

North at the University of Alaska.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 65


Saturday, Sept. 28 / Noon - 5pm

Cider Swig

Greater Peninsula Cider Festival

6th Annual

Presented By Uptown Gig Harbor

SEHMEL HOMESTEAD PARK • GIG HARBOR

TAKE HOME YOUR FAVORITE CIDERS DIRECT FROM THE CIDERMAKERS!

66 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

TICKETS AVAILABLE

CIDERSWIG2019.EVENTBRITE.COM

$28 ADVANCE $35 @ GATE $18 VOLUNTEER

The Meacham

Foundation


2019 SUBARU ASCENT

Join us for the 17th Annual Kids Classic Golf Tournament

PENINSULA AUTO GROUP PROUDLY PRESENTS

The Kids Classic | Golf Tournament-Scramble

September 13th

Canterwood Golf and Country Club

12606 54th Ave. NW., Gig Harbor, WA 98332

Registration at 12:00 PM

Burgers, Hot Dogs & Beverages

Shotgun Start at 1:00 PM

RSVP by September 6th

Please call John Dionas or Denise: 800.458.5808

Located in Bremerton, only a 20-minute drive, and lower sales tax!

800.458.5808 | PeninsulaSubaru.com

3888 W. St. Hwy. 16, Bremerton, WA (between Bremerton & Port Orchard)

CLOSED ON SUNDAY FOR FAMILY DAY

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 67


*****************ECRWSS****

Please Deliver By September 6, 2019

Local Postal Customer

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Post Falls, ID

PERMIT NO. 32

68 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

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