BeatRoute Magazine AB Edition September 2019

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a monthly arts and entertainment paper with a predominant focus on music – local, independent or otherwise. The paper started in June 2004 and continues to provide a healthy dose of perversity while exercising rock ‘n’ roll ethics. Currently BeatRoute’s AB edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton (by S*A*R*G*E), Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

SEPTEMBER 2019 • FREE

Tegan

And

Sara

POP POWER

SIBLINGS

GO BACK

TO HIGH

SCHOOL

AND THEIR

PUNK ROCK

ROOTS

The New

Pornographers

Fontaines D.C.

Sam Fender

Carly Rae

Jepsen

Ghost

Free

Meek

Tool


B E

DEEPLY

FUNKY

FLU E VO G X G EO RGE

CLI NTO N THE MOTH ER S H I P

JOHNFLUEVOGSHOESGRANVILLEST··WATERST··FLUEVOGCOM


Contents

BEATROUTE

BEATROUTE

BEAT

ROUTE

BR

BRLIVE

BRYYZ

Up Front

4

7

8

The Guide

SOFI TUKKER bring the

world together through

their multilingual dance pop.

Drink

The Espresso Martini is

your answer to last call’s

last drink.

Style

Tyler, the Creator closes

out the tennis season with

his boldest statement yet.

Music

13

23

29

33

Concert Previews

Fontaines D.C., Sinzere,

Ghost, Black Mountain,

Pigs, Lissie, Carly Rae

Jepsen

The Playlist

All the singles we can’t stop

listening to this month.

Album Reviews

TOOL, BROCKHAMPTON,

Alex Cameron, The Lumineers,

Vivan Girls, Chron

Goblin, Pixies, Sam Fender,

Whitney, Rick Ross

Live Reviews

The Dirty Nil at Commonwealth

Tegan

And

Sara

POP POWER

SIBLINGS

GO BACK

TO HIGH

SCHOOL

AND THEIR

PUNK ROCK

ROOTS

Cover Story

26

Tegan and Sara

Pop twins’ tell-all High School

memoir relives everybody’s

most anxious, life defining

times.

SEPTEMBER 2019 • FREE

THE NEW

PORNOGRAPHERS

FONTAINES D.C.

SAM FENDER

CARLY RAE

JEPSEN

GHOST

TOOL

FREE

MEEK

SUMMER’S

LAST PARTY

WESTWARD

FEST GUIDE

INSIDE

Screen Time

34

34

36

Punk: four-part

documentary

traces the roots of the seminal

rise of music’s most confrontational

genre.

Free Meek

Criminal justice is exposed in

docuseries highlighting the

struggles of rapper Meek Mill’s

incarceration.

Calgary International

Film Festival

Music takes centrestage at CIFF

2019, exploring everything from

Miles Davis to Judy Garland.

YYC

39

44

46

36? at the Ship August 21, 2019.

Check out our review of this show

and more online at beatroute.ca

The Librarian

Calgary DJ reminisces about her

first Shambhala, and subsequent

career, ahead of Circle Carnival.

YYC Agenda

Beakerhead brings science and

technology to the front, Calgary

Folk Music Festival releases their

dual-LP covers album featuring

festival favourite alumni, Alberta

Guitar Shows hosts the gear

show to end gear shows.

YYC Music

Lindsay Ell brings a bit of

Nashville home to Calgary,

OFF-COUNTRY celebrates

country’s off shoots during the

CCMAs, Paul Coutts creates

music that connects Alberta,

Sunglaciers set to stun on their

debut LP, Foreign Bodies.

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

Plus The BeatRoute

Cheat Sheet brings you the

essential shows for September

in Calgary.

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 3


The Guide

SEPTEMBER

Dance-pop nerds

SOFI TUKKER provide

the sountrack to your

best night ever

You might know electronic music duo

SOFI TUKKER best from a 2017

iPhone X commercial featuring a poop

emoji happily lip-syncing along to

their song “Best Friend,” a track that

also showed up in the soundtrack for

Ocean’s Eight and FIFA 18.

The duo’s specific brand of

multilingual dance-pop has bridged

cultural divides, and their ability to pull

influences from around the world has

turned them into a widely soughtafter

act, capable of shutting down

a dance floor. Their latest single with

Colombian group Bomba Estereo,

“Playa Grande,” is performed in Engligh,

Spanish, and Portuguese.

Based in New York, Sophie Hawley-Weld

and Tucker Halpern met

while performing separately at a music

gala at Brown University. During his

set Halpern spontaneously remixed

one of Hawley-Weld’s songs, and the

next day they contacted each other.

That willingness to try just about

anything has translated into the music

they make together through their

project SOFI TUKKER.

Despite being two Ivy League music

nerds and receiving enough accolades

to earn a couple of Grammy nominations,

SOFI TUKKER enjoy settling

into their roles as the providers of your

party playlist, and want to be the backdrop

to having the night of your life.

Their debut full-length album,

Treehouse, was inspired by the kind

of unapologetic, childlike spirit that

allows you to be yourself to the fullest

extent. It’s the same spirit that the duo

hope to see when they look out over

the crowd on their latest tour, aptly

titled “R.I.P. Shame.”

SOFI TUKKER performs October 2 at

The Palace (Calgary) and October 4 at

the Commodore Ballroom (Vancouver).

By BEN BODDEZ

BEATROUTE

Publisher

Julia Rambeau Smith

Senior Editor

Glenn Alderson

Associate Editor

Brad Simm

Creative Director

Troy Beyer

Contributing Editors

Sebastian Buzzalino

Josephine Cruz

Dayna Mahannah

Melissa Vincent

Contributors

Max Asper • Ben Boddez

Morgan Cairns • Jonathan Crane

Jesse Gillett • Kathryn Helmore

Jeevin Johal • Brendan Lee

Christine Leonard

Dave MacIntyre • Dayna Mahannah

James Olson • Jennie Orton

Johnny Papan • Tory Rosso

Yasmine Shemesh •

Graeme Wiggins • Helena Zhang

Contributing Photographers

Lindsey Blane

Sebastian Buzzalino

Kira Clavell • Bev Davies

Michaela DeCiantis-Wong

Jesse Gillett • Joshua Grafstein

Preet Hundal • Olivia Jaffe

Amanda Leigh Smith

Céline Pinget • Kezia Nathe

Darrole Palmer • Travis Shinn

Dave Today • Daniel Topete

Coordinator (live music)

Darrole Palmer

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Distribution

BeatRoute is distributed in

Vancouver, Victoria, Calgary,

Edmonton, Winnipeg and

Saskatoon

Contact us

2405 East Hastings St.

Vancouver, BC

V5K 1Y8

e-mail:

editor@beatroute.ca


@beatrouteBC


@beatroutemedia


beatrouteBC

beatroute.ca


UPCOMING EVENTS

SEPT 6

SNAK THE RIPPER

Greasy Business Tour

CALGARY DEERFOOT CITY

SEPT 20

SEPT 21

SEPT 28

OCT 3

OCT 5

DUELING PIANOS

REC THE MIC

w/ 10at10

LUNA COAST EP RELEASE

w/ Alone I Walk, On The Frontline &

Nicolas Rage

DEHLI 2 DUBLIN

BIG BAND BURLESQUE

w/ Glitterverse Productions

Tickets and full listings

TheRecRoom.com

The Rec Room® is owned by Cineplex Entertainment L. P.

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

Upcoming Events

Thu. Sept. 5 | The Gateway Presents:

Grandson

with Special Guests

Fri. Sept. 6 | X92.9 Xposure Presents:

Bombargo

with Special Guests

Fri. Sept. 13 | The Gateway Presents:

Daniel Wesley

with Special Guests

Sun. Sept. 15 | The Gateway Presents:

Busty & The Bass

with Special Guests

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

Mon Sept. 16 & Tue. Sept. 17 | MRG Concerts Presents:

Ziggy Alberts

with Emily Brimlow

Tue. Sept. 24 | The Gateway Presents:

Sickboy Podcast:

Live!

Thurs. Sept. 26 FREE SHOW | The Gateway Presents:

The Gateway’s 18th

with Transit22, TEMI, WTVRR, and JAM!

Fri. Sept. 27 | Stampede Entertainment Presents:

Too Many Zooz &

Five Alarm Funk

Follow The Gateway on Facebook/Instagram/Twitter to stay informed on all upcoming events!

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

GATEWAY

Saitsa.com/events

Sat. Sept. 28 | ConcertWorks Presents:

Cancer Bats

with Single Mothers and Sharptooth

Fri. Oct. 4 | X92 Xposure Presents:

The Carbons

with A Day as Wolves and Poke The Bear

Tue. Oct. 15 | The Gateway Presents:

Tyler Shaw

with Special Guests

Sat. Oct. 19 | X92 Presents:

The Royal Foundry

with Special Guests

Wed. Oct. 30 + Thurs. Oct. 31 | X92.9 Presents:

The Dudes

Annual Halloween Party

The Gateway In SAIT Campus Centre, 1301 - 16 Avenue NW, Calgary, AB. 18+, Legal ID required. This event is open to all Sait students, staff, faculty, alumni, members, and guests. Please visit Saitsa.com for more information.

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 5


6 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


Drink

PEP UP

THE PARTY

The Espresso Martini

is the sophistocated

alternative for a late-night

pick-me-up. No Bull.

By JENNIE ORTON

T

hose seasoned in the ways

of oblivion know that the

trick to longevity in an

action-packed night on

the town is a well curated

mix of liquid courage and

high octane pep. Or as the

mysterious woman who, in

1980, entered Fred’s Club

in London to grab a nightcap

put it: something that will “wake

me up, then fuck me up.” The resulting

cocktail was the Espresso Martini

and for those who feel they may

have outgrown the Jagerbomb, this

is your key to a good time — and a

long time — while still looking classy.

Though credited to the aforementioned

Fred’s Club bartender Dick

Bradsell, the cocktail has enjoyed

several bouts of popularity as we

have gone through ebbs and flows of

admitting to ourselves that it’s one of

our collective guilty pleasures.

Through the years experts on both

coffee and mixology have weighed in

on the perfect way to pull and pour

this dark master of a mixed drink,

but the consensus seems to be 1.5

ounces of vodka, 3/4 ounce of hot

espresso coffee (a “short” for those

fond of third-wave coffee terminology),

3/4 ounce of Kahlua, and 1/3

ounce of sugar syrup. We decided

to reach out to experts across the

nation to find out why this turbo treat

has such staying power and how

they go about making it their own.

GORD HANNAH

Head Bartender and Cocktail

Ambassador / Drake Hotel Properties

Toronto, ON

“The Espresso Martini is fun, it

always has been and it always

will be. Dick Bradsell knew how

to throw a party. A little booze, a

little sweetness, a little bitter and

a kick of caffeine. Put all of that in

an elegant glass, served quickly

with a smile and your guests are

on their way to a great night. It is

every bartenders’ guilty pleasure

and an easy way to impress any

guest. Our current spec is based

on simplicity and history.”

Recipe:

1 oz Absolut Vodka

1 oz Kahlua

1 shot Espresso

Garnished with espresso beans.

REECE SOUTHERN

Bar Manager / Proof

Calgary, AB

“The Espresso Martini is a cocktail

I hold close to me. I watched the

drinks popularity steadily rise to

the point that venues were all

trying to put their crazy spin on this

modern classic. I’ve seen Espresso

Martinis batched into nitro kegs

for high volumes and almost every

high volume venue in Perth had

them on tap. I personally find the

classic recipe a tad too sweet and I

wanted to elevate my touch on this

cocktail giving the guest a version

that imparts part of me and my love

for this cocktail and the travels I

have been on.”

Recipe:

1.5 oz Vodka

.5 oz Amaro

.25 oz Coffee Liqueurs

1 oz Freshly Brewed Coffee

1 spoon 2:1 Simple Syrup

1 Pinch Salt

SHOIN FUJITA

Bar Manager / CinCin Ristorante + Bar

Vancouver, BC

“The Espresso Martini is such a

versatile classic cocktail because

you can enjoy it at any point of

your day. Breakfast, lunch, dinner,

nightcap - it really doesn’t matter. I

really believe that the cocktail has

a really big fan base that consists

of all sorts of people who like the

various recipes they have been

exposed to. Our recipe is meant

to be simple, executable during a

rush, and delicious.”

Recipe:

0.5 oz simple syrup

0.5 oz Kahlua

1.5 oz Van Gogh

Espresso Vodka

2 shots Espresso

Garnish with 3 espresso beans

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 7


Style

Tyler’s

TYLER, THE

CREATOR AND

LACOSTE TURN

NOSTALGIA

INTO STYLE

By DAYNA MAHANNAH

I

t wasn’t

enough for

Tyler, the Creator

to release his

sixth album, IGOR, to

critical acclaim earlier

this year — BeatRoute

called it a “compelling and complicated

reinvention.” Now the master collaborator

and music lion has teamed up with Lacoste to

bring his fashion game to the street.

GOLF le Fleur is his 16-piece collection

ranging from two-toned socks to fuzzy pink

sweaters and retro tracksuits, all softened with

a dreamy, 80s courtside vibe. In these pastel

pieces, comfort is at a lounging-in-sweatpantson-a-Sunday

level, while swag reaches heights

of front-row-at-the-French-Open.

Tyler’s beats and style have become intertwined

— he communicates articulately through

both phonics and visuals. Scrapping hyper-masculinity

for ungendered designs with simple lines

and fresh colour, "Fleur is for the busy and the

bold. Creamy Neapolitan tones are revamped:

pale pink, beige, and off-white become ‘litchi,’

‘geode,’ and ‘mascarpone."

If the retro and diverse campaign doesn’t

convince you, Tyler’s instagram videos might.

Watch him rap the rap — in a green and cream

GOLF le Fleur letterman jacket — to 12,000

people at Versailles Electro music event outside

Paris. He looks more than just comfortable.

Bucket hats off to you, Tyler.

Find GOLF le Fleur online at Lacoste’s physical and online

stores. Catch Tyler, the Creator live at Scotiabank Arena in

Toronto September 6, Place Bell in Laval September 11, and at

the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver October 15.

Tri-tone T

If a platinum bowl cut can

be enviable, bubblegum

blue can be classy. These

vertical colour blocks are

simple yet standout.

8 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


Tennis

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 9


Style

Double-Dip Collared Sweater

All retro prep, this thick cotton sweatshirt is cozy and

streamlined. The iconic Lacoste croc has been reworked with

stylized GOLF text.

Floccose Button-Down Cardigan

The warm-fuzzies have never felt so cool. Pull over a

T-shirt or wrap around your head to hide from envious gazes,

á la the Creator, courtside.

The Classic Polo—or is it?

It doesn’t take much to not be boring. A little asymmetry,

a rose in a croc’s mouth — this polo upends

expectations just enough.

Varsity Reminisci

Oh nostalgia. Bottle green wool, white leather.

A wardrobe staple that punches up any outfit with

sportswear chic and palpable street cred.

Slash Track Jacket

Inject bold slabs of colour into your morning

jog or slip a sleek 80s slant to your

Friday night outfit MO.

Not-Your-Fisherman’s Bucket Hat

True to old-school rap style, the bucket hat has powered

through decades of trends. Classic shape, fresh colour, and

the tell-tale GOLF Le Fleur ribbon? Absolute choice.

Bubblegum Bum

Remember the blonde bowl cut? These are the

matching shorts — straight lines, poppy colour,

good for warm weather.

Goede and Litchi Legs

Stretch and cotton let you move. Tuck your phone

in the back pocket, pop in your headphones, and

groove to IGOR all across town

What’s Good? Dem Socks

Feet cred turns heads. Coveted toes are no problem

here — pull up your socks and walk tall. Also available

in blue and mascarpone.

10 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


B E

DEEPLY

FUNKY

FLU E VO G X G EO RGE

CLI NTO N THE MOTH ER S H I P

JOHNFLUEVOGCALGARYTHAVESW··

JOHNFLUEVOGEDMONTONAVENW··

FLUEVOGCOM


MUSiC

The most

important thing is

to take yourself out,

and to serve the

song and not serve

the musician.

Carlos O’Connell,

Fontaines’ guitarist

Fontaines D.C.

Dublin post-punkers’

quest to become the

biggest band in the

world

By MELISSA VINCENT

It’s 7:30 pm in Dublin when Carlos

O’Connell, one of two guitarists in the

universally buzzed about Dublin post

punk band, Fontaines D.C, answers the

phone from the aptly named Garage Bar

in the city’s East End. It’s a familiar spot

for the band, one that they would meet at

frequently when their early poetry chapbooks

were in the genesis stage, and

now has become a familiar reprieve in

between their lengthy international tour.

“We found all our music tastes in here,”

O’Connell says over the clink of a pint in

the background.

It’s far from a surprise that the band

would select this location to chat with

writers the world over. When it comes

to memorializing the reality of life in

contemporary Dublin, few bands have

become such ardent archivists of time

and place like Fontaines D.C. Since rising

to attention in 2017 with their single

“Liberty Bell,” they’ve been in direct

opposition to the failure to launch myth

that’s populated contemporary rock. Now

with a late night performance on Jimmy

Fallon under their belt and a nomination

for the esteemed Mercury Award in tow,

Fontaines D.C. are part of the newest

group of artists, alongside bands like

London’s Shame and Bristol’s Idles,

tasked with revitalizing the newest era of

rock erupting out of the United Kingdom.

“One of the things we said from the

start is that we want to be the biggest

band in the world. I think that’s the thing

that we still want to be,” he says. When

asked why, O’Connell’s answer is an even

mix of depreciation and ambition. “Probably

we’re just deluded to be honest,” he

laughs. “But I think there’s nothing wrong

with that. I think I’ll probably hate it. But I

want to know if I will.”

Ambitions of grandeur aside, what

makes Fontaines D.C. stand out is their

devotion to a sonic approach that yields

to clarity. Through cutting their teeth on

a blend of asphyxiating social commentary

with a smart ear for sprawling,

scrappy melodies, perhaps unintentionally,

there’s a ragtag elegance to their seismic

debut Dogrel. Album opener “Big”

is a turbulent and unnervingly catchy

declaration of ownership that demands

rapt attention, and “Too Real” toys with

galactic off-kilter galactic synths, before

a precise, metallic bass line serves as

a necessary form of ground control.

“Checkless Reckless” adds its spin on a

parched and swampy kind of grindhouse,

and “Dublin City Sky” is a cerebral ballad

CONTINUED ON PG. 14 k

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 13

DANIEL TOPETE


DANIEL TOPETE

MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

FONTAINES D.C.

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

that resolutely pins the city’s heart to to

the arch of the band’s sleeve.

At nearly every corner, they debunk

the reductive description that they’re

a post-punk band. Task delegation and

discipline is something the band think

about often. Their ability to prevent

their flair for experimentation from careening

off a cliff is a calculated effort.

FONTAINES D.C.

Friday, Sept. 13

“It’s important for us that every element, even if

it’s a very simple element, is all necessary. The most

important thing is to take yourself out, and to serve

the song and not serve the musician,” he continues.

While much of their music has been described as

a clear-headed portrait of a specific moment in Dublin’s

cultural history, Fontaines D.C. consider their

method far less rigid. By relying on the mechanics of

poetry to examine themes of frustration and disillusionment,

gusto and joy, rather than crafting a love

letter to their city, they’re more invested in writing

an unedited state of the union signed off by those

at the bottom.

“We didn’t want to ignore any aspect of the place

we lived in, and just tried to see the honesty in the

place. A lot of the times those feelings weren’t necessarily

unpleasant, but we didn’t want to brush it

off. We wanted to understand them.”

To illustrate this point, O’Connell recites the following

line from Leonard Cohen’s “Famous Blue

Phoenix Concert Theatre

(Toronto)

Tix: $16, ticketfly.com

Friday, Sept. 20

Fox Cabaret (Vancouver)

Tix: $18, ticketweb.ca

Raincoat” from memory, and without

missing a beat: “And thanks, for

the trouble you took from her eyes / I

thought it was there for good so I never

tried.”

“Those lyrics just speak to the value

of ambiguity. The listener can place

whoever they want in the role of the

subject,” he says. “I think speaking of

lyrics too much can be damaging to the song. The

most important thing we have is our own interpretation

of things.”

In an era of cultural hyperspecificity, perhaps offering

listeners the agency to define the contents of

a song is more than a rejection of ego; it provides

an opportunity to dismantle the long-held assumptions

of who gets to be the protagonist in rock’s

most legendary stories. In an interview with The

Guardian, lead singer Grian Chatteren explained

that one reading of “Boys in the Better Land” could

be from the perspective of an ambiguous, multicultural

taxi driver asserting his Irishness.

“Most places more or less have the same broad,

political backbone. It has its flaws, and there’s good

things,” he finishes. “I suppose that’s part of the

reason why it resonates with people: because even

though they’re not from the same place that we got

all that inspiration from, there’s a mirror image in

all these different cities.” ,

50+ Bands

8 Venues

3 Nights of Music

1 Wristband

ON SALE NOW!

BREAKOUTWEST.CA

KICK OFF CONCERT FEATURING…

SARAH MACDOUGALL

This project is funded in part by FACTOR, the Government of Canada and Canada’s private radio broadcasters.

This Ce project projet is est funded financé in part en partie by FACTOR, par FACTOR, Musicaction le gouvernement and the Governent du Canada of Canada et and les Canada’s radiodiffuseurs private privés radio broadcasters.

du Canada.

Ce projet est financé en partie par FACTOR, Musicaction et le gouvernement du Canada et les radiodiffuseurs privés du Canada.

DAKHKÁ KHWÁAN

DANCERS AND DJ DASH

DEL BARBER

BreakOut West 2019 is funded in part by the government of Yukon

E D M O N T O N

GUITAR SHOW

Sunday SEPT 22, 2019 • 10 AM to 4 PM

Italian Cultural Center, 14230 - 133 Ave. NW

C A L G A R Y

GUITAR SHOW

Sunday SEPT 29, 2019 • 10 AM to 4 PM

Red & White Club, McMahon Stadium

$

10 Tickets

at the door

BROWSE

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PLAY SELL

BOUTIQUE

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14 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


Artist to Watch

SINZERE:

CALGARY RAPPER

INSPIRED BY HER

FAMILY'S RESILIENCE

By JONATHAN CRANE

C

algary rapper Sinzere has

channeled a lifetime of music

and the resiliency of her family

into a career that’s landed her

on the same stage as artists

like Elephant Man, Obie Trice,

and Mavado.

The young artist originally began as a

dancer, then naturally drifted into DJing

and MCing. It’s a process that started in

childhood, where the love of music was

passed down through the generations of

her Jamaican family.

“My mom was hugely influenced by

funk and early R&B and soul. And then

my grandma, she’d have 45s and a lot of

reggae cuts,” says Sinzere.

While Sinzere was born in Calgary, both

her mother and grandmother were born in

a tin shanty in Jamaica, both were single

mothers. When they arrived in Canada in

search of a better life they were met with

a tumultuous beginning. At the age of

seven an abusive relationship forced them

to relocate to Toronto.

“The reason why we moved in the first

place is because my sister’s dad was an

addict and he was very abusive. He made

an attempt on my mom’s life, and so it was

more like we ran to Toronto,” she says.

Once there they lived in a one-bedroom

apartment, in a state of perpetual fear

of being tracked

down by her

sister’s father. In

one instance he

almost succeeded.

SINZERE

Friday, Sept. 13

Container Bar (Calgary)

Tix: free

“He almost burned down the apartment

that we were in and we almost died,” says

Sinzere.

Witnessing her mother emerge as an

author and business owner after overcoming

this painful situation and subsequent

hardships is what has given Sinzere

the strength to forge ahead as an artist.

“All those trials and tribulations, her

walking through that fire, for it to be able

to burn her completely down to ashes

and for her to rise again like a phoenix, it

was one of the biggest inspirations,” says

Sinzere.

Her mother’s resiliency and triumph is

now the central theme of Sinzere’s forthcoming

album, Ghetto Gabby, a narrative

hip-hopera in which the beginning of the

album is the ending, a decision she says

will become apparent to listeners as they

progress through each track.

“The general theme is just understanding

that what you go through, your beginning,

it’s not who you are, or what you’ll

end up being,” says Sinzere. “There’s so

much more to the story.”

ESTHER CHO

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 15


LOCAL BEERS

& CRAFT COCKTAILS

&

DELICIOUS

FOOD

ALL DAY

BRUNCH • LUNCH • DINNER

no cover

EVERY SUNDAY

THE YYSCENE PRESENTS

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SUNDAYS

DOUG HOYER

WITH

LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR

EVERY FRI • 4-7 PM

VINYL BRUNCH

WITH ARCHIVE PAT

EVERY SATURDAY

VIBE • EAT • DRINK

LIVE

MUSIC

SEPT. 5-7

DAN

MOXON

FRI OCT. 11

SHRED KELLY

SAT OCT. 19

AND

MORE!

VISIT KINGEDDY.CA FOR INFO AND TICKETS

King Eddy | 438 9 Avenue SE, Calgary kingeddy.ca @KingEddyYYC #KingEddyYYC


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

GHOST

F

or nearly a decade, Ghost

frontman Tobias Forge

successfully obscured his

real identity from the limelight.

As Papa Emeritus’ I,

II, and III, pope-like entities

from the same fictional

bloodline, Forge found

conduits in which he could

angelically sing grim lyrics

over his band’s signature

style of metal.

Ghost then teamed up with pop-music

producer Klahs Ahlund, who previously

worked with the likes of Madonna,

Katy Perry and Britney Spears, and

unleashed the pseudo-gothic heavy

metal opera, Meliora, in 2015. Meliora

jolted the band into a new echelon

within their genre, misting a crisp,

catchy aura into their sound. They

band grew in popularity, and Forge’s

character at the time, the illustrious

Papa Emeritus III, became somewhat

of a sex symbol in the dark-alternative

community.

“I think people are attracted to

my characters for the same reasons

I got attracted to the cats in the musical

Cats when I was 12,” Forge says

while walking down a busy road in

his home-country of Sweden. “The

character could be whoever you’d like

them to be; all I saw was the shape of

a woman. Anytime there’s something

hidden, everything else is left to interpretation.

I think that serves the

excitement for anyone seeing Ghost.

You don’t have to think too much

about our hair color or how we smell.

You can imagine whatever qualities

you’d like.”

Unfortunately, fame’s complications

led to a lawsuit filed by Ghost’s

instrumentalists, previously only

known as the band’s ‘Nameless

Ghouls.’ Although the lawsuit was dismissed

by courts, Forge’s

anonymity as the singer of GHOST

Ghost was relinquished to Friday, Sept. 20

the public in 2017.

Pacific Coliseum (Vancouver)

Forge released a new Monday, Sept. 23

Ghost album, Prequelle, Rogers Place (Edmonton)

with new members in Tuesday, Sept. 24

2018. Musically, the album

continues the catchy,

Scotiabank Saddledome

(Calgary)

Tix: $39.50, ticketmaster.ca

arena-rock direction explored

in their previous

album. Again, Forge collaborated with

pop artists, a decision Forge says “mixes

things up.” Thematically, the album

touches on grim themes like the

Plague and Black Death, which Forge

The nine lives

of the unmasked

metal mastermind

Tobias Forge

By JOHNNY PAPAN

says are metaphors for the end of the

world—in a physical, emotional and

personal sense.

“The end of the world happens

to different people and societies all

the time,” Forge says. “When we talk

about the end of the world, I think

we have a tendency to forget that it’s

already happened, and will happen in

the future. It’s frightening, but morbidly

fascinating. Having my identity

revealed, that alone was not painful.

The process that led to it was painful

because I hadn’t done anything

wrong.”

Prior to Prequelle, Forge would introduce

a new Papa Emeritus character

every time Ghost would release

an album, each ‘Papa’ more evolved

than the last. For this album, Forge

decided to kill off the Papa Emeritus

lineage, introducing a new character—the

vampiristic and flawed Cardinal

Copia.

“We needed to see something

new,” Forge says about the demise

of Papa Emeritus. “Papa Emeritus

already reached maximum exaltation;

there was no trajectory. Now we

can see someone who has not risen

yet. Someone who is not perfected

yet. My characters are as much me

as they are others. Characters that I

don’t want to be, or wish I could have

been. Cardinal Copia has an amplified

coolness and slickness that you

can’t really have in real life, especially

not in a person like myself. I wouldn’t

be comfortable enough to behave as

ridiculous as Cardinal Copia. I can’t

really explain it, but he is a lot of

things that I am not.”

Despite his true identity being

outed by the public, Forge managed

to keep the bands mystique in tact.

Ghost’s fanbase is fully on board with

the act and their underworldly characters.

Their popularity continues

to grow and their shows and overall

aesthetic are becoming more theatrical

in nature. On separating himself

from his beloved characters, Forge

concludes:

“Let’s be real, I think Ghost is still

way more known than I will ever be.

I’m very happy that is the case. (For)

most artists, the difference between

them and the person on stage isn’t

visually clear. People expect them to

be that person all the time. No one

is really expecting me to be like my

character. I can actually step out of

him.” ,

17 BEATROUTE AUGUST 2019


BLACK

MOUNTAIN

Psychrock masterminds break barriers and burn rubber on high octane

space age highway chase By CHRISTINE LEONARD

OLIVIA JAFFE

H

overing over your metropolis

like a sleek black

leviathan, Destroyer is but

the latest vehicle of deliverance

for Vancouver space

rockers Black Mountain.

Armed with digitized pop

tentacles and pulsating

with vintage video game

vibes, the time-travelling album harvests

riffs and rhythms from across decades

and devices. Customarily nonchalant

about their earth-quaking creations,

founding guitarist/lead vocalist Stephen

McBean and lynchpin/keyboardist

Jeremy Schmidt, have always gravitated

towards generating deadly sonic vortexes

that defy chronological classification.

“We’re definitely in tune with our

aesthetic pasts. I guess that’s pretty evident,

just from what our preoccupations

are,” says Schmidt of the new album’s

retro-tronic soundscape. “I feel like the

past is something that’s always revealing

itself. Even though it seems like it’s

all behind us, variations of it seem to

be revealing themselves in the present

and continuing to do so in the future all

the time. So, to me it’s like the past is an

ongoing project.”

Crashing into mid-life with phasing

synths set to stun, Schmidt and McBean

hit the virtual reset button following

the appearance of the band’s previous

full-length release, IV (2016), leaving

them alone in the cockpit for the first

time in years. Approaching an age when

a man’s thoughts might run to HRT and

hot rods, the duo fixed upon the title

Destroyer, a nod to the discontinued

single-run 1985 Dodge testosterone

factory on wheels.

“Steve is actually a new driver. He

recently learned how to drive, so that

kind of informed a couple of the ideas in

an off-handed, casual way.”

The “Boogie Lover” persona that

flows from McBean’s newfound sense of

freedom comes through loud and clear

on new tracks such as the easy ridin’

“Future Shade,” the power mongering

“Horns Arising” and the Manson-child

recruitment anthem “Pretty Little

Lazies.” Pieced together between their

coastal outposts in LA and Vancouver,

the resulting production carries the

weight of Black Mountain’s ample experience

and a burning thirst for untested

waters.

“To me the results sound like a progression,”

Schmidt says. “The record fits

well within the canon of everything else

we’ve done. It seems similar enough to

what we’ve done in the past to sound

like a Black

Mountain record

and different

enough that it

sounds new.”

Determined

to repopulate

their psychedelic

utopia with

a fresh crew

of supporting

players,

the long-time

friends opened

the studio pod

BLACK MOUNTAIN

Saturday, Sept. 14

Vogue Theatre (Vancouver)

Sunday, Sept. 15

Distrikt (Victoria))

Tix: $25, eventbrite.ca

Tuesday, Sept. 17

The Starlite Room

(Edmonton)

Tix: $18, ticketweb.ca

Wednesday, Sept. 18

Commonwealth (Calgary)

Tix:$25, ticketweb.ca

bay doors to a brave new world of artistic

possibilities on Destroyer.

“We’ve always liked the balance of

female and male vocals. It adds a different

kind of narrative and it creates a

dynamic which I think is very appealing

and very much a part of the band,” he

continues. “One could say our ‘happy

place’ is where the organic meets the

electronic. It’s kind of like this yin and

yang thing where the two sort of egg

each other on. Blending artifice and

things that people regard as being more

organic has always been something of

interest to me and the band. In a lot of

ways, it’s the nucleus of our sound.”

Atomic poet/vocalist/keyboardist

18 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


Rachel Fannan (Only You, Sleepy Sun),

alt-metal drummer Adam Bulgasem

(Almost is Nothing, Dommengang,

Soft Kill) and bassist Arjan Miranda

complete Black Mountain’s live invasion

force. After a decade and a half as an

insular entity, the influx of new contributors

to their recording sessions has

brought vital energy to Black Mountain’s

monolithic stage presence.

“Stepping back and looking at the

album, it’s obviously different than you

imagined it might have been from the

beginning,” Schmidt says. “Live we’re

pretty true to the album, but we leave

room in the recording, so we have the

freedom to change things up. There’s

always some headroom to interpret

things as they start to take on a different

life on stage. When we approach

performing stuff it’s almost like we just

listened to the record and thought

‘Okay, let’s be the best Black Mountain

cover band we can be!’ Just kidding.”

The refueled Black Mountain will cut

a modest swath of destruction through

Canada and the US this September.

Keep your eyes on the skies as they

make contact with Black Mountain

Army converts at sightings scheduled

for touchdown from British Columbia

to Manitoba. ,

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 19


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

CARLY RAE

JEPSEN

A POP STAR FOR THE PEOPLE

By BEN BODDEZ

A

near-decade and two critically

acclaimed albums about the type of pop music

was really nice to start thinking

after the hit single, “Call I wanted to make. E•MO•-

Me Maybe,” there are TION was my first step into

still a surprising number that, and I’ve learned even

of people who view British

Columbia’s Carly Rae For all the talk of pic-

more with Dedicated.”

Jepsen as a pop-culture ture-perfect romance

punchline. But take a look at any in Jepsen’s music, it’s

online pop music forum and Jepsen easy to miss that she

stands tall as the reigning monarch, exists in many of her

complete with tongue-in-cheek adulations

proclaiming her as the genre’s er wishing for the euphoric fantasies

narratives as more of a lonely outsid-

holy saviour.

she sings about to come true. This

Jepsen is still taken aback by the message of escape that Jepsen presents

is universally appealing. Mem-

shift her career’s taken from massive

overnight sensation to the cult-like bers of the LGBTQ community hail

figure she is now. “I felt a different her as an icon, describing her jubilant

kind of good, to be embraced finally live shows as a place to fully step into

for something that was a lot more their identity — something Jepsen

real and a lot more of myself,” the has noticed.

singer admits. Through more personal,

heartfelt and emotional mate-

opener “Run Away With Me” as her

See points to her E•MO•TION

rial, she has made a deeper connection

with her fans. “‘Call Me Maybe’ reason.

favourite track to perform for that

was the gift of my life in so many “I’m trying to say to the audience,

ways, but I think the main thing was let’s forget everything tonight and

I saw it as a platform to show other escape into this feeling. And it feels

sides of who I am as an artist.” like I surrender myself too,” she says.

The song’s massive success was “I’m always amazed at the beautiful

what prompted her to take a step back crowd that we have. People are just

and reconsider what she really wanted.

“Chasing after the same thing crowds so full of love. How did we

nice to each other. I’ve never seen

didn’t even really seem possible, so it get so lucky?”

To emphasize just how

much you can discover when

looking below the surface level

of Jepsen’s music, a viral 150-page

essay titled A Scar No One Else

Can See attempted to showcase

how profoundly sad her music can

be, highlighting how Jepsen almost

always returns to the same themes

of obsession and longing. In fact,

“longing” is how she would describe

her album in a single word. “When

I listen to Billie Holiday, she makes

‘My Man’ sound so beautiful, and

yet it’s the saddest song in the

world. I think I like the contradictions

of those things sometimes

— really milking melancholy in

a way where it becomes poetic.”

While writing, Jepsen plans

for her music to be much more

somber — “very Lykke Li, Cat

Power type stuff” that reflects

her real-life romantic

experiences — before everything

changes in the recording

studio. “When I go into the

room, I naturally want to find

joy. And I don’t know why

that happens, but I stopped

questioning it too much.”

Still, she values every

moment in the studio and

on stage that she gets

choked up, reliving her

lowest points through

her songs. “‘Real Love’

hits me every night

that I play it now.

It’s good because

it reconnects

you.” The emotion

that comes

up reminds her

she is creating

art that comes

from a real

place. “Oth-

erwise you become like a Broadway

show where you go through the motions

of it and it’s like, ‘hit this spot

at this point.’ Anytime you’re kind of

shaken out of that on stage, it gets

across better to the audience,” she

says. “So I always treasure those moments,

even though sometimes it’s

like,” — here, Jepsen mimes a tearful

voice — “‘alright, I’m going to say it

again, all I want is real, real love!’”

To balance out those tearful moments,

Jepsen indulges in a little

bit of laughter. She emphasizes how

lucky she is to have found a kindred

sense of humour in both her fans

and her romantic partners. Despite

seeming confused and slightly embarrassed

whenever one of the many

memes comparing her to a pop music

heroine is brought up in conversation,

Jepsen appreciates the nonsensical

viral movement to give her

a (blow-up, non-dangerous) sword,

a weapon she now receives nightly

at her concerts. “I still don’t understand

it, but it’s adorable,” she says.

“I think it’s what I love about our

community, it feels like everyone has

a good sense of humour and wants to

have a joke together.”

While debuting her breakup song

“For Sure” for an ex-partner just before

they were separated by distance,

Jepsen says their eventual falling out

became something of a joke. “We

could laugh at anything. His hands

were up doing the happy dance, and

then he did a joking, slow sad dance

as he realized the words. But it was

meant to be funny, and we both

chuckled.”

Perhaps it is the perfect balance

between the two — the “happy

dance” and the “sad dance” — that

lifted Jepsen beyond “Call Me Maybe”

and landed her, “For Sure,” at the

top of pop music today. ,

20 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


FINDING CHARLOTTE

PIGS

Faux Floyd flying high By BRAD SIMM

W

hen a band can play a 400 seat theatre in Nelson,

B.C. on a Thursday, then get booked 40

minutes down the road in Trail the following

night to play a 700 seat venue, and then another

600 seater in Cranbrook only a couple

hours away on Saturday, by all means this is a

band with draw power.

Such is the status for Pigs, Canada’s top-seeded Pink

Floyd tribute act.

When Pink Floyd’s keyboardist, PIGS

Richard Wright, passed away in Wednesday, Oct. 2

2008 erasing the reunion possibility

of England’s rich mood mas-

Tix:$45

Bella Concert Hall

ters of multi-tracking, Pigs, under

the direction of guitarist/vocalist Josh Szczepanowski,

came into existence.

Based in Victoria, Pigs not only play sellout shows on

the West Coast and throughout the Interior of B.C., but

they’re currently embarking on yet another coast-to-coast

national tour with more than 40 dates this fall.

What’s all the buzz about? The method to their magic

in the seven-piece outfit goes to great lengths to recreate

the look, sound, and spirit of the great Floyd. This means

that in addition to the Roger Waters personality, they have

different guitarists trading off between Syd Barrett and

David Gilmore, drifting into extended psychedelic jams, a

female vocalist that does a soaring version of “Great Gig

In The Sky,” and even a sax player to make sure that crazy

diamond shines on and on.

Pigs is a tribute band that digs back to the 70s when

Pink Floyd floated high on the Battersea horizon.

THE NEW ALBUM

AVAILABLE 2019.09.27

STEELPANTHERROCKS.COM

/STEELPANTHER /STEELPANTHERROCKS /STEEL_PANTHER

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 21


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

C A LG ARY

Lissie

Soulful singer-songwriter channels country-living and her inner

Stevie Nicks for stripped down new album By YASMINE SHEMESH

$3.50 GUINNESS SLEEVES

AND $5.00 PINTS

PLUS TAX

JOIN US AT 1637 37 ST SW, CALGARY

WWW.DUBLINCALLING.COM/CALGARY

@DUBLINCALLINGCALGARY

Commonwealth Bar & Stage

(Calgary)

Tix: $13.50, eventbrite.ca

Tix: $22.50, westwardfest.com

E

lisabeth Maurus was in

LISSIE

high school, growing

Friday, Sept. 13

up in Rock City, Illinois,

the first time she heard

“Cowboy Take Me Away”

by the Dixie Chicks. Maurus,

Friday, Sept. 14

best known as singer-songwriter

Lissie, came across a 10-sec-

(Vancouver)

Rickshaw Theatre

ond clip of the country ballad on

the internet. She thought it was

beautiful and listened to the little

preview over and over again, until, finally,

she went out and bought the CD.

“It just really represented this ideal love, of

being able to be strong and certain of what

you want, and finding a partner that’s your

equal — someone you could build this beautiful,

authentic life with,” Maurus says speaking

with BeatRoute. “It stirred something up

in me and this sense of longing for that.”

Maurus’s own rendition of “Cowboy Take

Me Away” appears on her latest album,

When I’m Alone: The Piano Retrospective,

which features stripped-down re-imaginings

of her catalog, as well as a cover of Fleetwood

Mac’s “Dreams.” With the

record recalling where things

all began for Maurus in her

career — her striking voice — it

felt right to pay homage to two

of her favourite vocalists, Stevie

Nicks (Fleetwood Mac) and

Natalie Maines (Dixie Chicks).

And now, as an adult, living on a

sprawling 47-acre farm in rural

Iowa where she harvests hay,

“Cowboy” holds even deeper significance

for the artist.

“I mean, I couldn’t really warm more to

that idea of, ‘I want to touch the earth, I

want to break it in my hands, I want to grow

something wild and unruly,’” Maurus adds,

referencing the song’s lyrics. “It’s wanting to

live this sort of pastoral, nature-based life.

The place that I feel most happy is when

I’m out in nature. So, that song just took on

even more meaning for me. And, you know, I

do have a partner and he’s actually a farmer

and I always joke with him, ‘This song, ‘Cowboy

Take Me Away,’ this song is for you.’”

22 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


The Playlist:

BEATROUTE

3

5

BEATROUTE

BEAT

ROUTE

BR

BRLIVE

BRYYZ

10 songs in heavy rotation at the BR offices right now

4

6

8

1

Jorja Smith

Be Honest (Ft. Burna Boy)

The rising UK R&B artist teams up

with Nigeria’s biggest star, diving

fully into the Afrobeat sound after

exploring it on the Black Panther

soundtrack. Smith’s versatile vocals

sound good over almost anything

and she sounds almost like a young

Rihanna here, but Burna Boy’s

authentic sound sells the track.

3

Noble Oak

Evaporate

The Vancouver chillwave multi-instrumentalist’s

new track sounds

just like its artwork, depicting

someone looking off a mountain

into a cloud-filled sky. Producing

something that sounds this lush

and vibrant is impressive, and the

vocal layering at the end is dreampop

magic.

4 Katy

Perry

Small Talk

Bon Iver

5 Naeem

Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon compared

this track to the dramatics of

something from Les Miserables.

With and raspy, angry vocals, the

politically-tinged track ultimately

explodes into driving percussion

as Vernon nervously stresses

the need to make some changes

before we’re all extinct.

Katy Perry

continues her

redemption arc

with another solid

single addressing

the awkwardness

of having a regular

conversation

2 BROCKHAMPTON

If You Pray Right

Everything BROCKHAMPTON with someone

does is an absolute breath of fresh who once knew

air in the world of hip-hop, and this everything about

track is no exception. They keep you. It’s produced

things a little more structurally to its full bouncy

straightforward here, but there’s synthpop potential

something about each member by the classically-trained

Charlie

bringing their own unique sound to

that dark and intoxicating looping Puth, who actually

tuba beat makes us want to jump beatboxes most of

1

on the furniture. the percussion.

7 9 10

6

Half Moon Run

Then Again

The Montreal indie-rock quartet

finally release a song they’ve

been performing in different

versions for the last five years,

adding an eerie orchestral

string section up front in the

mix. A slow build that sees

them team up with Jack

White’s producer, the track

goes just about everywhere

before climaxing with a frantic

garage-rock section.

7 SiR

Hair Down

(Ft. Kendrick Lamar)

Top Dawg Entertainment’s

most underrated

member teams up with

its figurehead, trading

in his deeper vocals

and old-soul delivery

for a smooth, dreamy

track that fits in with a

more modern sound.

As usual, Lamar

completely takes over

the track with a verse

that’s uncharacteristically

subdued, but as

dynamic and charismatic

as ever.

8

Lana Del Rey

Looking For America

A track that won’t appear on Del

Rey’s upcoming album, she wrote

and released it quickly in response to

the four catastrophic mass shootings

in the United States in the first week

of August. Her voice is hauntingly

beautiful, delivering some harrowing

lyrics as she softly sings of her

dream of a peaceful future.

9 Phantogram

Mister Impossible

One of the alt-pop group’s most

experimental tracks yet, this percussion-heavy

track sounds like they’re

auditioning to land the theme song of

the next big superhero movie. Industrial

synths drone and a muted horn

section infuses the track with energy

as the two vocalists trade cryptic

lyrics about a decidedly badass dude.

10 Bazzi

Fallin (Ft. 6lack)

The young singer-songwriter brings a

more somber spin to the trap-pop formulas

dominating the radio, teaming

up with one of R&B’s most passionate

crooners, 6lack, while emoting over a

sparse piano instrumental and deep,

choral backing vocals.

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 23


24 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019

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THEN&NOW


We had grown up in

the punk and alternative

scene of the 9 0s, if

you made a dollar,

you were a sell-out.

And your music sucked.

And you were shit. -SARA

BACK FROM THE PAST, ONE

SOLITARY SISTER TALKS THE 90s,

FIRSTS OF ALL SORTS, AND REVILED

‘CLASSIC TWIN QUESTIONS’

By DAYNA MAHANNAH

For most people, high school is among the atrocities

they’d like to never think about again. For Calgary-born

indie-pop twins Tegan and Sara Quin,

those memories are the bedrock of their first memoir,

appropriately dubbed High School, and ninth

studio album, Hey, You’re Just Like Me.

While prepping for a near sold-out North American

tour, Sara hopped on a call with BeatRoute

from her Vancouver home, where she recently

landed after bouncing between cities, countries,

and coasts for the last decade. She had moved

there as a broke artist at 20, but couldn’t “eat or

drink or live,” and headed east. “Now I’ve come

back as an adult! With disposable income!”

With most family and industry connections on

the west coast, the move makes for a happier work/

life balance. It’s also the first time Sara and Tegan

have lived in the same Canadian city since 2002.

Though the twins’ tumultuous relationship is

no secret, writing a memoir together has been a

long-talked about project. The crux of the book’s

narrative crystallized while reminiscing about

high school. Not only were those years their most

formative, but Sara and Tegan, who turn 39 this

month, realized it was an opportunity to share

their origin story in more detail than interviews

allowed for.

“We’re forced to give really short answers because

we know there’s not time to dig into that

history,” Sara says. “We didn’t feel like there was

space or time to share it.”

Why bring up an LSD-laced, emotionally turbulent

“boiling point” of being queer teen girls in

the nineties? “Those years are seminal,” Sara says

with a deep breath. At 15, Tegan and Sara had never

touched a guitar, and by 17 they were being offered

a record deal. It’s a story of firsts—stepping onto

a stage, using a microphone, receiving applause—

profound moments burned into their memories.

“It’s the same with love,” Sara adds, who is now

best friends with the first girl she had a romantic

relationship with.

CONTINUED ON PG. 24 k

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 25


BRCOVERSTORY

BRYYZ

Once I discovered I

could write songs, it

really replaced a lot of my

other bad habits. I was

less interested in drugs and

drinking. In a weird way,

it was a good addiction.

-SARA

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

Digging into their past led to the discovery

of the first songs they wrote at 15. “Once I

discovered I could write songs, it replaced

my other bad habits. I was less interested in

drugs and drinking,” Sara says. “In a weird

way, it was a good addiction.”

When others took notice of their music,

Tegan was brazen with confidence, while

Sara wanted to weigh the options. “Tegan

was like, ‘If they don’t get it, fuck ‘em.’

And I was like, ‘Hm. If they don’t get it,

I want to understand why. Are there vulnerabilities

and weaknesses in what we’re

doing, should we consider that?’” But she

admits that it was her sister’s enthusiasm

and entrepreneurial spirit that won her

over. “We had grown up in the punk and

alternative scene of the 1990s — if you

made a dollar, you were a sell-out; your

music sucked; and you were shit.” Her

voice is lighthearted. “And Tegan was like,

‘let’s just make some money. We gotta pay

the bills.’ She sort of recognized the privilege

of even being able to decide that your

art shouldn’t have value.”

The twins wrote more than 40 songs in three

years, 12 of which made the album. Hey, I’m Just

Like You is a time capsule of teen angst, emotion,

and defiance—a real-life soundtrack to their High

School memoir. Lies, love, and broken hearts

run the course with satisfying melodrama and

head-bobbing nostalgia. “Hold My Breath Until I

Die” captures the life-or-death stakes that youth

injects into relationships, while the title track is

a colourful celebration of friendship. Held up to

Tegan and Sara’s present-day selves, the songs

retain their punk heart while the album’s pop

production is a testament to the twins’ musical

evolution.

Now idols of entrepreneurial savvy and queer

resistance, the duo are still trying to reconcile

individual identities with an award-winning career

built heavily on their twin image. “There

are strong parallels between being a twin and being

famous,” Sara says. Even in strollers, people

would swarm the Quins. Their parents started

taking the toddlers out separately to avoid attention.

“Sharing a face” had its upsides, though, like

when they transferred to a new school in third

grade. “I knew we could use each other as power.

We could go to this new

school and if we were

together, people were

gonna be interested. We

wouldn’t be invisible.”

That superpower became

“claustrophobic”

over the years — a “trap”

that oppressed individuality,

yet made the pair

distinct. Does Sara still

struggle with it? “Absolutely.

It almost intensifies

with age,”

she says. The infan-

TEGAN AND SARA

Saturday, Oct. 5

The Vogue Theatre (Van.)

Wednesday, Oct. 9

Myer Horowitz

Theatre (Edmonton)

Thursday, Oct. 10

Bella Concert Hall

(Calgary)

Thursday, Oct. 11

Bella Concert Hall

(Calgary)

Friday, Oct. 12

The Garrick (Winnipeg)

Tix: Sold out

tilization that a “fluke of science” invites is a

point of contention for her. “People will ask

in interviews, ‘Do you still live together?’

And I’m like, ‘Do you live with your 40 year

old sibling?’” Her voice has spiked an octave.

“People try to ask us the ‘classic twin

questions.’ Like, I’m not gonna give you

pull quotes about whether we can read each

other’s thoughts. Give me a break. If I could

read Tegan’s mind, we’d be in Vegas doing card

tricks.” Her tone drops. “Why are there certain

rules for non-twins we don’t allow for twins?

Or why do we treat famous people like they

don’t get the same privacy and respect that

you want?”

While writing both book and album, Sara

rediscovered poignant confessions sprinkled

among “asshole adolescent” notes. She was

failing classes, but afraid to admit she didn’t

want to go to post-secondary. “I was a deeply

closeted, suffering, confused teenager.”

She scribbled notes about living up to the

expectations of my parents. “Especially my

mother, who was risking it all, going back to

school and working a job full-time and raising

us. I can barely deal with my life and

my cats.” Her mother isn’t so sure, and

worries the memoir doesn’t showcase her

well. “I think that’s her own self criticism

because most people read the book and

think she was fantastic. And she was.”

For their birthday on September 19,

Tegan and Sara will be working. Maybe

indulge in a “nip of scotch” before bed.

It’s a far cry from the experimental days

of their youth, but Sara doesn’t mind. “I

just wanna stare at a bird and tree, and

sleep really well.” That giggle again. “I

feel like it’s a nice period of my life to

be creative and quiet.” Funny, since

Tegan and Sara will be playing to sold

out venues across the continent

this fall. On second thought, the

kids turned out alright. Sara’s

smiles into the phone; “I

think my mom’s really

proud of us.” ,

26 BEATROUTE AUGUST 2019


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TEGAN AND SARA

HEY, I’M JUST LIKE YOU

THE NEW ALBUM

OUT 9.27.19

THE BOOK OUT 9.24.19


Reviews

ALBUM

Album Review

TOOL

Fear Inoculum

Sony Music

TOOL taught everyone a lesson in patience

with a 13-year wait for new material. This

skill comes in handy when listening to Fear

Inoculum, a challenging album that finds the

band leading the listener through long hallways

of hard truths and elusive catharsis. Release

comes, but they make you work for it.

From the first familiar cymbal tings of the

title track, to the sketchy paranoia in the Danny

Carey drum solo track, “Chocolate Chip Trip,”

you’re left feeling like you’ve stumbled into a

funhouse full of warped mirrors and memories

— jarring but oddly satisfying.

It’s in “Descending,” when Justin Chanellor’s

churning bass line and Carey’s driving war

cry drums, you hear singer Maynard James

Keenan bellow, «Stir us from our wanton

slumber. Mitigate our ruin. Call us all to

arms and order” that the work reveals its

fruit. This slightly resentful, slightly menacing,

slightly jaded growl is the voice of a band back

from a long time in the abyss. You can see the

claw marks on them; years of speculation and

demands, years of watching their country become

a circus of entitlement and division, years

of fending off the ghosts of their own relevance.

The last two minutes of this song breathes fire,

a chest bursting delivery from the beast that

rode the spiral to the end and led us all where

no one’s been before.

Tempestuous as always, TOOL prove

that absence breeds breathless longing

and makes escapists of us all. True to

form, they do not allow us to escape, but

instead put us right in front, face first with

a snarl. And all we can do it smile and ask

for more.

Best Song: Descending

Jennie Orton

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 29

TRAVIS SHINN


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

Interview

THE NEW

PORNOGRAPHERS'

THROWBACK

TO SIMPLER

TIMES

BROCKHAMPTON

Ginger

Question Everything/RCA

THE NEW

PORNOGRAPHERS

In the Morse Code of

Brake Lights

Collected Work Records

Carl Newman is sitting on a chic

couch in a vacant corner of Toronto’s

Chelsea Hotel, basking in confident

tranquility. He’s calm, cool,

collected, and sipping on a latte as

he meets with the press, mentally

preparing to lead his band, The

New Pornographers, on yet another

tour, this time in support of their

eighth studio album, In the Morse

Code of Brake Lights.

Since their inception in 2000,

the Canadian indie rockers have

amassed fandom all around the

world due to their penchant for

catchy power pop tunes and

relatable songwriting. Their last album,

Whiteout Conditions (2017),

received favourable reviews, and

was followed by a successful tour.

Now, two years later, armed with

a new collection of songs, Newman

is ready to ramp things up

again. You might wonder where his

head is at, but his head is where it’s

always been – in the music.

“I feel like I never really get

away from the music. I get away

from playing gigs, but I’m always

at home trying to write,” says

Newman. “Like even right now, this

record hasn’t even come out yet

and I’m already looking at what

I’ve been working on most recently

and saying, ‘I’ve got the guts of

another record here.’”

Home for Newman is in the

small upstate New York town of

Woodstock, where he lives with

his wife and seven-year-old son.

There are only about 6000 residents

in the offseason, with it doubling

during the summer months.

He enjoys the peace and quiet of

the place but is very aware of the

larger national community and political

atmosphere he is now a part

of, and it seeps into his writing. “I

just can’t avoid it,” says Newman,

but at the same time, he doubts

his own perspective.

“Well for me it’s ultimately just

personal. Like I’m not trying to

write any statement about what

it means to be here right now, but

I can try to communicate what I

feel like and maybe somebody

else feels the same way,” says

Newman. “In a lot of ways, I don’t

think it’s my place to be the person

who tries to make a political

statement about what’s going on

because I’m the privileged one. I’m

a middle aged straight white guy.

Not that we don’t have anything to

say, but nobody needs us to step

in and say, ‘Hey guys, I’ve figured

this out!’”

While Brake Lights’ political

themes are a more latent effect

of Newman’s surroundings, the

album’s throwback sound is much

more purposeful. He notes that,

as he’s gotten older, he’s become

less self-conscious about repeating

himself.

“Halfway through the record,

I think I was in Vancouver, I said,

‘Let’s do it differently. Let’s speed

it up by 10 or 15 BPM and give it

more of a DOO DOO DOO DOO,

that driving four-on-the-floor thing

we used to do more of.’”

The result is a sound that new

and long-time fans can easily

enjoy, throwing things back to

simpler times, when things were

less chaotic and everyone was

more or less on the same driving

beat.

Best track: The Surprise Knock


Max Asper

It’s only been three years since

BROCKHAMPTON released their

first mixtape, but the “boy band”

that famously formed through a

Kanye West fan forum has lived a

lifetime since. Among their biggest

wins was securing a $15-million

record deal with RCA; an achievement

offset by the departure of

popular member (and possibly best

rapper), Ameer Vann, amid sexual

misconduct allegations.

They’ve made it through hell,

and their latest effort Ginger is

the story of what it’s like adjusting

to the other side. This quip from

de facto leader Kevin Abstract on

“Dearly Departed” describes the

overall vibe: “No lies, ‘bout how me

and my brothers been traumatized

/ And I must keep creating truths

and hooks to get up outta this hell

for myself.” While it’s not exactly

triumphant or jubilant, it’s honest,

and articulates more complicated

and mature emotions than we’ve

seen in the past from the group.

The album starts off swinging

with the four best tracks in

succession—with an appearance

from buzzy British rapper slowthai

in there for good measure. The

vocal styles and themes feel a bit

disjointed at times, which seems

inevitable in a group so large, but

the stellar production of Romil

Hemnani and Jabari Manwa holds

everything together nicely.

Some producers may struggle to

create canvases that can accomodate

so many contrasting styles,

but these guys navigate the group’s

performance needs with ease to

create the emotionally fun ride that

is Ginger.

Best Track: Boy Bye

Josephine Cruz

30 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


ALEX CAMERON

Miami Memory

Secretly Canadian

THE LUMINEERS

III

Dualtone

VIVIAN GIRLS

Memory

Polyvinyl Record Co

CHRON GOBLIN

Here Before

Grand Hand Records

PIXIES

Beneath the Eyrie

BMG

A master of the caricature, Alex

Cameron’s previous work delightfully

presented a tongue-in-cheek

portrait of a hypermasculine,

verile, and seedy middle-aged man

struggling to find meaning in a

progressive and feminist age. With

Miami Memory, Cameron takes a

surprising turn. Placing the femme

fetale in the centre, Cameron’s new

album bids his colour characterizations

adieu and embodies a new

character: himself.

The glistening Miami Memory is

a candid and vulnerable love letter

to his girlfriend, actress Jemima

Kirke (of Girls fame). The first

single, “Miami Memory,” captures

the tenderness and honesty of

long-term commitment with a track

shimmering in nostalgic synth and

Cameron’s trademark sax. Yet,

Cameron hasn’t gone soft. Far from

just silly love songs, the track is

unapologetically sexual and complex

with recollections of cellulite

massages and “eating ass” in a city

condemned by rising sea levels.

Shedding the masciline parody in

celebration of the female perspective

and empowerment, “Far From

Born Again” explores the hypocrisy

and and flips the script on sex

work.

Still rife with Cameron’s deliciously

nostalgic dad rock sound,

driven by bass, guitar, sax and layers

of organ, Miami Memory is nevertheless

an unexpected turn. Yet,

true to Cameron’s form, his love

letter to womanhood is refreshing,

insightful, and meaningful.

Best Track: Far From Born Again

The dulcet tone of Denver’s favorite

indie crooners takes a ride on

the concept album train with III, a

Catskill Mountain inspired threepart

family tale full of sentiment

and swell.

The reach of III is larger than that

of previous entries with production

that allows for larger kicks, churning

reverb, and an insistence upon

the grandiose.

Still present are the wistful lyrics

and the camaraderie of the vocals,

but new is the sense that this is

a larger story, one that doesn’t

bank on the ambiguity of familiar

experience to gain emotional

buy-in. These are stories told with

a stomping earnestness, much like

Tom Petty’s coziest numbers.

Broken into three parts, the

album tells the story of Gloria,

Junior, and Jimmy Sparks, three

generations of a family grappling

with addiction. “Salt And The Sea”

is particularly touching in its incredible

loneliness and regret, with

piano keys that mainline straight to

the part of your heart that knows

those feelings all too well.

The Lumineers have moved

away from sweet and harmless

wedding songs towards the lovely

pain of poetry about normal people

weathering the storm of regular life

and it looks good on them.

Best Track: Jimmy Sparks

Jennie Orton

Vivian Girls rip the covers off Memory

with “Most of All,” a two-minute

psych-pop banger that crashes into

its hazy, urgent chorus as soon as

it starts.

It’s a fitting reintroduction to

Vivian Girls on their reunion album,

a clear statement from the trio that

they’re back after more than five

years spent living apart.

Amidst swirling vocals and a

frenetic, driving rhythm section,

Cassie Ramone’s chants compel

the band forward into the depths

of a psychic poetry reading in the

back of some ephemeral DIY art

space. It’s a dream world built from

the perfect blend of nostalgia and

three-too-many beers and Vivian

Girls set the ideal soundtrack to the

madness.

There’s a romantic urgency that

drives Memory forward, like a stolen

kiss at the end of the night. “This

memory is all I need to feel all right,”

sings Ramone on the title track and

you get the sense that Vivial Girls

feel reinvigorated by their reunion,

looking only forward.

Vivian Girls are back with Memory,

but it mysteriously sounds like

they never split up in the first place.

Best Track - Something To Do

Sebastian Buzzalino

Ascending from their role as

local skatepark punks to that of

Canadian psych-rock tastemakers,

Calgary’s legendary curb-grinding

garage band Chron Goblin isn’t the

same old thrash ‘n’ grab outfit they

once were.

Here Before, marks a deliberate

recalibration from the hard-rolling

crew as they crank the production

values to eleven on volatile numbers

like “Giving in to Fun,” “Slipping

Under,” and “Out of My Mind.”

Singer Josh Sandulak’s raucous

vocals and poetic lyrics are thrust

into the spotlight as never before

and his confident, yet bitter, mouthfuls

come washed down with an

unerring supply of acidic guitar riffs

and dexterous rhythms. Haunted

by a shared history and infectious

back catalogue, the group

navigates a jagged path through

the dank underbrush on “Oblivion”

before diving into the lazy river of

the lumbering “Giant.”

Intricate, intentional and gritty to

the bone, Here Before challenges

the maturing quartet to supersede

their former selves with dangerously

divergent compositions; including

eerie banshee ballad “Ghost” and

pugnacious ripper “War.” The defining

wallet-chain swagger, bluesy

breakdowns and ballsy bravado

that set them apart from day one

may remain the same, but Chron

Goblin’s best just got a whole lot

better.

Best Track: Giant

Christine Leonard

The Pixies have always sounded

like they were from a faraway

place, somewhere beyond the

stratosphere. And that Frank Black

believed in UFOs and was an avid

sci-fi fan only accented their outer-worldliness.

By complying to a “no blues rule,”

the throbbing bass lines, Black’s

primordial wail and Joey Santiago’s

angular Latino riffs made them

undeniably weird.

While Black still steers the craft

along the extraterrestrial plane,

on Beneath the Eyrie, their third

post-reunion album since 2004,

the territory they traverse dips into

some very earthly portals. “Graveyard

Hill,” with its touch of 60s psychedelia

and B-movie spook theme

exhumes Vincent Price from the

crypt. There’s a direct dissension

into vaudeville with the medicine

show strut of “This is My Fate” and

a full-out psychobilly romp rips

through “St. Nazaire.” Hollywood’s

creep scene is only part of the tour

package.

Santiago’s guitar playing has

always been the Pixies’ secret

weapon, while Black wears his

atomic beach pop heart on his

sleeve. No one will ever grasp who

the strange little characters in his

songs actually are, but that too is

part of the Pixies’ charm — weirdos

in a weird land, which Beneath the

Eyrie is all about.

Best Track - Ready for Love


Brad Simm

Kathryn Helmore

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 31


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

Interview

WHITNEY

Forever Turned Around

Secretly Canadian

RICK ROSS

Port of Miami 2

MMG/Epic Records

SAM FENDER'S

MESSAGE TO

THE COMMON

PEOPLE

SAM FENDER

Hypersonic Missiles

Interscope Records

To divorce Sam Fender’s music

from his Northern England roots

is near impossible.

The colour of industrial, impoverished

and often forgotten

North Shields, England saturates

the 24-year-old’s guitar-fuelled

indie rock, creating a repertoire

that is gritty, unflinching and starkly

different from the plethora of softcore

romantics like Ed Sheeran or

Sam Smith.

“Where I’m from definitely plays

a part in my music because it is

intrinsically part of who I am,” says

Fender. “When my parents divorced

at 10 I moved from a terrace house

into a small flat. We could only work

a certain number of hours a week

and the majority of our money was

coming from benefits. We were on

the bones of our arse. There was

no such thing as savings.”

Growing up on the precipice

of poverty has given Fender a

curiosity and compassion for those

surviving in the chasm below. His

debut album, Hypersonic Missiles,

tackles subjects such as young

male suicide rates on the track

“Dead Boys.” In addition to gritty

and grounded lyrics, the album,

produced in Fender’s self-made

warehouse, is loud, occasionally

bombastic post-punk with hollering

Buckley-esque vocals layered on

top. It packs the heat and meaning

of Brit-rock with a soulful

modern twist.

Nevertheless, Fender is humble

and refuses the mantle of working

class hero.

“I’m not on some crusade,”

says Fender. “I don’t like to say

I’m working class but I am from

a working class family and I’m

from a working class town. I’ve

experienced many different

financial situations throughout my

life. I would say that what I am is a

common person and I can stand

for that.”

With venues like New York

and LA already sold out on his

upcoming North American tour,

Fender is clearly finding international

resonance. Perhaps this

is because, while North Shields

might be in a frozen corner of

an island an entire ocean away,

the stuff he writes about and the

common people he speaks to are

found in every corner.

Best Track: Dead Boys

Kathryn Helmore

Three years after their acclaimed

debut, Light Upon the Lake, the

Chicago-based Whitney return

with Forever Turned Around, a

sophomore effort that expands on

their signature duality of bluesy,

cozy indie folk.

Acoustic guitars, trumpets,

pianos and subtle electric guitars

are central to the mix, paired with

wistful, melancholic lyrics often

discussing themes of lost love.

Evoking traces of Bon Iver, soul,

Americana, and fellow Chi-Town

dad rockers, Wilco, Whitney show

once again how adept they are at

tugging at heartstrings both lyrically

and musically, even if the results

as a whole sound almost identical

to their debut.

Regardless, Forever Turned

Around has some truly gorgeous

moments. Warm, enfolding lead

single “Giving Up,” as well as “Valleys

(My Love),” the breezy “Friend

of Mine,” and its sweeping closing

title track are clear standouts,

while drummer/vocalist Julien

Ehrlich’s delicate falsetto remains

the group’s calling card.

Though the album itself may not

be a gigantic leap forward musically

for Whitney, their collection of

tender folk songs will fit the mood

nicely as summer turns to autumn.

Best Track: Valleys (My Love)

Dave MacIntyre

With his long-awaited sequel, Port

of Miami 2, rap-veteran Rick Ross

reasserts his prowess for bassheavy

bangers, strong collaborations,

and music that makes you

feel invincible.

It’s been two years since we’ve

heard an album from the Teflon

Don. His 2017 offering, Rather You

Than Me, received decent reviews

but didn’t bring any new relevance

to the Florida rapper. Whether this

album can accomplish that remains

to be seen, but Ross has more to

say this time around, speaking on

the widely publicized legal troubles

of his own label’s signee, Meek Mill,

a scary health episode with a heart

attack, and the passing of friend

and collaborator, Nipsey Hussle.

Port of Miami 2 delivers as a

quintessential Rick Ross album.

From its full-flex opener, “Act

a Fool (feat. Wale),” to its most

banging track, “BIG TYME (feat.

Swizz Beatz),” to the more heartfelt

moments like “Fascinated,” this is

a solid rap album with excellent

production and features.

While it likely won’t bring Ross

back to the heights he saw circa

2012, it’s a worthwhile offering for

new and long-time fans.

Best Track: BIG TYME

(feat. Swizz Beatz)

Max Asper

32 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


Live

MUSiC

THE DIRTY

NIL

August 24, 2019

Commonwealth Bar & Stage

JESSE GILLET

From the moment the house

music dropped, the Dirty Nil

had the audience in the palm

of their hand. Lighting up

Commonwealth’s stage, the

three-piece powerhouse hurtled

into an onslaught of massive

tunes and whiplash-inducing

stage presence. Guitarist

Luke Bentham popped bright

pink bubble gum while churning

out swaggering guitar riffs

and irresistible shout-along

choruses. Ross Miller’s bass

grooves were coupled with

manic dance moves and high

kicks aimed to pierce the

ceiling, while Kyle Fisher kept

the train firmly on the rails with

his thunderous beats. Though

they hail from Hamilton, Ontario,

the Nil were undoubtedly

at home on stage demolishing

the barrier between artist and

audience. Their primal, yet polished,

performance stands in

bold defiance of anyone who

thinks rock and roll is dead.

Kicking off the night were

the Foul English, who set the

stage with their signature

“dadcore” punk rock. Earnest,

punchy, and with more energy

than many acts half their age,

the Foul English prove you’re

never too old to rock hard.


Jesse Gillett

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 33


Essential Film and TV for music lovers

Screen

Time

John Lydon of Public

Image Limited, Oct 14,

1984 at UBC

BEV DAVIES

BEV DAVIES

Iggy Pop performing at the

Sub Ballroom, Nov 23, 1979

LYNN WERNER

DOA’s

Randy

Rampage with

Joey Ramone

Crave’s Punk: A Movement In Four-Parts elevates the early roots of punk and its long-lasting legacy By BRENDAN LEE

W

hoever Iggy Pop

34 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER AUGUST 2019 2019

you are, wherever you hail

from, we all at the very least, have

a vague understanding of Punk music

as both a genre and an evolving

movement. But when viewed from

afar, the screeching skinny kids with mohawks

may seem nothing more than unpalatable

noise. The latest Crave documentary series,

PUNK: A Movement in Four Parts, peels back

the genre’s crusty skin, revealing an intricate

heart still beating with vigour.

“We kind of equate punk music with being

a room full of boneheads,” says director, Jesse

James Miller, “but it’s actually completely the

opposite.”

Miller joins consulting producer, Susanne

Tabata, on a phone call with BeatRoute on a

sleepy Saturday morning. Tabata has deep

roots in the Vancouver punk scene, and was

part of the series’ core creative team based

out of Vancouver.

Each instalment of the four-part series

(produced by Derik Murray and Network Entertainment,

exec produced by Iggy Pop and

John Varvatos) focuses on a particular era

in the punk chronology, featuring interviews

with the likes of Johnny Rotten, Iggy Pop,

Dave Grohl and many more.

The city of Vancouver plays an integral part

in the whole story, and, particularly, the third

episode — a part that both Miller and Tabata

fought for.

“Vancouver was a really big part of that

west-coast express going up and down the I-5

highway,” reflects Tabata, who also produced

and directed the Vancouver punk-scene 1977-

81 documentary, Bloodied but Unbowed.

“And then D.O.A., they were the biggest touring

band, exceeding Black Flag at that time.”

Close friends with Randy Rampage (D.O.A),

who sadly passed just as the project was getting

off the ground, Tabata says she “worked

on [PUNK] in his honour silently.”

When asked what it was like to sit across

from so many legends, Miller seems humbled.

“It was an honour,” he says. “They’re all

very sophisticated, very layered, very deep

people and heavy thinkers.”

Punk music, at its core, has always been

about more than drugs, sex and anarchy — although

there’s a lot of that too. Above all else,

PUNK showcases the menagerie of personalities

who unknowingly became leaders of a

movement that truly celebrates individuality.

“I keep learning about punk as I go through

life now,” says Miller. “It’s more of a mindset,

and when I first started working on the series

I didn’t realize that.”

“It reinforces, in four episodes, thinking for

yourself,” says Tabata, with a last blast of enthusiasm.

“Being an individual, going against

the grain, being your own boss, taking risks.”

Punk: A Movement in Four Parts is now

streaming on Crave.

Jayne County


FREAKS&MEEK

viction, Free Meek is full of baffling moments

that are maddening to watch. There’s the

Free Meek docuseries shines

allegation that Justice Genece Brinkley, the

light on hardships within the chief antagonist in Meek’s story, called a private

meeting with the rapper and asked him

criminal justice system

By JOSEPHINE CRUZ

to record a remix of the Boyz II Men ballad,

D

“On Bended Knee,” that included a shoutout

espite being released from jail in

to her. There’s also an unforgettable moment

April 2018 and subsequently dropping

the most successful project of

where the lawyer who represents Brinkley

gets caught on a hot mic saying what he really

his career, Meek Mill isn’t free. The

thinks of the judge.

Philly based rapper remains trapped

Free Meek also provides context to some of

by a criminal justice system designed

the moments that became favourite fodder

to victimize people in all of its stages, from arrest

to incarceration to parole. The five-part

for social media over the last few years, including

Meek’s relationship with Nicki MInaj

Free Meek docuseries traces Meek’s case and

and his feud with Drake.

career in stunning and granular detail, while at

While there’s no happy ending, there is a

the same time highlighting the broader epidemic

at hand.

glimmer of hope in Meek’s story. The Pennsylvania

Supreme Court recently overturned

The interview segments range from emotional

testimonies from Meek’s family; reflections

his 2008 conviction and also his 2017 probation

violation ruling, which means he will be

from his team at Roc Nation including Jay

getting a new trial on all charges after pleading

guilty to a misdemeanour gun charge,

Z; and thorough analyses from legal experts,

offering a 360-degree view of a case built on

ending the 12-year long case.

shaky evidence and the word of corrupt law enforcement.

While the docuseries intersperses

But despite these small wins, a sobering reality

prevails: “There’s millions of people like

interviews with real-life archival footage, reenactments

of events not caught on camera really

Meek,” Jay Z says at one point in the doc. The

only difference being that those millions don’t

bring the frustrating narrative to life.

have Meek’s fame, money and resources.

In addition to exposing the paper-thin case

Freek Meek is streaming now on

brought against Meek in his original 2008 con-

Amazon Prime.

SEPT. 27

MICHAEL BERNARD

FITZGERALD

SEPT. 28

DWEEZIL ZAPPA

OCT. 7 – 8

CAMP FESTIVAL

OCT. 10

TEAGAN AND SARA

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AT THE BELLA

TAYLORCENTRE.CA

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 35


Screen Time

Music

Mania

Invades

CIFF

One look at the Calgary International

Film Festival (CIFF) lineup

and it’s clear to see that there is

no shortage of music-related films

this year. 2019 marks the 20th

anniversary of the city’s biggest

film fest, and to celebrate CIFF is

showcasing the most noteworthy

music documentaries accompanied

with compelling soundtracks

now in circulation.

Judy Judy Garland once said, “If I am

a legend, then why am I so lonely?” That

sentiment echoes throughout the 2019

biopic, Judy. In 1969, Judy Garland, played

by Renée Zelleweger, is in a serious career

slump. With her substance abuse escalating

and the relationships with her children and

ex-husband extremely strained, Garland

goes to London to perform a series of soldout

shows in hopes of revitalizing her career.

Critics are already predicting a Best Actress

nomination for Zellweger. Could it be time

for Renée’s second gold statue?

By MORGAN CAIRNS

Linda Ronstadt:

The Sound of My Voice

“There will never be another voice

like Linda’s,” declares Emmylou

Harris, and when the queen of

country speaks, we should listen. At

one time the highest paid woman

in rock and roll, in 2012 legendary

singer/songwriter Linda Ronstadt

was diagnosed with Parkinson’s

Disease, which has since taken

away her singing voice. A touching

and beautiful tribute to one of music’s

most groundbreaking female

icons, Sound of My Voice features

stunning rare performance footage

of the iconic songstress as well as

interviews with some of her closest

colleagues and biggest fans.

Donnie Darko

Part of CIFF’s retrospective series

in celebration of the festival’s 20th

anniversary, fan pick Donnie Darko

makes its triumphant return for a

special one-time screening. The

psycho-thriller follows a troubled

teen who is informed by an invisible

6-foot tall rabbit named Frank that

the world will soon end. Richard

Kelly’s cult-classic features the

quintessential 80s soundtrack with

songs from Tears For Fears, Joy

Division, Echo & the Bunnymen,

Duran Duran and INXS.

Other Music

Profiling the New York record

store Other Music, the doc of the

same name is a love letter to one

of indie music’s most taste-making

institutions. Shutting its doors in

2016, the NYC hub was instrumental

in the success of bands such

as Animal Collective, Yo La Tengo,

Arcade Fire, William Basinksi, the

Yeah Yeah Yeahs and countless

others. Featuring interviews with

various cool-kids and indie icons

along with a fabulous soundtrack,

Other Music is essential viewing for

all curious music fans.

Mystify: Michael

Hutchence

Few musicians embodied the

decadence and overindulgence

of the 80s quite like INXS

frontman, Michael Hutchence.

Mystify: Michael Hutchence is a

harrowing portrait of a man who

took the all-too-familiar mentality

of “sex, drugs and rock & roll” a

little too far, and ended with his

death by suicide in 1997 (a fact

disputed by some). Composed

of archival live footage and home

videos, as well as commentary

from Hutchence’s friends,

colleagues and former lovers,

Mystify gives us a rare glimpse at

Hutchence’s final years, revealing

the tragic circumstances and

events that led to the rocker’s

death.

After So Many Days

In what would be a nightmare

for most musicians, folk duo

Jim and Sam decided to shake

things up (in their music and their

marriage) by making a pact to

play a show a day, every day, for

an entire year. Embarking on a

365 day world tour, this self-directed

doc follows Jim Hanft and

Samantha Yonack through the

trials, tension and tribulations

that accompany a year-long tour.

Will the pressure cause these

crazy kids to “call it quits”? You’ll

have to watch and find out.

Miles Davis:

Birth Of Cool

An in-depth look at

one of jazz’s most

iconic musicians,

Miles Davis: Birth

Of Cool shows us

exactly why Miles is

Miles and, undoubtedly,

the very

definition of cool. A

personality and musician

who constantly

pushed boundaries

and broke down

barriers, Davis’ raw

talent and restless

determination are at

the heart of this doc.

By utilizing a mix of

home movies, archival

footage, photographs,

paintings,

manuscripts, and

interviews, Birth Of

Cool dives deeper

than any other Davis

doc before.

36 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


YOU ARE NOW ENTERING

RADIO SPACE

B LASTING o FF O CTOBER 1

www. F UNDINGD RIVE. ca

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 37


BRING YOUR TALENT TO THE ROUGH HOUSE

Calling all musicians, dancers, magicians, comics, ventriloquists and more!

Do you have a talent that’s yet to be discovered?

This is your chance to perform live at the Scotiabank Saddledome in front of 12,000 fans!

WINNER WILL PERFORM AT A ROUGHNECKS HALFTIME SHOW, PLUS RECEIVE A $ 1,000 CASH PRIZE.

FULL CONTEST DETAILS AT:

CalgaryRoughnecks.com/GotTalent

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: SEP. 27

38 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019

AUGUST 2019 BEATROUTE 38


09.19

YYC

The Librarian Plunges

Deep into Different

Dimensions at Circle

Carnival

By BRAD SIMM

No matter how far you slide

inside the centre of your

mind, everyone remembers

their first Shambhala, Salmo

River’s annual electronic music

festival. For celebrated Canadian

DJ Andrea Graham, aka

The Librarian, it was in 2000

when she jumped in a car on

a late-night whim, bound for

her first EDM adventure in the

wilderness. It was early on in

the story of Shams, before

the fest went viral, and the

sonic explosion rolling through

the forest took Graham into

another dimension.

“It just clicked. I immediately

knew I wanted to express

music in that kind of setting

outdoors with an incredible

sound system, and have that

full body experience of electronic

music,” she says.

By 2007, after playing in

bands and solo acoustic

sets, Graham got a computer,

turntables, some records, and

plunged into DJ land. Although

she was an avid snowboarder

in Whistler, off the slopes she

was roaming Vancouver’s

sweaty dance clubs immersed

in the revolutionary sounds

of dubstep and grime coming

from the U.K.

The contrast between

Whistler’s “funky, happy” skitown

lifestyle and the big city’s

underground nightlife made

Graham feel “a bit like an

outlaw.” Yet, that sharp division

drives her creative energy and

inspires her DJ sets.

88Glam

“I spent many, many years

dedicated to snowboarding,

and I now mountain bike three,

or four days a week. That’s the

other side to my personality,”

she explains. “But I feel those

things actually fit together

with DJing. There’s this parallel

when pedaling up a hill; you

aren’t multitasking, it just frees

your mind.”

“Then on top and you’re

ready to drop into a line,

whether on a bike or snowboarding,

there’s no turning

back, just this moment of

deciding to commit and going

for it. It’s similar to walking on

stage, you’re going to do this

thing you can’t back out of.”

Navigating that downward

rush, riding electronic waves,

and pulsing with spontaneity

is a skill set Graham brings

to her shows. Her focus on

dynamic and innovative art

and music pulls from a broad

spectrum of genres, and is

also at the heart of Bass

Coast Festival, B.C.’s prominent

“boutique” electronic festival

which Graham co-founded

to complement Shambhala.

“I want my sets to always be

changing, and if I don’t have

something fresh of my own, I’ll

play other music. I’m okay with

that, I love the art of DJing.

Digging and finding new things

to play is just as exciting to

me.”

The Librarian performs at the

Bingo Dome Stage during the

Circle Carnival on Saturday, Sept.

14, 8:30 pm at Millennium Park.

CALGARY’S ESSENTIAL SEPTEMBER HAPPENINGSk

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 39


09.19YYCAGENDA

BEAKERHEAD: WHEN

SCIENCE AND ART

COLLIDE

By BRAD SIMM

Even though Calgary is often

branded oil and gas, the city has

long been a progressive leader in

developing science, engineering

and technology. Beakerhead taps

into that technical universe, pulling

out bits and pieces, then taking

them into the workshop where

techies and artists tweak, tinker,

and transform the marvels of the

modern world into weird and wonderous

new creations.

In previous years, installations

for the five-day mash-up of art

and science have been scattered

around the city at various locations.

While the pop-up style of events

will still happen at different destinations,

this year Beakerhead is

launching a grand finale tagged as

“The Spectacle” with food, music

and 25 eclectic exhibitions at

Prince’s Island Park capping off the

festival’s creative extravaganza.

Behind the scenes Beakerhead

is an educational program dedicated

to inspiring a new generation of

ingenuity through STEAM (science,

technology, engineering, art and

math).

On one hand, it’s an entertaining

funhouse full of wild inventions. On

the other it’s a hands-on exploration

into the mechanics of these

amazing projects and presentations.

Jeff Popiel, the festival’s CEO,

talks about a few of the “oddities,

curiosities and contraptions.”

Cocktails on Canvas – happy

hour in technicolor

Thurs, Sept. 19, 7 pm – 10 pm

Contemporary Calgary (701 11th

St. SW)

"Under a microscope we’re looking

at a certain cocktail or alcohol,

say a White Russian or a bourbon.

And these cocktails look absolutely

beautiful. An artist will lead

16 participants to paint what they

visualize, then take home their

inspirations.”

Make Fashion – an electrifying

runway show

Sat, Sept. 21, 8 pm and 9:30 pm

Prince’s Island Park

“Wearable tech fashion is one of

the most brilliant, artistic properties

to come out of Calgary and going

world-wide. What they (Make Fashion)

do is build tech into fashion

designs. It’s a massive display of

cool creations with LED lights and

glow wear, a visual spectacle that

happens on the (Spectacle’s) main

stage.”

YYCAgenda

Seven Wonderers – the back

story of science

Thurs, Sept. 19, 7:30 – 9:30 pm

National Music Centre (850 4th St.

SE)

“Science has the greatest adventure

stories on Earth. They’re

stories of human ingenuity brought

to life by scientists and artists set

at the National Music Centre. It’s

a theatrical show, with music and

humour woven into a bigger theme.

What we’re going for is an emotional

payoff. You leave changed,

inspired in some way.”

Road Trip to the Universe – date

night under the stars

Friday, Sept. 20, 7:30 – 10:30 pm

Rothney Astrophysical Observatory

(210 Ave. W, Hwy 22 S)

“Tickets are bought per carload for

a tour of the Rothney Observatory.

The topic is matter and anti-matter.

Even if you’re not a science junkie,

this is entertaining stuff and a great

opportunity to experience the

observatory.”

Beakerhead runs Sept.

18 to 22, with The

Spectacle on

Saturday, Sept.

22 at Prince’s

Island Park.

Yolanda Sargeant In Studio

Calgary Folk Music

Festival Takes Cover

To celebrate their 40th anniversary, the Calgary

Folk Music Festival has released a double vinyl

album featuring 21 local artists who chose to

record choice tracks originally penned by some

of the world’s most iconic singer-songwriters.

Cover Art is the project’s fitting title where

the diverse talent of local luminaries ranging

from Corb Lund and The Torchettes to Dragon

Fli Empire and Raleigh have created their own

innovative versions of tracks by the likes of Gil

Scott-Heron, Arrested Development, The

Tragically Hip, Buffy Saint-Marie and several

other profound artists.

Produced in state-of-the-arts studios at

the National Music Centre, Kerry Clarke,

artistic director of CFMF, calls the collection

of tracks “edgy and deep.”

Cover Art / Friday, Sept. 13 / Festival Hall

Alberta Guitar Shows

This annual buy-sell event is the largest gear

fest in Western Canada bringing together an

eclectic mix guitar buyers, sellers, dealers and

luthiers that showcase new and used instruments,

amps, pedals, accessories and a vast

selection of vintage, custom and hard to find

guitar gear.

The Calgary location strums along at the

Red and White Club’s McMahon Studio, which

has both an expansive showroom and lots

of parking space. Another feature this year

boosting the volume of collectable gear is the

Flea Market where dealers and sellers can

leave a limited number of items with the floor

staff who will monitor the products and assist

with negotiations.

Edmonton / Sun, Sept. 22 / Italian Cultural Centre

Calgary / Sun, Sept. 29 / Red & White Club

40 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


09.19YYCMUSIC

LINDSAY ELL

Country star wrangles

a place for herself in

Nashville and beyond

By BRAD SIMM

Boots and the Hoots

OFF-COUNTRY

The Music Mile celebrates

Country Music Week

By SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

Returning to Calgary for the ninth time (the most of any

host city), this year the Canadian Country Music Awards

(CCMA) has teamed up with the Music Mile to present

OFF-COUNTRY, a three-day, multi-venue festival from

September 5 to 8 featuring Alberta’s brightest country,

roots and blues talent. Here are some highlights.

Justine Vandergrift

and Kate Stevens

Gravity Cafe (7 pm - 9 pm)

Two emerging singer-songwriters,

Justine Vandergrift

and Kate Stevens cocoon

you in dulcet melodies and

masterful hooks.

D

uring the performance of

her hit single “Criminal”

at the Canadian Country

Music Association

Awards in 2018, the rapidly

rising Calgary-based artist Lindsay

Ell swept across the stage in an orange

sequined jumpsuit complete with gigantic

bell bottom flares. She topped off her Dolly

Parton-inspired look with her signature

white Stratocaster as an accessory, effortlessly

nailing a thundering guitar solo and

belting out the end of the song through a

megaphone.

Ell is no stranger to delivering

show-stoppers of all kinds. Early on in her

career, still in her teens, she once landed

at gig at the Calgary airport playing with

her band on top of a baggage carousel to

bewildered passengers.

“It was at Stampede,” Ell recalls over

the phone. “People were pouring off the

flights, tired and restless just waiting for

their bags. Obviously they couldn’t give a

crap. They just wanted to get out of there

while we played bearing out our lives and

souls. It was awkward for all of us,” she

chuckles.

Perseverance, however, is one of Ell’s

impressive trademarks. The Calgary artist

has been on the Stampede circuit since

she was very young. One year she peaked,

playing a whopping 68 shows over

the 10-day stretch of cowtown craziness.

“I literally ran from the stage to the car

non-stop.”

While in high school she maintained

the same hectic schedule. Each weekend

she loaded up the van, playing all sorts

of dive bars across the country before

returning to class and graduating a year

early a valedictorian. That type of relentless

drive and determination guided

her in Nashville after finishing a degree

in business at the University of Calgary.

Despite its reputation as a treadmill for

hit-making, Ell is deep in her element and

thoroughly enjoys living in the country

music capital.

“There’s two sides to the town, for

sure,” notes Ell. “It depends who you

hang out with. But since I first went to

Nashville, I felt right at home. I thought,

‘Man, what is this place?’ They were so

wonderful from the beginning.” Despite

living there for nine years Ell still thinks

Canadian, admits that she stands out.

She says that she feels like, “a perfectly

accepted outcast,” which she’s entirely

happy with.

As for inspiration, Ell claims that Nashville

is the place to be. “I’m surrounded by

so many talented people every day. That

keeps me on my toes. It’s a great environment

to live in when everyone understands

the lingo and crazy schedules, it

just works. That said, we played 235 shows

last year and we’re on track for 170 this

year. Being so nomadic, it definitely helps

my creative frame — travelling, being in

different cities each day.”

Although Ell falls within the spectrum

of country music, it’s hard to deny she’s

also rooted in a splendid mix of pop, rock,

blues and even funk. As a singer she can

swoop down into sweet, melodic ballads

that burst into fiery outpourings. As a

guitarist, Ell has carved out a soulful style

that is all her own. The Stratocaster she

wields draws on Jimi Hendrix’s funky

rhythm chops that float like a butterfly

and honey-dripping solos that sting like a

bee. Ell seconds that motion.

“If could play funk and blues and tour

the world playing arenas, I would be the

happiest camper on the planet.”

Lindsay Ell performs September 7 at the

Webber Performing Arts Centre (1515 93

Street). Email contests@beatroute.ca for

your chance to win a pair of tickets.

JJ Shiplett

Thursday, September 5

JJ Shiplett presents:

Calgary Roots Night

Ironwood (8 pm - 10 pm)

JJ Shiplett’s alt-country is

as powerful as it is emotive.

He’ll be heading up a night

of the best in Calgary roots

music.

T. Buckley with

Megan Dawson

Charbar Rooftop Patio

(7 pm - 9 pm)

Take in the alt-folk charm

of T Buckley and Megan

Dawson’s gorgeous harmonies

and hooks.

Friday, September 6

Boots and the Hoots

King Eddy (4 pm - 6 pm)

Spend your Friday happy

hour with Alberta’s trad

country daddies, Boots and

the Hoots while they pluck

and twang their way to a

bygone era.

Jess Knights

Saturday, September 7

Jess Knights

OFF Cut Bar - The Nash

(2 pm - 4 pm)

Jess Knights’ spirited and

heady blend of bourbon-tinged

rock, blues,

and soul is as heady as the

bourbons and gins being

slung behind the bar.

Eddie Turner & Trouble

Blues Can (9pm - 11 pm)

Eddie Turner & Trouble

bring the kind of fiery blues

that makes you believe in

the devil at the crossroads.

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 41


09.19YYCMUSIC

PAUL

JAMES

COUTTS:

A TALE

OF TWO

CITIES

Local Band

Spotlight

FF19BRoute1.qxp_Layout 1 2019-08-29 1:19 PM Page 1

FISH GRIWKOWSKY

O

ccupying a sonic landscape

somewhere between Ted Leo

& The Pharmacists and Judas

Priest, Paul James Coutts crafts

unadulterated rock and roll for the working

class. He’s caught between his dual identities,

both as a Calgarian and an Edmontonian,

having released more than 12 albums across

his storied career in seminal Alberta bands

like Twin Fangs, The Primrods, XL Birdsuit,

Free Judges and The New 1-2.

“I was a part of the Calgary scene for

thirty years before I moved up here. I feel

more Calgary than I do Edmonton sometimes.

I put out six records in Calgary before

I moved up to Edmonton, and then I put

out about another six records. It’s a bit of a

duality with my identity,” says Coutts.

His latest production, Utterances, was

recorded in basements and a living room

between 2017-2018 by Calgary’s own Chris

Vail; the record was inspired by invocation

and transformation.

“I left it in the hands of someone else. In

this case, a great friend (Chris Vail),” says

Coutts. “We experimented much more with

the production of sounds. He arranged

instrumentation, mixed and produced it, ultimately.

I usually have more of a hand in that,

but Chris nailed it at the demo stage and you

should never stop something that’s all right.

It turned out as well as I ever wanted it to, I’m

pretty happy about it.”

When Paul isn’t busy writing, recording

or performing, you can typically find him

getting lost in a novel or traversing Alberta’s

badlands. Exploring external hobbies and

passions has been part of the musician’s

transformation, indirectly exposing him to

new influences.

“If you’re just making music for music's

sake all the time, you’re kind of stuck in this

weird incestuous loop. I came to the realization

that I could do more things. It informs

your playing and your music. Take a pottery

class or read a history book, those things

can influence your music,” explains Coutts.

By TORY ROSSO

42 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


Local Band

Spotlight

Calgary postpunkers

find a

time signature

that works for

everyone on

Foreign Bodies

By SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

SUNGLACIERS

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

E

very now and then, the

trajectory of a solo recording

project unexpectedly changes

direction after a chance

encounter, like placing a small

rock in a new stream to divert

the course of a future river. For songwriter

Evan Resnik, that was meeting up with

drummer Mathieu Blanchard in early 2017.

Resnik was writing complex, mathy songs as

Sunglaciers and put out a call for a drummer

who could lay down some rhythm on an EP

he was working on.

Blanchard answered and the pair clicked,

joining forces as a duo, inspiring new ideas

and material to try in a live setting. As Resnik

puts it, Blanchard is a “real man of action” and

within the next year the two-piece had two

new EPs.

Blanchard also broke Resnik out of his

comfort zone, bringing in a host of new influences

that began to reshape the Sunglaciers

sound, moving it away from technical and

mathy art rock towards more garage, surf and

post-punk influences.

As Sunglaciers continued to evolve, the

material started to pile up. They recorded two

EPs and, almost immediately, had enough

material for a third, which expanded into what

would become their debut full-length, Foreign

Bodies.

The band expanded to a four-piece, bringing

in Kyle Crough on bass and Helen Young

on synths, and their sound continued to

mature both in its willingness to experiment

with different influences and styles, as well

as in its certainty and confidence at the core

of each song. The full-length, Foreign Bodies,

sounds like a fully-realized idea, drawing from

post-punk at its core and layering in garage,

surf, musique concrète and noise influences.

During this whole process, Resnik’s songwriting

style was changed by his band members’

influences, pushing him out of his safe zones.

“The second track, ‘Dream Fever,’ if you

asked me three years ago, I’d say it was way

too simplistic, slow-moving, and plodding,”

says Resnik. “Mathieu and I went down to

Mexico City and we stayed at an Airbnb that

had a jam space in it. Instead of seeing the

city for a week, we just played music all day

and then went out to drink mezcal. It was then

that ‘Dream Fever’ was conceived, and was

actually one of the first times that Matt really

exerted his influence over a song. He wanted

to take a simple idea that was good and stay

within those confines. Every time I wanted to

switch it up, change the time signature, or cut

off a measure, he would reign me in.”

Reflecting on how things have changed

since he met Blanchard, Resnik seems more

confident and self-assured having finally

found his place not only as a musician, but

also his artistic voice in the larger community.

“It’s been really exciting,” he says. “it’s been

a period of good growth and I’m starting to

wise up to how all of this works, how I can

carve my own place in it all.”

Friday, September 13 / The Palomino

Tix: $12, showpass.com

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 43


JOIN US FOR OUR STORE’S BIGGEST

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT EVENT OF THE YEAR!

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Presented by Music Centre Canada

2

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September 20 th (10am-8pm)

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September 21 st (10am-6pm)

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SPECIAL GUESTS

21 AWARD CATEGORIES

PERFORMANCES BY:

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Nice Horse

Sheldon Zandboer

Punch Drunk Cabaret

Zaire Ink and Afuhmbom

School of Rock Calgary South House Band

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

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44 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


09.19YYCMUSIC

The Cheat Sheet BR PICKS THE 5 ESSENTIAL LIVE MUSIC SHOWS

INDIE

HEAVY

R&B

EDM

FOLK

1

FEMME WAVE

FUNDRAISER

Fri, Sept 6 at the Globe Theatre

Femme Wave’s annual fundraiser

is back with a screening of the

classic feature film, ALIEN, raising

funds for the feminist festival in

November.

2 WHOOP-Szo

Tues, Sept 10 at Palomino Smokehouse

Southern Ontario’s WHOOP-Szo

have been making waves with their

wild fusion of folk, metal, pop, grunge,

and even classical musical.

3

TINY SHRINE

Wed, Sept 18 at Ship & Anchor Three

standout local bands take a rare

stage together for sonic explorations

that run the gamut from

power-pop to neo-psych.

4

SARAH NEUFELD

Fri, Sept 13 at National Music Centre

Montréal-based violinist and

Arcade Fire instrumentalist Sarah

Neufeld is one of Canada's most

exciting composers, her music is a

journey through pop-minimalism.

5 SUNGLACIERS

Fri, Sept 13 at Palomino Smokehouse

One of Calgary’s preeminent postpunk

and psych bands, Sunglaciers

are releasing their debut LP, alongside

Vancouver’s Ex-SOFTESS and

locals Fitness and Janitor Scum.

1 SLEEP

Wed, Sept 4 at The Palace Theatre

Dubbed “the ultimate stoner rock

band,” Sleep are the loud and

proud forefathers of modern doom

metal.

2

IAN BLURTON’S

FUTURE NOW

Thursday, Sept 18 at King Eddy

One of Canada’s most iconic

riff-masters, Ian Blurton, descends

on NMC for their Artist in Residency

program, kicking things off with

a free show at the Eddy next door.

3 PERIPHERY

Tues, Sept 24 at The Palace Theatre

Djent masters, Periphery, descend

on Calgary with their ultra-technical,

advanced math riffs to take

you on a sonic journey.

4 BLACKRAT

Fri, Sept 27 at Palomino Smokehouse

Metal anarchy and necromancing

screams howl down the highway

to hell with Calgary’s Blackrat at

the cursed wheel.

5

CANCER BATS

Sat, Sept 28 at SAIT Gateway

One of Canada’s most beloved

hardcore metal punk bands,

Cancer Bats are bringing the party

back to town for a night of heavy

riffs.

HIPHOP DJ

1 COTIS

Wed, Sept 11 at Commonwealth.

1 MADCHILD

Thur, Sept 5 at Ace Nightclub

Ex-Swollen Members emcee,

Madchild, returns to Calgary with

his hardcore, west coast rap and

horrorcore show.

2

SNAK THE RIPPER

Fri, Sept 6 at The Rec Room

Vancouver’s Snak The Ripper is

one of the founding members of

the Stompdown Killaz hip-hop collective,

serving up his delicious and

aggressive wordplay one rhyme at

a time.

3 GRIEVES

Thur, Sept 12 at Hifi Club

Benjamin Laub emerged from

Seattle in 2007 to make a name for

himself as one of the city’s great

hip hop artists, signing to Rhymesayers

and touring with acts like

Atmosphere and Macklemore.

4

MURDA BEATZ

Sat, Sept 14 at Commonwealth

Ontario producer, Murda Beatz,

brings his fiery hip-hop and trap

beats to Commonwealth for a

banger sponsored by Monster

Energy.”

5 RHYE

Thurs, Sept 19 at The Palace Theatre

Hushed and sensual R&B is the

name of the game for Rhye. Led

by Michael Milosh, their seductive

vibes come to life on stage backed

by an electric live band.

Victoria-based COTIS brings his

unique sound of rap, R&B and

electronic music for a live show

at Commonwealth’s weekly party,

What A Time.

2

ODD MOB

Sat, Sept 14 at Hifi Club

Australia’s up-and-coming house

DJs, Odd Mob, make their debut in

North America, including their first

stop in Calgary at Hifi.

3 CLAPTONE

Fri, Sept 20 at The Palace Theatre

House DJ Claptone spent years

wandering medieval landscapes

bringing both magical mystery and

muted melancholy to his cosmic

sets.

4

FINAL VERSIONS

PATIO PARTY

Tue, Sept 24 at Broken City

Season 6 of Versions’ much-loved,

family-friendly patio dance party at

Broken City comes to a close with

a slew of some of Calgary’s best

tune selectors.

5 DREZO

Fri, Sept 27 at Hifi Club

Dark house master Drezo brings

the chill omens to a night of inky

vibes and moody dance floors.

1

SUN KIL MOON

Wednesday, Sept 4 at Commonwealth

American folk songwriter, Sun

Kil Moon, writes music that often

seems like a one-sided conversation:

rambling, esoteric and deeply

meditative

HAYES CARLL

2 Thur, Sept 5 and Fri, Sept 6 at Festival Hall

Hayes Carll works within and

without the Texas outlaw tradition

to brand his own roots music with a

defiant statement.

3

BARKS, BUBBLES & BREWS:

A DOGWASH FUNDRAISER

Fri, Sept 6, 2-7 pm at Cold Garden

An afternoon filled with craft beers

and pooch pampering. Bring your

best friend and raise money for the

Calgary Humane Society alongside

The Torchettes, Yolanda Sargeant,

Amelie Patterson, and Denis Bouwman.

4 A CONVERSATION

WITH SYLVIA TYSON

Fri, Sept 6 at National Music Centre

A recent inductee to the Canadian

Songwriters Hall of Fame, Sylvia

Tyson reminisces and explores her

lauded career, first as half of Ian

& Sylvia, then in her solo career

and her contributions in the group

Quartette.

5

CFMF COVER ART

ALBUM RELEASE

Fri, Sept 13 at Festival Hall

More than 20 of Alberta’s finest

artists reinterpret iconic songs

from key artists who have performed

at the Calgary Folk Music

Fest throughout its 40-year history.

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 45


Savage Love

BY DAN SAVAGE

Boundaries

I’m a 42-year-old single, straight

female who recently started dating

a 36-year-old man in a somewhat

exclusive, long-distance relationship.

We have known each other

for a short time, but have clocked

hours upon hours on the phone.

I have specifically stated many

times I don’t want kids of my own

(he does), am extremely safety

conscious (only when I see someone’s

STI results and know we’re

100 percent monogamous will I

go “bareback”), and am against

hormonal contraception. Therefore,

I’ve insisted on the use of condoms

since our very first encounter,

which he at first reluctantly agreed

to, but has since obliged without

incident. He is expressively into me

and treats me better than any guy

I’ve dated; cooks for me, gives me

massages, buys me gifts, showers

me with compliments, listens to me

at any hour of the night, and has

shown nothing but respect towards

me since Day 1.

Until our last sexual encounter.

He woke me up in the morning

clearly aroused and ready for sexy

time. He asked if he could enter

me, and after I said yes, I grabbed

a condom for him and he put it

on. We were spooning at the time

so he entered me from behind. At

one point early in the encounter, I

reached back to grab his hand, and

all of a sudden, felt the condom he

had been wearing laid out on the

bed. Shocked and outraged, I immediately

stopped and turned to him

asking, “Why did you take this off?”

To which he replied, “Because I

wanted to cum faster.” All I could

muster back was, “Do you have any

idea how bad that is? I can’t even

look at you.” I covered my eyes

and cried uncontrollably for a few

minutes.

After getting dressed, showering,

and exiting without a word,

I started to process the atrocity

of his actions. It’s clear that he

does not respect me, my body, my

health, or my reproductive choices,

and made his physical pleasure as

top priority. He has apologized profusely,

been emotional about his

actions, and has definite remorse.

After sending him several articles

on how it’s criminal (including

the one about the German man

who got eight months in jail for

stealthing), he now seems to grasp

the severity. It’s hard to reconcile

his consistent respect for me with

a bold and disrespectful act like

this. The best case is that he’s a

dumb-ass, the worst being that

his respect and care for me is all

a façade and I’ve been a fool. Is

there any reason I should consider

continuing to see this guy? Is it

remotely forgivable?

Stealthed On Suddenly

Nope.

The obvious (and objectively true)

point is that anything is forgivable.

People have forgiven worse—I

mean, there are mothers out there

who’ve forgiven the people that

murdered their children. But moms

who’ve found it within themselves

to forgive their children’s murderers...

yeah, they don’t have to live

with, take meals with, or sleep with

their children’s murderers. I’m not

saying that forgiving the person who

murdered your kid is easy (I wouldn’t

be able to do it), but most people

who’ve “forgiven worse” never have

to lay eyes on the person they

forgave again.

So while it may be true that

people have forgiven worse, SOS, I

don’t think you should forgive this.

And here’s why: You only just started

dating this guy and all the good

qualities you listed—everything

that made him seem like a good,

decent, lovely, and possibly loving

guy (the cooking, the massages, the

compliments, etc.)—is the kind of

best-foot-forward fronting a person

does at the start of a new relationship.

Not only is there nothing wrong

with that, SOS, but you wouldn’t

want to date someone who didn’t

do that at the start… because the

kind of person who doesn’t make

the effort to impress early in a

relationship is the kind of person

who can’t be bothered to make any

effort later in the relationship. We all

erect those façades, SOS, but some

people are slapping those façades

on slums you wouldn’t wanna live in,

while others are slapping them on

what turns out to be pretty decent

housing. And if I may continue to

torture this metaphor: when the first

cracks appear in the façade, which

they inevitably do, and you get a

peek behind it, you aren’t a fool if it

turns out there’s a slum there. You’re

only a fool if you move in instead of

moving on.

Anyway, SOS, everybody fronts,

but eventually, those façades fall

away and you get to see people

for who and what they really are.

And the collapse of your new

boyfriend’s façade revealed him to

be a selfish and uncaring asshole

with no respect for your body or

your boundaries. He was on his

best behavior until he sensed your

guard was down, at which point

he violated and sexually assaulted

you. Those aren’t flaws you can

learn to live with or actions you can

excuse. Move on.

I am a 27-year-old man in an open

marriage with a wonderful partner.

They’re my best friend, I smile

whenever they walk into the room,

and we have a ton in common. We

don’t, however, have that much

sex. I’m currently seeing someone

else and our sex is great. We’ve

explored some light BDSM and

pegging, and I’m finding myself

really enjoying being a sub. I’m

kind of terrified that, as a man, I

might accidentally violate someone’s

boundaries. I’m also autistic,

which makes navigating cues from

partners rather difficult. Completely

submitting to someone

else weirdly makes me feel totally

safe and free for kind of the first

time. The problem is, my spouse

is also pretty subby. When they

do try to initiate sex, it’s often

so subtle that I totally miss the

signals. In the past month, I’ve had

sex with my spouse maybe once,

compared to four or five times

with my other partner. My question

is this: have you seen examples

of people in open marriages who

essentially fulfill their sexual needs

with secondary partners, while still

maintaining a happy companionable

partnership with their primary?

Sexually Understanding Butt-Boy

I’ve personally known people in loving,

happy, sexless marriages who

aren’t leading sexless lives; their

marriages are companionate—some

can even be described as passionate—but

both halves seek sexual

fulfillment with secondary, tertiary,

quaternary, etc., partners. But

companionate open marriages only

work when it’s what both partners

want… and your partner’s feelings

are conspicuously absent from

your letter. How do they feel about

being in a sexless or nearly sexless

marriage? Your spouse would seem

to be interested in having sex with

you—they occasionally try to initiate—but

perhaps your spouse is just

going through the motions because

they think it’s what you want. So…

you’re gonna need to have a conversation

with your spouse about

your sex lives. If you’ve found being

told what to do in unsubtle ways by

your Dominant second partner to be

sexually liberating, SUBB, you could

ask your spouse to be a little less

subtle when they want to initiate—or,

better yet, ask them not to be subtle

at all. Nowhere is it written that subs

like you and your spouse have to be

subtle or sly or stand there waiting

for others to initiate. “I am feeling

horny and I’d really like to have sex

tonight” is something submissives

can and do say.

46 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019


A SMASH-UP OF ART, SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

TICKETS

AVAILABLE

NOW

SEPT 18–22

EVENTS

WORKSHOPS, SHOWS, TOURS

SEPT 21

THE SPECTACLE

ONE NIGHT, ONE LOCATION,

25+ ENGINEERED ART

INSTALLATIONS

VISIT

BEAKERHEAD.COM

SEPTEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 47


48 BEATROUTE SEPTEMBER 2019 TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT MRGCONCERTS.COM

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