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CPT International 3/2019

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EDITORIAL<br />

Converting big data<br />

to smart data!<br />

With interesting new cooperations and numerous future-oriented<br />

innovations, GIFA has come to a successful conclusion. The fair thus<br />

underscored its role as the world‘s leading trade fair for foundry<br />

technology.<br />

Robert Piterek<br />

e-mail: robert.piterek@bdguss.de<br />

Digitalization in the foundry<br />

industry was one of the main<br />

topics at the GIFA in late June.<br />

We discuss it in our trade fair review<br />

from P. 38, which summarizes the trends<br />

and innovations at this year’s trade fair.<br />

Whether molding plant producers, furnace<br />

constructors or die-casting equipment<br />

specialists – all the important<br />

companies had new developments in<br />

their programs for converting big data<br />

to smart data, i.e. enabling visualization<br />

of plant performance in comprehensible<br />

graphics and exploiting optimization<br />

potentials uncovered by comparisons<br />

with old data or other plants.<br />

There were also virtual and augmented<br />

reality applications for servicing, maintenance,<br />

repair and training – showing<br />

that the sector has finally found its way<br />

into the 21st century.<br />

In addition to our GIFA review, we<br />

also offer two digitalization highlights<br />

in this issue: melting furnace producer<br />

Otto Junker used GIFA to present its<br />

optimized Optical Coil Protection System<br />

(OCP), which monitors the service<br />

life of furnace linings and makes maintenance<br />

intervals predictable (more on<br />

this from P. 9). And machine manufacturer<br />

Gustav Eirich GmbH & Co. KG from<br />

Hardheim meets the need for digitalizing<br />

production processes in its sand<br />

preparation plants with the AT1 inline<br />

inspection tester. The system automatically<br />

measures the compactability and<br />

shearing strength of the sand employed,<br />

and was greeted with great interest<br />

by specialist visitors to GIFA (from<br />

P. 18).<br />

The second main trend at the trade<br />

fair was additive manufacturing, which<br />

is increasingly receiving attention from<br />

casters all over the world. Our interview<br />

with ExOne Managing Directors Hartner<br />

and Bader focused on industrialization<br />

of the process and the company’s collaboration<br />

with Siemens in this field, as<br />

well as the increasing importance of the<br />

new technology worldwide (from P. 6).<br />

The rolls made by Gontermann-Peiper<br />

from Siegen using cylindrical centrifugal<br />

casting and gravity die casting are<br />

also found worldwide. The company<br />

casts the world’s heaviest and longest<br />

rolls, and can look back on about 200<br />

years of history and comprehensive<br />

expertise in the casting of rolls (from<br />

P. 28). Gontermann-Peipers also supplied<br />

the world’s most modern steelworks,<br />

Big River Steel, with more than<br />

100 rolls made in Germany. The ‘learning<br />

steelworks’ and its possibilities<br />

were also proudly presented at the GIFA<br />

by plant constructor SMS.<br />

Please note that from now on you find<br />

our Casting Industry Suppliers Guide in<br />

each issue – book your entry now and...<br />

...have a good read!<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 3


CONTENTS<br />

FEATURES<br />

6 INTERVIEW<br />

„ Siemens is a great industrial partner“<br />

Interview with the ExOne Managing directors<br />

Hartner and Bader about their cooperation with<br />

Siemens on the industrialization of 3-D printing.<br />

Robert Piterek<br />

9 MELTING SHOP<br />

Digitalization in industrial furnace manufacturing<br />

- on the way to Industry 4.0<br />

With examples like the OCP Optical Coil Protection<br />

system industrial furnace manufacturer Otto<br />

Junker presents his innovations on digitalization.<br />

Felix Aßmann, Simon Künne, Kunal Mody, Wilfried<br />

Schmitz and Günther Valder<br />

INTERVIEW<br />

ExOne Managers<br />

Hartner and Bader on<br />

the industrialization<br />

of 3-D-Printing.<br />

COMPANY<br />

Visit to the roller<br />

foundry Gontermann-Peipers<br />

in<br />

Siegen .<br />

18 SAND REGENERATION<br />

Automatic mold material preparation<br />

During sand regeneration at Jürgens Gießerei the<br />

latest technology from machine builder Eirich is in<br />

use. Of particular interest: the AT1 inline tester.<br />

Edith Weiser<br />

22 MOLD AND COREMAKING<br />

Sand core hardening: Digital quality<br />

with new ACS-Technology<br />

Sand core quality plays a decisive role for casting<br />

quality. The ACS solution generates the heat in the<br />

cores and thereby hardens them completely.<br />

Wolfram Bach, Gotthard Wolf<br />

Cover-Photo:<br />

Titelfoto: Bednareck Photography<br />

Gontermann-Peipers GmbH<br />

Hauptstraße 20, 57074 Siegen, Germany<br />

info@gontermann-peipers.de<br />

www.gontermann-peipers.de/en<br />

GIFA SPECIAL<br />

GIFA and NEWCAST<br />

President Nelissen<br />

takes stock after the<br />

completed fair.<br />

Melting shop in the Marienborn plant of Gontermann-Peipers.<br />

The company is one of the world‘s most<br />

important producers of rolls for rolling mills and highperformance<br />

components for machine construction.<br />

4


CONTENTS<br />

MELTING SHOP<br />

Digitalization in<br />

industrial furnace<br />

manufacturing.<br />

24 COATINGS<br />

Waterbased coatings for large-scale castings<br />

The new waterbased coating at the iron foundry<br />

König & Bauer is environmentally friendly and<br />

reduces costs. Ulf Knobloch, Christian Koch<br />

28 COMPANY<br />

Rolls for the world<br />

Gontermann-Peipers casts the world‘s heaviest<br />

rolling mill rolls and has almost 200 years of foundry<br />

expertise. Robert Piterek<br />

35 SPECIAL: GIFA <strong>2019</strong><br />

„ GIFA has underlined its claim to being<br />

the world‘s leading trade fair“<br />

GIFA and NEWCAST President Heinz Nelissen on the<br />

outcome of the fair, Martin Vogt, Robert Piterek<br />

GIFA sets the trends for the future of<br />

the industry<br />

What remains of the Bright World of Metals with<br />

its core, the trade fair GIFA? There was no new<br />

record of visitors, but the fair set clear trends for<br />

the industry‘s future. Robert Piterek, Martin Vogt<br />

44 E-MOBILITY<br />

Powertrain 2030 - driven by diversification<br />

At the specialist conference „Foundry Technology<br />

in Engine Construction“ two automotive engineers<br />

presented a scenario of the future of mobility.<br />

Andreas Pfeifer, Otmar Scharrer<br />

COLUMNS<br />

E-MOBILITY (left)<br />

How will E-Mobility<br />

develop and how will<br />

vehicles be powered<br />

in 2030? A scenario<br />

presented by two<br />

engineers at the<br />

„Foundry Technology<br />

in Engine Construction“<br />

conference in<br />

Magdeburg.<br />

3 EDITORIAL<br />

43 GIFA NEWS<br />

48 NEWS IN BRIEF<br />

55 NEW: THE KEY TO CASTING<br />

INDUSTRY SUPPLIERS<br />

73 FAIRS AND KONGRESSES/AD INDEX<br />

74 PREVIEW/IMPRINT<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 5


INTERVIEW<br />

“Siemens is a great<br />

industrial partner”<br />

At GIFA, 3-D printer manufacturer ExOne announced a cooperation with Siemens on the<br />

industrialization of 3-D printing. Managing directors John Hartner (USA) and Eric Bader<br />

(Germany) talked with CP+T about the new partnership and the growing importance of<br />

3-D printers in the foundry industry.<br />

Photos: Martin Vogt/BDG<br />

Core and mold makers still use the classic<br />

methods of core shooting and molding<br />

machines. What development has<br />

the branch taken since ExOne and<br />

other companies came up with core<br />

and mold printing?<br />

John Hartner: The conversion of industry<br />

is based on market factors and<br />

things we can do to accelerate those<br />

market factors. One part of this is that<br />

customers come up with more complex<br />

designs and they need to achieve these<br />

designs more rapidly. Thus the complexity<br />

of 3-D printing – and you get it for<br />

free – is one thing driving the 3-D printing<br />

market. The accelerating speed of<br />

the machines is also going to drive the<br />

market. Furthermore, we will continue<br />

to bring down the cost of ownership.<br />

Our new machine is the best example of<br />

that. It has the same price but is up to<br />

30 per cent more productive. I spend a<br />

big part of my business life in the semiconductor<br />

and electronics industry.<br />

Every year we have had to deliver more<br />

for the same price or less. The additive<br />

manufacturing business is going to<br />

become like that.<br />

Eric Bader: I agree. Bringing down the<br />

cost of ownership helps make the technology<br />

affordable and to see it practically<br />

in daily life. Not just for prototyping,<br />

but with these complex structures<br />

it helps start the production of small<br />

series. And it should move to larger<br />

series production.<br />

Do you expect that serial production<br />

with your machines will be possible<br />

one day?<br />

John Hartner: Yes we do, there are<br />

customers that have already started<br />

6


ExOne’s current business<br />

strategy and the<br />

impact of 3-D printing<br />

technology on the<br />

foundry industry were<br />

the topics of discussion<br />

in the interview of the<br />

company’s Managing<br />

Directors Eric Bader<br />

(Germany) and John<br />

Hartner (USA) with <strong>CPT</strong><br />

Editor Robert Piterek<br />

(from left).<br />

“The cooperation with<br />

Siemens should help us<br />

with quality control on<br />

the one hand, and digitalization<br />

on the other<br />

hand,” explains John<br />

Hartner.<br />

with it and there are customers whose<br />

plans are much broader. That is very<br />

encouraging for us. The new machine<br />

has not only improved cost of ownership<br />

but it also has the connectivity<br />

required for Industry 4.0 that will allow<br />

people to seamlessly get the automation<br />

to deliver their factory-wide requirements<br />

in volume.<br />

How will the cooperation with Siemens<br />

boost your business?<br />

John Hartner: On the one hand, the<br />

cooperation will help us with quality<br />

control and, on the other hand, the<br />

machine has many new sensors. All that<br />

data is going to improve the process.<br />

And Siemens is a great industrial partner.<br />

They work with the major automotive<br />

companies in Germany; they work<br />

with all major customers around the<br />

world. I think it is a fantastic partnership<br />

and, as Siemens said: our system has<br />

the highest level of integration in<br />

Industry 4.0 applications of all the additive<br />

manufacturing vendors.<br />

So it’s all about industrialization…<br />

Eric Bader: That’s the clear challenge<br />

the industry confronts us with. Not just<br />

having a stand-alone machine – which<br />

we can’t look into, like a black box,<br />

when it comes to quality, result and<br />

operability of the machine – but in<br />

addition to increasing the speed and<br />

reducing the cost of ownership also<br />

increasing reliability and the transparency<br />

of the grinding process. Right<br />

here the collaboration with Siemens is a<br />

big achievement for us.<br />

Your company is still young. How have<br />

revenues developed in recent years?<br />

John Hartner: We were in binder-jetting<br />

for longer than it seems because<br />

we belonged to another company<br />

working with binder-jetting before<br />

ExOne was formed. Our company was<br />

finally established as a sole entity in<br />

2005. That gave us the chance to grow.<br />

In 2014 we became public. Since then<br />

we have grown in the mid-teens, so<br />

14 or 15 per cent per year. We think<br />

we will continue to grow at that pace<br />

or faster.<br />

It is possible to produce complex cores<br />

and molds using 3-D printing. Can you<br />

give us an example of a geometry that<br />

isn’t possible without a printer?<br />

Eric Bader: The classic examples are core<br />

packages where you have 10, 15, 20<br />

parts and you integrate them into a<br />

single core package. Or multiples cores<br />

and the mold are integrated into a<br />

single printed mold package. This is a<br />

big achievement for binder-jetting and<br />

ExOne technology. And other examples<br />

are just coming up, e.g. water-core<br />

jackets for innovative motors for temperature<br />

management. Some of it you<br />

can do traditionally, some you can’t. We<br />

will see many more examples, e.g. in<br />

the pump industry. Where you will also<br />

have a hard time with classically shot<br />

cores is the field of e-mobility. With 3-D<br />

printing you bring more performance<br />

into parts, higher cooling efficiency.<br />

These are really examples where printing<br />

brings a lot of additional benefits<br />

to the end-product and that is what we<br />

aim for – to create additional value and<br />

drive the cost down so that 3-D printing<br />

can be used in more and more applications.<br />

But I don’t really envision that<br />

3-D printing will blow the traditional<br />

market away at a stroke.<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 7


INTERVIEW<br />

Is operation of the systems becoming<br />

easier?<br />

Eric Bader: With the integration into<br />

Industry 4.0, which we are now implementing<br />

with our new partner, the<br />

fears about the complexity of the technology<br />

should disappear because transparency<br />

has increased. There is a<br />

camera image from the box on which<br />

you can observe the printing process<br />

layer-by-layer. That should lower the<br />

hurdle to enter 3-D printer technology.<br />

How important is Germany as a market<br />

for 3-D printing technology?<br />

Eric Bader: The country is at the top of<br />

the ladder, we have some companies in<br />

here that are pushing the technology to<br />

its limits. There are foundries that have<br />

their own sorting process. Suddenly,<br />

there is space for many other applications<br />

that are possible with the 3-D<br />

printer. Apart from Germany, there are<br />

also other prime examples, such as the<br />

Japanese-American company Kimura,<br />

which has more than ten of our machines.<br />

The company has completely switched<br />

from traditional core and mold<br />

making to 3-D printing. It is important<br />

for companies to become owners of a<br />

machine. It is not enough to be supplied<br />

with 3-D printed products. We<br />

have to use the machines ourselves to<br />

understand the possibilities.<br />

“We print with inorganic binders – this<br />

is a trend that will affect the entire industry,”<br />

Eric Bader predicts.<br />

Who are your customers in the foundry<br />

industry?<br />

Eric Bader: Georg Fischer, Gießerei Grunewald<br />

and many more. Most of the<br />

automotive companies in Europe, the<br />

Americas, India and China are utilizing<br />

3-D printing technology. 70 - 80 percent<br />

are running on our printing equipment.<br />

The pump industry is interesting,<br />

aerospace is very interesting, the building<br />

equipment industry, and parts of<br />

general industry too. These are the<br />

markets that we are in today. We certainly<br />

have a solid backbone in the<br />

automotive industry but the technology<br />

is now spreading out into other<br />

diverse industries.<br />

John Hartner: Many of our customers<br />

have already placed follow-up orders<br />

with us. We also have the largest market<br />

share. Ford is a good example.<br />

Recently, two brand new systems were<br />

deployed at their Advanced Manufacturing<br />

Center in Detroit. The center is one<br />

of our oldest customers.<br />

So business in the US is going well too?<br />

John Hartner: We are just negotiating<br />

with representatives of a construction<br />

equipment company. Yes, business in<br />

the US is going well. But we also have a<br />

very large customer in Japan, for<br />

example, who in turn has customers<br />

who demand high levels of complexity<br />

and who want to automate more<br />

because of the shortage of skilled workers.<br />

How about the environmental friendliness<br />

of your technology?<br />

Eric Bader: The pressure in terms of climate<br />

protection weighs on all companies.<br />

We print with inorganic binders –<br />

this is a trend that will affect the whole<br />

industry. In addition, we also work with<br />

chemical and natural resources companies<br />

to produce binders with low emissions.<br />

We are currently trying to reduce<br />

the emissions of furan resin binder systems.<br />

What is decisive for the ecological<br />

footprint, however, is that 3-D printing<br />

no longer necessarily means that products<br />

need to be shipped, but that the<br />

data can simply be sent to a printer in<br />

another country and printed there. This<br />

gives you the flexibility to produce the<br />

parts where you need them.<br />

We saw some interesting developments<br />

at GIFA: what do you think of the entry<br />

of Laempe Mössner Sinto into the production<br />

of 3-D printers, or the alliance<br />

for 3-D printing involving Loramendi,<br />

voxeljet and ASK Chemicals?<br />

John Hartner: The market is growing,<br />

interest is increasing. However the market<br />

develops, we will be able to handle<br />

it and improve even further!<br />

Eric Bader and John Hartner spoke with<br />

Robert Piterek<br />

8


MELTING SHOP<br />

Photo: Andreas Bednareck<br />

Digitalization in industrial<br />

furnace manufacturing –<br />

on the way to Industry 4.0<br />

OCP system in use. In<br />

contrast to the previous<br />

version, the current one<br />

enables cross-system<br />

communication and standardized<br />

data exchange.<br />

The way to Industry 4.0 is an evolutionary process which offers great potential for<br />

improving and stabilizing production processes and for increasing energy and resource<br />

efficiency by way of digitalization and networking. As a leading supplier to foundries<br />

and semis producers, Otto Junker GmbH (Simmerath/Germany), is determined to meet<br />

this challenge as demonstrated herein on the examples of its OCP Optical Coil Protection<br />

system, predictive maintenance system, and process models (Digital Twins).<br />

by Felix Aßmann, Simon Künne, Kunal Mody, Wilfried Schmitz and Günter Valder<br />

Introduction<br />

While the automation level and hence,<br />

the degree of digitalization of modern<br />

industrial furnace equipment, be it melting<br />

or heat treatment systems, has<br />

kept rising in recent years, these systems<br />

and the associated peripherals<br />

have, in many cases, largely remained<br />

digital islands to this day. Although<br />

extensive digital networking and the<br />

consistent acquisition and, above all,<br />

consolidation of all available data for<br />

the purposes of comprehensive higher-level<br />

analysis within the meaning of<br />

Industry 4.0 is well underway in foundries<br />

and semifinished product manufacturing<br />

plants, there are still many steps<br />

that remain to be taken. Otto Junker<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 9


MELTING SHOP<br />

Figure 1: Sketch<br />

of a typical furnace<br />

body, with<br />

OCP sensor cable<br />

permanently<br />

embedded in the<br />

furnace‘s permanent<br />

lining (4).<br />

Graphics: Otto Junker<br />

GmbH is making every effort to support<br />

this global process in the best possible<br />

manner. This shall be detailed in the following<br />

sections on the examples of its<br />

OCP Optical Coil Protection system, predictive<br />

maintenance system, and process<br />

models (Digital Twins).<br />

OCP - Optical Coil<br />

Protection system<br />

The OCP Optical Coil Protection system<br />

was first launched on an industrial scale<br />

in 2004 and has since evolved into a<br />

standard in coil and crucible monitoring<br />

technology for induction furnaces.<br />

Addressing the ubiquitous digitalization<br />

process and introduction of Industry 4.0<br />

standards, Otto Junker had set itself the<br />

task of advancing the relevant measuring,<br />

visualization and archiving software<br />

in that direction as well. Before<br />

these efforts are examined in detail, let<br />

us first recapitulate the system‘s basic<br />

functionality.<br />

Functional concept<br />

The materials employed to insulate the<br />

induction coil – e.g., insulating varnish,<br />

resins and, if applicable, insulating<br />

bandages – are commonly heat-resistant<br />

up to around 180 °C. Consequently,<br />

excessive temperatures in this area may<br />

give rise to insulation damage or even<br />

cause insulants to become electrically<br />

conductive, resulting in interturn short<br />

circuiting in the coil, typically in the presence<br />

of moisture [1]. The key fact is<br />

that in terms of temperature resistance,<br />

the coil insulation constitutes the most<br />

sensitive part of the entire coil assembly.<br />

The temperature must never exceed<br />

180 °C permanently in this area,<br />

whether due to erosion or other defects<br />

of the refractory lining or, for instance,<br />

because of problems in the coil‘s cooling<br />

water supply. It appears only logical,<br />

therefore, to devise a temperature measuring<br />

and monitoring system covering<br />

the entire inner side of the coil.<br />

The OCP system is a temperature<br />

measuring and monitoring solution<br />

relying on an optical fibre as a sensor<br />

element, which is particularly suitable<br />

for trouble-free temperature monitoring<br />

in induction melting furnaces due<br />

to its metrological characteristics, i.e.,<br />

the fact that this optical measuring<br />

method is, on principle, not susceptible<br />

to interference by the strong electromagnetic<br />

fields. Figure 1 shows a typical<br />

furnace body structure of a coreless<br />

induction furnace plant with the OCP<br />

sensor cable embedded in the permanent<br />

furnace lining right on the coil (4).<br />

Based on an optical fibre, the system<br />

makes use of the so-called Raman<br />

effect. Laser light of a suitable<br />

wavelength and modulation frequency<br />

is initially fed into the optical fibre. This<br />

laser light then gets scattered as it<br />

impinges on bonding electrons of the<br />

solid state structure over the full fiber<br />

length, and its backscatter spectrum is<br />

detected. This spectrum contains the<br />

Raman lines, the intensity of which is a<br />

function of vibration levels in the solid<br />

state fibre structure, which in turn<br />

depend on temperature. By noting the<br />

laser light‘s time of flight, these lines<br />

can be detected in a position-related<br />

manner and a precise high-resolution<br />

linear temperature profile can thus be<br />

measured online over the length of the<br />

optical fibre.<br />

It can thus be ensured, by an appropriate<br />

arrangement of the sensor cable<br />

on the interior side of the coil, that any<br />

point of particularly high temperature<br />

– e.g., due to infiltration, erosion, formation<br />

of cracks in the crucible, or even<br />

cooling problems – can be accurately<br />

localized and it can be determined<br />

whether the temperature at this point<br />

may become problematic for the coil<br />

insulation.<br />

The core of the OCP sensor cable is,<br />

first of all, a commercially available<br />

high-temperature glass fibre of the type<br />

widely employed in telecommunications.<br />

For mechanical protection, this<br />

fibre is surrounded by a stainless steel<br />

tube having a diameter of 1.2 mm<br />

10


Figure 2:<br />

Arrangement of the<br />

OCP sensor cable on<br />

the coil of a 6-tonne<br />

induction furnace<br />

for steel (4 meander<br />

layers).<br />

Figure 3: Arrangement of the<br />

furnace yokes.<br />

Figure 4: Visualization and operation using mobile terminal devices.<br />

which in turn is coated with an elastic<br />

high-temperature insulant. The overall<br />

diameter of the sensor cable is 5 mm.<br />

The sensor cable is rated for a maximum<br />

continuous operating temperature of<br />

approx. 250 °C which is well above the<br />

maximum temperature resistance of the<br />

coil insulation. The measuring<br />

technique has a range of several kilometers,<br />

and its spatial resolution over<br />

the developed length of the optical<br />

fibre is 27 cm, i.e., a temperature average<br />

is determined over every 27 cm.<br />

This does not interfere with the capturing<br />

of local temperature events<br />

because, on the one hand, the latter<br />

will always have a spatially extended<br />

temperature field; moreover, active<br />

temperature gradient monitoring functions<br />

are in place to detect even small<br />

changes. The relative temperature resolution<br />

of the measuring process is better<br />

than 1K.<br />

In order to provide the fullest possible<br />

crucible sensor coverage in the<br />

close vicinity of the coil, it is desirable to<br />

have a maximum length of sensor cable<br />

in the furnace. To this end, the sensor<br />

cable is arranged in a meandering pattern<br />

on the inside of the coil, taking<br />

into account its minimum bending<br />

radius. Figure 2 exemplifies this method<br />

for the coil of a six-tonne steel melting<br />

furnace. Four meandering fibre layers<br />

were installed in this case. On larger<br />

furnaces, the number of meander layers<br />

is increased accordingly. Once the sensor<br />

cable has been placed in the above-described<br />

manner, a former is placed<br />

in the coil, as is standard practice at<br />

Otto Junker, and a permanent lining of<br />

high thermal conductivity corundum<br />

concrete is cast in which the sensor<br />

cable thus remains permanently embedded.<br />

In the case of new equipment and<br />

coil overhaul projects these operations<br />

can be carried out in the workshop,<br />

while for retrofits or special applications<br />

they can also be performed locally<br />

in the foundry. It is even possible to<br />

replace individual meanders on site if<br />

the fiber has become damaged, e.g.,<br />

due to mechanical impacts.<br />

It is possible to assign alarm<br />

thresholds to every meander, i.e., one<br />

each for an alarm signal and for a furnace<br />

shutdown. On the one hand, the<br />

absolute temperature is an alarm criterion,<br />

but temperature gradients are also<br />

monitored. Especially this gradient<br />

monitoring function is highly valuable<br />

for the early detection of local lining<br />

defects.<br />

It should also be noted here that<br />

one measuring instrument can monitor<br />

up to four furnaces simultaneously. This<br />

capability, plus the fact that the sensor<br />

elements need not be renewed whenever<br />

the furnace is relined (contrary to a<br />

competitor system), makes for an extremely<br />

favourable cost-benefit ratio.<br />

Monitoring furnace yoke temperatures<br />

Nearly every coreless induction furnace<br />

exhibits magnetic yokes radially surrounding<br />

the coil to guide the external<br />

magnetic field and to provide mechanical<br />

support to the coil (Figure 3).<br />

Although these yokes are made of lowloss<br />

transformer sheet laminations,<br />

some heat is produced inside them and<br />

will have to be removed by convection<br />

or, in the case of high-powered furnaces,<br />

via an appropriate water cooling<br />

system. Nevertheless, ageing, corrosion<br />

or local defects may cause inacceptable<br />

local overheating of the yokes, with the<br />

potential effect of damaging the adjoining<br />

coil as well. Monitoring the yoke<br />

temperature is therefore highly recommendable.<br />

This is achieved by inserting<br />

an OCP sensor cable, likewise in meander<br />

form, into the yoke insulation consisting<br />

of micanite sheet between the<br />

yoke and coil. The temperature in this<br />

plane, and hence indirectly the yoke<br />

temperature, is thus captured over the<br />

surface area and visualized. Needless to<br />

say, suitable alarm thresholds can be<br />

defined here as well. It should be<br />

re-emphasized at this point that the<br />

immunity of this measuring process to<br />

electro-magnetic interference is of key<br />

importance.<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 11


MELTING SHOP<br />

Figure 6: OCP system visualization screen.<br />

Figure 7: Indication of yoke temperatures.<br />

Processing and visualization of OCP<br />

temperature data<br />

Unlike prior OCP software versions, the<br />

present one has data management and<br />

processing features designed fully in<br />

line with the Industry 4.0 concept as<br />

based on the OPC UA standard. This will<br />

permit future cross-system communication<br />

and a standardized data exchange<br />

with higher-level systems.<br />

Figure 5:<br />

Software<br />

architecture<br />

(schematic).<br />

Moreover, in redesigning the visualization<br />

and control interfaces, web-based<br />

solutions were developed so that<br />

the full functionality is also available<br />

with mobile terminal devices (Figure 4).<br />

In a further step, a feature was<br />

implemented whereby OCP temperature<br />

data, together with other furnace<br />

information such as actual furnace<br />

power, charge weight and furnace operating<br />

status, can be stored in a cloud<br />

system in coordination with the plant<br />

owner. This enables Otto Junker, e.g.,<br />

on the one hand, to view and analyze<br />

data so as to assist with the user‘s interpretation<br />

thereof in a given case. On<br />

the other hand, it lays the foundation<br />

for the use of tools such as, e.g., artificial<br />

intelligence to improve the system‘s<br />

predictive capabilities.<br />

Figure 5 illustrates the current software<br />

architecture in simplified form.<br />

Finally, the opportunity was used to<br />

fully redesign the individual input and<br />

visualization screens, with clarity, simplicity<br />

and intuitive control being accorded<br />

high priority. It goes without saying<br />

that alternative (i.e., mouse, keyboard<br />

or touch screen) control methods are<br />

supported.<br />

Let us now look at the relevant<br />

visualization windows by way of<br />

example: The main OCP visualization<br />

screen is depicted in Figure 6. This<br />

window shows a schematic top view of<br />

the furnace, with four meandering<br />

optical fibre layers in this case. On principle,<br />

the temperatures in each of the<br />

four meander layers are initially displayed<br />

in polar form, with the option<br />

to suppress individual layers for the<br />

sake of clarity. The temperature axis<br />

can be scaled at will. As an alternative<br />

to the polar temperature diagram<br />

shown, a corresponding linear rendering<br />

of the temperature profiles in<br />

the meander layers is available. When<br />

an alarm threshold is exceeded, this<br />

will be indicated by appropriate symbols<br />

next to the temperature graphs.<br />

At the same time, the border colour of<br />

the symbolic furnace will change traffic<br />

light style, i.e., from green through yellow<br />

(warning) to red (shutdown), in<br />

the relevant segments. Depending on<br />

the number of furnaces in place, these<br />

can be visualized simultaneously in<br />

separate windows.<br />

By selecting a playback function<br />

and entering a date and time, historic<br />

temperature profiles can be viewed. It<br />

is also possible to show temperature<br />

profile images in a video-like animated<br />

mode, at an adjustable playback speed,<br />

between a previously entered start and<br />

end time. These latter features are particularly<br />

helpful in tracking the<br />

development of a crucible defect in<br />

time and hence, to understand its evolution.<br />

Figure 7 shows the yoke temperature<br />

monitoring screen. Again, the furnace<br />

is shown in a schematic top view<br />

and comprises eight yokes in this case.<br />

12


Arranged around the furnace are the individual yokes in diagram<br />

form, with indication of the temperature profile over<br />

the yoke height plus a numeric display of the given average<br />

temperature. Here again, a „traffic light“ colour change will<br />

mark an overrun of predefined thresholds, with warning and<br />

shutdown functions operating analogously.<br />

Predictive maintenance system<br />

General architecture<br />

As part of Otto Junker GmbH‘s digitalization drive, a maintenance<br />

system for melting furnaces was developed and integrated<br />

into the web-based Junker Furnace Control System<br />

(JOKS).<br />

Designed as a process management tool for Otto Junker<br />

melting equipment, JOKS monitors the entire melting process.<br />

It controls all functions and process sequences automatically.<br />

At the same time, an exchange of data and information<br />

with higher-level process control resources is supported so<br />

that operating data can be logged, analyzed, and made available<br />

via interfaces. Various elements of the process chain<br />

that are subsumed under the functions of automation, monitoring<br />

and documentation are integrated in the JOKS system.<br />

The JOKS automates the furnace charging and melting process<br />

in that it automatically computes the necessary energy<br />

input, the bath temperature and the remaining melting time<br />

on the basis of the captured charge weight. Moreover, its<br />

charge make-up computing and melt composition adjustment<br />

functions provide quantity targets for the addition of additives.<br />

Further, the system monitors the operating states of all<br />

pumps, valves and air coolers. Analogue and digital sensor<br />

readings from the water recooling and switchgear systems<br />

are visualized as well. Continuous monitoring of the mean<br />

refractory thickness and coil-to-ground electrical resistance<br />

provides additional safety. All through the melting process,<br />

production records are generated and analyzed for each heat<br />

and furnace. Moreover, process data such as, e.g., electrical<br />

parameters over time are visualized over a freely selectable<br />

evaluation interval. These JOKS functionalities are now supplemented<br />

by the maintenance system described below.<br />

In operating a furnace system, maintenance has a high priority.<br />

The jobs required in this context must not only be performed<br />

but also documented and archived in an appropriate<br />

manner. A modern system is characterized by its ability to<br />

archive completed steps quickly and easily. Unnecessary<br />

delays in running the furnace can thus be avoided. This rapid<br />

availability and creation of the necessary documentation contents<br />

is also indispensable from the view point of low maintenance<br />

cost. Moreover, the use of a reliable digital system<br />

can reduce the risk of data loss, which may be quite substantial,<br />

e.g., with paper-based systems.<br />

A digitalized maintenance system must include lists of<br />

inspection items, a maintenance schedule and troubleshooting<br />

help functions, which are integrated in the web-based<br />

JOKS. Thus, all functionalities are combined in one system.<br />

During some maintenance steps it may be helpful and<br />

sometimes necessary to access current furnace plant operating<br />

data. Here, too, the system integration will show its<br />

merits as all operating data can be made available by the<br />

JOKS. Another advantage of a web-based system is that in<br />

order to display contents, no additional programs need to be<br />

installed on the given visualization device (e.g., a tablet PC).<br />

In a standard installation the JOKS system can be accessed<br />

via a web browser on an industrial-grade panel PC. The latter<br />

is built into the operating cabinet or console of the furnace<br />

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MELTING SHOP<br />

system. From here, acting through a<br />

secure link, the system accesses a web<br />

server that will provide the relevant<br />

web page contents.<br />

The pages of the maintenance system<br />

display contents from a database<br />

expanded specifically for this purpose.<br />

Accordingly, whenever a step has been<br />

completed, it can be acknowledged in<br />

the visualization system. The web server<br />

will then link up to the database, causing<br />

it to be updated and/or expanded<br />

accordingly. For each of the various<br />

maintenance subjects, individual tables<br />

have been created in the database so as<br />

to cover all inspection, maintenance<br />

and troubleshooting activities. Depending<br />

on the plant configuration, suitable<br />

work instructions will then be read<br />

from the database. Thanks to this<br />

approach, the maintenance system can<br />

be quickly adapted to other furnace<br />

plants as only the link to the database<br />

needs to be updated according to the<br />

plant configuration. The implemented<br />

functionalities can be maintained.<br />

Proper equipment operation means<br />

that those maintenance steps which<br />

Figure 8: Inspection form listing necessary<br />

work on the water circuit; completed<br />

steps can be stored in the database<br />

with operator‘s name and time stamp.<br />

have been completed are documented<br />

afterwards. It can thus be checked<br />

whether necessary measures were carried<br />

out in good time on a given furnace.<br />

The present web-based solution<br />

satisfies these documentation requirements.<br />

Inspections during installation<br />

Inspection activities required during installation<br />

or extensive rebuilding of a<br />

furnace system are itemized in check<br />

lists. These check lists have been implemented<br />

in the system as interactive<br />

forms covering all component assemblies,<br />

e.g., the hydraulic system, switchgear,<br />

water circuit, etc. Figure 8 shows<br />

such a form generated from the database<br />

to document an intervention on<br />

the water circuit. Upon completion of a<br />

task, the relevant row can be checked<br />

off and stored along with the name of<br />

the responsible employee and the current<br />

time. The completed task will then<br />

be updated in the appropriate table<br />

and line of the database and adapted in<br />

the visualization system. For clarity‘s<br />

sake, there exists an additional page listing<br />

all completed inspection steps in<br />

chronologically descending order.<br />

There, a PDF form can be generated<br />

from the displayed database items by<br />

means of a library of functions.<br />

Continuous maintenance<br />

Apart from periodic inspections, a continuous<br />

maintenance of furnace equipment<br />

is important for its trouble-free<br />

and safe operation. The maintenance<br />

schedule comprises all periodically<br />

necessary steps and has likewise been<br />

digitalized; maintenance activities on<br />

the various assemblies as well as the<br />

relevant maintenance intervals are thus<br />

specified by the system. The visualization<br />

once again relies on interactive<br />

forms, but their underlying database<br />

structure functions somewhat differently.<br />

Since the same tasks must be<br />

periodically repeated, every storage<br />

operation initiated via the visualization<br />

14


a<br />

b<br />

c<br />

d e f<br />

Figure 9 a-f: Modelling the temperature distribution in an aluminium rolling ingot during (a-c) and after (d-f) quenching in water<br />

system will generate a new line in the<br />

database instead of updating an existing<br />

one. At the implementation level,<br />

the entire database content is filtered<br />

so that only the most recent entry for a<br />

given step will be displayed. Needless to<br />

say, the entries suppressed by the filter<br />

are not lost; here, too, a page has been<br />

created which presents a summary of all<br />

completed steps.<br />

An additional feature is the listing<br />

of all urgently required jobs that have<br />

not been performed within a defined<br />

period. The omission of maintenance<br />

activities may lead to severe problems,<br />

up to and including – in the worst case<br />

– extended plant downtime. An additional<br />

list of activities that have not been<br />

completed, e.g., over a two-week<br />

period, may avoid such faults which<br />

may have arisen due to high workloads,<br />

etc.<br />

Equipment malfunctions<br />

A malfunction always constitutes a safety<br />

risk for the plant operator, or may<br />

result in plant downtime. It is therefore<br />

important to respond quickly to any arising<br />

fault so that first remedial action<br />

can be taken right away. A list of fault<br />

alarms summarizes all messages the<br />

plant controller is capable of registering.<br />

Using a dedicated function, the<br />

operator can conduct a selective search<br />

of the list maintained in the database<br />

by entering appropriate criteria (fault<br />

number, message text, operating status),<br />

so that relevant messages will be<br />

displayed along with a recommended<br />

first remedial step. Thanks to this search<br />

feature, even inexperienced personnel<br />

can respond appropriately in the event<br />

of an unknown malfunction. For<br />

instance, if a fault message containing<br />

the term „transformer“ is displayed and<br />

the operator also notices that no medium-frequency<br />

voltage is coming from<br />

the converter system, the list can be<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 15


MELTING SHOP<br />

searched for these terms. From the filtered<br />

entries it may then be concluded<br />

that, in all likelihood, the cooling water<br />

flow rate through the transformer is<br />

too low and the cooling system therefore<br />

needs to be inspected.<br />

Also included in the maintenance<br />

system are instructions intended to<br />

make the troubleshooting process more<br />

well-structured. These instructions<br />

sometimes include service videos which<br />

explain the relevant jobs in detail. By<br />

way of example, the following paragraphs<br />

describe the contents of such a service<br />

video for the job of replacing a<br />

defective thyristor stack.<br />

First of all, the system needs to be<br />

de-energized, locked/tagged out, and<br />

grounded in line with safety regulations.<br />

Next, the water circuit must be<br />

shut off. This step is followed by a presentation<br />

of all tools needed for the<br />

replacement job, and the procedure for<br />

disconnecting the firing-circuit cables is<br />

then shown. It is pointed out how to<br />

mark and disconnect the relevant cooling<br />

water hoses. Ultimately, the procedure<br />

of disassembling and removing the<br />

thyristor stack with its associated power<br />

leads is explained. In a further step, the<br />

operation of installing a new thyristor<br />

stack is demonstrated. The service video<br />

then explains how to re-connect the<br />

power feeders, having cleaned them<br />

beforehand if necessary. A description<br />

of how to connect the water hoses and<br />

firing-circuit cables completes the<br />

demonstration of this part replacement.<br />

Upon resetting of the fault message the<br />

original fault should be removed. The<br />

following QR code/Link gives a path to<br />

the video in question:<br />

https://bit.ly/2YrrCFm<br />

Depending on the fault type, different<br />

components need to be replaced to restore<br />

the proper functionality of all<br />

plant areas. This will normally be done<br />

by drawing on an existing spare parts<br />

stock. All spare parts are listed with full<br />

information regarding quantity, internal<br />

reference numbers, etc. In the maintenance<br />

system this list can be invoked<br />

in a form arranged by component<br />

assemblies. If a part is needed but not<br />

locally in stock, a procurement enquiry<br />

can be started directly out of the maintenance<br />

system by e-mail at this stage.<br />

Key details such as an unequivocal product<br />

code, the item designation and the<br />

necessary quantity are inserted into the<br />

e-mail text automatically. This makes it<br />

easier to contact Otto Junker‘s service<br />

department. The troubleshooting guide<br />

additionally comprises a list of frequently<br />

asked questions on both general<br />

and specific subjects.<br />

Process models (digital twins)<br />

Motivation<br />

Thermoprocessing systems are used to<br />

selectively adjust the properties of a<br />

component by a defined heat treatment.<br />

To this end, the temperature profile within<br />

the material must be controlled in<br />

such a way that the desired metallurgical<br />

processes can take place. The most<br />

important control parameters are the<br />

holding temperature and holding time,<br />

the cooling rate and the ageing temperature,<br />

if applicable. Although the ideal<br />

temperature profile may be known from<br />

laboratory tests, it is usually not possible<br />

in an industrial process to verify whether<br />

it is actually being observed.<br />

With the aid of process modeling,<br />

the full temperature profile inside the<br />

material or component can be determined<br />

by means of a few selected temperature<br />

measurements. Thanks to this<br />

mathematical approach, the data will<br />

be available in a structured form that<br />

facilitates further processing in an<br />

Industry 4.0 environment: Thus, for<br />

every product passing through the system<br />

it is possible to automatically generate<br />

a digital twin that will facilitate<br />

networking with upstream or<br />

downstream process steps.<br />

Modular system for process models<br />

To be able to supply process models as<br />

efficiently as possible for all equipment<br />

in its product range, Otto Junker GmbH<br />

has developed a software library that<br />

enables processes to be mapped as an<br />

FVM simulation using a modular system<br />

of building blocks. The fundamentals<br />

of this system have been explained,<br />

e.g., in [2].<br />

Volume elements can be created<br />

and linked to diverse boundary conditions.<br />

Each volume owns geometrical<br />

dimensions as well as information<br />

about its material properties. The links<br />

represent different heat transfer<br />

mechanisms. It is thus possible to map<br />

effects such as heat conductance, convective<br />

heat transfer with or without<br />

phase change, radiation or enthalpy<br />

flows. The system is then transferred to<br />

a solver capable of providing both<br />

steady and non-steady solutions to systems<br />

of this kind. In doing so, it relies<br />

on various numeric methods such as<br />

the Crank-Nicolson method, MUSCL<br />

schemes or Adams-Moulton methods<br />

in order to be able to handle shocks<br />

and discontinuities in the temperature<br />

profile. These methods can be found in<br />

the standard specialized literature,<br />

e.g., [3], [4] or [5].<br />

Application example of an<br />

ingot quench<br />

In the production of aluminium strip,<br />

ingots with dimensions in the region of<br />

4.5 x 1.2 x 0.5 m are initially heat-treated<br />

in pusher furnaces. Here they are<br />

homogenized at approx. 540 °C. Thereafter,<br />

they must cool down to a uniform<br />

temperature of 400 °C before they can<br />

be hot-rolled. For the ends of the ingot,<br />

a slightly higher temperature is desired<br />

because this is advantageous in the<br />

rolling process. Simply letting the temperature<br />

drop in air by free convection<br />

would take too long; moreover, the<br />

desired temperature profile would not<br />

be achievable in this manner. For this<br />

reason, water quenching with a subsequent<br />

soak phase is employed.<br />

The ingots are fed to the quench<br />

from the various furnaces on a roller<br />

conveyor. In the quench they are subjected<br />

to a selective application of water<br />

before they are transferred to a soak<br />

chamber. There they are held at an<br />

ambient temperature of 400 °C for 20<br />

minutes. After that the ingots are<br />

moved to the hot rolling mill for further<br />

processing.<br />

It is thus a requirement on the water<br />

quench that it should remove no more<br />

energy from the ingot than needs to be<br />

withdrawn to achieve a uniform temperature<br />

decrease from 540 °C to 400 °C.<br />

After all, it is not intended to introduce<br />

any further energy into the soak chamber.<br />

This way, both the energy demand<br />

and, ultimately, process costs will be<br />

minimized.<br />

For the foregoing purposes, the surface<br />

temperature of each ingot is measured<br />

directly upstream of the quench.<br />

Thereafter, its transfer from the furnace<br />

to the quench is simulated using a process<br />

model based on the above-described<br />

modular system. The ingot is assumed<br />

to possess a homogeneous<br />

temperature distribution upon exiting<br />

the furnace, and to lose heat by free<br />

convection during the transfer. If the<br />

surface temperature thus computed<br />

coincides with the measured one, the<br />

simulated temperature distribution will<br />

be used as a basis for the further calculations.<br />

16


An initial recipe is now selected for the quench, and the<br />

entire process is simulated all the way to the end of the soak<br />

cycle. A test is then carried out to ascertain whether or not the<br />

requirements on the ingot temperature are met. If necessary,<br />

the recipe will be adapted to the quench and a new simulation<br />

will be carried out. This process will be repeated until a<br />

setting is found that will cause the ingot to leave the soak<br />

chamber with just the desired temperature profile. This recipe<br />

is then loaded into the quench controller and executed. About<br />

5 to 10 simulation runs are necessary, but these take only a<br />

few seconds to complete. In this manner, every ingot geometry<br />

is treated with a tailor-made recipe so as to make optimum<br />

use of the residual heat.<br />

The results of such a simulation are graphically presented in<br />

(Figures 9 a - f). Figure 9 a shows the temperature distribution<br />

in the ingot at the time when its front end has just exited<br />

the quench. In Figure 9 b, the first half of the ingot is outside<br />

the quench. It is evident that the surface of that portion<br />

has already become distinctly hotter again than it was in the<br />

quench. Its temperature has risen from around 50 °C to<br />

approx. 250 °C due to heat conductance from the interior of<br />

the ingot. Ultimately, the ingot‘s temperature profile upon<br />

leaving the water quench is rendered in Figure 9 c.<br />

Figs. 9d through 9f show the temperature evolution over<br />

the soak phase. It should be noted that the colour scale in this<br />

diagram differs from that used in the previous images. In Fig.<br />

9d we can still detect major temperature differences. As is<br />

evident from Figs. 9e and 9f, these differences decrease over<br />

time. Ultimately, a temperature of around 400 °C is reached<br />

inside the ingot while its ends are slightly hotter to provide<br />

improved rolling properties.<br />

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Conclusion and outlook<br />

The process model presented above generates a digital twin<br />

of every ingot, documenting the temperature profile during<br />

the quenching process. Should any problems arise during hotrolling<br />

of certain ingots, these could thus be correlated to<br />

earlier process steps through data mining methods. This is a<br />

precondition for an extensive interlinking of processes and<br />

equipment (‚networking‘) in the context of Industry 4.0.<br />

In addition, an optimum recipe is generated for every<br />

ingot, thereby increasing process quality. The plant operator<br />

can directly specify the desired temperature the ingot should<br />

have upon exiting the soak chamber. Process parameters such<br />

as the water application density and ingot conveying speed<br />

are defined via an optimization routine that maps the process<br />

with the aid of a process model.<br />

As regards the OCP and predictive maintenance systems, it<br />

remains to be noted that there, too, the Industry 4.0 concept<br />

has been consistently put into practice. Above all, the architecture<br />

of the OCP software, which stores all measurement<br />

data in a cloud together with plant data generated by the<br />

JOKS software, permits a comprehensive analysis of these<br />

data, including, e.g., by means of artificial intelligence. The<br />

foundation has thus been laid for a decisive improvement of<br />

this tool‘s predictive capabilities.<br />

Primary publication in the technical journal „Heat Processing“<br />

Felix Aßmann, Simon Künne, Kunal Mody, Wilfried Schmitz,<br />

and Günter Valder, Otto Junker GmbH, Simmerath<br />

References:<br />

www.cpt-international.com<br />

Honorary sponsors<br />

VDD Verband Deutscher<br />

Druckgießereien, Düsseldorf<br />

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We’ll be pleased to help you!<br />

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T +49 9 11 86 06-49 16<br />

visitorservice@nuernbergmesse.de


Photos: Eirich<br />

Production Manager Jürgen<br />

Poggemann with<br />

Edith Weiser (Eirich<br />

Foun dry Business Unit).<br />

Background: Visua li zation<br />

of the mold ma te rial<br />

Automatic mold material<br />

preparation process.<br />

preparation – networked<br />

processes – better casting quality<br />

About 25 percent fewer rejects, major progress regarding surface quality (with more<br />

than 50 percent less post-processing work), and considerably more stable processes –<br />

Thomas Poggemann, Production Manager at Jürgens Gießerei GmbH & Co. KG, is more<br />

than just satisfied. Replacement of the old molding material preparation system with a<br />

second-hand plant, a control system and an AT1 inline tester device from the Gustav<br />

Eirich GmbH & Co. KG engineering works is paying off. Molding material preparation<br />

has now been in unmanned operation – using a pattern plates catalog – for two-and-ahalf<br />

years thanks to the SandExpert software solution. A clear advantage given frequent<br />

mold changes on two molding lines and increasingly complex castings.<br />

By Edith Weiser, Hardheim<br />

18


SAND REGENERATION<br />

Perfection is the drive” is the mission<br />

statement of the Jürgens<br />

foundry in Emsdetten, Germany.<br />

This includes production processes that<br />

are optimally coordinated with one<br />

another, that are continuously improved,<br />

and that are adapted to the particular<br />

requirement profile. A good<br />

example of this is the old molding<br />

material preparation plant with its Muller<br />

mixer. After 2012 it no longer met<br />

the demands of a foundry specializing<br />

in gray cast iron and spheroidal graphite<br />

iron.<br />

Eirich mold material preparation<br />

– turning old into new<br />

“We were thinking about expanding silo<br />

capacities when we stumbled across a<br />

two- or three-year-old Eirich molding<br />

sand preparation plant with a Webac<br />

cooler. We were able to purchase the<br />

equipment from the insolvency assets of<br />

a foundry in southern Germany. That<br />

was a stroke of luck”, remembers Thomas<br />

Poggemann, Production Manager at<br />

the Jürgens foundry in Emsdetten. Jürgens<br />

decided to build a new hall, which<br />

was seamless connected to the secondhand<br />

sand preparation plant (in tower<br />

design) with all central system components.<br />

A competent partner was found<br />

– the Gustav Eirich engineering works in<br />

Hardheim, Germany – who carried out<br />

the detailed engineering and assembly<br />

of the machine technology, as well as<br />

the steel construction including the<br />

enclosure. The delivery also included the<br />

complete control system and an AT1<br />

inline tester device for automatically<br />

measuring compactability and shear<br />

strength. The Jürgens foundry inplemented<br />

the conveyor system from VHV Anlagenbau,<br />

Hörstel, Germany. Preventive<br />

molding material control was achieved<br />

using SandExpert software from Eirich<br />

for the continuous registration and analysis<br />

of batch data. The control solution<br />

and quality package together form the<br />

basis for achieving without human intervention<br />

a high quality molding material<br />

preparation despite challenging conditions.<br />

A demanding task in view of the<br />

foundry’s wide range of castings.<br />

Control via pattern catalog database<br />

Jürgens currently produces molding<br />

boxes for about 4,500 different castings<br />

using two HWS molding lines, both operated<br />

with the Seiatsu mold process. The<br />

casting weight of the small molding line<br />

Figure 1: The second-hand Eirich mixer at<br />

the Jürgens foundry uses pre-water.<br />

is between 20 and 140 kg liquid iron,<br />

while that of the large mold line is between<br />

100 and 1,000 kg. The two molding<br />

lines run in parallel. Two completely<br />

different castings are made at the<br />

same time. “The molding material must<br />

be right for both patterns, although the<br />

iron-to-sand ratios are very different,”<br />

according to Thomas Poggemann.<br />

Manually calculating the best molding<br />

material recipe involved much time and<br />

effort considering the frequent changes<br />

of mold. Today, the mold material preparation<br />

is programmed for each specific<br />

mold and processing is fully automated.<br />

This method of operation requires a<br />

lot of advance work – which Thomas<br />

Poggemann and his team have carried<br />

out excellently. Box weight, box size,<br />

liquid iron, required bentonite content,<br />

required compression strength, compactability,<br />

shakeout properties, core decay<br />

– they defined all this meticulously for<br />

each pattern plates,” confirms<br />

Klaus-Dieter Knapp with appreciation.<br />

He is supporting the Jürgens Foundry as<br />

an Eirich service technician and was<br />

already involved in the planning and<br />

design phase<br />

Objective: homogeneous<br />

return sand<br />

The software automatically calculates<br />

the composition of the molding material<br />

when there is a pattern plate<br />

change at the molding line. This takes<br />

into account the values from the pattern<br />

catalog so that the return sand<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 19


SAND REGENERATION<br />

quality remains identical, regardless of<br />

the castings produced. The return sand<br />

of the new batch is freshened up with<br />

exactly the same amount of bentonite<br />

and additives as will be lost in the subsequent<br />

casting process. Why? Production<br />

Manager Thomas Poggemann puts<br />

it in a nutshell: “It’s very easy: return<br />

sand in order, input materials in order,<br />

casting in order.”<br />

Pre-water for the best molding<br />

material quality<br />

The Eirich control system offers two<br />

options for operating the mixer<br />

(Figure 1): with or without pre-water.<br />

The Jürgens foundry works with<br />

pre-water in order to achieve a preparation<br />

time with water that is as long<br />

as possible while shortening overall<br />

charge times. A high portion of the<br />

total water required for the previous<br />

batch is added to the mixer.<br />

During the mixing time, the probe<br />

in the mixer measures the temperature<br />

and moisture, and automatically<br />

meters the additional water required.<br />

Finally, the correction factor required<br />

for calculating the amount of water<br />

for the next mixture is determined by<br />

measuring compactability with the<br />

Figure 2: The AT1 inline tester device<br />

with an independent local control unit.<br />

Figure 3: Above the molding sand line,<br />

the visualization screen showing the<br />

mold material data can be seen.<br />

AT1. Any possible loss of moisture<br />

during transport is, naturally, taken<br />

into account here.<br />

Preventive molding material control<br />

through networked processes<br />

The AT1 inline tester device<br />

(Figure 2) is mounted on the conveyor<br />

belt immediately behind the mixer, and<br />

equipped with an independent local<br />

control unit. While the mixer is emptying,<br />

the AT1 inline tester device carries<br />

out an analysis of the compactability and<br />

shear strength on two till three samples<br />

from each batch. The measured values<br />

are made available to the plant control<br />

system via an interface, and used for<br />

automatically correcting the next batch.<br />

As a quality assurance measure, Thomas<br />

Poggemann merely takes a molding<br />

material sample once a day and checks<br />

the moisture content, compactability,<br />

shear strength, double shear strength,<br />

splitting strength, compressive strength,<br />

gas permeability and bulk density. He<br />

notes that: “The processes have become<br />

considerably more stable since we started<br />

operating the mold material preparation<br />

system without human intervention<br />

using the pattern catalog.”<br />

Benefits from mold material<br />

preparation<br />

That’s not all: as a result of the improvement<br />

in mold material preparation, the<br />

number of rejects at Jürgens has been<br />

reduced by about 25 percent. Moreover,<br />

there has been an extreme improvement<br />

in the surface quality achieved. The postprocessing<br />

has been drastically reduced<br />

- more than 50 percent less. In Emsdetten,<br />

they have also implemented an operating<br />

mode with break times, which<br />

contributes significantly to saving energy.<br />

During the half-hour breaks when the<br />

molding lines are not producing, the<br />

machinery of the sand preparation system<br />

switches to the break mode. This<br />

takes place in a con trolled manner and<br />

fully automatically. The mixer only switches<br />

itself off after the last batch has<br />

been completely emptied. Then the cooler<br />

follows, also switching off after it is<br />

completely empty.Finally, the conveyor<br />

belts shut down too.<br />

20


Everything in view at all times<br />

All monitors along the process chain<br />

permit the graphic representation of<br />

the actual situation within the molding<br />

material preparation system, as well as<br />

the batch and consumption logs. So<br />

the operating personnel have an<br />

insight into the actual situation and<br />

the quality of the molding material at<br />

each of the screens (Figure 3). When<br />

messages appear, the operator decides<br />

on the next step and can determine<br />

the action necessary. Only the Shift<br />

Manager in the control room and the<br />

Production Manager at his personal<br />

monitor, however, have full access, for<br />

example access to the sand recipe. By<br />

means of the teleservice function,<br />

Eirich is also able to access the visualization<br />

and control system, as well as<br />

the current data, at any time. “If necessary,<br />

someone can always be reached<br />

– that’s helpful,” finds Thomas Poggemann.<br />

He welcomes the fact that<br />

repairs and downtimes are thus kept to<br />

a minimum.<br />

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Investments in the future<br />

“At Juergens, we are digitally focused<br />

and always innovative. We are well<br />

aware that castings will become increasingly<br />

complex and sophisticated in the<br />

future,“ says Thomas Poggemann. As a<br />

railway-certified caster for high-quality<br />

small and medium-sized series for all<br />

sectors except automotive, the Jürgens<br />

foundry considers itself ideally positioned<br />

for mastering the challenges of<br />

the future. “Automated molding material<br />

preparation with the Eirich mixer<br />

and the quality package with the AT1<br />

inline tester device, as well as the Sand-<br />

Expert software for preventive forming<br />

material control, was another step in<br />

the right direction for us,” according to<br />

Production Manager Poggemann. The<br />

next measures he is planning is the<br />

refurbishment of the melting plant as<br />

well as providing the large mold line<br />

with another 40 molding boxes. The<br />

current molding material preparation<br />

system will not interfere with these<br />

plans.<br />

At Gifa <strong>2019</strong> Thomas Poggemann<br />

was invited at the Eirich-Stand to take a<br />

closer look at the possibilities offered<br />

by the new generation of the AT1 inline<br />

tester with web interface and new measuring<br />

options. Perhaps it is still possible<br />

to improve molding material preparation<br />

a little bit more.<br />

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Sand core hardening:<br />

Digital quality with new<br />

ACS-Technology<br />

Corebox for inorganic sand<br />

core test bars adjusted to<br />

ACS technology at DISA core<br />

shooter.<br />

Sand cores are building the back-bone of the foundry business to deliver constantly<br />

improving foundry products. The sand core requirements stretch from high dimensional<br />

accuracy to easy core removal while at the same time demanding the lowest possible<br />

cost. Sand core quality plays an important role as quality defects of sand cores usually<br />

results in defects of final foundry products.<br />

By Wolfram Bach, Sülzetal, and Prof. Gotthard Wolf, Freiberg<br />

Photo: ACS<br />

All these requirements are driven<br />

to ensure the highest possible<br />

quality for the final foundry<br />

product at the lowest price.<br />

All inorganic sand core manufacturing<br />

process offer various parameters to<br />

adjust the sand core quality. The parameters<br />

can be grouped into five main<br />

critical steps during the manufacturing<br />

process:<br />

1. Sand core & core box design<br />

2. Shooting process<br />

3. Curing process<br />

4. Handling & Storage<br />

5. Application<br />

All processes above have a direct impact<br />

on the quality of the sand cores. The<br />

curing process (Step 3.) has the biggest<br />

operational impact on the individual<br />

sand core quality while all other process<br />

parameters are de-signed upfront and<br />

to ensure reliable quality. The main reason<br />

why the curing process is so critical,<br />

is that it requires heat application to<br />

the individual sand core to ensure sufficient<br />

sand core strength.<br />

Heat application processes can be<br />

simulated but are difficult to control in<br />

real time. Especially if heat is generated<br />

externally and conveyed into the core<br />

box for conventional core boxes. The<br />

Tool design.<br />

common heat applications in the core<br />

box use either thermo oil or heating<br />

rod to generate the heat and to heat<br />

up the core box to tar-get temperature.<br />

Additional heat energy is applied to the<br />

22


MOLD AND COREMAKING<br />

Equipment design.<br />

sand core via heated air while removing<br />

humidity.<br />

The key problem remains: The heat<br />

conductivity of sand (cores) is terrible<br />

and hence impacting the efficiency of<br />

the whole core making process. The<br />

negative impact is reduced by operating<br />

the core box with excessive heat even<br />

above 200 °C. This allows to increase<br />

the heat transfer from the core box into<br />

the sand core and to compensate for<br />

the loss in cycle time. This approach has<br />

limitations as the sand binders have a<br />

maximum temperature to avoid damaging<br />

the chemical binder.<br />

The „Advanced Core Solutions“<br />

(ACS) project has patented a new process<br />

that generates the heat directly<br />

inside the sand core. This process uses<br />

the electrical conductivity of all common<br />

inorganic binders and sand core<br />

mixtures. The heat is generated by<br />

applying electrical current to the sand<br />

core and core box based on the principles<br />

of the 1st law of Joule. The patented<br />

innovation allows the adjustment of the<br />

electrical conductivity of the core box<br />

material to match the conductivity of<br />

the sand binder composition.<br />

Thanks to this approach the electrical<br />

resistance is nearly identical at every<br />

single point between the electrodes. As a<br />

consequence the electrical flow through<br />

the core box is very homogeneous and<br />

allows the complete hardening of<br />

sand-cores independent of their shape.<br />

The model of a core box design is<br />

very simple as it mainly contains the<br />

core box, electrodes and isolation layer.<br />

The electrode are applying the electrical<br />

current with the ideal voltage and amperage<br />

level and are measured and adjusted<br />

in milliseconds to increase the optimal<br />

energy introduction into the sand<br />

core. This does allow the reduction of<br />

energy consumption of up to 41 % and<br />

faster cycle times of up to 30%. The<br />

homogeneous current flow through the<br />

sand core also improves the sand core<br />

quality by homogeneous curing.<br />

The bigger benefit is the transformation<br />

of the classic hardening process<br />

into a digital quality process. The flow<br />

of electrical current through the sand<br />

core is at ever millisecond controlled<br />

and documented. This allows to measure<br />

not only the individual energy<br />

consumption over time per individual<br />

sand core. It also enables the first time<br />

to direct comparison of energy<br />

consumption per individual sand core<br />

versus all previous produces sand cores.<br />

Based on Six Sigma concepts it<br />

allows the automatic detection of any<br />

major variation versus previous sand<br />

cores. The ACS-System can then identify<br />

and mark sand cores for additional<br />

inspections or removal.<br />

This decreases quality defects early<br />

in the manufacturing process to reduce<br />

additional losses later in the manufacturing<br />

steps and at the same time increasing<br />

the output capacity.<br />

The same approach can be applied<br />

also for family core boxed with ten or<br />

more cavities or specifically for large<br />

complex sand cores. Furthermore can<br />

the quality data be linked to each sand<br />

core and used for life cycle tracking.<br />

This enables future insights by applying<br />

big data analysis by connecting the<br />

results to final foundry product quality.<br />

Dipl.-Ing. Wolfram Bach, Inventor &<br />

Process Engineer, Advanced Core Solutions(ACS),<br />

Sülzetal, Germany, and Prof.<br />

Dr.-Ing. Gotthard Wolf, Head of<br />

Foundry Institute, Universität Bergakademie<br />

Freiberg, Germany<br />

www.advanced-core-solutions.com<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 23


COATINGS<br />

Photos and Graphics: ASK Chemicals<br />

Large-scale casting<br />

and water based refractory<br />

coating – does that work?<br />

Solitec HI 703 (water-based coating)<br />

shows the user the current status of<br />

drying by means of a colour change.<br />

With the switch from alcohol to water-based coating, the iron foundry König & Bauer<br />

not only uses an environmentally friendly solution that complies with workplace limit<br />

values with regard to ethanol, but can also reduce costs in the fettling shop, in explosive-protected<br />

areas and in the permanent extraction of the flood basins. With the environmentally<br />

friendly water-based coating from ASK Chemicals the iron foundry Koenig<br />

& Bauer can also realize drying times of less than six hours.<br />

Ulf Knobloch and Christian Koch, Hilden<br />

24


The Koenig & Bauer Foundry<br />

GmbH, Würzburg, Germany, was<br />

divested from the Koenig & Bauer<br />

Group in 2014 and today, as a subsidiary<br />

of Koenig & Bauer AG & Co. KG, serves<br />

well-known customers throughout<br />

Europe. This takes place either directly<br />

with raw parts or in cooperation with<br />

Koenig & Bauer Industrial AG & Co. KG<br />

(the subsidiary responsible for mechanical<br />

processing) with components for<br />

pressure equipment and other parts for<br />

mechanical and plant engineering.<br />

At the Würzburg site, the foundry<br />

looks back on a 200-year company history.<br />

Specialized in the production of<br />

cast iron with lamellar graphite (GJL)<br />

and nodular graphite (GJS), up to<br />

12,000 tons of good castings with individual<br />

weights of 0.1 to 10 tons can be<br />

poured, blasted, fettled and painted<br />

each year via the hand molding process.<br />

In 2011, the foundry with attached<br />

pattern making shop underwent a complete<br />

renovation with an investment<br />

volume of 12 million euros in buildings,<br />

facilities and environmental protection.<br />

Modern requirement profile<br />

The Koenig & Bauer foundry, as many<br />

other foundries in the manual coremaking<br />

and molding sectors, used alcohol<br />

coatings over many years. Alcohol-based<br />

coatings are characterized by<br />

the fact that the cores and molds dry<br />

faster or that the solvent can be burned<br />

off. However, these advantages are contrast<br />

ed by a number of disadvantages,<br />

such as the need for protective measures<br />

and compliance with limit values:<br />

> Clearance areas in the finishing area<br />

(fire and explosion protection)<br />

> Defined work areas for finishing and<br />

flash off<br />

> Two component purchases (coating<br />

and solvents) with special storage in<br />

explosion-protected areas<br />

> Compliance with occupational exposure<br />

limits for ethanol or isopropanol<br />

“As a responsible and modern enterprise,<br />

it was only a matter of time<br />

before we took measures in order to<br />

sustainably comply with occupational<br />

exposure limits and to demonstrate<br />

Figure 1: The mold is coated at the<br />

mobile flood basin.<br />

ecological responsibility,“ states Ulf<br />

Schmidtgen, Segment Manager of<br />

Koenig & Bauer Gießerei GmbH, mentioning<br />

two of the main reasons for the<br />

decision to switch to water-based<br />

refractory coating.<br />

The conversion should be absolutely<br />

cost-neutral, both based on the overall<br />

process and without loss of productivity,<br />

i.e. the core and mold output per day<br />

should at least remain constant. “It was<br />

also important for us not to have to<br />

invest in oven drying,“ adds Stefan<br />

Braun, Production Manager. “On the<br />

one hand, oven drying would have<br />

made our cores and molds more expensive<br />

and, on the other hand, there was<br />

no space for the necessary infrastructure.“<br />

The proviso was therefore to<br />

make the conversion to water-based<br />

coating without the installation of additional<br />

drying ovens.<br />

Water-based refractory coating<br />

for large-scale casting<br />

On the basis of the requirement profile,<br />

the foundry conducted pilot trials<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 25


COATINGS<br />

Figure 2: Stefan Braun, Production Manager, Ulf Schmidtgen, Segment Manager of Koenig<br />

& Bauer Gießerei GmbH, and Ulf Knobloch, ASK Chemicals GmbH (left to right), measuring<br />

the wet layer thickness.<br />

accompanied by ASK Chemicals, Hilden,<br />

Germany, using Solitec HI 703 coating<br />

over a long period of time.<br />

Solitec HI 703 is a zircon-free brush<br />

and flood coating for cores and molds<br />

manufactured using cold processes.<br />

The high-solid coating is more flexible<br />

in thermal and physical expansion<br />

behaviour than zircon coatings. Graphite<br />

and oxide content also have a separating<br />

effect between sand and the<br />

casting. The state-of-the-art binder<br />

component holds the water on the<br />

coating surface and prevents water<br />

migration into the sand interior. The<br />

flood viscosity is reached with a minimal<br />

addition of water of about 10 %<br />

by weight. The uniformly thick layered<br />

application with a relatively short dripping<br />

time of the coating is a distinguishing<br />

characteristic. In ductile iron,<br />

sulphur absorbent prevents the sulphur<br />

transport from the molding material<br />

into the casting surface and thereby<br />

averts graphite degenerations. In certain<br />

cases, it is also used to combat pinhole<br />

defects. The progress of the drying<br />

progress is easily recognisable to<br />

the user by a colour change.<br />

Custom process setting<br />

The viscosity of the coating for the<br />

cores and molds adapted to dipping<br />

and flooding behaviour was quickly<br />

determined in a few tests. The implementation<br />

of the requirement to<br />

achieve short drying time while maintaining<br />

productivity required some<br />

changes in the production process. For<br />

example, trials with hot spraying were<br />

performed. In this process, the ready-touse<br />

coating is heated to a temperature<br />

of approx. 70-80 °C just upstream from<br />

the spray nozzle. This should lead to<br />

faster flash off of the water and thus<br />

prevent the deep penetration of water<br />

into the mold surface. However, the trials<br />

did not lead to the desired result<br />

due to the geometry of the molds.<br />

Although parallel and slightly sloping<br />

surfaces and contours were well covered<br />

by the coating using the available<br />

nozzles, vertical contours could only<br />

partially be wetted or not at all.<br />

Attempts to heat the top layer of<br />

the mold using infrared radiators also<br />

did not lead to a successful shortening<br />

of the drying time. The specifications<br />

could only be achieved by ensuring constant<br />

circulation of the room air in the<br />

core shop without simultaneously creating<br />

drafts in the working areas. In the<br />

molding shop, the process of „molding<br />

- finishing - form assembling - casting“<br />

was redefined. Here, too, the drying of<br />

the mold halves after coating is assisted<br />

with moving air. Now drying times of<br />

less than six hours could be achieved. To<br />

obtain even more flexibility in the<br />

molding shop, a special construction of<br />

the flood basin has been in use since<br />

the middle of 2018. The mobile flood<br />

basin allows for finishing directly on site<br />

at the respective forming area, the<br />

mold halves now no longer have to be<br />

driven across the entire hall and the<br />

cranes can increasingly be used for<br />

direct production (Figure 1).<br />

In addition to the mentioned advantages,<br />

the chosen Solitec HI 703 coating<br />

also reduced costs in the fettling shop.<br />

26


Likewise, it is now possible to dispense<br />

with the additional application of a precoat<br />

coating to the higher thermally<br />

stressed points of the cores and molds.<br />

The fettling work caused by burn in and<br />

mineralization has been significantly<br />

reduced. The gas bubble defects have<br />

also decreased significantly. Up until<br />

now it was necessary to work with a<br />

special gas-permeable coating for certain<br />

components. Since the conversion<br />

to Solitec HI 703, the majority of these<br />

have been dispensed with. Ultimately,<br />

the surfaces achieved over the entire<br />

product range are significantly better<br />

than with the alcohol coating used<br />

hitherto.<br />

Large-scale casting and waterbased<br />

refractory coating – that<br />

works well!<br />

In 2018, the Koenig & Bauer Foundry<br />

completely converted its core and form<br />

shop sectors from coating with solvent<br />

as a liquid carrier to a water-based<br />

product. ASK Chemicals supported and<br />

accompanied the changeover phase to<br />

the new Solitec HI 703 water-based<br />

coating. Ulf Schmidtgen, Segment<br />

Head of Koenig & Bauer Gießerei<br />

GmbH (Figure 2), is satisfied: “The<br />

result speaks for itself! We use an<br />

en vi ronmentally friendly and<br />

employee-friendly product and have<br />

achieved even more efficiency in the<br />

process. We were able to reduce casting-related<br />

rework and refrain from<br />

additional work steps such as the application<br />

of pre-coat coating. The mobile<br />

flood basin is, of course, a very special<br />

highlight which makes our work processes<br />

easier for our employees and<br />

makes our production processes more<br />

flexible.“ Now the entire surface in the<br />

molding shop provided with overhead<br />

cranes can be used very flexibly,<br />

explains Stefan Braun, because there<br />

are no longer the restrictions due to<br />

the requirement of explosion-proof<br />

areas. Likewise, it is now possible to<br />

pour off in the entire hall, regardless<br />

of restricted areas. Frequent transport<br />

of molds ready for casting is no longer<br />

necessary.<br />

The time spent in the fettling area<br />

for the elimination of mold and corerelated<br />

casting defects has been significantly<br />

reduced. By switching to waterbased<br />

coating and the concurrent<br />

elimination of explosion-proof areas,<br />

maintenance costs in this area were<br />

reduced by about 80%. Furthermore,<br />

there is energy saving, since no permanent<br />

extraction is necessary at all flood<br />

basins. As a result of the conversion, the<br />

occupational exposure limits with<br />

regard to ethanol can now be reliably<br />

adhered to, since there is no longer any<br />

pollution. Again, storage areas in the<br />

production areas are freed up, since day<br />

storage for isopropanol and/or ethanol<br />

is omitted.<br />

This success story shows that the<br />

option of solvent-free coating is also<br />

open to hand-molding. A conversion to<br />

water-based coating can be carried out<br />

without complex drying units and, in<br />

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and the environment, also offers cost<br />

and efficiency advantages for the<br />

foundry. www.ask-chemicals.com<br />

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CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 27


COMPANY<br />

Rolls for the world<br />

Gontermann-Peipers casts the world’s heaviest rolling mill rolls. With almost 200 years of<br />

foundry expertise, engineering skill and innovative spirit, the Siegen-based company has<br />

become one of the world’s most important producers of rolls for rolling mills and<br />

high-performance components for machine construction.<br />

by Robert Piterek, Düsseldorf<br />

Photos: Andreas Bednareck<br />

It is vibrating in the works hall – from<br />

beneath the cover plate with a diameter<br />

of about five meters. Then a<br />

two-meter-tall casting ladle slowly<br />

descends to the pouring funnel at the<br />

center of the plate. The casting cycle<br />

starts: an employee in heat-protection<br />

gear rapidly, but carefully, tilts the ladle<br />

forward by handwheel. The molten<br />

steel sloshes over the spout. A wide<br />

stream flows, almost silently, into the<br />

underground cylinder about 13 meters<br />

deep where a vertical centrifugal casting<br />

mold is rotating at several hundred<br />

revolutions per minute – operating at<br />

full speed. The centrifugal forces press<br />

the melt to the edge of the mold (like<br />

an enormous salad spinner), ensuring<br />

compact compression of the structure.<br />

Smoke now rises from the funnel and<br />

the gaps in the cover plate, which is<br />

fixed in place with enormous screws. A<br />

work roll, which will one day be used in<br />

the roughing stand of a hot strip or<br />

28


Managing Director Frieder Spannagel explains the layout of the individual depart -ments<br />

on the works grounds. He has been managing the company since 2015, together with<br />

Dr. Hartmut Jacke and Dr. Bernd Hofmann.<br />

Casting on the vertical spin caster.<br />

A mold rotates at several hundred<br />

revolutions per minute below the<br />

round cover plate.<br />

heavy plate mill to roll slabs into sheet,<br />

is being produced here using the vertical<br />

spin casting process. The shell just<br />

cast from extremely wear-resistant steel<br />

will be filled with a ductile core – which<br />

will absorb the forces ultimately exerted<br />

on the roll. The spin caster will still<br />

need some time for the current work<br />

step. After casting, it will take several<br />

days for the raw work roll to cool<br />

enough to permit further processing.<br />

A prime example of an SME<br />

The action is taking place at the Marienborn<br />

works of the Gontermann-Peipers<br />

foundry in the German town of<br />

Siegen which, in addition to other<br />

high-performance components, casts<br />

and finishes about 800 work rolls a year<br />

in a weight class from about eight tonnes.<br />

The company’s two sites, the Hain<br />

works and the Marienborn works,<br />

employ 570 personnel. It achieves sales<br />

of about 100 million euros every year<br />

and is still in family hands. The descendants<br />

of the company founder already<br />

manage the traditional company in the<br />

seventh generation. The foundation<br />

stone was laid in 1825 – in six years the<br />

company will be 200 years old. Gontermann-Peipers<br />

is thus a prime example<br />

of the SME economic power that has<br />

always formed the backbone of German<br />

society.<br />

The company already has more than<br />

a century’s worth of expertise in casting<br />

rolls: the first rolls were cast here in<br />

Three casters in so-called ‘silver man<br />

suits’ – heat protection for work on the<br />

melting plants and during the casting of<br />

components.<br />

1855. No wonder, then, that there are<br />

only a few companies worldwide that<br />

can compete in its market segment.<br />

Gontermann-Peipers set a world record<br />

in 1985 with the casting of a work roll<br />

for the Dillinger Hütte plate mill: it had<br />

a finished weight of 265 tonnes and<br />

was 11.5 meters long. Gontermann-Peipers<br />

collaborated with other regional<br />

foundries and steelworks in order to<br />

put together the 500 to 600 tonnes of<br />

liquid iron necessary to cast a roll of this<br />

magnitude. A mammoth task, at most<br />

only approached by the production of<br />

the largest back-up roll for aluminum<br />

sheet: the world’s longest heavyweight<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 29


COMPANY<br />

60-tonne electric-arc furnace at the Marienborn<br />

works. Together with the three<br />

other furnaces, the works has a total<br />

melting capacity of 150 tonnes.<br />

The 13-meter-deep casting pit in which two permanent molds are already present.<br />

The larger the rolls at Gontermann-Peipers since the 1970s, the deeper the casting pit.<br />

work roll, weighing 236 tonnes and<br />

13.55 meters long. This was made for<br />

the Arconic works in Davenport, USA,<br />

which produces for aircraft-maker<br />

Boeing among others.<br />

High export rate<br />

The current family representative at<br />

Gontermann-Peipers is Frieder Spannagel<br />

who, together with Dr. Bernd Hofmann<br />

and Dr. Hartmut Jacke, forms<br />

the three member executive team of<br />

the family-run company. In 2015, the<br />

44-year-old took over leadership of<br />

the company from his father Fritz<br />

Spannagel, who now has an advisory<br />

role as Chairman of the Supervisory<br />

Board. Frieder Spannagel studied business<br />

administration and worked for<br />

metallurgical plant supplier SMS<br />

Group for six years before joining the<br />

family company. Spannagel is as unimpressed<br />

by entries in the Guinness<br />

Book of Records as he is by the company’s<br />

recent entry in the ranking of<br />

world market leaders in Wirtschaftswoche,<br />

a German weekly business<br />

news magazine. In his position leading<br />

the company he prefers realistic business<br />

assessments to titles. “In order to<br />

stay at the top of the ladder in worldwide<br />

competition, our products must<br />

be at least as much better as they are<br />

more expensive than those of others,”<br />

he stresses.<br />

For Gontermann-Peipers – with its<br />

export rate of 70 percent for rolls –<br />

worldwide competition is as important<br />

to them as developments on the steel<br />

markets, where its customers (such as<br />

Dillinger Hütte, Dillinger France, Salzgitter<br />

Grobblech, thyssenkrupp, Severstahl<br />

and MMK Magnetogorsk) are<br />

active. The steel sector has been characterized<br />

by enormous overcapacities<br />

since at least 2009, triggered by Chinese<br />

steelworks. The roll business,<br />

however, is now regaining momentum.<br />

The main purchasing countries<br />

are India, Mexico and Russia, as well as<br />

30


those of Latin America. Orders from<br />

China are falling. Demand for the largest<br />

rolls is restricted because there<br />

are only a limited number of plants<br />

that can use them. In addition, of<br />

course, these large rolls have very long<br />

service lives before requiring replacement.<br />

Innovative roll composition<br />

In addition to work rolls, the Marienborn<br />

works also produces back-up rolls<br />

and profile rolls that are also used in<br />

rolling mills. The back-up rolls, which<br />

include the heaviest of rolls, are made<br />

using a composite steel casting process<br />

developed by the company itself in<br />

which, like with the vertical spin casting<br />

process, different materials are combined<br />

in the roll shell and core to create<br />

extremely high-performing rolls.<br />

The materials used for the rolls are<br />

hot-working tool steels, chrome steels<br />

with up to 18 percent chromium, and<br />

HS steels with high vanadium contents.<br />

Recently, unfortunately for the company,<br />

prices for the elements that<br />

increase the toughness (and thus the<br />

resilience) of the steel have increased<br />

massively.<br />

Another prominent product from<br />

Gontermann-Peipers is bodies for nuclear<br />

casks – cast and mechanically processed<br />

thick-walled bodies for the Castor<br />

® casks of GNS (Gesellschaft für<br />

Nuklear Service). Castor ® is a secure container<br />

for the transport and storage of<br />

highly radioactive waste and the spent<br />

fuel of nuclear power stations. The 100-<br />

tonne container bodies, made of spheroidal<br />

graphite iron, are among the<br />

most demanding castings to make. Gontermann-Peipers<br />

is one of a very small<br />

circle of companies capable of casting<br />

and processing Castor ® bodies. The<br />

An employee prepares a casting mold.<br />

Mold elements are available in the most<br />

varied of sizes. So the roll foundry can<br />

flexibly produce different roll sizes.<br />

The rolls are stacked three meters high<br />

on the works grounds – in a variety of<br />

processing stages.<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 31


company has its own state-accredited<br />

inspection laboratory for these products.<br />

The works in Hain, which uses the<br />

most varied of casting processes, considers<br />

itself a foundry for specialties.<br />

Demanding materials and components<br />

are produced for machine construction<br />

in general. In addition to permanent<br />

mold casting and horizontal spin casting,<br />

production takes place using continuous<br />

casting and hand molding processes.<br />

Typical products include cylinder<br />

liners, cast machine beds, easily<br />

machined continuously cast products,<br />

and composite cast high-performance<br />

wear sections for cement works and<br />

other crushing applications – components<br />

that have sold well in recent<br />

years, according to Spannagel.<br />

A corset made up of<br />

molds and rings<br />

Business with large rolls really got<br />

going at the Marienborn works from<br />

the 1970s onwards. The melting operation<br />

was also expanded then, and now<br />

consists of four electric-arc furnaces<br />

with capacities of 20, 30, 40 and 60 tonnes.<br />

Just now, a large charging basket is<br />

swinging through the hall on an indoor<br />

crane, its cargo clanking as it charges<br />

the furnace. One employee in a bulky<br />

protective suit flushes the melt with<br />

oxygen. Then the clinkering door is<br />

opened; a glance inside revealing three<br />

The roll on this boring machine is tiny<br />

compared to the large rolls. The foundry<br />

casts and processes rolls weighing from<br />

8 to 265 tonnes.<br />

dazzlingly bright graphite electrodes<br />

– the heart of the electric-arc furnace,<br />

at several thousand degrees.<br />

Moving past stacked mold rings and<br />

permanent mold elements – cast in<br />

Hain for use at the sister foundry – we<br />

continue to the 13-meter-deep casting<br />

pit. A back-up roll stands here, wedged<br />

into a corset made up of precisely<br />

these permanent mold elements. It<br />

must have been cast recently because<br />

the structure is still smoking and glowing.<br />

The task of back-up rolls in<br />

rolling mills is to prevent sagging of<br />

the work rolls. “So the back-up rolls<br />

are in effect backing up the work rolls<br />

during forming work,” explains Spannagel.<br />

The back-up rolls thus have a<br />

Ready for further transport – a used roll<br />

from a customer and a heavy permanent<br />

mold produced at the sister works wait<br />

alongside the railway siding at the Marienborn<br />

works. About 75 percent of all<br />

rolls leave the works grounds by train on<br />

their way to Bremen, Bremerhaven or<br />

Rotterdam.<br />

32


COMPANY<br />

For exports – which<br />

account for about<br />

70 percent of the<br />

production – the<br />

journey continues<br />

by ship. Here a huge<br />

236-tonne back-up<br />

roll for Arconic-Davenport,<br />

one of the<br />

world’s largest aluminum<br />

works, crosses<br />

the Mississippi.<br />

central function that is important for<br />

the performance of the entire rolling<br />

mill.<br />

Our path continues to the finishing<br />

area, where one can see that the<br />

demand for rolls is currently high. On<br />

one side, bordering the passage, a red<br />

brick wall with a shingle top and small<br />

tower-shaped structure is unmistakably<br />

from the time of the Kaiser. On the<br />

other side of the passage the hall is filled<br />

with differently sized rolls stacked<br />

three meters high. The rolls still have<br />

rough and spiky surfaces instead of a<br />

gleaming chrome finish.<br />

A hall – about one hundred meters<br />

long and filled from one end to the<br />

other with grinding machines, rough<br />

and fine turning machines, as well as<br />

boring and milling machines – is available<br />

for the finishing work. Rolls of<br />

varying sizes are clamped into these<br />

machines. At the moment, a turning<br />

machine is scraping helical shavings six<br />

centimeters wide from the surface of a<br />

raw roll. The rasping noise – augmented<br />

by short hydraulic impacts and rattling<br />

sounds – fills the hall. Employees stand<br />

at screens monitoring the processes.<br />

Spannagel points out that Gontermann-Peipers<br />

has the world’s largest<br />

roll-turning machine, then he meets<br />

Christian Balling, Works Manager for<br />

mechanical processing, and shakes his<br />

hand. He is responsible for the pre- and<br />

final turning of the rolls, the grinding,<br />

the milling and boring work, and the<br />

packaging. He quotes the annual production<br />

of rolls and the other tasks carried<br />

out by his department, such as contract<br />

processing and repairs. “We have<br />

high capacity utilization here,” he says<br />

assertively, and Spannagel underlines<br />

this by adding that the works’ capacity<br />

utilization is 80 percent. The Marienborn<br />

works currently produces 20,000<br />

tonnes a year; the Hain works 23,000<br />

tonnes. Nothing is left to chance. When<br />

the roll is ready for dispatch it shines<br />

like a Christmas bauble on a tree – in<br />

addition to the ‘internal values’ of the<br />

product, the external impression always<br />

counts.<br />

Keeping up expertise for the third<br />

century of operation<br />

When one sees the great variety of<br />

work steps the question arises: How<br />

will the company’s wide-ranging specialist<br />

expertise survive the transition to<br />

the third century of the family-run<br />

company? The answer is: with increasing<br />

automation and digitalization, and<br />

a well thought-out trainee program –<br />

currently with 30 trainees and about 15<br />

up-and-coming managers with master’s<br />

certification or technician diplomas.<br />

The newly qualified specialists are to<br />

gradually replace the workforce, the<br />

average age of which is currently<br />

around the mid-forties. Gontermann-Peipers’<br />

good reputation in the<br />

region, the varied training at the<br />

works, and the fruitful collaboration<br />

with regional educational institutes<br />

and partner companies help in the<br />

acquisition of a younger generation.<br />

And there is the consistent focus on<br />

innovation – with two full-time R&D<br />

engineers whose task is to continuously<br />

make production more and more efficient,<br />

while taking into account the<br />

opportunities offered by digitalization<br />

(for optimizing process and logistical<br />

systems, for example). The company<br />

obtains young engineers from universities<br />

and colleges in Freiberg, Aachen,<br />

Clausthal, Friedberg, Duisburg and Siegen.<br />

“One of our engineers is just finishing<br />

his PhD at Siegen University,”<br />

Spannagel reports proudly. Regular<br />

investments in the company’s technical<br />

equipment and infrastructure are also<br />

important for the future – amounting<br />

to between six and seven million euros<br />

a year.<br />

This course has been rewarded with<br />

the trust of customers from all over the<br />

world. One prestigious order of recent<br />

years, for example, was for Big River<br />

Steel, a steelworks newly built by the<br />

Düsseldorf-based SMS Group on the<br />

banks of the Mississippi in the US state<br />

of Arkansas. This involved more than<br />

100 rolls with subsequent orders. A<br />

similarly large order has just been received<br />

from Mexico. The large rolls are<br />

usually transported by ship and rail. For<br />

this purpose, the company has its own<br />

rail siding on the works grounds. The<br />

wagons, suitable for transporting the<br />

heaviest of rolls, are a sought-after<br />

commodity for industrial companies<br />

with products of this size. “Though<br />

there are only two wagons of this type<br />

in the whole of Germany,” Spannagel<br />

points out. This occasionally leads to<br />

wrangling with Siemens and other producers<br />

of large components. The rolls<br />

then continue their journey from Bremerhaven<br />

to the destination country,<br />

spreading the good reputation of<br />

‘Made in Germany’ engineering skill<br />

worldwide.<br />

www.gontermann-peipers.de<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 33


HÜTTENTAG <strong>2019</strong><br />

Steel industry's meeting point<br />

Location: MESSE ESSEN | Messeplatz 1 | 45131 Essen, Germany<br />

FOLLOW<br />

TRADITION,<br />

SHAPE THE<br />

FUTURE!<br />

Professional exchange and networking have a long tradition in the steel industry. The<br />

new HÜTTENTAG is continuing this tradition with a bright new touch in the Foyer East<br />

of Messe Essen. It offers participants and exhibitors a perfect mixture of lectures,<br />

panel discussions, company exhibition and Hüttenabend in one day.<br />

Programme<br />

Thursday, 7 November <strong>2019</strong><br />

9:00 Registration and Start of the Company Exhibition<br />

register now!<br />

9:45 –10:00 Welcome speech by DVS Media GmbH and MESSE ESSEN GmbH<br />

10:00 –10:30 Welcome speech<br />

Rudolf Jelinek, 1st Mayor City of Essen<br />

Conference price for participants<br />

(lecture programme,<br />

visit to the exhibition and<br />

Hüttenabend incl. food and<br />

drinks)<br />

10:30 –11:00<br />

11:00 –11:45<br />

Keynote<br />

Prof. Johannes Schenk, Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversität Leoben, Austria<br />

„The European steel industry on their way to CO2-free steel<br />

production through the use of hydrogen and electrical energy“<br />

Panel<br />

„Current status and outlook for CO2-free Steel Production“<br />

Participants: Prof. Johannes Schenk, Dr. Markus Dorndorf a.o.<br />

Conference price 149.00 €<br />

Booking at:<br />

www.homeofsteel.de/<br />

huettentag/huettentag-en<br />

11:45 –12:15 Coffee break<br />

12:15 –13:00<br />

13:00 –14:00 Lunch break<br />

Panel<br />

„Outlook for Steel and the Challenges of Electromobility“<br />

Participants: Wolfgang Eggert a.o.<br />

14:00 –15:30<br />

Lectures in Room 1 and 2:<br />

Dr. Michael Krenz, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen<br />

and Klaus Gottwald, VDMA, about Supply Chain Management<br />

in Large-Scale Plant Engineering<br />

Dr. Horst Hill, Deutsche Edelstahlwerke, about Additive Manufacturing<br />

Dr. Andreas Quick, iba AG, about Digital Transformation and Industry 4.0<br />

Further lectures by LOI Thermprocess, Linde AG, Steuler KCH,<br />

Vestas a.o.<br />

15:30 –16:00 Coffee break<br />

Photo: worldsteel / Gregor Schläger<br />

16:00 –17:30<br />

Lectures in Room 1 and 2:<br />

Historical-technical lectures:<br />

Prof. Dr. Manfred Rasch, formerly thyssenkrupp Group Archive:<br />

Germany's first coastal steel mill<br />

Johan van Ikelen, Hoogovens Museum, IJmuiden: Founding history of<br />

IJmuiden<br />

Further lectures by Asinco, Magma, Schuh Anlagentechnik a.o.<br />

18:00 – 23:00<br />

„Hüttenabend“ and Company Exhibition


CASTING<br />

Special<br />

GIFA <strong>2019</strong><br />

Part 3: Opportunities provided by new<br />

technologies<br />

GIFA<br />

Special<br />

Photo: Martin Vogt/BDG


SPECIAL: GIFA <strong>2019</strong>/INTERVIEW<br />

“GIFA has underlined its<br />

claim to being the world’s<br />

leading trade fair”<br />

Expectations of the <strong>2019</strong> quartet of trade fairs – made up of GIFA, METEC,<br />

THERM PROCESS and NEWCAST – were ambitious. Heinz Nelissen, President of GIFA<br />

and NEWCAST looks back at the five days in an interview.<br />

Photo: BDG/Vogt<br />

Mr. Nelissen, during our talk before<br />

GIFA you had high expectations but<br />

also mentioned the clouds on the economic<br />

horizon. Was your outlook confirmed?<br />

We did, indeed, have some doubts<br />

about whether the current economic<br />

downturn would impair visitor interest<br />

and lower the quality of the trade fair.<br />

But these misgivings were unfounded.<br />

When did you realize this?<br />

Honestly? 20 minutes after the trade<br />

fair started – when we had the first visitors<br />

at our stand. We registered very<br />

high visitor interest, especially during<br />

the first three days. The visitors – that<br />

was my perception – clearly wanted to<br />

increase their competitiveness. I experienced<br />

this <strong>2019</strong> trade fair as very forward-looking.<br />

What were the main points raised<br />

during customer contacts?<br />

Foseco had a very good supply of<br />

high-quality visitors, i.e. thoroughly<br />

concrete customer contacts, right from<br />

the start of the trade fair. There were<br />

very interesting conversations – for<br />

example about optimizing gating systems.<br />

With the aim of achieving a higher<br />

yield and saving energy. So more<br />

economical production with higher<br />

quality.<br />

So a <strong>2019</strong> trade fair with interesting<br />

and professional customer contacts?<br />

Yes, a trade fair with very positive<br />

customer contacts and interesting<br />

technical discussions which we believe<br />

will also be followed up. During the<br />

conversations, about half of the customers<br />

expressed a wish for us to visit<br />

them. That is a very positive value.<br />

Does this also apply for customers from<br />

the automotive sector? There was a lot<br />

of talk about restraint before the trade<br />

fair.<br />

The resonance here could indeed have<br />

been stronger. As far as I know, the carmakers<br />

didn’t have a chance to visit the<br />

36


trade fair, and there were even travelling<br />

restrictions. We will have to stimulate<br />

follow-ups for customers from the<br />

automotive sector, in particular.<br />

GIFA and NEWCAST are international<br />

trade fairs. What did you think of the<br />

mix among the public?<br />

It is indeed true that we traditionally<br />

have a high percentage of international<br />

visitors. I thought that the Asians were<br />

very strongly represented here, and particularly<br />

visitors to our stand from India.<br />

Though less strongly from the American<br />

side. The talks with German customers<br />

took place on the highest technical<br />

level. Here one had the impression that,<br />

comparatively speaking, the technology<br />

was somewhat lagging behind in the<br />

Asian countries.<br />

Can Germany maintain its lead?<br />

We are maintaining the lead, but Asia is<br />

catching up. We see a real readiness to<br />

make investments there, and a lot of<br />

automation taking place. The quality<br />

level is being cranked up because the<br />

Chinese carmakers have high demands.<br />

The Chinese are catching up, but we<br />

still have the edge.<br />

Is that also true of machine<br />

construction?<br />

German machine constructors are working<br />

on state-of-the-art solutions and<br />

are still in a leading position. But here,<br />

too, it is necessary to defend the lead.<br />

Because in this field the Chinese are<br />

also ambitious – and are catching up.<br />

What were the main areas of interest<br />

that you observed at the trade fair?<br />

I got the clear impression that compared<br />

to the last GIFA a lot has been<br />

achieved regarding digitalization and<br />

automation, in particular. Robots were<br />

in action at a lot of stands. Robot technology<br />

has become more affordable<br />

and easier to program.<br />

What will this mean for works practice?<br />

My forecast is that there will be a big<br />

surge after the trade fair. Many foundries<br />

will think about which departments<br />

could sensibly use additional automation.<br />

And then implement solutions at<br />

their works.<br />

Did you notice any concrete readiness<br />

to invest on the part of the companies?<br />

We had record years in the foundry<br />

industry in 2017 and 2018. Now we are<br />

experiencing a slight dip – whereby<br />

many companies are naturally considering<br />

what the future holds. Actually, I<br />

did get the feeling that there was a readiness<br />

to invest – and the capital costs<br />

for it are still low.<br />

Do you see any focal points for this<br />

surge in automation?<br />

In general, where we now already have<br />

a high level of automation, i.e. at the<br />

die-casters. And this will continue. But<br />

there will also be more automation and<br />

optimization in core and machine mold<br />

technology. And in safety-relevant<br />

areas, where employees are still in<br />

action and are exposed to certain<br />

hazards. There, too, people will be using<br />

robots more.<br />

Were there any other emphases?<br />

I noticed that the printing of cores was<br />

another focus. The printers are becoming<br />

more economical and also quicker<br />

– so that this process can be used to<br />

economically produce an increasingly<br />

wide range of cores.<br />

Was the recruitment of young talent<br />

successful?<br />

I think so. We had several school classes<br />

at our stand every day, as part of the<br />

‘Metals4you’ campaign. We confronted<br />

the schoolkids with technical topics in a<br />

fun way. We have to keep working on<br />

this in collaboration with the German<br />

Foundry Association (BDG) and German<br />

Foundrymen’s Association (VDG)<br />

because during the coming years we<br />

will have a wave of retirements in the<br />

foundry industry – and we have to convince<br />

young people about the benefits<br />

of our sector. We are a small sector and<br />

must draw attention to ourselves.<br />

What stimuli will emanate from GIFA<br />

<strong>2019</strong> and what is your final conclusion?<br />

We will have the next GIFA in 2023 – in<br />

my opinion this four-year cycle is<br />

important and very helpful. It ensures<br />

that GIFA remains a leading trade fair<br />

worldwide. Because the <strong>2019</strong> trade fair<br />

very definitely underlined this aspiration.<br />

In four years there will be even<br />

more digitalization and automation to<br />

keep personnel costs under control.<br />

Interview by R. Piterek and M. Vogt<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 37


GIFA sets the trends for<br />

the future of the industry<br />

The trend towards<br />

e-mobility also played<br />

a major role at the<br />

Bright World of Metals.<br />

What remains of the Bright World of Metals with its core, the leading trade fair GIFA?<br />

There was no new record of visitors, but the fair set clear trends for the future of the<br />

industry.<br />

by Robert Piterek and Martin Vogt<br />

Photos: Martin Vogt, Messe Düsseldorf, Robert Piterek<br />

Trade fairs like to report new<br />

records for their most important<br />

events. The organizers secretly<br />

hoped for 80,000 visitors for the five<br />

days of the Bright World of Metals,<br />

which would have been a slight<br />

increase on 2015. In the end, GIFA,<br />

Metec, Thermprocess and Newcast officially<br />

counted 72,500 visitors from 118<br />

countries. The roughly seven percent<br />

fall in the number of visitors could not<br />

be broken down on a fair-by-fair basis<br />

because the entrance ticket enabled<br />

access to the entire site. One consolation:<br />

quantity is not everything!<br />

<strong>International</strong>ity increases again<br />

“GIFA has clearly confirmed its status as<br />

the world’s leading trade fair,” GIFA<br />

President Heinz Nelissen gives his opinion<br />

of the <strong>2019</strong> trade fair. The official<br />

figures also show that the proportion of<br />

international exhibitors rose from 65<br />

percent in 2015 to 70 percent this year,<br />

and foreign visitors from 62 to 66<br />

percent.<br />

Exhibitors stress the quality<br />

of the contacts<br />

Exhibitors particularly emphasized one<br />

aspect of their customer contacts when<br />

talking to the CP+T editors. “We had<br />

fewer walk-in customers – but more<br />

high-quality contacts,” Till Schreiter<br />

(Managing Director of ABP in Dortmund,<br />

Germany) sums up the five days<br />

of the trade fair. “High-quality” was<br />

probably the most often quoted assessment<br />

of the trade fair.<br />

GIFA also kept the promise that Nelissen<br />

had made in advance of it, namely<br />

that there would be “a veritable explosion<br />

of innovations”. We describe the<br />

most concrete trends below with<br />

examples.<br />

38


SPECIAL: GIFA <strong>2019</strong><br />

The die-casting<br />

machine of Oskar Frech<br />

at the stand of the Academy<br />

of the German<br />

Foundrymen’s Association<br />

produced animal<br />

halves – bees and lions<br />

– made of zinc.<br />

The sector needs specialists,<br />

research and<br />

expertise: the Institute’s<br />

show provided a venue<br />

for candidates and companies<br />

to meet.<br />

We had fewer walk-in<br />

customers than in 2015,<br />

but that was offset by<br />

more high-quality contacts.”<br />

Till Schreiter, ABP Induction Systems<br />

The aim of the collaboration that Loramendi,<br />

voxeljet and ASK Chemicals presented<br />

at the trade fair is the automated<br />

serial printing of cores.<br />

Trend: automation<br />

Exhibitors confirm the clear trend<br />

towards automation. Certainly, there<br />

have never been as many robots at a<br />

GIFA as this year – few stands were<br />

without them. Suppliers are seeing continuously<br />

rising demand for industrial<br />

robots. There are reasons for this. In<br />

addition to the predictable argument<br />

regarding increased productivity, another<br />

factor is driving this development<br />

– particularly in the German foundry<br />

industry. “A shortage of specialists and<br />

demographic change are coming<br />

together,” Steffen Günther (Head of<br />

Business Development at Kuka, Friedberg,<br />

Germany) analyzes the situation.<br />

People who retire could in future be<br />

replaced by a machine, particularly for<br />

simple tasks. So-called pre-machining<br />

cells, for example, are doing particularly<br />

well. These are robots that carry out<br />

one processing step on castings before<br />

they go to CNC processing.<br />

Digitalization, by the way, is already<br />

integrated among our sheet metal comrades.<br />

The system notices if one of the<br />

robots suddenly starts using more electricity.<br />

And it is possible to predict wear<br />

and plan maintenance intervals.<br />

In markets with high energy costs, in<br />

particular – so most especially Germany<br />

– development is also increasingly focusing<br />

on electricity consumption. Kuka is<br />

specifically marketing its SKT 22 press<br />

with up to 40 percent less electricity<br />

consumption. Electric motors regulated<br />

on a needs-oriented basis replace the<br />

hydraulic system in the press, used for<br />

deburring die-cast components. The<br />

new technology is not only more economical,<br />

but also faster.<br />

The increasing use of the OPC-UA<br />

standardized digital interface is particularly<br />

noticeable here, and among many<br />

other machine constructors – so digitalization<br />

now has a promising future in<br />

modern foundry technology.<br />

Trend: additive manufacturing<br />

For the first time in the history of the<br />

Bright World of Metals this subject had<br />

its own specialist conference, at which<br />

many aspects of direct and indirect 3-D<br />

printing were examined on the second<br />

day of the trade fair. Representatives<br />

from companies such as MAN Energy<br />

Solutions, SLM Solutions, EMEA Voxeljet,<br />

Trumpf, Protiq, EDAG Engineering<br />

and the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing<br />

Technology and Advanced<br />

Materials (IFAM) reported on the applications<br />

of additive manufacturing,<br />

including tool, mold and core production;<br />

metal 3-D printing; and laser<br />

deposition welding. In his presentation,<br />

Ralf Frohwerk from SLM Solutions quoted<br />

concrete figures on the profitability<br />

of the metal 3-D printing process which<br />

has recently become increasingly relevant<br />

in production: he revealed that<br />

from series of up to 3,000 units, metal<br />

3-D printing of components for medical<br />

technology, shipbuilding, aviation, small<br />

automotive series or spare parts for oldtimers<br />

already paid off.<br />

The indirect 3-D printing of molds<br />

and cores has meanwhile taken over a<br />

considerably broader range of uses in<br />

the foundry industry. Printing is now<br />

also taking place with phenolic and<br />

inorganic binders. The molds and cores<br />

(sometimes printed in one piece) can be<br />

used in combination with conventional<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 39


SPECIAL: GIFA <strong>2019</strong><br />

metal casting for the production of<br />

components – and are high quality,<br />

environmentally friendly and quick, as<br />

Matthias Steinbusch from EMEA Voxeljet<br />

AG showed in his presentation.<br />

The trade fair offered an impressive<br />

number of innovations in indirect additive<br />

manufacturing. And cooperations<br />

on the industrialization of the process<br />

were announced at the trade fair. Thus<br />

Loramendi (a specialist in mold and<br />

core production), voxeljet (one of the<br />

leading players in the production of<br />

3-D printers), and ASK Chemicals (who<br />

produce, among other things, inorganic<br />

binding agents for cores and<br />

molds), presented a plant for the automated<br />

serial printing of cores. ASK<br />

Chemicals has developed its own inorganic<br />

binder, Inotec 3D (consisting of a<br />

printing fluid and a promotor), which<br />

can be used for hot-hardening additive<br />

manufacturing processes. The aim of<br />

this collaboration is to introduce 3-D<br />

printing technology for medium and<br />

large serial production. The partners<br />

spent four years working on the construction<br />

of the automated core printing<br />

plant – whose presentation attracted a<br />

large crowd.<br />

ExOne, a competitor of voxeljet, was<br />

also able to score points in the sector<br />

and among visitors for its indirect 3-D<br />

printing: the company presented a collaboration<br />

with Siemens. The cooperation<br />

between the technology group and<br />

the producer of 3-D printers also involves<br />

the industrialization of 3-D printing.<br />

In an interview with CP+T (page XXX),<br />

John Hartner (ExOne’s Managing Director<br />

USA) said that the two companies<br />

are working together closely on both<br />

quality assurance and digitalization.<br />

The latest product at the stand of the<br />

Gersthofen-based producer was the<br />

new S-Max Pro 3D printer which, for<br />

the same purchase price, offers 25 - 30<br />

percent higher productivity than conventional<br />

printers, according to Eric<br />

Bader (ExOne’s Managing Director Germany).<br />

The technology, which also uses<br />

environmentally friendly inorganic binding<br />

agent, can be employed to make<br />

innovative water jacket cores for the<br />

temperature management of engines,<br />

the pump industry and e-mobility, for<br />

example.<br />

The triumphant advance of indirect<br />

3-D printing in the sector was finally<br />

crowned with the announcement that<br />

Laempe Mössner Sinto (which produces<br />

conventional core-shooting plants,<br />

among other things), is also entering<br />

the 3-D printer market. In a strictly<br />

A sand core from Laempe Mössner<br />

Sinto made using additive<br />

manufacturing. Selected visitors<br />

to the trade fair were able to<br />

see the machine constructor’s<br />

first 3-D printer.<br />

This so-called Pre-Machining Cell<br />

at the Kuka stand was the subject<br />

of enormous interest.<br />

Foundries often cannot find any<br />

employees for finishing work.<br />

screened area, the Schopfheim-based<br />

machine constructor presented its first<br />

3-D printer, developed during the last<br />

three years. It is more productive and<br />

faster than the competition because the<br />

printing head, which constructs the core<br />

contour layer-by-layer, prints in both<br />

directions, according to Managing<br />

Director Andreas Mössner. The accuracy<br />

of the printing and production is monitored<br />

by a measurement device from<br />

the recently acquired subsidiary inspectomation<br />

systems. The plant is likely to<br />

be tested in the state-of-the-art Inacore<br />

core shop (see also corporate report on<br />

the company in CP+T Issue 1-<strong>2019</strong> from<br />

page 10) and presented to the public<br />

during the last quarter of the year.<br />

Laempe Mössner Sinto is one of the<br />

partners in Inacore, which produces<br />

inorganic cores for BMW’s light-metal<br />

foundry in the southern German town<br />

of Landshut.<br />

Other interesting topics covered<br />

during the conference on additive production<br />

included 3-D printing in tool<br />

and mold construction, and the opportunities<br />

offered by near-contour cooling<br />

in die-casting, presented by Christoph<br />

Dörr from machine constructor Trumpf.<br />

Thus 3-D printing can be used to make<br />

molds for die-casting machines with<br />

cooling channels designed to precisely<br />

dissipate the heat where necessary to<br />

produce a perfect die-cast component.<br />

The advantages are improved cycle<br />

times, more stable casting processes<br />

with lower solidification porosity, lon-<br />

40


At its stand, ABP showed how<br />

customers can take courses in<br />

making up a charge, inoculation, or<br />

safety in virtual training rooms<br />

with virtual reality (VR) glasses.<br />

ger mold service lives, and an improved<br />

energy and resource balance. In addition,<br />

according to Dörr, this technology<br />

allows the amount of spray fluid to be<br />

reduced – with benefits for the workplace<br />

and for surface quality. Other presentations<br />

covered the processing of<br />

The presence of Chinese<br />

foundries, in particular,<br />

could not be<br />

overlooked. Overall,<br />

GIFA has become even<br />

more international.<br />

Sustainability was also<br />

a topic at GIFA. Magma<br />

had decorated an entire<br />

wall with green foliage<br />

– a thoroughly original<br />

stand design.<br />

zinc die-casting materials in selective<br />

laser-melting processes, and hybrid production<br />

chains in which a combination<br />

of light-metal die-casting and laser-melting<br />

bring together the advantages of<br />

die-casting with those of additive<br />

manufacturing.<br />

Trend: digitalization<br />

Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things,<br />

digitalization. The field which can selectively<br />

be described with these words –<br />

even if not entirely congruent terminologically<br />

– exhibited a real boom at the<br />

trade fair. There were promising solutions<br />

for, say, predicting faults and thus<br />

for reducing the number of rejects. And<br />

from Denmark’s Norican Group, which<br />

presented its four brands (DISA, Wheelabrator,<br />

StrikoWestofen and Italpresse-Gauss)<br />

for the first time. With DISA,<br />

for example, every casting is assigned<br />

an ID number with which the link can<br />

be made between the casting and its<br />

process parameters in a so-called ‘trace<br />

and guidance’ (TAG) concept. TAG tracking<br />

also paves the way for advanced<br />

analysis of the cause of any rejects.<br />

The Refill Monitor from StrikoWestofen<br />

is interesting, supporting workers<br />

operating fork-lift trucks loaded<br />

with ladles. They can see the filling level<br />

of the various furnaces at any time on<br />

screens. The result is that the furnaces<br />

are always filled in time, increasing<br />

availability for customers. At the same<br />

time, data on all the modern plants in<br />

the Group are collected in a cloud, from<br />

where they can be called up at any time<br />

and analyzed. As Peter Holm Larsen<br />

(COO and President of the Group) said<br />

in an interview with CP+T, the Group’s<br />

purchases in recent years have been<br />

intended to expand its presence in aluminum<br />

and thus meet demand in the<br />

automotive sector – among other<br />

things, StrikoWestofen constructs shaft<br />

melting furnaces for non-ferrous metal<br />

foundries, while Italpresse-Gauss makes<br />

die-casting equipment.<br />

The innovations at the stand of<br />

machine constructor Eirich (known for<br />

its sand mixers, among other things)<br />

were also the subject of great interest.<br />

The focus here was on the Qualimaster<br />

AT1, in particular. A plant that when<br />

installed downstream of the mixer measures<br />

gas permeability, spring-back and<br />

the malleability of the sand for each<br />

individual charge. The continuously collected<br />

data, connected via the OPC-UA<br />

international interface standard, considerably<br />

improves sand quality as well as<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 41


SPECIAL: GIFA <strong>2019</strong><br />

mold and casting precision. This helps<br />

meet the tighter tolerances demanded<br />

by customers and considerably reduces<br />

corrective work. The sand loop can also<br />

be included in the digitally monitored<br />

process chain, improving the traceability<br />

of the castings, among other things.<br />

“Many visitors would like to replace<br />

their current plant with a modern one<br />

with the Qualimaster AT1,” observed<br />

Edith Weiser, Foundry Sector Manager<br />

at Eirich. The company came to Düsseldorf<br />

with low expectations but<br />

returned to its home in Hardheim very<br />

satisfied indeed.<br />

Trend: digital services<br />

A clear tendency towards becoming service<br />

providers can be seen among some<br />

foundry suppliers – mostly exploiting<br />

the new possibilities offered by digitalization.<br />

This does not mean that they<br />

will give up their main business, just<br />

that the service aspect is expanding<br />

considerably alongside it. This group<br />

includes the internationally positioned<br />

melting furnace manufacturer ABP<br />

from Dortmund. It presented an open<br />

platform for maintenance and training<br />

for thermoprocessing equipment. It is<br />

not necessary to own a plant from ABP<br />

to exploit this service, and no technicians<br />

are flown in. The new service and<br />

training environment at ABP is entirely<br />

based upon the technical possibilities<br />

offered by augmented and virtual reality.<br />

The stand had a headset containing<br />

a camera that transmitted the video picture<br />

directly onto a small screen. During<br />

maintenance, a service technician can<br />

thus observe every movement of the<br />

on-site technician and, if necessary, provide<br />

circuit diagrams, for example, and<br />

give instructions. “We make a virtual<br />

visit to customers,” explains Till Schreiter<br />

(CEO of ABP). The aim is to increase<br />

productivity and availability for customers,<br />

who can also practice mixing a<br />

charge or undergo complete safety training<br />

for emergencies in virtual training<br />

rooms using virtual reality (VR) glasses.<br />

Schreiter also looks back at the trade<br />

fair with great satisfaction: 380 potential<br />

customers were introduced to the<br />

technology – the interest was enormous.<br />

In past GIFA years, the stand of<br />

Oskar Frech was largely characterized<br />

by the Schorndorf-based manufacturer’s<br />

die-casting equipment. It was different<br />

this year – an enormous hemisphere<br />

took up most of the stand<br />

space. Groups of visitors flowed in at<br />

regular intervals to find out about the<br />

European machine construction (here at<br />

Bühler) is the world leader. And in<br />

future? GIFA witnessed Asians who were<br />

scrutinizing every technical detail very,<br />

very carefully.<br />

company’s new Smart Foundry solution.<br />

The control systems for production<br />

shown at the stand were impressive.<br />

The possibilities offered by the<br />

new software were clearly demonstrated<br />

by means of a digital game where<br />

the aim was to increase the level of<br />

digitalization by networking a die-casting<br />

foundry: modules such as the<br />

Foundry Information Manager, Reporting<br />

Services, Data Safe and Overall<br />

Equipment Effectiveness cover all networked<br />

departments of the digital<br />

die-casting foundry, offer comparisons<br />

with old data and other machines, and<br />

visualize the data understandably in<br />

bar or curve form. The prediction of<br />

faults and planning of maintenance<br />

intervals will be added in future. Frech<br />

accepts that the company’s focus will<br />

shift more towards services, because<br />

the company itself will be taking responsibility<br />

for the data security of its<br />

Smart Foundry solutions. And the concept<br />

could be successful. After all, 80<br />

percent of die-casting foundries are<br />

SMEs and would therefore probably be<br />

grateful to place data security and<br />

digitalization in the hands of this innovative<br />

producer of die-casting equipment.<br />

Smart Foundry can be installed<br />

from September. The competition,<br />

however, is far from asleep: the Swiss<br />

die-casting equipment producer Bühler<br />

showed its ‘Digital Cells’ at the trade<br />

fair and campaigned with “0 percent<br />

defects, 40 percent lower cycle times<br />

and 100 percent availability”.<br />

42


SPECIAL: GIFA <strong>2019</strong><br />

FOSECO<br />

Flow control for iron and steel foundries<br />

Hot and cold start steel ladle systems<br />

At GIFA <strong>2019</strong> Foseco<br />

Foundry Division from<br />

Borken, Germany, highlighted<br />

the latest technologies<br />

available for<br />

controlling the metal<br />

flow in steel ladles and autopour iron<br />

applications. On show were alternative<br />

steel ladle lining and flow control systems<br />

for both cold start and hot start<br />

ladle systems.<br />

Foseco showed the Kaltek board<br />

system for bottom pour ladles, a<br />

unique lining system that requires no<br />

pre-heating. The Kaltek board system<br />

is suitable for ladles up to 25 tonnes<br />

capacity and more for specific projects.<br />

A new generation of Kaltek board<br />

multi-life system has been introduced<br />

to the market to combine the properties<br />

(no pre-heating, metal cleanliness,<br />

insulation) with a set that can be used<br />

up to 5 times and allow thermal cycles<br />

and nozzle exchange.<br />

Foseco’s new, VISO isopressed<br />

zoned nozzle offers the steel foundry a<br />

multi-life nozzle for improved productivity.<br />

The zoned nozzle uses a combination<br />

of different refractory systems<br />

to enhance strength and performance,<br />

thereby enabling repeated use of the<br />

nozzle in a steel foundry ladle.<br />

In addition Foseco presented the<br />

latest flow control technology for grey<br />

and ductile iron, especially for<br />

unheated pouring boxes, consisting of<br />

a range of design and refractory combinations<br />

to meet the requirements of<br />

a variety of autopour applications.<br />

www.foseco.com<br />

Photo: Foseco<br />

FOSECO<br />

Refractory linings for iron and steel foundries<br />

At GIFA, Foseco<br />

Foundry Devision, Borken,<br />

Germany, launched<br />

the Triad Z no<br />

cement castable range<br />

for iron and steel<br />

foundry applications.<br />

No cement castables have been available<br />

for many years and are attractive<br />

for minimizing furnace downtime<br />

during the relining process. The recent<br />

development of the Triad Z range<br />

brings added advantages in terms of<br />

superior slag resistance and enhanced<br />

hot properties of the castable system.<br />

Triad Z can be cast, pumped and<br />

shotcreted and is now available for<br />

most iron and steel foundry applications<br />

such as long campaign cupola melting,<br />

channel holding and pouring furnaces<br />

as well as iron and steel ladle<br />

applications.<br />

On the stand Foseco presented a<br />

complete package of lining and purging<br />

refractories designed for long life<br />

and improved metal cleanliness in<br />

Photo: Foseco<br />

Triad Z no cement<br />

castable range for<br />

iron and steel<br />

foundry applications<br />

coreless induction furnaces melting<br />

steel grades. The portfolio consists of<br />

high quality Kellundite lining systems<br />

suitable for melting a wide range of<br />

steel alloys and purge plugs utilizing<br />

integral earth protection and precise<br />

gas flow control systems to ensure safe<br />

and optimal operation. Foseco also<br />

showed a complete package of longlife<br />

linings for long campaign cupolas<br />

melting iron grades. The cupola portfolio<br />

consists of high quality Ramwell<br />

ramming mixes and Hydra-Max low<br />

cement castable lining systems enriched<br />

with silicon carbide and graphite<br />

aggregates to improve slag resistance.<br />

www.foseco.com<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 43


Powertrain 2030 –<br />

driven by diversification<br />

At the specialist conference “Foundry Technology<br />

in Engine Construction” two automotive<br />

engineers presented a scenario of the future of<br />

mobility and tried to find an answer on the<br />

question how E-Mobility will develop.<br />

How will vehicles be powered in 2030? Will only a minority of newly registered vehicles<br />

still have a combustion engine under the hood? Will battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have<br />

replaced their conventional predecessor? The scenario as forecast by Mahle follows. This<br />

article reflects the keynote speech given by Andreas Pfeifer at the ‘Foundry Technology<br />

in Engine Construction’ conference which took place in January <strong>2019</strong> in Magdeburg,<br />

Germany.<br />

By Andreas Pfeifer and Otmar Scharrer, Stuttgart<br />

Photo: Privat<br />

Increasing global temperatures and<br />

CO 2<br />

emissions, as well as continuing<br />

population growth, are increasingly<br />

changing the conditions of life for the<br />

world’s inhabitants. The agreement ratified<br />

at the UN Climate Conference in<br />

Paris on 12.12.2015 is intended to limit<br />

global warming to considerably less<br />

than 2°C compared to pre-industrial<br />

values. What is certain is that most of<br />

the continuous rise in average annual<br />

temperatures seen since at least the<br />

1960s is of anthropogenic origin. Studies<br />

suggest that the two-degree objective<br />

– intended to prevent irreversible<br />

feedback effects that would push the<br />

earth’s climate into a warm age with<br />

enormous consequences – is already<br />

unachievable (Figure 1).<br />

Against this background, all CO 2<br />

emitters are equally called upon to significantly<br />

and rapidly reduce their absolute<br />

emissions in order to prevent us<br />

overshooting the 2 °C level of global<br />

warming – requiring a far more costly<br />

realignment from above to achieve the<br />

long-term global warming objective of<br />

considerably below 2 °C (Figure 2).<br />

For the traffic sector, and thus for<br />

the automotive industry, this can only<br />

mean simultaneously doing absolutely<br />

everything technically possible to<br />

reduce CO 2<br />

emissions. As anthropogenic<br />

CO 2<br />

does not cause any purely regional<br />

emission problem that could be countered<br />

by purely regional measures, only a<br />

44


E-MOBILITY<br />

cradle-to-grave consideration with realistic<br />

emission evaluation can provide a<br />

clear stimulus for applying significant<br />

measures to reduce a vehicle’s total CO 2<br />

footprint over its entire lifetime. It is<br />

not just the direct CO 2<br />

emissions of<br />

vehicles in a tank-to-wheel consideration<br />

that matter for the world’s climate,<br />

but also the emissions resulting from<br />

fuel production and electricity generation<br />

plus their supply chains, as well as<br />

from the production and subsequent<br />

disposal of the vehicles themselves. If<br />

the expenditure required to achieve<br />

negative CO 2<br />

emissions by the end of<br />

the century – for example, using Carbon<br />

Capture and Storage (CCS) – is to be<br />

kept within an affordable range, and if<br />

one considers the risks of irreversible<br />

climate change (a warm age), it is obvious<br />

that now is the time to act and, in<br />

view of the service life of existing<br />

vehicles, solely focusing on providing<br />

new vehicles with battery electric powertrains<br />

as rapidly as possible is simply<br />

not enough.<br />

If we take an aggressive global<br />

‘Green Planet’ scenario in which, from<br />

now on, the share of pure battery electric<br />

vehicles gradually rises to 50 % and<br />

that of hybrid vehicles by another 25 %<br />

of all new vehicles in 2030 (Figure 3),<br />

then by 2030 only 14 % of the entire<br />

vehicle fleet will have an alternative<br />

drive, namely 210 million of the total of<br />

1.5 billion cars and light commercial<br />

vehicles (Figure 4). A CO 2<br />

saving of<br />

about 520 million tonnes is possible<br />

with these 210 million vehicles with<br />

alternative drives if electricity from<br />

purely renewable sources is used. A<br />

similar effect can be achieved by substituting<br />

19 % of fossil fuel use with fuel<br />

produced from renewable sources (i.e.<br />

CO 2<br />

-neutrally) in an existing stock of<br />

about 1.1 billion vehicles with combustion<br />

engines (Figure 5).<br />

But where should the renewably<br />

produced fuel come from? It could<br />

come from the excess power produced<br />

from renewable sources. Even if renewable<br />

electricity represents, on average,<br />

about 30 % of all electricity produced in<br />

Germany, the availability of renewable<br />

energies is subject to major fluctuations<br />

of up to 400 % due, above all, to<br />

weather phenomena. The electrical storage<br />

of excess energy is seriously limited,<br />

as Figure 6 shows. Germany’s pumped-storage<br />

power plants, as a typical<br />

solution, only have a capacity of about<br />

50 GWh. This would only be enough to<br />

cover an average electrical energy<br />

requirement of about 60 GW for one<br />

Figure 1: The average annual temperature has been rising continuously since the<br />

1960s.<br />

Figure 2: Historical and future CO 2<br />

emissions.<br />

Figure 3: MAHLE base and Green Planet scenarios: proportion of vehicles with battery<br />

electric and hybrid drives by 2030.<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 45


E-MOBILITY<br />

Figure 4: Only an estimated 14 % of cars will have an alternative drive by 2030 –<br />

even in the Green Planet scenario.<br />

Figure 5: Mahle’s Green Planet scenario, CO 2<br />

reduction potential.<br />

hour. If all cars were electrified, requiring<br />

a total capacity of 600 GWh (assuming<br />

45 million battery electric vehicles<br />

[BEV] at 50 kWh and 50 % state-ofcharge<br />

[SOC], of which 50 % are on the<br />

electric grid at any one time) it would<br />

be possible to guarantee security of<br />

supply in Germany for about ten hours.<br />

Thus a BEV fleet could make a significant<br />

contribution to offsetting shortterm<br />

fluctuations in energy production.<br />

But we need other solutions for the<br />

long-term storage of energy because<br />

renewable electricity production is not<br />

only subject to brief fluctuations but<br />

also to serious seasonal fluctuations. In<br />

the distant future, one solution could<br />

be renewables-driven gas power stations<br />

which, using existing natural gas<br />

reservoirs, could be operated for more<br />

than 2,000 hours (equivalent to roughly<br />

three months). On the way to this situation,<br />

the sector-coupling of regenerative<br />

gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons<br />

could make an important contribution<br />

towards further decarbonizing the traffic<br />

sector. The study on e-fuels [1] presented<br />

by the German Energy Agency<br />

(dena) shows that comparable fuel costs<br />

could be achieved using pure renewable<br />

electricity and renewable hydrocarbons<br />

for combustion engines.<br />

The CO 2<br />

emissions of the existing<br />

fleet of vehicles could also be reduced<br />

by using gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons<br />

renewably produced from renewable<br />

excess electricity. Focusing the use of<br />

Figure 6: The electrical storage of excess energy is seriously limited.<br />

46


Figure 7: The monovalent<br />

gas engine can<br />

be operated with<br />

highly efficient<br />

stoichio metric engine<br />

characteristics – and<br />

thus low CO 2<br />

emissions.<br />

Figure 8: CO 2<br />

emissions are highly dependent on the vehicle type.<br />

renewably produced hydrocarbons<br />

purely on aviation and shipping seems<br />

inappropriate, given the global challenge.<br />

The necessary investments must<br />

be made now in order to be able to<br />

continue to run existing vehicles with<br />

combustion engines CO 2<br />

-neutrally,<br />

reduce exploitation of the corresponding<br />

resources. There are many<br />

examples of the efficient use of renewably<br />

produced hydrocarbons in combustion<br />

engines – ranging from monovalent<br />

gas engines with highly efficient<br />

stoichiometric engine characteristics<br />

and thus low-CO 2<br />

operation (Figure 7),<br />

to mixtures of dimethyl carbonate with<br />

gasoline and oxy-methyl ester as a diesel-drop-in<br />

fuel.<br />

In the long term, renewably produced<br />

hydrogen will in future drive<br />

vehicles CO 2<br />

-neutrally – principally by<br />

means of fuel cells, but in special cases<br />

(like mobile work machines) with combustion<br />

engines. It is foreseeable that<br />

the construction of the necessary infrastructure<br />

will require considerably more<br />

than two decades. In the meantime, in<br />

addition to converting the fleet with an<br />

increasing share of battery electric<br />

vehicles and the introduction of renewably<br />

produced fuels for existing<br />

vehicles, there must also be a massive<br />

rethinking process among vehicle buyers<br />

and users. The type of vehicle with the<br />

lowest CO 2<br />

footprint should be selected,<br />

depending on the usage profile.<br />

Figure 8 shows a striking comparison<br />

of vehicle type-dependent CO 2<br />

emissions.<br />

Assuming that each tree takes up<br />

about 12.5 kg CO 2<br />

/year, compensating<br />

for a purely fossil-powered SUV driven<br />

15,000 km annually would require a<br />

stock of about 260 trees per SUV. For a<br />

compact car, on the other hand, only<br />

160 trees would be necessary [2].<br />

The emission and efficiency problems<br />

of cars with combustion engines<br />

are particularly evident in urban use,<br />

and are largely due to the customers’<br />

misuse of modern efficiency-optimized<br />

combustion engines. From an energy<br />

(and thus CO 2<br />

reduction) point of view<br />

the most frequent causes of misuse are<br />

the high proportion of cold starts, the<br />

low efficiency of inner-city journeys,<br />

and the use of vehicles that are far too<br />

heavy for their transport task. A transition<br />

to pure e-vehicles would be sensible<br />

here. In future, the combustion<br />

engine will remain the drive system of<br />

first choice for longer journeys with<br />

high levels of utilization. When vehicles<br />

are used both within cities and for<br />

long-distance journeys, hybrid vehicles<br />

will continue to establish themselves<br />

despite the greater mass of the powertrain<br />

(and thus the entire vehicle). In<br />

addition to the possibility of zero emissions<br />

locally, hybrid concepts also offer<br />

the potential of phlegmatization of the<br />

combustion engine and use at the most<br />

efficient operation points for optimum<br />

consumption, whereby CO 2<br />

potentials<br />

that already exist can be exploited.<br />

Until there is widespread conversion<br />

to a pure hydrogen economy there will<br />

be further differentiation of vehicle<br />

powertrains in order to enable the<br />

lowest CO 2<br />

footprint for the particular<br />

vehicle concept, taking into account the<br />

customer’s wishes regarding user-friendliness,<br />

the availability of drive energy,<br />

driving performance, and range.<br />

Dr. Andreas Pfeifer, Manager Product<br />

Development Engine Systems & Components,<br />

and Dr. Otmar Scharrer, Vice President<br />

Corporate Research & Advanced<br />

Engineering, Mahle GmbH, Stuttgart<br />

References:<br />

www.cpt-international.com<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 47


NEWS<br />

SILBITZ GROUP<br />

Foundry Group joins Meuselwitz Guss<br />

Silbitz Group Beteiligungs GmbH has<br />

acquired a stake in Meuselwitz Guss<br />

Eisengiesserei GmbH. The Silbitz Group,<br />

headquartered in Silbitz, in the German<br />

federal state of Thuringia, has three<br />

foundries in Silbitz, Zeitz and in Košice,<br />

Slovakia, as well as a mechanical processor<br />

in Stassfurt. The Silbitz Group, a<br />

company from the portfolio of Deutsche<br />

Beteiligungs AG (DBAG), is joining<br />

Meuselwitz Guss with immediate effect.<br />

„We are very pleased to be able to<br />

give the company a long-term perspective<br />

as a new co-shareholder of Meuselwitz<br />

Guss Eisengiesserei GmbH. We are<br />

convinced of the performance of the<br />

company and its employees,“ said Dr.<br />

Torsten Tiefel, Managing Director of Silbitz<br />

Group GmbH.<br />

The group entered the Meuselwitz<br />

Guss Eisengiesserei GmbH by acquiring<br />

the shares of the former executive<br />

director, Mr. Herbert Werner. His merit<br />

is to have decisively developed and<br />

advanced the foundry: „After 48 years<br />

with Meuselwitz Guss and my many<br />

years as managing director and consultant<br />

in the company, the foundry is very<br />

important to me. The technical equipment<br />

of Meuselwitz Guss Eisengiesserei<br />

GmbH offers an excellent starting point<br />

for the further development of the<br />

company, so that I have decided to sell<br />

my company shares to Silbitz Group<br />

Beteiligungs GmbH „, explained Werner<br />

the reasons for the sale of his shares.<br />

And further: „I am sure that with the<br />

Silbitz Group, my life‘s work can continue<br />

not only in my own interests, but<br />

also in the interests of the motivated<br />

Casting in the iron foundry in Silbitz: The Thuringian foundry group has acquired a stake<br />

in the DIHAG foundry Meuselwitz Guss<br />

workforce and can be developed<br />

further on,“ said the former Managing<br />

Director of Meuselwitz Guss Eisengiesserei<br />

GmbH.<br />

„As the Silbitz Group, we are aware<br />

of the long-standing commitment of<br />

Mr. Werner and we will be responsible<br />

for shaping the technically well-aligned<br />

company in his spirit,“ commented Dr.<br />

Tiefel the transition of the shares.<br />

The Silbitz Group is one of the leading<br />

foundry groups in Europe. It<br />

employs 1,230 people and 67 apprentices<br />

at four company locations. For the<br />

current year, a turnover of 192 million<br />

euros is planned. The foundry group<br />

has a casting capacity of more than<br />

75,000 tonnes per year and is a reliable<br />

partner for casting in precision in nine<br />

business areas, including wind power,<br />

engine technology, mechanical engineering,<br />

drive technology, mining and utility<br />

and rail engineering.<br />

Meuselwitz Guss Eisengiesserei<br />

GmbH, which belongs to the DIHAG<br />

Group, generates annual sales of 65<br />

million euros and has a production<br />

volume of 30,000 tons. Meuselwitz<br />

employs around 320 people and 27<br />

apprentices. With the help of modern<br />

manual and large forming plants, large<br />

parts up to 80 tons of piece weight,<br />

high reproducibility of the workpiece<br />

quality and inductive melting operation<br />

in the material quality up to „solid<br />

solution hardened nodular cast iron“<br />

are the specialty for the machine tools,<br />

injection molding, measuring plates,<br />

press construction and wind energy<br />

sectors.<br />

www.silbitz-group.com/en<br />

www.meuselwitz-guss.de/home/?L=1<br />

Photo: Silbitz Guss<br />

ASK CHEMICALS<br />

Foundry chemistry group to acquire industrial<br />

resin business<br />

ASK Chemicals, Hilden, Germany, one of<br />

the world’s leading suppliers of foundry<br />

chemicals, has entered into a definitive<br />

agreement to purchase the industrial<br />

resin business from SI Group (New York,<br />

USA). With this acquisition, ASK Chemicals<br />

is reinforcing its position in the<br />

foundry market and at the same time<br />

strengthening its non-foundry business.<br />

ASK Chemicals and SI Group have<br />

agreed on the purchase of SI Group’s<br />

industrial resins business and associated<br />

manufacturing sites in Rio Claro (Brazil),<br />

Ranjangaon (India), Johannesburg and<br />

Durban (South Africa), as well as licensed<br />

technology and multiple tolling<br />

agreements globally. The transaction is<br />

expected to close later this year.<br />

SI Group’s industrial resin business<br />

serves a wide range of markets and<br />

applications such as foundry, friction,<br />

abrasives, refractory, paper impregnation,<br />

insulation and composites. “This<br />

acquisition is an important step in our<br />

growth strategy. It substantially reinforces<br />

our position in the foundry business<br />

and helps us to accelerate our<br />

penetration in certain growth countries.”<br />

states Frank Coenen, Chief Executive<br />

Officer of ASK Chemicals. “At<br />

the same time, it allows us to take a<br />

first step in building a phenolic industrial<br />

resins business, an attractive market<br />

with promising growth opportunities.”<br />

www.ask-chemicals.com<br />

48


FRAUNHOFER IFAM<br />

Low-cost powders developed for the additive<br />

manufacturing of steels<br />

Photo: Fraunhofer IFAM<br />

Demonstrator component made of iron powder,<br />

produced by selective electron beam<br />

melting<br />

At the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing<br />

Technology and Advanced<br />

Materials IFAM in Dresden, Germany, a<br />

new type of iron powder has been successfully<br />

processed and tested, which<br />

answers one of the cost questions in<br />

additive manufacturing and opens up<br />

new possibilities.<br />

Up to now, only spherical powders<br />

produced by inert gas atomization have<br />

been used for additive manufacturing<br />

in the powder bed-based processes<br />

Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM)<br />

and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). As a<br />

result, the prices are very high.<br />

With the newly tested production<br />

method, prices for iron powder can be<br />

achieved which are only around 10 %<br />

of current costs. There are also inexpensive<br />

alternatives for other materials,<br />

such as HDH titanium powder.<br />

Fraunhofer IFAM in Dresden has<br />

now shown with a feasibility study for<br />

processing by SEBM that dimensionally<br />

stable components can be produced<br />

with this iron powder. Despite the more<br />

irregular particle shape and the expected<br />

poorer flowability compared to gas<br />

atomized powders, this iron powder is a<br />

real low-cost alternative. Furthermore,<br />

it has been repeatedly proven that the<br />

SEBM process is a very robust technology<br />

with regard to variations in the flowability<br />

of the powder.<br />

The addition of various powder mixtures<br />

and, thus, the processing of a<br />

wide variety of alloys have also been<br />

successfully tested. Detailed investigations<br />

into the respective alloy behavior<br />

are currently underway.<br />

Thus, Fraunhofer IFAM Dresden has<br />

not only created an inexpensive alternative<br />

for the additive manufacturing of<br />

steels, which is also conceivable for<br />

other materials. Material flexibility also<br />

increases and a larger range of materials<br />

becomes economically feasible.<br />

The institute offers partners from<br />

industry and research a wide range of<br />

development services from powder to<br />

component, e.g. in the form of feasibility<br />

studies, the evaluation of powders<br />

for additive manufacturing and the<br />

qualification of new materials. Furthermore,<br />

component development, starting<br />

with powder and continuing<br />

through design (e.g. topology optimization<br />

for weight reduction and/or component<br />

integration) to production and<br />

post-processing, is part of the offer.<br />

In the Innovation Center Additive<br />

Manufacturing (ICAM), the institute has<br />

bundled its additive manufacturing<br />

technologies in one location and can<br />

thus offer tailor-made solutions for a<br />

wide variety of problems from a single<br />

source. Customers can choose from the<br />

following processes at the site: Selective<br />

Electron Beam Melting, 3-D Screen Printing,<br />

Fused Filament Fabrication,<br />

three-dimensional stencil printing and<br />

dispense printing.<br />

www.ifam.fraunhofer.de/en.html<br />

VELCO<br />

Injection Systems for Foundries<br />

Cost efficiency is one of the most<br />

important factors today. The injection<br />

systems developed and manufactured<br />

by Velco, Velbert, Germany, offer economic<br />

advantages<br />

> when injecting carbon into cupola<br />

furnaces instead of using costly<br />

batch coke<br />

> when FeSi and other additives are<br />

dosed added<br />

> when foundry residues like filter<br />

dust, grinding- and fettling dusts are<br />

injected, whereby valuable residues<br />

are added to the melt without charging<br />

the environment and high disposal<br />

costs are avoided<br />

Within the framework of a research<br />

project of the German Government<br />

Velco injected Zn-containing filter dusts<br />

into the metal melt. Here high-concentrated<br />

zinc oxide is produced.<br />

A similar installation is used in an<br />

iron foundry for the injection of carbon<br />

fines into the melt for their carburization<br />

process.<br />

Also for non-iron melting plant the<br />

recycling of production residues fines is<br />

Photo: Velco<br />

Fines injection in a<br />

German foundry.<br />

a practicable method. Depending on<br />

the grain sizes and the melt volumes<br />

the fines are blown into or onto the<br />

melt. Hence, valuable raw materials are<br />

recovered from residues.<br />

www.velco.de/en<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 49


NEWS<br />

Photo: ABP<br />

ABP INDUCTION SYSTEMS<br />

MHI and Primetals Technologies<br />

to acquire melting furnace manufacturer<br />

IFM 7 Twin Power from ABP, capacity<br />

13.4 tons, rated power 6 MW.<br />

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) and<br />

Primetals Technologies will acquire ABP<br />

Induction Systems (ABP), Dortmund,<br />

Germany, a global manufacturer and<br />

servicer of induction furnaces and heating<br />

systems from CM Acquisitions, a<br />

Chicago based private equity firm. ABP<br />

offers a variety of best-in-class products<br />

and comprehensive services to blue-chip<br />

customers, including leading automotive<br />

OEMs and suppliers, industrial<br />

manufacturers, independent foundries<br />

as well as steel plant manufacturers and<br />

steel producers. MHI and Primetals<br />

Technologies will jointly take ABP’s shares.<br />

Future business activities will be<br />

conducted in close cooperation with<br />

and under the leadership of Primetals<br />

Technologies.<br />

ABP provides state-of-the-art equipment<br />

for ferrous and non-ferrous metal<br />

casting, forging and steel making. Its<br />

main products are induction melting,<br />

holding and pouring furnaces as well as<br />

induction heaters. ABP’s business is built<br />

upon a large and global customer base<br />

with more than 1,600 active units worldwide.<br />

ABP also has a core competence<br />

in the service business and provides<br />

comprehensive aftermarket solutions to<br />

customers though the entire product<br />

lifecycle. Service centers are strategically<br />

located close to the major industrial<br />

areas in Germany, the United States,<br />

China, India, Mexico, Russia, South<br />

Africa, Sweden and Thailand.<br />

ABP also exclusively provides special<br />

induction heaters to Primetals Technologies<br />

for endless strip production,<br />

which helps provide a competitive<br />

edge. “ABP’s induction heaters are one<br />

of the most crucial elements for endless<br />

strip production, a flagship process for<br />

Primetals Technologies. With ABP becoming<br />

one of MHI’s group companies<br />

and the further close ties that will<br />

bring, we can develop and provide<br />

customers with even more advanced<br />

technologies. Also, with the acquisition<br />

of ABP, we combine its competence in<br />

induction heating and related activities<br />

with our know-how as a worldwide<br />

engineering, plant-building, lifecycle<br />

services and digitalization partner for<br />

the metals industry,” said Satoru Iijima,<br />

Chairman of the Board and CEO of Primetals<br />

Technologies. “ABP´s well-experienced<br />

portfolio and its know-how will<br />

certainly complement our wide range<br />

of customer plants, namely mini mills<br />

and long rolling plants, especially in<br />

emerging markets, as well as in endless<br />

strip production.” Till Schreiter, CEO of<br />

ABP, added: “ABP’s state-of-art induction<br />

products and technology-driven<br />

culture will fit well with both shareholders.<br />

Through a closer tie-up with MHI<br />

and Primetals Technologies, ABP can<br />

pursue further growth potentials, which<br />

will also lead to a contribution to<br />

them”. With MHI and Primetals Technologies,<br />

ABP has access to their resources<br />

worldwide, which will improve ABP´s<br />

global market presence, provide opportunities<br />

to develop new business sectors,<br />

and drive digitalization. “This will<br />

assure long-term stability for our facilities,<br />

employees and customers”. ABP<br />

will be a group company of MHI under<br />

the ownership of Mitsubishi Heavy<br />

Industries America, Inc., headquartered<br />

in Houston, Texas, and Primetals Technologies<br />

USA LLC, Alpharetta, Georgia.<br />

www.abpinduction.com<br />

50


OSKAR FRECH GROUP<br />

Huge investments in Europe and Asia<br />

Die casting machine manufacturer<br />

Oskar Frech, Schorndorf, Germany, is<br />

massively expanding at the Weiler site<br />

near Stuttgart for a figure well into the<br />

double-digit millions. It is about<br />

15,000 m 2 for a logistics center and two<br />

assembly halls for hot and cold chamber<br />

die casting machines. Furthermore a<br />

new plant in China for several million<br />

euros is planned in the next two years.<br />

This increases the production and<br />

business space in Schorndorf-Weiler from<br />

30,000 to around 50,000 m 2 . Part of the<br />

production at the Plüderhausen site will<br />

in future be relocated to the expanded<br />

Schorndorf-Weiler site. “Beside the large<br />

machines we haves new ideas for our<br />

works in Plüderhausen”, Frech-CEO<br />

Dr.-Ing. Ioannis Ioannidis told CASTING,<br />

Plant & Technology. The production<br />

capacity in China will be increased with a<br />

new plant over the course of two years<br />

for several million euros. Frech already<br />

operates a production site in Fengxiang,<br />

China, near Shanghai.<br />

The Oskar Frech Group is the only<br />

group-independent family-owned company<br />

with the brand “Made in Germany”<br />

which competes on international<br />

markets.<br />

www.frech.com<br />

Production of large machines which can<br />

be used for the production of structural<br />

components and gearbox housings at the<br />

Frech production site in Plüderhausen.<br />

Photo: Robert Piterek/BDG<br />

ALUMINIUM 2000<br />

Great success for foundry congress<br />

With 35 nations represented, participation<br />

at the congress in the Italian city of<br />

Treviso was about 9 % higher than in<br />

Verona 2017. During the three intense<br />

conference days in April <strong>2019</strong>, about 80<br />

papers were presented by technicians<br />

and industry experts, researchers and<br />

managers, coming from the most<br />

famous companies and universities all<br />

over the world.<br />

The three conference days were divided<br />

in three parallel sessions and<br />

during these days, 25 sponsors presented<br />

their products in the exhibition<br />

area. It was a meeting point for all participants.<br />

More sections were represented by<br />

markets and strategies, extrusion, surface<br />

treatments, rolling, and coil technologies,<br />

casting and melting, transport<br />

industry, recycling & environmental<br />

issues. Experts came from Europe,<br />

China, the Far East, as well as North and<br />

South America.<br />

On Friday, a huge number of participants<br />

took part to the technical visits<br />

to the following companies: Volpato<br />

Participation at Aluminium 2000 congress in Treviso was significantly higher than at the<br />

last congress in Verona in 2017.<br />

Industrie and Eureka, two excellences<br />

in the world of processing and anodizing<br />

for the furniture sector, and Hydro<br />

Extrusion Italy (which is part of the<br />

Norwegian Global Player Hydro) for<br />

the extrusion sector. The next conference<br />

is planned in 2021, location and<br />

date will be announced.<br />

www.aluminium2000.com<br />

Photo: Aluminium2000<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 51


NEWS<br />

BÜRKERT<br />

Gas control for casting and thermal<br />

processing technology<br />

Photos: Bürkert Fluid Control Systems<br />

Figure 1: Tailored automation concepts for gas control: delivering the optimum communication<br />

solution at all times (Photos: Bürkert Fluid Control Systems).<br />

Bürkert from Ingelfingen in Germany is<br />

presenting gas controls customized for<br />

a variety of casting plants. The mass<br />

flow controllers are suitable for solutions<br />

fitted with analogue interfaces all<br />

the way up to complete Industry 4.0 systems.<br />

Industrial plants for producing steel,<br />

for casting or for thermal processing<br />

technology place different requirements<br />

on their gas supply and rely on<br />

different automation concepts. Therefore,<br />

communication between components<br />

must always be tailored to the<br />

specific needs of the plant. Bürkert<br />

Fluid Control Systems is presenting a<br />

range of automation concepts for gas<br />

control (Figure 1) based on its proven<br />

mass flow controllers (MFC). Possibilities<br />

range from data exchange through to<br />

“conventional” analogue standardized<br />

interfaces and digital networking using<br />

all common fieldbus protocols all the<br />

way to plug-and-play MFC assemblies,<br />

not to mention complete control cabinets<br />

including all components for gas<br />

control (Figure 2).<br />

For smaller or simpler plants where<br />

only small amounts of data need to be<br />

transferred, the conventional analogue<br />

interface is the ideal choice. Start-up<br />

and maintenance are straightforward,<br />

and signals can be checked with the<br />

help of simple aids. These vendor-neutral<br />

devices operate independently of<br />

the controller and are extremely easy to<br />

replace.<br />

If diagnostic data, device state etc.<br />

are to be transmitted in addition to setpoint<br />

and actual values, the mass flow<br />

controllers can communicate via digital<br />

interfaces, e.g. Profinet, EtherNet/IP,<br />

Profibus DP, Modbus TCP, EtherCAT,<br />

CANopen or RS485. Gateways and Bürkert’s<br />

proprietary büS network also<br />

allow the integration of other protocols<br />

– for gas-control functions that are fully<br />

compatible with Industry 4.0.<br />

Plug-and-play complete solutions,<br />

which can easily be connected to the<br />

higher-level controller for precise<br />

dosing and logging of gas volumes, can<br />

be realized with digital as well as analogue<br />

interfaces. The MFC assemblies and<br />

complete control cabinets are tailored<br />

to the application requirements. The<br />

entire fluid control layout is factory-tested,<br />

ensuring that installation and<br />

start-up can be completed easily and<br />

quickly on site.<br />

In all automated gas-control solutions,<br />

the “Communicator” software<br />

simplifies the configuration, parameterization<br />

and diagnostics tasks. This<br />

practical EDIP tool (Efficient Device Integration<br />

Platform) is suitable for analogue<br />

and digital devices. It gives the user<br />

a complete overview of all cyclical process<br />

values as well as all acyclic diagnostic<br />

data. Device configurations can be<br />

backed up and restored and the integrated,<br />

graphical programming environment<br />

makes it possible to create control<br />

functions for decentralized sub-systems.<br />

Connections to a PC can also be established<br />

on the fly using a USB-CAN adapter.<br />

www.burkert.com/en<br />

Figure 2: Plug-and-play complete<br />

solutions can easily be<br />

connected to the higher-level<br />

controller for precise dosing<br />

and logging of gas volumes.<br />

52


SPEKTRO<br />

Analyzer for Process Control and Research<br />

Metal Analysis<br />

Spectro Analytical Instruments, Kleve,<br />

Germany, the arc/spark innovation leader,<br />

introduces the Spectrolab S<br />

high-performance arc/spark optical<br />

emission spectrometry (OES) analyzer<br />

for the analysis of metal in process control<br />

and research applications. The analyzer<br />

represents a real revolution in highend<br />

OES metal analysis – featuring<br />

Spectro’s proprietary CMOS+T technology<br />

and delivering the fastest measurements,<br />

lowest limits of detection, longest<br />

uptime, and most future-proof<br />

flexibility in its class.<br />

Many users of high-end stationary<br />

metal analyzers are tasked with identifying<br />

and measuring – with exceptionally<br />

high accuracy and precision – all<br />

the elements and compounds in their<br />

incoming, in-production, and outgoing<br />

materials. This may also include research<br />

on new materials. The new Spectro LAB<br />

S is designed to be the best-performing<br />

spectrometer available for primary metal<br />

producers – as well as an equally excellent<br />

solution for secondary metal producers;<br />

automotive and aerospace<br />

manufacturers; and makers of finished<br />

and semi-finished goods, electronics,<br />

semiconductors, and other end products.<br />

In terms of sample throughput, Spectrolab<br />

S meets the metal market’s need<br />

for ultra-high-speed measurement.<br />

Example: when analyzing low alloy<br />

steel, it can deliver highly accurate measurements<br />

in less than 20 seconds. The<br />

analyzer has the world’s first CMOS-based<br />

detector system that’s perfected for<br />

high-end metal analysis – thanks to<br />

Spectro’s proprietary CMOS+T technology.<br />

From trace elements to multi-matrix<br />

applications, it provides high-speed,<br />

highly accurate analysis plus the lowest<br />

limits of detection in its class – limits<br />

previously attainable only with PMT<br />

detectors. On some key elements, Spectrolab<br />

S CMOS+T technology surpasses<br />

PMT performance. Uptime is outstanding.<br />

Spectrolab’s regular maintenance<br />

intervention requirements (spark stand<br />

cleaning) have been reduced by a factor<br />

of eight. Calibration is easy and cost-efficient,<br />

needing only a single-sample,<br />

5-minute standardization. In most cases,<br />

unique iCAL 2.0 diagnostics ensure stable<br />

performance from then on —<br />

regardless of most shifts in ambient<br />

temperature or pressure. Most users<br />

Spectrolab S analyzer with user.<br />

save at least 30 minutes a day. The analyzer’s<br />

flexibility ensures that it is future<br />

proof. New elements or matrices can be<br />

added via a simple software update —<br />

eliminating the need for substantial<br />

hardware modifications. The intuitive<br />

user interface ensures effortless ease-ofuse<br />

— even for<br />

less experienced<br />

personnel. Instead<br />

of multiple dialog<br />

boxes, a simplified<br />

operator view<br />

presents clear<br />

choices via dedicated<br />

toolbar buttons.<br />

Tailored<br />

application profiles<br />

eliminate complicated<br />

method<br />

development.<br />

Furthermore the<br />

analyzer provides<br />

both short-term<br />

and long-term<br />

stability. Unlike<br />

conventional analyzers,<br />

its sealed,<br />

no-purge optical<br />

system maximizes<br />

light transmission<br />

stability, even in<br />

the far UV. Its<br />

software utilizes<br />

sophisticated<br />

measures such as<br />

online drift correction<br />

and iCAL<br />

2.0 temperature<br />

compensation for<br />

reproducible readings, even over successive<br />

shifts or maintenance intervals. To<br />

fit packed laboratory spaces, the SPECT-<br />

ROLAB S features a 27 % decrease in<br />

footprint over previous models.<br />

https://www.spectro.com/lab-s<br />

DECORING HAMMERS FOR GRAVITY, LOW<br />

PRESSURE AND LOST WAX PROCESS<br />

- DIFFERENT MODELS<br />

- EASILY CARRIED<br />

- HIGH PERFORMANCES<br />

- WORLDWIDE PRESENCE<br />

- CUSTOMER CARE<br />

NEW MONITORING SYSTEM THOR V4.0 TO CHECK<br />

THE HAMMER’S PERFORMANCES<br />

JUST CONTACT US TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR PRODUCTS!<br />

O.M.LER SRL, Via Don Orione, 198/E -198/F 12042 Bandito-BRA (CN), ITALY<br />

Tel. +39 0172/457256 omlersrl@gmail.com www.omlersrl.com<br />

Photo: Spectro<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 53


NEWS<br />

Photo: Robert Piterek/BDG<br />

VDMA METALLURGY<br />

On the way to intelligent machinemachine<br />

communication<br />

Stand of VDMA Metallurgy at GIFA,<br />

where OPC UA was presented. The standard<br />

is an important step for die casters<br />

in the direction of Industry 4.0.<br />

The die casting sector is preparing for<br />

Industry 4.0; more than 30 European<br />

companies are developing jointly a<br />

standardized open communication<br />

interface under the umbrella of VDMA<br />

(German Mechanical Engineering Industry<br />

Association) Metallurgy and CEMA-<br />

FON, the European Association of<br />

foundry equipment suppliers.<br />

The die casting sector is a strong<br />

part of the foundry business in Europe,<br />

which is characterized by extensive<br />

experience but also by very different<br />

organizational and technological levels.<br />

With Industry 4.0, the age of the intelligent<br />

machine to machine communication<br />

has also started in this area.<br />

Fast commissioning, detailed process<br />

monitoring, optimal productivity,<br />

reproducible product quality or complete<br />

storage of setting and process<br />

data – the market requirements on a<br />

die casting cell are constantly increasing.<br />

All these demands require an efficient<br />

exchange of information across<br />

manufacturers. A boundary condition<br />

that has only been met to a limited<br />

extent up to now. The available fieldbus<br />

technologies are only partially<br />

standardized; communication with higher-level<br />

MES systems requires manufacturer-specific<br />

solutions. This means<br />

that the die-caster must implement<br />

various communication technologies<br />

and protocols in his system for this task<br />

alone; a bottleneck in data communication<br />

and high project costs.<br />

In order to meet the requirements<br />

of Industry 4.0 with intelligent communication<br />

in and to a die casting cell, the<br />

representatives of the European die casting<br />

industry are jointly developing a<br />

standardised open communication<br />

interface. The open interface standard<br />

„Open Platform Communications Unified<br />

Architecture (OPC UA)“ will be<br />

used. This provides security functions, is<br />

freely accessible and provides meta-information<br />

about the data that can be<br />

viewed by anyone.<br />

Under the umbrella of VDMA Metallurgy<br />

and CEMAFON, over 60 experts<br />

from over 30 European companies are<br />

developing manufacturer-independent<br />

information models (Companion Specifications),<br />

the interface between components,<br />

machines and systems. These<br />

describe device and capability information<br />

so that a machine can be easily<br />

integrated into a plant network by all<br />

manufacturers and can, for example, be<br />

connected to a software system for<br />

planning and controlling production.<br />

Among other things, the description<br />

of the manufacturer‘s name, the device<br />

type and the process data, such as temperatures<br />

or pressure as well as organizational<br />

information such as information<br />

on productivity and quality, are standardized.<br />

The first release candidate is<br />

planned for the beginning of 2020.<br />

https://metallurgy.vdma.org<br />

54


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

CASTING<br />

PLANT AND TECHNOLOGY<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

© DVS Media GmbH<br />

Contact person: Vanessa Wollstein<br />

Aachener Straße 172 Phone: +49 211 1591-152<br />

40223 Düsseldorf Fax: +49 211 1591-150<br />

E-Mail: vanessa.wollstein@dvs-media.info<br />

1 Foundry Plants and Equipment<br />

17 Surface Treatment and Drying<br />

2<br />

Melting Plants and Equipment for Iron and<br />

Steel Castings and for Malleable Cast Iron<br />

18<br />

Plant, Transport, Stock, and Handling<br />

Engineering<br />

3 Melting Plants and Equipment for NFM<br />

4 Refractories Technology<br />

19 Pattern- and Diemaking<br />

20 Control Systems and Automation<br />

5<br />

6<br />

7<br />

8<br />

Non-metal Raw Materials and Auxiliaries for<br />

Melting Shop<br />

Metallic Charge Materials for Iron and Steel<br />

Castings and for Malleable Cast Iron<br />

Metallic Charge and Treatment Materials for<br />

Light and Heavy Metal Castings<br />

Plants and Machines for Moulding and<br />

Coremaking Processes<br />

21 Testing of Materials<br />

22 Analysis Technique and Laboratory<br />

23 Air Technique and Equipment<br />

24 Environmental Protection and Disposal<br />

9 Moulding Sands<br />

10 Sand Conditioning and Reclamation<br />

11 Moulding Auxiliaries<br />

12 Gating and Feeding<br />

13 Casting Machines and Equipment<br />

25 Accident Prevention and Ergonomics<br />

26 Other Products for Casting Industry<br />

27 Consulting and Service<br />

28 Castings<br />

29 By-Products<br />

14<br />

Discharging, Cleaning, Finishing of Raw<br />

Castings<br />

30 Data Processing Technology<br />

15 Surface Treatment<br />

16 Welding and Cutting<br />

31 Foundries<br />

32 Additive manufacturing / 3-D printing<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 55


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

01 Foundry Plants and Equipment<br />

▼ Foundry Equipment and Facilities, in general 20<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Second Hand Foundry Plants and Equipment 45<br />

TCT TESIC GmbH<br />

Foundry Marketing & Services<br />

58640 Iserlohn, Germany<br />

( +49 2371 77260<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.ncn-nesic.com<br />

02 Melting Plants and Equipment for Iron and<br />

Steel Castings and for Malleable Cast Iron<br />

02.06 Maintenance and Repairing<br />

▼ Repairing of Induction Furnaces 584<br />

▼ Remelting Furnaces 700<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

04 Refractories Technology<br />

04.01 Plants, Equipment and Tools for Lining in Melting<br />

and Casting<br />

▼ Mixers and Chargers for Refractory Mixes 930<br />

UELZENER Maschinen GmbH<br />

Snahlsnr. 26-28, 65428 Rüsselsheim, Germany<br />

( +49 6142 177 68 0<br />

E--ailt:<br />

connacn@uelzener-ums.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.uelzener-ums.de<br />

▼ Gunning for Relining of Cupolas 950<br />

UELZENER Maschinen GmbH<br />

Snahlsnr. 26-28, 65428 Rüsselsheim, Germany<br />

( +49 6142 177 68 0<br />

E--ailt:<br />

connacn@uelzener-ums.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.uelzener-ums.de<br />

▼ Wear Indicators for Refractory Lining 980<br />

▼ Insulating Refractoy Bricks 1050<br />

Etex Building Performance GmbH<br />

Division Etex Industry<br />

Raningen/Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

www.proman-indusnry.com<br />

▼ Insulating Products 1130<br />

Etex Building Performance GmbH<br />

Division Etex Industry<br />

Raningen/Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

www.proman-indusnry.com<br />

▼ Ceramic Fibre Mats, Papers, Plates, and Felts 1155<br />

Etex Building Performance GmbH<br />

Division Etex Industry<br />

Raningen/Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

www.proman-indusnry.com<br />

▼ Micro Porous Insulating Materials 1220<br />

Etex Building Performance GmbH<br />

Division Etex Industry<br />

Raningen/Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

www.proman-indusnry.com<br />

▼ Ladle Refractory Mixes 1240<br />

UELZENER Maschinen GmbH<br />

Snahlsnr. 26-28, 65428 Rüsselsheim, Germany<br />

( +49 6142 177 68 0<br />

E--ailt:<br />

connacn@uelzener-ums.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.uelzener-ums.de<br />

04.04 Refractory Building<br />

▼ Maintenance of Refractory Linings 1462<br />

TCT TESIC GmbH<br />

Foundry Marketing & Services<br />

58640 Iserlohn, Germany<br />

( +49 2371 77260<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.ncn-nesic.com<br />

03 Melting Plants and Equipment for NFM<br />

Saveway GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Wümbacher Landsnraße 8, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany<br />

( +49 3677 8060-0 7 +49 3677 8060-99<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.saveway-germany.de<br />

▼ Wear Measuring and Monitoring for Refractory Lining 982<br />

UELZENER Maschinen GmbH<br />

Snahlsnr. 26-28, 65428 Rüsselsheim, Germany<br />

( +49 6142 177 68 0<br />

E--ailt:<br />

connacn@uelzener-ums.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.uelzener-ums.de<br />

05 Non-metal Raw Materials and Auxiliaries for<br />

Melting Shop<br />

03.02 Melting and Holding Furnaces, Electrically<br />

Heated<br />

▼ Aluminium Melting Furnaces 630<br />

Saveway GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Wümbacher Landsnraße 8, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany<br />

( +49 3677 8060-0 7 +49 3677 8060-99<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.saveway-germany.de<br />

▼ State Diagnosis of Refractory Lines 985<br />

05.04 Carburization Agents<br />

▼ Coke Breeze, Coke-Dust 1680<br />

ARISTON Formstaub-Werke GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Worringersnr. 255, 45289 Essen, Germany<br />

( +49 201 57761 7 +49 201 570648<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.arisnon-essen.de<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Induction Furnaces (Mains, Medium,<br />

and High Frequency) 660<br />

Saveway GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Wümbacher Landsnraße 8, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany<br />

( +49 3677 8060-0 7 +49 3677 8060-99<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.saveway-germany.de<br />

04.02 Refractory Materials (Shaped and Non Shaped)<br />

▼ Refractories, in general 1040<br />

08 Plants and Machines for Molding and<br />

Coremaking Processes<br />

08.01 Moulding Plants<br />

▼ Moulding Machines, Fully and Partially Automatic 3070<br />

INDUGA GmbH & Co. KG<br />

52152 Simmeranh, Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@induga.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.induga.com<br />

L. & F. PETERS GmbH<br />

E--ailt:<br />

www.peners-feuerfesn.de<br />

Refratechnik Steel GmbH<br />

Refratechnik Casting GmbH<br />

Schiess-Snr. 58, 40549 Düsseldorf, Germany<br />

( +49 211 5858-0<br />

E--ailt:<br />

sneel@refra.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.refra.com<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

56


08.02 Moulding and Coremaking Machines<br />

▼ Automatic Moulding Machines 3100<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Moulding Machines, Boxless 3150<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Air-flow Squeeze Moulding Machines and Plants 3190<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Multi-Stage Vacuum Process 3223<br />

Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH<br />

35614 Asslar, Germany<br />

( +49 6441 802-1190 7 +49 6441 802-1199<br />

E--ailt:<br />

andreas.wuerz@pfeiffer-vacuum.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.pfeiffer-vacuum.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

▼ Vacuum Moulding Machines and Processes 3280<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

08.03 Additives and Accessories<br />

▼ Core Handling 3450<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

09 Molding Sands<br />

09.01 Basic Moulding Sands<br />

▼ Chromite Sands 3630<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

▼ Ceramic Sands/Chamotte Sands 3645<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

▼ Silica Sands 3720<br />

STROBEL QUARZSAND GmbH<br />

Freihungsand, 92271 Freihung, Germany<br />

( +49 9646 9201-0 7 +49 9646 9201-1257<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@snrobel-quarzsand.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.snrobel-quarzsand.de<br />

09.04 Mould and Core Coating<br />

▼ Blackings, in general 4270<br />

ARISTON Formstaub-Werke GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Worringersnr. 255, 45289 Essen, Germany<br />

( +49 201 57761 7 +49 201 570648<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.arisnon-essen.de<br />

09.06 Moulding Sands Testing<br />

▼ Moisture Testing Equipment for Moulding Sand 4410<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

▼ Moulding Sand Testing Equipment, in general 4420<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

10 Sand Conditioning and Reclamation<br />

▼ Sand Reclamation System 4448<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

10.01 Moulding Sand Conditioning<br />

▼ Aerators for Moulding Sand Ready-to-Use 4470<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

▼ Sand Preparation Plants and Machines 4480<br />

▼ Mixers 4520<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

▼ Sand Mixers 4550<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

▼ Aerators 4560<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

▼ Scales and Weighing Control 4590<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

10.04 Sand Reconditioning<br />

▼ Sand Coolers 4720<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

12 Gating and Feeding<br />

▼ Covering Agents 5320<br />

Refratechnik Steel GmbH<br />

Refratechnik Casting GmbH<br />

Schiess-Snr. 58, 40549 Düsseldorf, Germany<br />

( +49 211 5858-0<br />

E--ailt:<br />

sneel@refra.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.refra.com<br />

▼ Breaker Cores 5340<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

▼ Exothermic Products 5360<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

▼ Insulating Sleeves 5375<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

▼ Exothermic Mini-Feeders 5400<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

▼ Exothermic Feeder Sleeves 5420<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 57


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

▼ Exothermic Feeding Compounds 5430<br />

GTP Schäfer GmbH<br />

41515 Grevenbroich, Germany<br />

( +49 2181 23394-0 7 +49 2181 23394-55<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@gnp-schaefer.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.gnp-schaefer.com<br />

13 Casting Machines and Equipment<br />

▼ Pouring Machines and Equipment 5436<br />

INDUGA GmbH & Co. KG<br />

52152 Simmeranh, Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@induga.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.induga.com<br />

▼ Hydraulic Cylinders 5750<br />

HYDROPNEU GmbH<br />

Sudenensnr. , 73760 Osnfildern, Germany<br />

( +49 711 342999-0 7 +49 711 342999-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@hydropneu.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.hydropneu.de<br />

▼ Piston Lubricants 5790<br />

Chem-Trend (Deutschland) GmbH<br />

Robern-Koch-Snr. 27, 22851 Nordersnedn, Germany<br />

( +49 40 52955-0 7 +49 40 52955-2111<br />

E--ailt:<br />

service@chemnrend.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.chemnrend.com<br />

▼ Parting Agents for Dies 5850<br />

14 Discharging, Cleaning, Finishing of Raw<br />

Castings<br />

14.05 Additional Cleaning Plants and Devices<br />

▼ Pneumatic Hammers 6940<br />

MD Drucklufttechnik GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Weissacher Snr. 1, 70499 Snunngarn, Germany<br />

( +49 711 88718-0 7 +49 711 88718-100<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.mannesmann-demag.com<br />

17 Surface Treatment and Drying<br />

▼ Heat Treatment and Drying 7398<br />

13.01 Pouring Furnaces and their Equipment<br />

▼ Pouring Equipment 5450<br />

INDUGA GmbH & Co. KG<br />

52152 Simmeranh, Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@induga.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.induga.com<br />

▼ Pouring Equipment for Molding Plants,<br />

Railborn or Crane-operated 5470<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

INDUGA GmbH & Co. KG<br />

52152 Simmeranh, Germany<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@induga.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.induga.com<br />

13.02 Die Casting and Accessories<br />

▼ Diecasting Lubricants 5670<br />

Chem-Trend (Deutschland) GmbH<br />

Robern-Koch-Snr. 27, 22851 Nordersnedn, Germany<br />

( +49 40 52955-0 7 +49 40 52955-2111<br />

E--ailt:<br />

service@chemnrend.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.chemnrend.com<br />

▼ Dry Lubricants (Beads) 5865<br />

Chem-Trend (Deutschland) GmbH<br />

Robern-Koch-Snr. 27, 22851 Nordersnedn, Germany<br />

( +49 40 52955-0 7 +49 40 52955-2111<br />

E--ailt:<br />

service@chemnrend.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.chemnrend.com<br />

▼ Multi-Stage Vacuum Process 5876<br />

Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH<br />

35614 Asslar, Germany<br />

( +49 6441 802-1190 7 +49 6441 802-1199<br />

E--ailt:<br />

andreas.wuerz@pfeiffer-vacuum.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.pfeiffer-vacuum.de<br />

13.03 Gravity Die Casting<br />

▼ Gravity Diecasting Machines 5940<br />

Gebr. Löcher Glüherei GmbH<br />

-ühlenseifen 2, 57271 Hilchenbach, Germany<br />

( +49 2733 8968-0 7 +49 2733 8968-10<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loecher-glueherei.de<br />

17.01 Plants and Furnaces<br />

▼ Tempering Furnaces 7400<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Ageing Furnaces 7401<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Annealing and Hardening Furnaces 7430<br />

Chem-Trend (Deutschland) GmbH<br />

Robern-Koch-Snr. 27, 22851 Nordersnedn, Germany<br />

( +49 40 52955-0 7 +49 40 52955-2111<br />

E--ailt:<br />

service@chemnrend.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.chemnrend.com<br />

▼ Diecasting Parting Agents 5680<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Low Pressure Diecasting Machines 5980<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Solution Annealing Furnaces 7455<br />

Chem-Trend (Deutschland) GmbH<br />

Robern-Koch-Snr. 27, 22851 Nordersnedn, Germany<br />

( +49 40 52955-0 7 +49 40 52955-2111<br />

E--ailt:<br />

service@chemnrend.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.chemnrend.com<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

58


▼ Annealing Furnaces 7490<br />

19 Pattern- and Diemaking<br />

▼ Laser Measurement Techniques 9310<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Quenching and Tempering Furnaces 7510<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Heat Treating Furnaces 7520<br />

19.04 Rapid Prototyping<br />

▼ Pattern and Prototype Making 9025<br />

Georg Herrmann Metallgießerei GmbH<br />

-uldenhünnen 22, 09599 Freiberg, Germany<br />

( +49 3731 3969 0 7 +49 3731 3969 3<br />

E--ailt:<br />

mail@ghm-aluguss.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.ghm-aluguss.de<br />

20 Control Systems and Automation<br />

20.01 Control and Adjustment Systems<br />

▼ Automation and Control for Sand Preparation 9030<br />

POLYTEC GmbH<br />

76337 Waldbronn, Germany<br />

( +49 7243 604-0 7 +49 7243 69944<br />

E--ailt:<br />

Lm@polynec.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.polynec.de<br />

▼ Positioning Control 9345<br />

POLYTEC GmbH<br />

76337 Waldbronn, Germany<br />

( +49 7243 604-0 7 +49 7243 69944<br />

E--ailt:<br />

Lm@polynec.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.polynec.de<br />

▼ Temperature Measurement 9380<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

▼ Hearth Bogie Type Furnaces 7525<br />

Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich<br />

GmbH & Co KG<br />

Walldürner Snr. 50, 74736 Hardheim, Germany<br />

▼ Automation 9040<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

▼ Thermal Analysis Equipment 9400<br />

LOI Thermoprocess GmbH<br />

45141 Essen/Germany<br />

( +49 201 1891-1<br />

E--ailt:<br />

loi@nenova.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loi.nenova.com<br />

18 Plant, Transport, Stock, and Handling<br />

Engineering<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Software for Production Planning and Control 9042<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

▼ Thermo Couples 9410<br />

18.01 Continuous Conveyors and Accessories<br />

▼ Flexible Tubes with Ceramic Wear Protection 7676<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Control Systems and Automation, in general 9090<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

STEIN INJECTION TECHNOLOGY GmbH<br />

Hagener Snr. 20-24, 58285 Gevelsberg, Germany<br />

( +49 2332 75742-0 7 +49 2332 75742-40<br />

E--ailt:<br />

snein@sin-gmbh.nen<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.sin-gmbh.nen<br />

▼ Vibratory Motors 7980<br />

FRIEDRICH Schwingtechnik GmbH<br />

Am Höfgen 24, 42781 Haan, Germany<br />

( +49 2129 3790-0 7 +49 2129 3790-37<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@friedrich-schwingnechnik.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.friedrich-schwingnechnik.de<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

20.02 Measuring and Control Instruments<br />

▼ Immersion Thermo Couples 9230<br />

20.03 Data Acquisition and Processing<br />

▼ Data Logging and Communication 9440<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Machine Data Logging 9480<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 59


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

▼ Numerical Solidification Analysis<br />

and Process Simulation 9500<br />

MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH<br />

Kackernsnr. 11, 52072 Aachen, Germany<br />

( +49 241 88901-0 7 +49 241 88901-60<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@magmasofn.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.magmasofn.com<br />

▼ Numerical Solidification Simulation<br />

and Process Optimization 9502<br />

MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH<br />

Kackernsnr. 11, 52072 Aachen, Germany<br />

( +49 241 88901-0 7 +49 241 88901-60<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@magmasofn.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.magmasofn.com<br />

▼ Computer Programmes and Software for Foundries 9520<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Simulation Software 9522<br />

MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH<br />

Kackernsnr. 11, 52072 Aachen, Germany<br />

( +49 241 88901-0 7 +49 241 88901-60<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@magmasofn.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.magmasofn.com<br />

▼ Software for Foundries 9523<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

▼ Fault Indicating Systems, Registration<br />

and Documentation 9540<br />

HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO<br />

57334 Bad Laasphe, Germany<br />

( +49 2752 907-0 7 +49 2752 907-280<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.wagner-sinno.de<br />

21 Testing of Materials<br />

21.01 Testing of Materials and Workpieces<br />

▼ Dye Penetrants 9600<br />

KARL DEUTSCH<br />

Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co. KG<br />

Onno-Hausmann-Ring 101, 42115 Wuppernal, Germany<br />

( +49 202 71 92-0 7 +49 202 71 49 32<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@karldeunsch.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.karldeunsch.de<br />

▼ Instruments for Non-destructive Testing 9610<br />

KARL DEUTSCH<br />

Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co. KG<br />

Onno-Hausmann-Ring 101, 42115 Wuppernal, Germany<br />

( +49 202 71 92-0 7 +49 202 71 49 32<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@karldeunsch.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.karldeunsch.de<br />

▼ Magnetic Crack Detection Equipment 9680<br />

KARL DEUTSCH<br />

Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co. KG<br />

Onno-Hausmann-Ring 101, 42115 Wuppernal, Germany<br />

( +49 202 71 92-0 7 +49 202 71 49 32<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@karldeunsch.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.karldeunsch.de<br />

▼ Ultrasonic Testing Equipment 9750<br />

KARL DEUTSCH<br />

Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co. KG<br />

Onno-Hausmann-Ring 101, 42115 Wuppernal, Germany<br />

( +49 202 71 92-0 7 +49 202 71 49 32<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@karldeunsch.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.karldeunsch.de<br />

▼ UV-Lamps 9758<br />

KARL DEUTSCH<br />

Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co. KG<br />

Onno-Hausmann-Ring 101, 42115 Wuppernal, Germany<br />

( +49 202 71 92-0 7 +49 202 71 49 32<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@karldeunsch.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.karldeunsch.de<br />

▼ Devices for Testing of Materials,<br />

non-destructive, in general 9836<br />

KARL DEUTSCH<br />

Prüf- und Messgerätebau GmbH + Co. KG<br />

Onno-Hausmann-Ring 101, 42115 Wuppernal, Germany<br />

( +49 202 71 92-0 7 +49 202 71 49 32<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@karldeunsch.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.karldeunsch.de<br />

22 Analysis Technique and Laboratory Equipment<br />

▼ Sampling Systems 9970<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

26 Other Products for Casting Industry<br />

26.02 Industrial Commodities<br />

▼ Joints, Asbestos-free 11120<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

▼ Sealing and Insulating Products up to 1260 øC 11125<br />

MINKON GmbH<br />

Heinrich-Hernz-Snr. 30-32, 40699 Erkranh, Germany<br />

( +49 211 209908-0 7 +49 211 209908-90<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@minkon.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.minkon.de<br />

27 Consulting and Service<br />

▼ Machining 11292<br />

Behringer GmbH<br />

Maschinenfabrik und Eisengiesserei<br />

Posnfacht:<br />

1153, 74910 Kirchardn, Germany<br />

( +49 7266 207-0 7 +49 7266 207-500<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.behringer.nen<br />

▼ Simulation Services 11310<br />

MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH<br />

Kackernsnr. 11, 52072 Aachen, Germany<br />

( +49 241 88901-0 7 +49 241 88901-60<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@magmasofn.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.magmasofn.com<br />

▼ Heat Treatment 11345<br />

Gebr. Löcher Glüherei GmbH<br />

-ühlenseifen 2, 57271 Hilchenbach, Germany<br />

( +49 2733 8968-0 7 +49 2733 8968-10<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.loecher-glueherei.de<br />

28 Castings<br />

▼ Aluminium Pressure Diecasting 11390<br />

Schött Druckguß GmbH<br />

Aluminium Die Casting<br />

Posnfacht:<br />

27 66, 58687 -enden, Germany<br />

( +49 2373 1608-0 7 +49 2373 1608-110<br />

E--ailt:<br />

vernrieb@schoenn-druckguss.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.schoenn-druckguss.de<br />

▼ Rolled Wire 11489<br />

Behringer GmbH<br />

Maschinenfabrik und Eisengiesserei<br />

Posnfacht:<br />

1153, 74910 Kirchardn, Germany<br />

( +49 7266 207-0 7 +49 7266 207-500<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.behringer.nen<br />

▼ Spheroidal Iron 11540<br />

Behringer GmbH<br />

Maschinenfabrik und Eisengiesserei<br />

Posnfacht:<br />

1153, 74910 Kirchardn, Germany<br />

( +49 7266 207-0 7 +49 7266 207-500<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.behringer.nen<br />

▼ Steel Castings 11550<br />

KS Gleitlager GmbH, Werk Papenburg<br />

Friesensnr. 2, 26871 Papenburg, Germany<br />

( +49 4961 986-150 7 +49 4961 986-166<br />

E--ailt:<br />

sales-cc@de.rheinmenall.com<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.rheinmenall-aunomonive.com<br />

60


30 Data Processing Technology<br />

31.02 NFM Foundries<br />

▼ Light Metal Casting Plants 11862<br />

▼ Mold Filling and Solidification Simulation 11700<br />

MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH<br />

Kackernsnr. 11, 52072 Aachen, Germany<br />

( +49 241 88901-0 7 +49 241 88901-60<br />

E--ailt:<br />

info@magmasofn.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.magmasofn.com<br />

31 Foundries<br />

Georg Herrmann Metallgießerei GmbH<br />

-uldenhünnen 22, 09599 Freiberg, Germany<br />

( +49 3731 3969 0 7 +49 3731 3969 3<br />

E--ailt:<br />

mail@ghm-aluguss.de<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.ghm-aluguss.de<br />

31.01 Iron, Steel, and Malleable-Iron Foundries<br />

▼ Iron Foudries 11855<br />

Behringer GmbH<br />

Maschinenfabrik und Eisengiesserei<br />

Posnfacht:<br />

1153, 74910 Kirchardn, Germany<br />

( +49 7266 207-0 7 +49 7266 207-500<br />

Innernent:<br />

www.behringer.nen<br />

Index to Companies<br />

Company Product Company Product<br />

ARISTON Formsnaub-Werke GmbH & Co. KG 1680, 4270<br />

BEHRINGER GmbH 11292, 11489, 11540, 11855<br />

-aschinenfabrik & Eisengießerei<br />

Chem Trend (Deunschland) GmbH 5670, 5680, 5790, 5850, 5865<br />

-aschinenfabrik Gusnav Eirich GmbH & Co KG 4410, 4420, 4470, 4480, 4520,<br />

4550, 4560, 4590, 4720, 9030<br />

Enex Building Performance GmbH 1050, 1130, 1155, 1220<br />

Friedrich Schwingnechnik GmbH 7980<br />

GTP Schäfer Giessnechnische Produkne GmbH 3630, 3645, 5340, 5360, 5375,<br />

5400, 5420, 5430<br />

Heinrich Wagner Sinno -aschinenfabrik GmbH 20, 3070, 3100, 3150, 3190,<br />

3280, 3450, 4448, 5470, 5940,<br />

5980, 9040, 9042, 9090, 9440,<br />

9480, 9520, 9523, 9540<br />

HYDROPNEU GmbH 5750<br />

INDUGA GmbH & Co. KG 660, 5436, 5450, 5470<br />

KARL DEUTSCH Prüf- und 9600, 9610, 9680, 9750, 9758,<br />

-essgeränebau GmbH + Co KG 9836<br />

KS Gleinlager GmbH 11550<br />

Gebr. Löcher Glüherei GmbH 7398, 11345<br />

LOI Thermprocess GmbH 630, 700, 7400, 7401, 7430,<br />

7455, 7490, 7510, 7520, 7525<br />

-AG-A Gießereinechnologie GmbH 9500, 9502, 9522, 11310, 11700<br />

-D Drucklufnnechnik GmbH & Co. KG 6940<br />

Georg Herrmann -enallgießerei GmbH 9025, 11862<br />

-INKON GmbH 9230, 9380, 9400, 9410, 9970,<br />

11120, 11125<br />

L. & F. PETERS GmbH 1040<br />

Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH 3223, 5876<br />

Polynec GmbH 9310, 9345<br />

Refranechnik Sneel GmbH 1040, 5320<br />

Saveway GmbH & Co. KG 980, 982, 985<br />

Schönn-Druckguß GmbH 11390<br />

Snein Injecnion Technology GmbH 7676<br />

Snrobel Quarzsand GmbH 3720<br />

TCT TESIC GmbH 45, 584<br />

Uelzener -aschinen GmbH 930, 950, 1240, 1462<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 61


List of Products<br />

01 Foundry Plants and Equipment<br />

10 Foundry Plants, Planning and<br />

Construction<br />

20 Foundry Equipment and Facilities,<br />

in general<br />

30 Foundry Plants, fully and<br />

partially automatic<br />

40 Maintenance and Repairing of<br />

Foundry Plants<br />

44 Swing-Technique Machines for<br />

Handling, Dosing, and Classing<br />

45 Second Hand Foundry Plants and<br />

Equipment<br />

47 Spray Deposition Plants<br />

01.01. Components<br />

47 Spray Deposition Plants<br />

50 Charging Systems, in general<br />

52 Cored Wire Treatment Stations<br />

53 Plug Connections, Heat Resisting<br />

02 Melting Plants and Equipment for Iron and<br />

Steel Castings and for Malleable Cast Iron<br />

02.01. Cupolas<br />

55 Cupolas<br />

60 Hot-Blast Cupolas<br />

70 Cold-Blast Cupolas<br />

80 Circulating Gas Cupolas<br />

90 Gas Fired Cupolas<br />

100 Cupolas, cokeless<br />

110 Cupolas with Oxygen-Enrichment<br />

120 Cupolas with Secondary Blast<br />

Operation<br />

02.02. Cupola Accessories and<br />

Auxiliaries<br />

130 Lighter<br />

140 Cupola Charging Equipment<br />

150 Tuyères<br />

160 Burners for Cupolas<br />

180 Blowing-In Equipment for Carbo Fer<br />

190 Blowing-In Equipment for Filter<br />

Dusts into Cupolas<br />

210 Blowing-In Equipment for Carbon<br />

211 Blowing-In Equipment for Metallurgical<br />

Processes<br />

220 Dedusting, Cupolas<br />

225 Gas Cleaning<br />

230 Charging Plants, fully and partially<br />

automatic<br />

240 Blowers, Cupolas<br />

270 Recuperators<br />

280 Oxygen Injection for Cupolas<br />

290 Shaking Ladles, Plants<br />

295 Dust Briquetting<br />

300 Monitoring Plants, Cupola<br />

310 Forehearths, Cupola<br />

320 Blast Heater<br />

02.03. Melting and Holding<br />

Furnaces, Electrically Heated<br />

330 Electric melting Furnaces, in general<br />

340 Induction Channel Furnaces<br />

350 Crucible Induction Furnaces, medium<br />

Frequency<br />

360 Crucible Induction Furnaces,<br />

Mains Frequency<br />

370 Short-Coil Induction Furnaces<br />

390 Filters, in general<br />

399 Tower Melter<br />

400 Holding Furnaces<br />

02.04. Accessories and Auxiliaries<br />

for Electric Furnaces<br />

410 Charging Units<br />

420 Blowing-In Equipment for Carbo Fer<br />

430 Blowing-In Equipment for Filter Dusts<br />

440 Blowing-In Equipment for Carbon<br />

445 Inert Gas Systems for EAF and EIF<br />

450 Inert Gas Systems for EAF and EIF<br />

460 Electro-magnetic Conveyor Chutes<br />

470 Dust Separation Plant<br />

480 Charging Equipment<br />

500 Graphite Electrodes<br />

510 Lime Dosing Device<br />

520 Condensors<br />

540 Cooling Equipment<br />

550 Scrap preheating Plants<br />

560 Secondary Metallurgical Plants<br />

565 Control Installations<br />

570 Equipment for induction stirring<br />

02.05. Rotary Furnaces<br />

580 Rotary Furnaces<br />

02.06. Maintenance and Repairing<br />

584 Repairing of Induction Furnaces<br />

586 Maintenance of Complete<br />

Induction Furnace Plants<br />

03 Melting Plants and Equipment for NFM<br />

03.01. Melting Furnaces, Fuel Fired<br />

590 Hearth-Type (Melting) Furnaces<br />

599 Tower Furnaces<br />

600 Bale-Out Furnaces<br />

610 Crucible Furnaces<br />

620 Drum-Type Melting Furnaces<br />

03.02. Melting and Holding<br />

Furnaces, Electrically Heated<br />

630 Aluminium Melting Furnaces<br />

640 Dosing Furnace<br />

655 Heating Elements for Resistance<br />

Furnaces<br />

660 Induction Furnaces (Mains,<br />

Medium, and High Frequency)<br />

665 Magnesium Melting Plants and<br />

Dosing Devices<br />

670 Melting Furnacs, in general<br />

680 Bale-Out Furnaces<br />

690 Crucible Furnaces<br />

700 Remelting Furnaces<br />

710 Holding Furnaces<br />

720 Electric Resistance Furnaces<br />

902 Vacuum Melting and Casting<br />

Furnaces<br />

03.03. Accessories and Auxiliaries<br />

730 Exhausting Plants<br />

740 Molten Metal Refining by Argon<br />

742 Gassing Systems for Aluminium<br />

Melting<br />

750 Gassing Systems for Magnesium<br />

Melting<br />

760 Charging Plants<br />

770 Blowing-in Equipment for Alloying<br />

and Inoculating Agents<br />

774 Blowing-in Equipment for<br />

Inoculating Agents<br />

778 Degassing Equipment<br />

780 Dedusting Equipment<br />

785 Crucibles, Ready-To-Use<br />

790 Charging Equipment<br />

800 Graphite Melting Pots<br />

825 Emergency Iron Collecting<br />

Reservoirs<br />

847 Cleaning Devices for Cleaning<br />

Dross in Induction Furnaces<br />

848 Cleaning Device and Gripper for<br />

Deslagging - Induction Furnaces<br />

850 Crucibles<br />

860 Inert Gas Systems<br />

870 Silicon Carbide Pots<br />

875 Special Vibrating Grippers for<br />

the Removal of Loose Dross and<br />

Caking<br />

880 Gas Flushing Installations<br />

890 Crucibles, Pots<br />

895 Power Supply, Plasma Generators<br />

900 Vacuum Degassing Equipment<br />

04 Refractories Technology<br />

04.01. Plants, Equipment and Tools for<br />

Lining in Melting and Casting<br />

910 Spraying Tools for Furnace Lining<br />

920 Breakage Equipment for Cupolas,<br />

Crucibles, Pots, Torpedo Ladles<br />

and Ladles<br />

923 Lost Formers<br />

930 Mixers and Chargers for<br />

Refractory Mixes<br />

940 Charging Units for Furnaces<br />

950 Gunning for Relining of Cupolas<br />

954 Ramming Mix Formers<br />

956 Ramming Templates<br />

980 Wear Indicators for Refractory Lining<br />

982 Wear Measuring and Monitoring<br />

for Refractory Lining<br />

985 State Diagnosis of Refractory Lines<br />

62


04.02. Refractory Materials<br />

(Shaped and Non Shaped)<br />

1000 Boron-Nitride Isolation<br />

1005 Sand Gaskets, Isolation<br />

Materials (up to 1260 °C)<br />

1009 Running and Feeding<br />

Systems (Gating Systems)<br />

1010 Running and Feeding Systems<br />

(Runner Bricks, Centre Bricks,<br />

Sprue Cups)<br />

1020 Fibrous Mould Parts<br />

1021 Fibrous Mould Parts up to 1750 °C<br />

1030 Refractory Castables<br />

1040 Refractories, in general<br />

1050 Insulating Refractoy Bricks<br />

1060 Refractoy Cements<br />

1070 Refractories for Aluminium Melting<br />

Furnaces<br />

1080 Refractory Materials for Anode<br />

Kilns<br />

1090 Refractory Materials for Melting<br />

Furnaces, in general<br />

1100 Refractory Materials for Holding<br />

Furnaces<br />

1103 Ceramic Fibre Mould Parts and<br />

Modules<br />

1104 Mold Sections and Modules made<br />

of HTW (High Temperature Wool)<br />

1109 Precasts<br />

1110 Pouring Lip Bricks<br />

1113 Fibreglass Mats<br />

1114 Slip Foils for Glowing Materials<br />

1117 High Temperature Mats, Papers,<br />

Plates, and Felts<br />

1120 Induction Furnace Compounds<br />

1123 Insulating and Sealing Panels up<br />

to 1200 °C<br />

1125 Insulating Fabrics up to 1260 °C<br />

1128 Insulating Felts and Mats up to<br />

1260 °C<br />

1130 Insulating Products<br />

1140 Insulating Products (such as<br />

Fibres, Micanites)<br />

1150 Insulating Bricks<br />

1155 Ceramic Fibre Mats, Papers,<br />

Plates, and Felts<br />

1160 Ceramic Fibre Modules<br />

1169 Ceramic Fibre Substitutes<br />

1170 Ceramic Fibre Products<br />

1180 Loamy Sands<br />

1190 Carbon Bricks<br />

1200 Cupola and Siphon Mixes<br />

1210 Cupola Bricks<br />

1220 Micro Porous Insulating Materials<br />

1222 Nano Porous Insulating Materials<br />

1225 Furnace Door Sealings, Cords, and<br />

Packings<br />

1230 Furnace Linings<br />

1240 Ladle Refractory Mixes<br />

1250 Ladle Bricks<br />

1260 Plates, free from Ceramic Fibres<br />

1261 Plates made of Ground Alkali<br />

Silicate Wool<br />

1270 Acid and Silica Mixes<br />

1280 Fire-Clay Mixes and Cements<br />

1290 Fire-Clay Bricks<br />

1310 Porous Plugs<br />

1312 Stirring Cones for Steel, Grey Cast<br />

Iron and Aluminium<br />

1320 Moulding Mixtures for Steel Casting<br />

1330 Ramming, Relining, Casting,<br />

Gunning, and Vibration Bulks<br />

1333 Ramming, Casting, Gunning, and<br />

Repairing Compounds<br />

1340 Plugs and Nozzles<br />

1345 Textile Fabrics up to 1260 °C<br />

988 Substitutes of Aluminium Silicate<br />

Wool<br />

990 Coating and Filling Materials,<br />

Protective Coatings<br />

04.03. Refractory Raw Materials<br />

1350 Glass Powder<br />

1360 Loamy Sands<br />

1370 Magnesite, Chrom-Magnesite,<br />

Forsterite<br />

1390 Chamotte, Ground Chamotte<br />

1400 Clays, Clay Powders<br />

04.04. Refractory Building<br />

1410 Bricking-Up of Furnaces<br />

1420 Refractory Building/Installation<br />

1430 Fire and Heat Protection<br />

1435 Furnace Door Joints<br />

1440 Furnace Reconstruction<br />

1450 Repairing of Furnaces and Refractories<br />

1460 Heat Insulation<br />

1462 Maintenance of Refractory Linings<br />

05 Non-metal Raw Materials and Auxiliaries for<br />

Melting Shop<br />

05.01. Coke<br />

1480 Lignite Coke<br />

1490 Foundry Coke<br />

1510 Petroleum Coke<br />

05.02. Additives<br />

1520 Desulphurization Compounds<br />

1530 Felspar<br />

1540 Fluorspar<br />

1550 Casting Carbide<br />

1560 Glass Granulate<br />

1570 Lime, Limestones<br />

1575 Briquets for Cupolas<br />

1580 Slag Forming Addition<br />

05.03. Gases<br />

1590 Argon<br />

1600 Oxygen<br />

1610 Inert Gases<br />

1620 Nitrogen<br />

1622 Hydrogen<br />

05.04. Carburization Agents<br />

1630 Carburization Agents, in general<br />

1640 Lignite Coke<br />

1650 Electrode Butts<br />

1660 Electrode Graphite<br />

1665 Desulfurizer<br />

1670 Graphite<br />

1680 Coke Breeze, Coke-Dust<br />

1700 Petroleum Coke<br />

1710 Silicon Carbide<br />

3261 Automatic Powder Feeding<br />

05.05. Melting Fluxes for NF-Metals<br />

1720 Aluminium Covering Fluxes<br />

1730 Desoxidants, in general<br />

1740 Degassing Fluxes<br />

1750 Desulphurisers<br />

1760 Charcoal<br />

1770 Refiners<br />

1780 Fluxing Agents<br />

1785 Melt Treatment Agents<br />

1790 Fluxing Agents<br />

06 Metallic Charge Materials for Iron and Steel<br />

Castings and for Malleable Cast Iron<br />

06.01. Scrap Materials<br />

1810 Cast Scrap<br />

1811 Cast Turnings<br />

1813 Cuttings/Stampings<br />

1817 Steel Scrap<br />

06.02. Pig Iron<br />

1820 Hematite Pig Iron<br />

1830 Foundry Pig Iron<br />

1838 DK Pig Iron<br />

1840 DK-Perlit Special Pig Iron<br />

1880 DK Pig Iron for Malleable Cast Iron<br />

1898 DK Pig Iron, low-carbon, Quality<br />

DKC<br />

1900 DK-Perlit Special Pig Iron, Low<br />

Carbon, DKC Quality<br />

1936 DK Phosphorus Alloy Pig Iron<br />

1940 DK-Perlit Special Pig Iron, Type<br />

Siegerlaender<br />

1950 Spiegel Eisen<br />

1970 Blast Furnace Ferro Silicon<br />

06.03. Specials (Pig Iron)<br />

1990 Foundry Pig Iron<br />

2000 Hematite Pig Iron<br />

2010 Sorel Metal<br />

2020 Special Pig Iron for s. g. Cast Iron<br />

Production<br />

2030 Special Pig Iron for s.g. Cast Iron<br />

2040 Steelmaking Pig Iron<br />

06.04. Ferro Alloys<br />

2050 Ferro-Boron<br />

2060 Ferro-Chromium<br />

2070 Ferroalloys, in general<br />

2080 Ferro-Manganese<br />

2090 Ferro-Molybdenum<br />

2100 Ferro-Nickel<br />

2110 Ferro-Niobium<br />

2120 Ferro-Phosphorus<br />

2130 Ferro-Selenium<br />

2140 Ferro-Silicon<br />

2150 Ferro-Silicon-Magnesium<br />

2160 Ferro-Titanium<br />

2170 Ferro-Vanadium<br />

2180 Ferro-Tungsten<br />

2190 Silicon-Manganese<br />

06.05. Other Alloy Metals and Master<br />

Alloys<br />

2200 Aluminium Granulates<br />

2210 Aluminium, Aluminium Alloys<br />

2220 Aluminium Powder<br />

2230 Aluminium Master Alloys<br />

2250 Calcium Carbide<br />

2260 Calcium-Silicon<br />

2265 Cerium Mischmetal<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 63


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

2280 Chromium Metals<br />

2290 Cobalt<br />

2300 Chromium Metal, Aluminothermic<br />

2310 Deoxidation Alloys<br />

2318 High-grade Steel<br />

2320 Iron Powder<br />

2350 Copper<br />

2360 Cupola Briquets<br />

2370 Alloying Metals, in general<br />

2380 Alloying Additives<br />

2390 Magnesium, Magnesium Alloys<br />

2410 Manganese Metal<br />

2420 Manganese Metal, Electrolytic<br />

2430 Molybdenum<br />

2440 Molybdenum Alloys<br />

2450 Molybdenum Oxide<br />

2460 Nickel, Nickel Alloys<br />

2470 Nickel-Magnesium<br />

2490 Furnace Additives<br />

2500 Ladle Additives<br />

2510 High-Purity Iron, Low-Carbon<br />

2520 Sulphuric Iron<br />

2530 Silicon Carbide<br />

2540 Silicon Metal<br />

2545 Silicon Metal Granules<br />

2550 Special Alloys<br />

2570 Titanium Sponge<br />

2575 Master Alloys for Precious Metals<br />

2580 Bismuth<br />

2590 Tungsten<br />

2600 Tin<br />

2610 Alloying Metals, Master Alloys<br />

06.06. Nodularizing Additives and<br />

Auxiliaries<br />

2620 Magnesium Treatment Alloys for<br />

s. g. Cast Iron<br />

2630 Mischmetal<br />

06.07. Inoculants and Auxiliary<br />

Appliances<br />

2640 Cored-Wire Injectors<br />

2645 Injection Appliances for Cored Wire<br />

2650 Cored Wires for Secondary and<br />

Ladle Metallurgy<br />

2653 Cored Wires for Magnesium Treatment<br />

2656 Cored Wires for Inoculation of Cast<br />

Iron Melts<br />

2658 Stream Inoculants<br />

2660 Automatic IDA-Type Inoculation<br />

Dosing Devices<br />

2670 Injection Appliances<br />

2680 Inoculants and Inoculation Alloys,<br />

in general<br />

2690 Inoculants for Cast Iron<br />

2692 MSI Pouring Stream Inoculation<br />

Devices<br />

2694 Ladle Inoculants<br />

07 Metallic Charge and Treatment Materials for<br />

Light and Heavy Metal Castings<br />

07.01. Scrap<br />

2730 Metal Residues<br />

07.02. Ingot Metal<br />

2740 Standard Aluminium Alloys<br />

2750 Brass Ingots<br />

2770 High-Grade Zinc Alloys<br />

2790 Copper<br />

2800 Copper Alloys<br />

2810 Magnesium, Magnesium Alloys<br />

2830 Tin<br />

07.03. Alloying Addition for Treatment<br />

2838 Aluminium-Beryllium Master Alloys<br />

2840 Aluminium-Copper<br />

2852 Aluminium Master Alloys<br />

2870 Arsenic Copper<br />

2875 Beryllium-Copper<br />

2890 Calcium<br />

2891 Calcium Carbide, Desulphurisers<br />

2893 Chromium-Copper<br />

2900 Ferro-Copper<br />

2910 Grain Refiner<br />

2920 Granulated Copper<br />

2924 Copper Magnesium<br />

2925 Copper Salts<br />

2927 Copper Master Alloys<br />

2930 Alloy Metals, in general<br />

2935 Alloy Biscuits<br />

2936 Lithium<br />

2938 Manganese Chloride (anhydrate)<br />

2940 Manganese Copper<br />

2950 Metal Powder<br />

2960 Niobium<br />

2970 Phosphor-Copper<br />

2980 Phosphor-Tin<br />

2990 Silicon-Copper<br />

3000 Silicon Metal<br />

3010 Strontium, Strontium Alloys<br />

3020 Tantalum<br />

3025 Titanium, powdery<br />

3030 Refining Agents for Aluminium<br />

3033 Zirconium-Copper<br />

08 Plants and Machines for Moulding and<br />

Coremaking Processes<br />

08.01. Moulding Plants<br />

3050 Moulding Plants, in general<br />

3058 Moulding Machines, Boxless<br />

3060 Moulding Machines, Fully Automatic<br />

3070 Moulding Machines, Fully and<br />

Partially Automatic<br />

08.02. Moulding and Coremaking<br />

Machines<br />

3080 Lifting Moulding Machine<br />

3090 Pneumatic Moulding Machines<br />

3100 Automatic Moulding Machines<br />

3110 High-Pressure Squeeze Moulding<br />

Machines<br />

3130 Impact Moulding Machines<br />

3140 Moulding Plants and Machines for<br />

Cold-Setting Processes<br />

3150 Moulding Machines, Boxless<br />

3160 Core Blowers<br />

3170 Coremaking Machines<br />

3180 Core Shooters<br />

3190 Air-flow Squeeze Moulding Machines<br />

and Plants<br />

3200 Shell Moulding Machines<br />

3210 Shell Moulding Machines<br />

3220 Shell Moulding Machines and<br />

Hollow Core Blowers<br />

3225 Multi-Stage Vacuum Process<br />

3230 Multi-Stage Vacuum Processes for<br />

Pressure Die Casting Processes<br />

3235 Rapid Prototyping<br />

3240 Jolt Squeeze Moulding Machines<br />

3250 Suction Squeeze Moulding Machines<br />

and Plants<br />

3260 Pinlift Moulding Machines<br />

3270 Rollover Moulding Machines<br />

3280 Vacuum Moulding Machines and<br />

Processes<br />

3290 Multi-Piston Squeeze Moulding<br />

Machines<br />

3300 Turnover Moulding Machines<br />

08.03. Additives and Accessories<br />

3310 Exhaust Air Cleaning Plants for<br />

Moulding Machines<br />

3320 Gassing Units for Moulds and<br />

Cores<br />

3325 Seal Bonnets for Immersion Nozzles<br />

3330 Metering Dosing Devices for<br />

Binders and Additives<br />

3340 Electrical Equipment for Moulding<br />

Machines and Accessories<br />

3350 Electrical and Electronic Controlling<br />

Devices for Moulding<br />

Machines<br />

3355 Mould Dryer<br />

3360 Vents<br />

3370 Screen-Vents<br />

3380 Spare Parts for Moulding Machines<br />

3390 Flow Coating Plants<br />

3400 Pattern Plates<br />

3420 Manipulators<br />

3430 Core Setting Equipment<br />

3440 Core Removal Handling<br />

3450 Core Handling<br />

3460 Coremaking Manipulators<br />

3462 Core Transport Racks<br />

3470 Shell Mould Sealing Equipment<br />

and Presses<br />

3480 Mixers for Blackings and Coatings<br />

3500 Plastic Blowing and Gassing Plates<br />

3510 Coating Equipment<br />

3512 Coating Dryers<br />

3520 Equipment for Alcohol-based<br />

Coatings<br />

3525 Coating Stores and<br />

Preparation Equipment<br />

3530 Coating Mixers, Coating Preparation<br />

Equipment<br />

3540 Screen Vents, front Armoured<br />

3560 Swing Conveyors<br />

3570 Screening Machines<br />

3580 Plug Connections, Heat-Resisting<br />

08.04. Mould Boxes and Accessories<br />

3590 Moulding Boxes<br />

3610 Moulding Box Round-hole and<br />

Long-hole Guides<br />

09 Moulding Sands<br />

09.01. Basic Moulding Sands<br />

3630 Chromite Sands<br />

3640 Moulding Sands<br />

3645 Ceramic Sands/Chamotte Sands<br />

3650 Core Sands<br />

64


3660 Molochite<br />

3670 Mullite Chamotte<br />

3690 Olivine Sands<br />

3700 Fused Silica<br />

3705 Lost Foam Backing Sands<br />

3710 Silica Flour<br />

3720 Silica Sands<br />

3730 Zircon Powder<br />

3740 Zircon Sands<br />

09.02. Binders<br />

3750 Alkyd Resins<br />

3755 Inorganic Binders<br />

3760 Asphalt Binders<br />

3770 Bentonite<br />

3790 Binders for Investment Casting<br />

3800 Cold-Box Binders<br />

3803 Resins for the Shell Moulding<br />

Process<br />

3820 Ethyl Silicate<br />

3830 Moulding Sand Binders, in general<br />

3833 Binders, Inorganic<br />

3840 Resins<br />

3860 Oil Binders<br />

3870 Core Sand Binders, in general<br />

3875 Silica Sol<br />

3880 Synthetic Resin Binders, in general<br />

3890 Synthetic Resin Binders for<br />

Refractories<br />

3900 Synthetic Resin Binder for Gas<br />

Curing Processes<br />

3910 Synthetic Resin Binder for Hot<br />

Curing Processes<br />

3920 Synthetic Resin Binder for Cold<br />

Setting Processes<br />

3930 Facing Sand Binders<br />

3940 Binders for the Methyl-Formate<br />

Process<br />

3950 Phenolic Resins<br />

3960 Phenolic Resins (alkaline)<br />

3970 Polyurethane Binders and Resins<br />

3980 Swelling Binders<br />

3990 Swelling Clays<br />

4000 Quick-Setting Binders<br />

4010 Silicate Binders<br />

4020 Silica Sol<br />

4030 Binders for the SO2 Process<br />

4040 Cereal Binders<br />

4050 Warm-Box Binders<br />

4060 Water-Glass Binders (CO2-Process)<br />

09.03. Moulding Sand Additives<br />

4066 Addition Agents<br />

4070 Iron Oxide<br />

4080 Red Iron Oxide<br />

4090 Lustrous Carbon Former<br />

4100 Pelleted Pitch<br />

4110 Coal Dust<br />

4120 Coal Dust Substitute (Liquid or<br />

Solid Carbon Carrier)<br />

4130 Coal Dust (Synthetic)<br />

09.04. Mould and Core Coating<br />

4140 Inflammable Coating<br />

4150 Alcohol-Based Coatings<br />

4160 Alcohol-based Granulated Coatings<br />

4170 Boron-Nitride Coatings<br />

4180 Coatings, Ready-to-Use<br />

4190 Mould Varnish<br />

4200 Mould Coating<br />

4210 Black Washes<br />

4220 Graphite Blackings<br />

4224 Lost-Foam Coatings<br />

4225 Ceramic Coatings<br />

4230 Core Coatings<br />

4240 Core Blackings<br />

4260 Paste Coatings<br />

4266 Coatings (with metallurgical effects)<br />

4270 Blackings, in general<br />

4280 Steel Mould Coatings<br />

4290 Talc<br />

4298 Coatings for Full Mould Casting<br />

4300 Water-based Coatings<br />

4310 Granulated Water-based Coatings<br />

4320 Zircon Coatings<br />

4321 Zircon-free Coatings<br />

09.05. Moulding Sands<br />

Ready-to-Use<br />

4340 Sands for Shell Moulding, Readyto-use<br />

4350 Sands Ready-to-Use, Oil-Bonded<br />

(Water-free)<br />

4360 Precoated Quartz Sands, Zircon<br />

Sands, Chromite Sands, Ceramic<br />

Sands<br />

4370 Moulding Sands for Precision<br />

Casting<br />

4380 Steel Moulding Sands<br />

4390 Synthetic Moulding and Core Sand<br />

09.06. Moulding Sands Testing<br />

4400 Strength Testing Equipment for<br />

Moulding Sand<br />

4410 Moisture Testing Equipment for<br />

Moulding Sand<br />

4420 Moulding Sand Testing Equipment,<br />

in general<br />

4426 Core Gas Meters for Al + Fe<br />

4440 Sand Testing<br />

10 Sand Conditioning and Reclamation<br />

4446 Sand Preparation and<br />

Reclamation<br />

4448 Sand Reclamation System<br />

10.01. Moulding Sand Conditioning<br />

4450 Nozzles for Moistening<br />

4459 Continuous Mixers<br />

4460 Continuous Mixers for Cold-Setting<br />

Sands<br />

4470 Aerators for Moulding Sand<br />

Ready-to-Use<br />

4480 Sand Preparation Plants and<br />

Machines<br />

4490 Sand Mullers<br />

4500 Measuring Instruments for Compactibility,<br />

Shear Strength, and<br />

Deformability<br />

4510 Measuring Instruments for<br />

Mouldability Testing (Moisture,<br />

Density, Temperature)<br />

4520 Mixers<br />

4550 Sand Mixers<br />

4560 Aerators<br />

4567 Vibration Sand Lump Crusher<br />

4568 Vibratory Screens<br />

4570 Sand Precoating Plants<br />

4590 Scales and Weighing Control<br />

10.03. Conditioning of Cold, Warm,<br />

and Hot Coated Sands<br />

4650 Preparation Plants for Resin<br />

Coated Sand<br />

10.04. Sand Reconditioning<br />

4660 Used Sand Preparation Plants<br />

4662 Batch Coolers for Used Sand<br />

4664 Flow Coolers for Used Sand<br />

4670 Magnetic Separators<br />

4690 Core Sand Lump Preparation<br />

Plants<br />

4700 Reclamation Plants for Core Sands<br />

4710 Ball Mills<br />

4720 Sand Coolers<br />

4730 Sand Reclamation Plants<br />

4740 Sand Screens<br />

4760 Separation of Chromite/Silica Sand<br />

10.05. Reclamation of Used Sand<br />

4780 Reclamation Plants, in general<br />

4785 Reclamation Plants,<br />

Chemical-Combined<br />

4790 Reclamation Plants,<br />

Mechanical<br />

4800 Reclamation Plants,<br />

Mechanical/Pneumatic<br />

4810 Reclamation Plants,<br />

Mechanical-Thermal<br />

4820 Reclamation Plants, Mechanical/<br />

Thermal/Mechanical<br />

4830 Reclamation Plants, wet<br />

4840 Reclamation Plants, Thermal<br />

4850 Reclamation Plants,<br />

Thermal-Mechanical<br />

11 Moulding Auxiliaries<br />

4880 Mould Dryers<br />

4890 Foundry Nails, Moulding Pins<br />

4910 Moulders‘ Tools<br />

4920 Mould Hardener<br />

4950 Guide Pins and Bushes<br />

4965 High Temperature Textile Fabrics<br />

up to 1260 °C<br />

4970 Ceramic Pouring Filters<br />

4980 Ceramic Auxiliaries for Investment<br />

Foundries<br />

4990 Ceramic Cores for Investment<br />

Casting - Gunned, Pressed, Drawn<br />

4998 Cope Seals<br />

5000 Core Benches<br />

5007 Core Putty Fillers<br />

5010 Core Wires<br />

5020 Cores (Cold-Box)<br />

5030 Cores (Shell)<br />

5040 Core Boxes<br />

5050 Core Box Dowels<br />

5070 Core Adhesives<br />

5080 Core Loosening Powder<br />

5090 Core Nails<br />

5100 Core Powders<br />

5110 Chaplets<br />

5130 Tubes for Core and Mould Venting<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 65


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

5140 Core Glueing<br />

5150 Core Glueing Machines<br />

5155 Cleaners<br />

5160 Adhesive Pastes<br />

5170 Carbon Dioxide<br />

(CO2 Process)<br />

5180 Carbon Dioxide Dosing<br />

Devices<br />

5210 Coal Dust and Small Coal<br />

5220 Chill Nails<br />

5230 Chill Coils<br />

5240 Antipiping Compounds<br />

5260 Shell Mould Sealers<br />

5270 Mould Dryers, Micro-Wave<br />

5280 Screening Machines<br />

5290 Glass Fabric Filters<br />

5300 Strainer Cores<br />

5310 Release Agents<br />

11.01. Moulding Bay Equipment<br />

5312 Glass Fabric Filters<br />

5314 Strainer Cores<br />

12 Gating and Feeding<br />

5320 Covering Agents<br />

5330 Heating-up Agents<br />

5340 Breaker Cores<br />

5350 Strainer Cores<br />

5360 Exothermic Products<br />

5365 Glass Fabric Filters<br />

5370 Insulating Products and Fibres<br />

5375 Insulating Sleeves<br />

5380 Ceramic Filters<br />

5390 Ceramic Breaker Cores<br />

5400 Exothermic Mini-Feeders<br />

5405 Non-Ceramic Foam Filters<br />

5410 Ceramic Dross Filters<br />

5416 Riser (exothermic)<br />

5418 Riser (insulating)<br />

5420 Exothermic Feeder Sleeves<br />

5430 Exothermic Feeding Compounds<br />

13 Casting Machines and Equipment<br />

5436 Pouring Machines and<br />

Equipment<br />

5437 Casting Machine,<br />

without Heating<br />

13.01. Pouring Furnaces and their<br />

Equipment<br />

5440 Aluminium Dosing Furnaces<br />

5450 Pouring Equipment<br />

5460 Pouring Ladles<br />

5461 Pouring Ladles, Insulating<br />

5468 Pig and Ingot Casting<br />

Machines<br />

5470 Pouring Equipment for Moulding<br />

Plants, Railborn or Crane-operated<br />

5480 Pouring Ladles<br />

5485 Pouring Ladles, Electrically Heated<br />

5490 Drum-Type Ladles<br />

5500 Ingot Casting Machines<br />

5510 Low Pressure Casting<br />

Machine<br />

13.02. Die Casting and<br />

Accessories<br />

5530 Trimming Presses for<br />

Diecastings<br />

5540 Trimming Tools for Diecastings<br />

(Standard Elements)<br />

5545 Exhausting and Filtering Plants for<br />

Diecastings<br />

5550 Ejectors for Diecasting Dies<br />

5560 Ejectors for Diecasting Dies (Manganese<br />

Phosphate Coated)<br />

5570 Feeding, Extraction, Spraying, and<br />

Automatic Trimming for Diecasting<br />

Machines<br />

5580 Trimming Tools<br />

5600 Dosing Devices for<br />

Diecasting Machines<br />

5610 Dosing Furnaces for<br />

Diecasting Machines<br />

5620 Diecasting Dies<br />

5630 Heating and Cooling Devices for<br />

Diecasting Dies<br />

5640 Diecasting Machines<br />

5641 Diecasting Machines and Plants<br />

5644 Diecasting Machines for Rotors<br />

5650 Diecasting Machine Monitoring<br />

and Documentation Systems<br />

5660 Diecasting Coatings<br />

5670 Diecasting Lubricants<br />

5675 Lost Diecasting Cores<br />

5680 Diecasting Parting Agents<br />

5689 Venting Blocks for HPDC Dies<br />

5690 Extraction Robots for<br />

Diecasting Machines<br />

5695 Frames and Holders for<br />

Diecasting Dies<br />

5700 Spraying Equipment for Diecasting<br />

Machines<br />

5710 Goosenecks and Shot Sleeves<br />

5720 Hand Spraying Devices<br />

5730 Heating Cartridges<br />

5740 High-duty Heating Cartridges<br />

5750 Hydraulic Cylinders<br />

5760 Core Pins<br />

5770 Cold Chamber Diecasting Machines<br />

5780 Pistons for Diecasting Machines<br />

5790 Piston Lubricants<br />

5800 Piston Spraying Devices<br />

5810 Mixing Pumps for Parting Agents<br />

5815 Electric Nozzle Heatings<br />

5817 Oil Filters<br />

5820 Melting and Molten Metal Feeding<br />

in Zinc Die Casting Plants<br />

5830 Steel Molds for Diecasting Machines<br />

5838 Heating and Cooling of Dies<br />

5840 Temperature Control Equipment for<br />

Diecasting Dies<br />

5850 Parting Agents for Dies<br />

5860 Parting Agent Spraying Devices for<br />

Diecasting Machines<br />

5865 Dry Lubricants (Beads)<br />

5870 Vacural-Type Plants<br />

5876 Multi-Stage Vacuum Process<br />

5880 Multi-Stage Vacuum Process<br />

5890 Vacuum Die Casting Plants<br />

5900 Hot Working Steel for<br />

Diecasting Dies<br />

5910 Hot Working Steel for Diecasting<br />

Tools<br />

5912 Hot Chamber Diecasting Machines<br />

13.03. Gravity Die Casting<br />

5914 Dosing Devices for Gravity Diecasting<br />

Stations<br />

5920 Permanent Molds<br />

5930 Automatic Permanent Moulding<br />

Machines<br />

5940 Gravity Diecasting Machines<br />

5941 Gravity and High Pressure Diecasting<br />

Automation<br />

5945 Cement and Fillers for Permanent<br />

Moulds up to 1600 °C<br />

5950 Cleaning Devices for Permanent<br />

Molds<br />

5960 Coatings for Permanent Molds<br />

5970 Colloidal Graphite<br />

5975 Chills<br />

5980 Low Pressure Diecasting Machines<br />

13.04. Centrifugal Casting<br />

5990 Centrifugal Casting Machines<br />

13.05. Continuous Casting<br />

6000 Anode Rotary Casting Machines<br />

6001 Length and Speed Measuring,<br />

non-contact, for Continuous<br />

Casting Plants<br />

6002 Thickness and Width Measurement<br />

for Continuous Casting<br />

Plants, non-contact<br />

6006 Casting and Shear Plants for<br />

Copper Anodes<br />

6007 Casting and Rolling Plants for<br />

Copper Wire<br />

6008 Casting and Rolling Plants for<br />

Copper Narrow Strips<br />

6010 Continuous Casting Plant, horizontal,<br />

for Tube Blanks with integrated<br />

Planetary Cross Rolling Mill for the<br />

Production of Tubes<br />

6020 Continuous Casting Moulds<br />

6030 Continuous Casting<br />

Machines and Plants<br />

6032 Continuous Casting, Accessories<br />

6033 Continuous Casting Machines and<br />

Plants (non-ferrous)<br />

13.06. Investment and Precision<br />

Casting<br />

6040 Burning Kilns for Investment<br />

Moulds<br />

6045 Investment Casting Waxes<br />

6050 Embedding Machines for Investment<br />

Casting Moulding Materials<br />

6060 Investment Casting Plants<br />

6062 Centrifugal Investment<br />

Casting Machines<br />

13.07. Full Mould Process Plants<br />

6070 Lost-Foam Pouring Plants<br />

13.08. Auxiliaries, Accessories, and<br />

Consumables<br />

6080 Pouring Manipulators<br />

6090 Slag Machines<br />

6093 Copper Templates<br />

6100 Nozzles, Cooling<br />

66


6110 Electrical and Electronic Control<br />

for Casting Machines<br />

6120 Extraction Devices<br />

6130 Pouring Consumables, in general<br />

6140 Rotary Casting Machines<br />

6150 Pouring Ladle Heaters<br />

6160 Ladle Bails<br />

6170 Stream Inoculation Devices<br />

6175 Graphite Chills<br />

6176 Marking and Identification<br />

6177 Bone Ash (TriCalcium Phosphate)<br />

6190 Long-term Pouring Ladle Coatings<br />

6200 Long-term Lubricants<br />

6210 Manipulators<br />

6220 Ladle Covering Compounds<br />

6240 Robots<br />

6245 Protective Jacket for Robots, Heat<br />

and Dust Resistant<br />

6250 Dosing Devices for Slag Formers<br />

Addition<br />

6270 Silicon Carbide Chills<br />

6280 Silicon Carbide Cooling Compounds<br />

6290 Crucible Coatings<br />

6300 Heat Transfer Fluids<br />

14 Discharging, Cleaning, Finishing of Raw<br />

Castings<br />

6305 Casting Cooling Plants<br />

14.01. Discharging<br />

6330 Knock-out Drums<br />

6340 Vibratory Shake-out Tables<br />

6345 Knock-out Vibratory Conveyors<br />

6346 Shake-out Grids<br />

6347 Shake-out Separation Runners<br />

6350 Decoring Equipment<br />

6352 Discharging of Metal Chips<br />

6360 Hooking<br />

6370 Manipulators<br />

6373 Manipulators for Knock-out Floors<br />

6380 Robots<br />

6390 Vibratory Grids, Hangers, and<br />

Chutes<br />

6400 Vibratory Tables<br />

14.02. Blast Cleaning Plants and<br />

Accessories<br />

6410 Turntable Blasting Fans<br />

6420 Pneumatic Blasting Plants<br />

6430 Automatic Continuous Shot-blasting<br />

plants<br />

6440 Descaling Plants<br />

6445 Spare Parts for Blasting Plants<br />

6450 Hose Blasting Plants, Fans<br />

6460 Hose Blasting Chambers<br />

6470 Monorail Fettling Booths<br />

6475 Efficiency Tuning for Blasting<br />

Plants<br />

6480 Manipulator Shotblast Plants<br />

6485 Tumbling Belt Blasting Plants,<br />

Compressed Air Driven<br />

6490 Wet and Dry Shotblast Plants<br />

6500 Fettling Machines<br />

6530 Airless Blast Cleaning Machines<br />

6540 Blasting Plants Efficiency Tuning<br />

6550 Shot Transport, Pneumatic<br />

6560 Shot-Blasting Plants<br />

6569 Shot Blasting Machines<br />

6570 Shot Blasting Machines, with/<br />

without Compressed Air Operating<br />

6572 Dry Ice Blasting<br />

6574 Dry Ice Production<br />

14.03. Blasts<br />

6580 Aluminium Shots<br />

6590 Wire-Shot<br />

6600 High-Grade Steel Shots<br />

6610 Granulated Chilled Iron, Chilled<br />

Iron Shots<br />

6630 Cast Steel Shots<br />

6640 Stainless Steel Shot<br />

6650 Shot-Blast Glass<br />

6660 Shot-Blast Glass Beads<br />

6670 Blasts<br />

6671 Stainless Steel Abrasives<br />

14.04. Grinding Machines and Accessories<br />

6675 Stainless Steel Grit<br />

6680 Belt Grinders<br />

6685 chamfering machines<br />

6690 Flexible Shafts<br />

6695 Diamond Cutting Wheels for<br />

Castings<br />

6700 Compressed Air Grinders<br />

6710 Fibre discs<br />

6714 Centrifugal Grinders<br />

6720 Vibratory Cleaning Machines and<br />

Plants<br />

6730 Rough Grinding Machines<br />

6735 Abrasive Wheels, visual, with<br />

Flakes/Lamellas<br />

6740 Numerical Controlled Grinders<br />

6750 Swing Grinders<br />

6760 Polishing Machines<br />

6770 Polishing Tools<br />

6773 Precision Cutting Wheels, 0,8 mm<br />

6780 Tumbling Drums<br />

6790 Pipe Grinders<br />

6800 Floor Type Grinders<br />

6810 Grinding Textiles<br />

6820 Emery Paper<br />

6830 Grinding Wheel Dresser<br />

6850 Grinding Wheels and Rough<br />

Grinding Wheels<br />

6855 Grinding Pins<br />

6860 Grinding Fleece<br />

6870 Grinding Tools<br />

6874 Drag Grinding Plants<br />

6880 Rough Grinding Machines<br />

6885 Cutting Wheels<br />

6890 Abrasive Cut-off Machines<br />

6900 Vibratory Cleaning Machines<br />

6910 Angle Grinders<br />

14.05. Additional Cleaning Plants<br />

and Devices<br />

6920 Gate Break-off Wedges<br />

6925 Plants for Casting Finishing<br />

6930 Automation<br />

6940 Pneumatic Hammers<br />

6950 Deflashing Machines<br />

6954 Deburring Machines,<br />

robot-supported<br />

6955 Robot Deburring Systems<br />

6960 Fettling Cabins<br />

6970 Fettling Manipulators<br />

6980 Fettling Benches<br />

6990 Core Deflashing Machines<br />

7000 Chipping Hammers<br />

7010 Dedusting of Fettling Shops<br />

7020 Fettling Hammers<br />

7030 Fettling Shops, Cabins, Cubicles<br />

7035 Refining Plants<br />

7040 Robot Fettling Cubicles<br />

7041 Robot Deflashing Units for Casting<br />

7050 Feeder Break-off Machines<br />

7052 Stamping Deflashing<br />

Equipment (tools, presses)<br />

7055 Break-off Wedges<br />

7056 Cutting and Sawing Plants<br />

7058 Band Saw Blades<br />

7059 Cut-off Saws<br />

7060 Cut-off Saws for Risers and Gates<br />

14.06. Jig Appliances<br />

7066 Magnetic Clamping Devices for<br />

Casting Dies<br />

7068 Core-Slides and Clamping<br />

Elements for Casting Dies<br />

7070 Clamping Devices<br />

14.07. Tribology<br />

7073 Lubricants for High Temperatures<br />

7074 Chain Lubricating Appliances<br />

7075 Cooling Lubricants<br />

7077 Central Lubricating Systems<br />

15 Surface Treatment<br />

7083 Anodizing of Aluminium<br />

7100 Pickling of High Quality Steel<br />

7105 CNC Machining<br />

7110 Paint Spraying Plants<br />

7115 Yellow/Green Chromating<br />

7130 Priming Paints<br />

7140 Casting Sealing<br />

7150 Casting Impregnation<br />

7166 Hard Anodic Coating of Aluminium<br />

7180 High Wear-Resistant Surface<br />

Coating<br />

7190 Impregnation<br />

7198 Impregnation Plants<br />

7200 Impregnating Devices and Accessories<br />

for Porous Castings<br />

7210 Anticorrosion Agents<br />

7220 Corrosion and Wearing Protection<br />

7230 Shot Peening<br />

7232 Wet Varnishing<br />

7234 Surface Treatment<br />

7235 Surface Coatings<br />

7240 Polishing Pastes<br />

7245 Powder Coatings<br />

7250 Repair Metals<br />

7260 Slide Grinding, free of Residues<br />

7290 Quick Repair Spaddle<br />

7292 Special Coatings<br />

7295 Special Adhesives up to 1200 °C<br />

7296 Shot-Blasting<br />

7297 Power Supply, Plasma Generators<br />

7300 Galvanizing Equipment<br />

7302 Zinc Phosphating<br />

7310 Scaling Protection<br />

7312 Subcontracting<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 67


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

16 Welding and Cutting<br />

16.01. Welding Machines and<br />

Devices<br />

7330 Welding Consumables, Electrodes<br />

16.02. Cutting Machines and Torches<br />

7350 Gougers<br />

7352 Special Machines for Machining<br />

7360 Coal/Graphite Electrodes<br />

7365 Water Jet Cutting<br />

7370 Oxygen Core Lances<br />

16.03. Accessories<br />

7394 Protective Blankets, Mats, and<br />

Curtains, made of Fabric, up to<br />

1250 °C<br />

7397 Protective Welding Paste, up to<br />

1400 °C<br />

17 Surface Treatment and Drying<br />

7398 Heat Treatment and Drying<br />

17.01. Plants and Furnaces<br />

7400 Tempering Furnaces<br />

7401 Ageing Furnaces<br />

7402 Combustion Chambers<br />

7404 Baking Ovens for Ceramic Industries<br />

7420 Mould Drying Stoves<br />

7430 Annealing and Hardening Furnaces<br />

7440 Induction Hardening and Heating<br />

Equipment<br />

7450 Core Drying Stoves<br />

7452 Microwave Drying Stoves and<br />

Chambers<br />

7455 Solution Annealing Furnaces<br />

7460 Ladle Dryers<br />

7470 Sand Dryers<br />

7480 Inert Gas Plants<br />

7490 Annealing Furnaces<br />

7500 Drying Stoves and Chambers<br />

7510 Quenching and Tempering Furnaces<br />

7520 Heat Treating Furnaces<br />

7525 Hearth Bogie Type Furnaces<br />

17.02. Components, Accessories,<br />

Operating Materials<br />

7550 Multi-purpose Gas Burners<br />

7560 Heating Equipment, in general<br />

7564 Special Torches<br />

7580 Firing Plants<br />

7590 Gas Torches<br />

7600 Gas Heatings<br />

7610 Capacitors<br />

7616 Furnace Optimization<br />

7620 Oil Burners<br />

7630 Recuperative Burners<br />

7640 Oxygen Burners<br />

7650 Heat Recovery Plants<br />

18 Plant, Transport, Stock, and Handling<br />

Engineering<br />

7654 Lifting Trucks<br />

7656 Transport, Stock, and<br />

Handling Technology<br />

18.01. Continuous Conveyors and<br />

Accessories<br />

7660 Belt Conveyors<br />

7670 Bucket Elevators<br />

7676 Flexible Tubes with Ceramic Wear<br />

Protection<br />

7680 Conveyors, in general<br />

7690 Conveyors, Fully Automatic<br />

7710 Conveyor Belts<br />

7720 Conveyor Belt Ploughss<br />

7730 Conveyor Belt Idlers<br />

7740 Conveyor Chutes<br />

7750 Conveying Tubes<br />

7760 Belt Guides<br />

7780 Overhead Rails<br />

7790 Hot Material Conveyors<br />

7810 Chain Conveyors<br />

7820 Chain Adjusters<br />

7850 Conveyors, Pneumatic<br />

7860 Roller Beds, Roller Conveyor<br />

Tables, Roller Tables<br />

7870 Sand Conveyors<br />

7890 Bulk Material Conveyors<br />

7900 Swing Conveyor Chutes<br />

7910 Elevators<br />

7920 Chip Dryers<br />

7950 Idlers and Guide Rollers<br />

7960 Transport Equipment, in general<br />

7970 Conveyor Screws<br />

7980 Vibratory Motors<br />

7981 Vibration Conveyors<br />

18.02. Cranes, Hoists, and<br />

Accessories<br />

8000 Grippers<br />

8010 Lifting Tables and Platforms<br />

8020 Jacks and Tilters<br />

8030 Operating Platforms, Hydraulic<br />

8032 Hydraulic and Electric Lifting<br />

Trucks<br />

8040 Cranes, in general<br />

8050 Lifting Magnets<br />

8060 Lifting Magnet Equipment<br />

18.03. Vehicles and Transport Containers<br />

8080 Container Parking Systems<br />

8090 Fork Lift Trucks, in general<br />

8100 Fork Lift Trucks for Fluid Transports<br />

8110 Equipment for Melt Transport<br />

18.04. Bunkers, Siloes and<br />

Accessories<br />

8140 Linings<br />

8145 Big-bag Removal Systems<br />

8150 Hopper Discharger and<br />

Discharge Chutes<br />

8160 Hoppers<br />

8170 Conveyor Hoses<br />

8190 Silos<br />

8200 Silo Discharge Equipment<br />

8210 Silo Over-charging Safety Devices<br />

8218 Wearing Protection<br />

8220 Vibrators<br />

18.05. Weighing Systems and Installations<br />

8230 Charging and Charge<br />

Make-up Scales<br />

8240 Metering Scales<br />

8250 Monorail Scales<br />

8260 Crane Weighers<br />

8280 Computerized Prescuption Plants<br />

8290 Scales, in general<br />

18.07. Handling Technology<br />

8320 Manipulators<br />

8340 Industrial Robots<br />

8350 Industrial Robots, Resistant to Rough<br />

8364 Chipping Plants with Robots<br />

18.08. Fluid Mechanics<br />

8365 Pumps<br />

8367 Compressors<br />

18.09. Storage Systems, Marshalling<br />

8368 Marking and Identification<br />

18.10. Components<br />

8374 Marking and Identification<br />

19 Pattern- and Diemaking<br />

19.01. Engines for Patternmaking<br />

and Permanent Mold<br />

8380 Band Sawing Machines for<br />

Patternmaking<br />

8400 CAD/CAM/CAE Systems<br />

8410 CAD Constructions<br />

8420 CAD Standard Element Software<br />

8423 CNC Milling Machines<br />

8425 Automatic CNC Post-Treatment<br />

Milling Machines<br />

8430 CNC Programming Systems<br />

8440 CNC, Copying, Portal and Gantry<br />

Milling Machines<br />

8470 Dosing Equipment and Suction<br />

Casting Machines for the Manufacture<br />

of Prototypes<br />

8480 Electrochemical Discharge Plants<br />

8490 Spark Erosion Plants<br />

8500 Spark Erosion Requirements<br />

8510 Development and Production of<br />

Lost-Foam Machines<br />

8520 Milling Machines for Lost-Foam<br />

Patterns<br />

8522 Hard Metal Alloy Milling Pins<br />

8525 Lost-Foam Glueing Equipment<br />

8527 Patternmaking Machines<br />

8576 Rapid Prototyping<br />

8610 Wax Injection Machines<br />

19.02. Materials, Standard Elements<br />

and Tools for Pattern- and<br />

Diemaking<br />

8630 Thermosetting Plastics for Patternmaking<br />

8650 Toolmaking Accessories<br />

8660 Milling Cutters for Lost-Foam<br />

Patterns<br />

8670 Free-hand Milling Pins made of<br />

Hard Metal Alloys and High-speed<br />

Steels<br />

8675 Hard Metal Alloy Milling Pins<br />

8680 Adhesives for Fabrication<br />

68


8690 Synthetic Resins for Patternmaking<br />

8700 Plastic Plates Foundry and Patternmaking<br />

8705 Lost-Foam Tools and<br />

Patterns<br />

8710 Patternmaking Requirements, in<br />

general<br />

8720 Patternmaking Materials, in general<br />

8730 Pattern Letters, Signs, Type Faces<br />

8740 Pattern Dowels (metallic)<br />

8750 Pattern Resins<br />

8760 Pattern Resin Fillers<br />

8770 Pattern Plaster<br />

8780 Pattern Gillet<br />

8790 Lumber for Patterns<br />

8800 Pattern Varnish<br />

8810 Pattern-Plate Pins<br />

8820 Pattern Spaddles<br />

8830 Standard Elements for Tools and<br />

Dies<br />

8840 Precision-shaping Silicone<br />

8846 Rapid Tooling<br />

19.03. Pattern Appliances<br />

8880 CNC Polystyrol<br />

Patternmaking<br />

8890 Development and Manufacture of<br />

Lost-Foam Patterns<br />

8900 Moulding Equipment<br />

8910 Wood Patterns<br />

8930 Core Box Equipment for Series<br />

Production<br />

8940 Resin Patterns<br />

8960 Metal Patterns<br />

8970 Pattern Equipment, in general<br />

8980 Pattern Plates<br />

8985 Pattern Shop for Lost-Foam<br />

Processes<br />

9000 Stereolithography Patterns<br />

9010 Evaporative Patterns for the Lost-<br />

Foam Process<br />

19.04. Rapid Prototyping<br />

9021 Design<br />

9022 Engineering<br />

9023 Hardware and Software<br />

9024 Complete Investment Casting<br />

Equipment for Rapid<br />

Prototyping<br />

9025 Pattern and Prototype<br />

Making<br />

9026 Rapid Prototyping for the Manufacture<br />

of Investment Casting<br />

Patterns<br />

9027 Integrable Prototypes<br />

9028 Tools<br />

9029 Tooling Machines<br />

20 Control Systems and Automation<br />

20.01. Control and Adjustment Systems<br />

9030 Automation and Control for Sand<br />

Preparation<br />

9040 Automation<br />

9042 Software for Production Planning<br />

and Control<br />

9050 Electric and Electronic Control<br />

9080 Equipment for the Inspection of<br />

Mass Production<br />

9090 Load Check Systems for Recording<br />

and Monitoring Energy Costs<br />

9120 Control Systems and<br />

Automation, in general<br />

9130 Control Systems, in general<br />

9160 Switch and Control Systems<br />

20.02. Measuring and Control<br />

Instruments<br />

9165 Automatic Pouring<br />

9166 Compensation Leads<br />

9185 Contactless Temperature Measurement,<br />

Heat Image Cameras<br />

9190 Leakage Testing and Volume<br />

Measuring Instruments<br />

9210 Flow Meters<br />

9220 Flow control Instruments<br />

9230 Immersion Thermo Couples<br />

9240 Moisture Controller<br />

9250 Level Indicator<br />

9280 Bar Strein Gauge<br />

9301 In-Stream Inoculation Checkers<br />

9302 In-Stream Inoculant Feeder<br />

9306 Calibration and Repair Services<br />

9310 Laser Measurement Techniques<br />

9320 Multi-coordinate Measuring<br />

Machine<br />

9330 Measuring and Controlling Appliances,<br />

in general<br />

9335 Measuring and Controlling Appliances<br />

for Fully Automatic Pouring<br />

9345 Positioning Control<br />

9350 Pyrometers<br />

9370 Radiation Pyrometers<br />

9375 Measuring Systems for Nuclear<br />

Radiation (receiving inspection)<br />

9376 Measuring Systems for Radioactivity,<br />

Incoming Goods‘ Inspection<br />

9380 Temperature Measurement<br />

9382 Temperature Control Units<br />

9385 Molten Metal Level Control<br />

9390 Temperature Measuring and<br />

Control Devices<br />

9391 Thermoregulator<br />

9395 Molten Metal Level Control<br />

9400 Thermal Analysis Equipment<br />

9410 Thermo Couples<br />

9420 Protection Tubes for Thermocouples<br />

9425 In-stream Inoculant Checkers<br />

9430 Heat Measuring Devices<br />

9433 Resistance Thermometers<br />

20.03. Data Acquisition and<br />

Processing<br />

9438 Automation of Production- and<br />

Warehouse-Systems<br />

9440 Data Logging and Communication<br />

9445 Business Intelligence<br />

9450 Data Processing/Software Development<br />

9456 ERP/PPS - Software for Foundries<br />

9470 EDP/IP Information and Data<br />

Processing<br />

9480 Machine Data Logging<br />

9484 Machine Identification<br />

9490 Data Logging Systems<br />

9500 Numerical Solidification Analysis<br />

and Process Simulation<br />

9502 Numerical Solidification Simulation<br />

and Process Optimization<br />

9504 ERP - Software for Foundries<br />

9506 Process Optimization with EDP, Information<br />

Processing for Foundries<br />

9510 Computer Programmes for Foundries<br />

9520 Computer Programmes and Software<br />

for Foundries<br />

9522 Simulation Software<br />

9523 Software for Foundries<br />

9525 Software for Coordinate<br />

Measuring Techniques<br />

9527 Software for Spectographic Analyses<br />

9530 Statistical Process Control<br />

9540 Fault Indicating Systems,<br />

Registration and Documentation<br />

20.04. Process Monitoring<br />

9541 High Speed Video<br />

21 Testing of Materials<br />

21.01. Testing of Materials and<br />

Workpieces<br />

9548 Calibration of Material Testing<br />

Machines<br />

9550 Aluminium Melt Testing<br />

Instruments<br />

9554 Acoustic Materials Testing<br />

9555 Acoustic Construction<br />

Element Testing<br />

9560 CAQ Computer-Aided Quality<br />

Assurance<br />

9564 Image Documentation<br />

9580 Chemical Analyses<br />

9585 Computerized Tomography, CT<br />

9586 Core Gas - System for Measurement<br />

and Condensation<br />

9587 Die Cast Control<br />

9589 Natural Frequency Measuring<br />

9590 Endoscopes<br />

9600 Dye Penetrants<br />

9610 Instruments for<br />

Non-destructive Testing<br />

9620 Hardness Testers<br />

9630 Inside Pressure Testing Facilities<br />

for Pipes and Fittings<br />

9645 Calibration of Material Testing<br />

Machines<br />

9650 Low-temperature Source of<br />

Lighting Current<br />

9670 Arc-baffler<br />

9678 Magna Flux Test Agents<br />

9680 Magnetic Crack Detection Equipment<br />

9690 Material Testing Machines and<br />

Devices<br />

9695 Metallographic and Chemical<br />

Analysis<br />

9696 Microscopic Image Analysis<br />

9697 Surface Analysis<br />

9700 Surface Testing Devices<br />

9710 Testing Institutes<br />

9719 X-ray Film Viewing Equipment and<br />

Densitometers<br />

9720 X-Ray Films<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 69


SUPPLIERS GUIDE<br />

9730 X-Ray Testing Equipment<br />

9740 Spectroscopy<br />

9750 Ultrasonic Testing Equipment<br />

9755 Vacuum Density Testing Equipment<br />

9758 UV-Lamps<br />

9759 UV Shiners<br />

9760 Ultraviolet Crack Detection Plants<br />

9765 Hydrogen Determination Equipment<br />

9770 Material Testing Equipment, in<br />

general<br />

9780 Testing of Materials<br />

9800 Inside Pressure Measuring for<br />

Tools<br />

9836 Devices for Testing of Materials,<br />

non-destructive, in general<br />

9838 NDT Non-destructive Testing of<br />

Materials<br />

9840 NDT X-ray Non-destructive Testing<br />

of Materials<br />

9850 Tensile Testing Machines<br />

22 Analysis Technique and Laboratory Equipment<br />

10000 Sample Preparation Machines<br />

10010 Quantometers<br />

10018 X-Ray Analysis Devices<br />

10020 Spectographic Analysis Devices<br />

10022 Certified Reference Materials for<br />

Spectrochemical and -scopic<br />

Analysis<br />

10040 Cut-off Machines for Metallography<br />

9860 Analyses<br />

9865 Image Analysis<br />

9880 Gas Analysis Appliances<br />

9890 Carbon and Sulphur<br />

Determination Equipment<br />

9900 Laboratory Automation<br />

9910 Laboratory Equipment, Devices,<br />

and Requirements, in general<br />

9920 Laboratory Kilns<br />

9930 Metallographic Laboratory<br />

Equipment<br />

9940 Microscopes<br />

9948 Optical Emission Spectrometers<br />

9950 Microscopic<br />

Low-temperature Illumination<br />

9955 Continuous Hydrogen Measurement<br />

9960 Polishing Machines for Metallography<br />

9970 Sampling Systems<br />

9980 Sample Transport<br />

23 Air Technique and Equipment<br />

23.01. Compressed Air Technique<br />

10050 Compressed Air Plants<br />

10060 Compressed Air Fittings<br />

10070 Compressed Air Tools<br />

10080 Compressors<br />

10100 Compressor Oils<br />

23.02. Fans and Blowers<br />

10120 Fans, in general<br />

23.03. Ventilators<br />

10150 Axial Ventilators<br />

10160 Hot-gas Circulating Ventilators<br />

10170 Radial Ventilators<br />

10180 Ventilators, in general<br />

23.04. Other Air Technique<br />

Equipments<br />

10188 Waste Gas Cleaning<br />

10190 Exhausting Plants<br />

10192 Exhaust Air Cleaning for Cold-Box<br />

Core Shooters<br />

10220 Air-engineering Plants, in general<br />

24 Environmental Protection and Disposal<br />

10230 Environmental Protection and<br />

Disposal<br />

10231 Measures to Optimize Energy<br />

10232 Fume Desulphurization for Boiler<br />

and Sintering Plants<br />

10235 Radiation Protection Equipment<br />

24.01. Dust Cleaning Plants<br />

10240 Extraction Hoods<br />

10258 Pneumatic Industrial Vacuum<br />

Cleaners<br />

10260 Pneumatic Vacuum Cleaners<br />

10270 Equipment for Air Pollution Control<br />

10280 Dust Cleaning Plants, in general<br />

10290 Gas Cleaning Plants<br />

10300 Hot-gas Dry Dust Removal<br />

10309 Industrial Vacuum Cleaners<br />

10310 Industrial Vacuum Cleaners<br />

10320 Leakage Indication Systems for<br />

Filter Plants<br />

10340 Multicyclone Plants<br />

10350 Wet Separators<br />

10360 Wet Dust Removal Plants<br />

10370 Wet Cleaners<br />

10380 Cartridge Filters<br />

10400 Pneumatic Filter Dust Conveyors<br />

by Pressure Vessels<br />

10410 Punctiform Exhausting Plants<br />

10420 Dust Separators<br />

10430 Vacuum Cleaning Plants<br />

10440 Dry Dust Removal Plants<br />

10450 Multi-Cell Separators<br />

10458 Central Vacuum Cleaning Plants<br />

10460 Cyclones<br />

24.02. Filters<br />

10470 Compressed Air Filters<br />

10490 Dedusting Filters<br />

10500 Filters, in general<br />

10510 Filter Gravel<br />

10520 Filter Materials<br />

10530 Filter Bags/Hoses<br />

10550 Fabric Filters<br />

10560 Air Filters<br />

10570 Cartridge Filters<br />

10580 Hose Filters<br />

10585 Electro-Filters<br />

10590 Air Filters<br />

10610 Fabric Filters<br />

24.03. Waste Disposal,<br />

Repreparation, and Utilization<br />

10618 Waste Air Cleaning<br />

10620 Waste Water Analyzers<br />

10630 Waste Water Cleaning and -Plants<br />

10640 Clean-up of Contaminated Site<br />

10646 Used Sands, Analysing of Soils<br />

10650 Waste Sand Reutilization and<br />

Reconditioning<br />

10655 Amine Recycling<br />

10660 Foundry Debris-conditioning Plants<br />

10680 Soil Clean-up<br />

10690 Briquetting Presses<br />

10695 Briquetting of Foundry<br />

Wastes/Filter Dusts<br />

10700 Disposal of Foundry Wastes<br />

10702 Hazardous Waste Disposal<br />

10705 Bleeding Plants<br />

10710 Reconditioning of Foundry Wastes<br />

10720 Ground Water Cleaning<br />

10740 Dross Recovery Plants<br />

10760 Cooling Towers<br />

10770 Cooling Water Processing Plants<br />

10780 Cooling Water Treatment<br />

10810 Post-combustion Plants<br />

10830 Recooling Systems<br />

10840 Recycling of Investment Casting<br />

Waxes<br />

10850 Slag Reconditioning<br />

10870 Waste Water Cooling Towers<br />

10880 Scrap Preparation<br />

10890 Transport and Logistic for Industrial<br />

Wastes<br />

10900 Rentilization of Foundry Wastes<br />

10910 Rentilization of Furnace Dusts and<br />

Sludges<br />

10920 Roll Scale De-oilers<br />

10940 Rentilization of Slide Grinding<br />

Sludges<br />

25 Accident Prevention and Ergonomics<br />

10960 Health and Safety Protection<br />

Products<br />

10970 Asbestos Replacements<br />

10990 Ventilators<br />

10993 Fire Protection Blankets and<br />

Curtains made of Fabrics<br />

10996 Fire-extinguishing Blankets and<br />

Containers<br />

11020 Heat Protection<br />

11025 Heat-Protection Clothes and Gloves<br />

11030 Climatic Measurement Equipment<br />

for Workplace Valuation<br />

11040 Protection against Noise<br />

11050 Light Barriers<br />

11060 Sound-protected Cabins<br />

11070 Sound-protected Equipment and<br />

Parting Walls<br />

11080 Vibration Protection<br />

26 Other Products for Casting Industry<br />

26.01. Plants, Components, and<br />

Materials<br />

11100 Concreting Plants<br />

11102 Devellopping and Optimizing of<br />

Casting Components<br />

11118 Vibration Technology<br />

26.02. Industrial Commodities<br />

11120 Joints, Asbestos-free<br />

70


11125 Sealing and Insulating<br />

Products up to 1260 °C<br />

11130 Dowels<br />

11150 Foundry Materials, in general<br />

11155 Heat-protecting and Insulating<br />

Fabrics up to 1260 °C<br />

11160 Hydraulic Oil, Flame-resistant<br />

11165 Marking and Identification<br />

11170 Signs for Machines<br />

11175 Fire-proof Protection Blankets,<br />

-mats, and -curtains<br />

11180 Screen and Filter Fabrics<br />

26.04. Job Coremaking<br />

11182 Inorganic Processes<br />

11183 Hot Processes<br />

11184 Cold Processes<br />

27 Consulting and Service<br />

11186 Ordered Research<br />

11190 CAD Services<br />

11200 Interpreters<br />

11202 Diecasting, Optimization of Mould<br />

Temperature Control<br />

11205 EDP Consulting<br />

11208 Wage Models<br />

11210 Emission, Immission, and Workplace<br />

Measurements<br />

11211 E-Business<br />

11212 eProcurement<br />

11213 Technical Literature<br />

11215 Investment Casting Engineering<br />

11220 Foundry Consulting<br />

11230 Foundry Legal Advice<br />

11240 Lean Foundry Organization<br />

11250 Foundry Planning<br />

11252 Greenfield Planning<br />

11253 Casting, Construction and Consulting,<br />

Optimizing of Mould Core<br />

Production and Casting Techniques<br />

11260 Nuclear Engineering Consulting<br />

11278 Customer Service for Temperature<br />

Control Units and Systems<br />

11280 Customer Service for<br />

Diecasting Machines<br />

11283 Jobbing Foundry<br />

11286 Efficiency of Material<br />

(Consulting)<br />

11290 Management of Approval<br />

Procedures<br />

11291 Management Consulting<br />

11292 Machining<br />

11293 Metallurgical Consulting<br />

11294 Patinating<br />

11295 Human Resources Services<br />

11296 Personnel Consulting<br />

11298 Process Optimization<br />

11299 Testing Status and Safety Labels<br />

11300 Rationalization<br />

11301 M&A Consulting<br />

11303 Recruitment<br />

11305 Centrifugal Casting Engineering<br />

11310 Simulation Services<br />

11320 Castings Machining<br />

11325 Steel Melting Consulting<br />

11330 Technical Translation and Documentation<br />

11336 Environmental Protection Management<br />

Systems (Environmental<br />

Audits)<br />

11339 Restructuring<br />

11340 Environmental Consulting<br />

11342 Business Consultancy<br />

11343 Leasing of Industrial Vacuum<br />

Cleaners<br />

11345 Heat Treatment<br />

11346 Associations<br />

11360 Material Consulting<br />

11370 Material Advices<br />

11380 Time Studies<br />

11382 Carving<br />

28 Castings<br />

11387 Aluminium Casting<br />

11389 ADI<br />

11390 Aluminium Pressure Diecasting<br />

11400 Aluminium Permanent Moulding<br />

(Gravity Diecasting)<br />

11410 Aluminium Sand Casting<br />

11420 Billet Casting<br />

11430 Cast Carbon Steel, Alloy and<br />

High-alloy Cast Steel<br />

11440 Non-ferrous Metal Gravity Diecasting<br />

11450 Pressure Diecasting<br />

11460 High-grade Investment Cast Steel<br />

11462 High-grade Steel Casting<br />

11470 High-grade Steel Castings<br />

11472 High-grade Centrifugal Cast Steel<br />

11480 Ingot Casting<br />

11485 Castings<br />

11489 Rolled Wire<br />

11490 Grey Cast Iron<br />

11492 Large-size Grey Iron Castings<br />

11496 Direct Chill Casting<br />

11498 Art Casting<br />

11499 Light Metal Casting<br />

11501 Magnesium Pressure<br />

Diecasting<br />

11510 Brass Pressure Diecasting<br />

11520 Non-ferrous Metal Sand Casting<br />

11525 Prototype Casting<br />

11530 Sand Casting SAND CASTING<br />

11539 Centrifugal Casting<br />

11540 Spheroidal Iron<br />

11547 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron<br />

11550 Steel Castings<br />

11552 Continuously Cast Material<br />

11553 Thixoforming<br />

11555 Full Mold (lost-foam) Casting<br />

11558 Rolls<br />

11560 Zinc Pressure Diecasting<br />

11570 Cylinder Pipes and Cylinder Liners<br />

29 By-Products<br />

11580 Sporting Field Sands<br />

30 Data Processing Technology<br />

11700 Mold Filling and Solidification<br />

Simulation<br />

11800 Simulation Programmes for<br />

Foundry Processes<br />

11820 Software for Foundries<br />

31 Foundries<br />

11850 Foundries, in general<br />

31.01. Iron, Steel, and Malleable-Iron<br />

Foundries<br />

11855 Iron Foudries<br />

11856 Steel Foundries<br />

11857 Malleable-Iron Foundries<br />

31.02. NFM Foundries<br />

11860 Heavy Metals Foundries<br />

11861 Die Casting Plants<br />

11862 Light Metal Casting Plants<br />

11863 Permanent Mold Foundry<br />

31 Additive manufacturing / 3-D printing<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 71


<strong>CPT</strong> Titelfond<br />

rund 1<br />

Sicher zum SOP.<br />

Autonomous Engineering mit MAGMA bedeutet<br />

Planungssicherheit für Konstrukteur und Gießer.<br />

Die richtige Lösung von Anfang an.<br />

made by<br />

Committed to casting excellence. www.magmasoft.de<br />

Titelanzeige_GIFA_final.indd 1 18.12.2018 17:03:16<br />

March<br />

<strong>2019</strong><br />

25.- 29. Juni <strong>2019</strong><br />

Düsseldorf<br />

Halle 12 / Stand A20<br />

cpt titel druckformular.indd 2 20.02.<strong>2019</strong> 11:57:12<br />

CASTING<br />

PLANT AND TECHNOLOGY<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

Order form<br />

Our entry:<br />

Company<br />

Street Address – P.O. Box<br />

Postal Code, City<br />

Phone<br />

Fax<br />

Email<br />

Internet<br />

Our entry should be published under the following numbers from the list of headwords:<br />

1.<br />

2.<br />

3.<br />

4.<br />

5.<br />

6.<br />

11.<br />

7.<br />

12.<br />

8.<br />

13.<br />

9.<br />

14.<br />

10. 15.<br />

www.cpt-international.com<br />

1<br />

CASTING<br />

PLANT AND TECHNOLOGY<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

NEW<br />

Design<br />

EXAKT DAS<br />

GEGENTEIL<br />

Circulation:<br />

5,000 copies<br />

Frequency:<br />

4 per annum<br />

Language: English<br />

For further keywords please use a separate sheet.<br />

It‘s possible to add new keywords to the existing list of keywords (appropriate to the main group).<br />

The entries in the Casting Industry Suppliers Guide take place in each case with a term of 12 month until they are canceled.<br />

Discontinuation will be accepted at the end of a subscribtion year considering 6 weeks notice. Deadline is the 15th of each month.<br />

In addition and at no charge: Your entry on the internet on www.keytocasting.com with a link to your homepage and also the<br />

publication of your company logo.<br />

Please send the order formular with your logo (jpg-fi le) to: vanessa.wollstein@dvs-media.info.<br />

Prices<br />

The price of your entry depends on the number of keywords.<br />

Number of keywords<br />

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1 75.00<br />

2 – 5 70.00<br />

6 – 10 65.00<br />

from 11 60.00<br />

* The prices are subject to VAT.<br />

72


INTERNATIONAL FAIRS AND CONGRESSES<br />

Fairs and Congresses<br />

Fenaf <strong>2019</strong> - Latin American Foundry Fair<br />

September, 17-20, <strong>2019</strong>, Sao Paulo, Brazil<br />

www.abifa.org.br<br />

The WFO Technical Forum and 59th IFC<br />

September, 18-20, <strong>2019</strong>, Portoroz, Slovenia<br />

www.drustvo-livarjev.si<br />

Metal+Metallurgy Thailand<br />

September, 18-20, <strong>2019</strong>, Bangkok, Thailand<br />

www.expochina.cn<br />

Die Casting Expo <strong>2019</strong><br />

October, 8-9, <strong>2019</strong>, Queretaro, Mexico<br />

http://diecastingexpo.mx<br />

Aluexpo <strong>2019</strong><br />

October, 10-12, <strong>2019</strong>, Istanbul, Turkey<br />

https://aluexpo.com/Home-En<br />

Foundry on Wheels Congress <strong>2019</strong><br />

October, 17-18, <strong>2019</strong>, Aguenda, Portugal<br />

www.citnm.pt<br />

Advertisers‘ Index<br />

Admar Group, Ocala, FL/USA 21<br />

AGTOS Gesellschaft für technische Oberflächensysteme<br />

mbH, Emsdetten/Germany 27<br />

ExOne GmbH, Gersthofen/Germany 13<br />

Hüttenes-Albertus Chemische Werke GmbH<br />

Düsseldorf/Germany<br />

Back Cover<br />

Kjellberg Vertrieb GmbH,<br />

Finsterwalde/Germany23<br />

Lucky-Winsun Enterprise Ltd.,<br />

Taichung/Taiwan <br />

Inside Front Cover<br />

Luoyang Hongfeng Abrasives Co., Ltd.,<br />

Luoyang/PR China 15<br />

NürnbergMesse GmbH,<br />

Nürnberg/Germany17<br />

O.M.LER S.r.l.,<br />

Bra (CN)/Italy 53<br />

2nd <strong>International</strong> Conference of Casting and<br />

Materials Engineering<br />

November, 8, <strong>2019</strong>, Krakow, Poland<br />

www.iccme.foundry-conference.com<br />

CASTING PLANT & TECHNOLOGY 3/<strong>2019</strong> 73


PREVIEW/IMPRINT<br />

Production of die-casting machines<br />

at Oskar Frech in Plüderhausen<br />

near Stuttgart. Each year around<br />

150 machines are manufactured<br />

here.<br />

Photo: Robert Piterek/BDG<br />

Preview of the next issue<br />

Selection of topics:<br />

R. Piterek: 70 years are not enough<br />

The German Oskar Frech Group will be 70 years old this year. The family-owned company represents the brand “Made in Germany”<br />

with ingenuity and entrepreneurial courage and keeps up in competition with companies with a corporate background.<br />

R. Riedel: Foundry Group pioneers data-driven productivity project<br />

What if analysis of casting could be replaced by real-time process awareness and gives transparency, how multiple global sites are<br />

performing in relation to each other? Questions the German MAT Foundry Group was asking. The Norican Group found a solution.<br />

B. Böndel: The digital cell is a step change for the die-casting industry<br />

The SmartCMS (Smart Cell Management System) by Bühler Die Casting, Uzwil, Switzerland, which is the core of its new digital<br />

cell improves process performance and makes it possible to significantly increase OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness).<br />

Imprint<br />

Publisher:<br />

German Foundry Association<br />

Editor in Chief:<br />

Martin Vogt, Dipl.-Journalist<br />

Deputy Editor in Chief:<br />

Robert Piterek, M.A.<br />

P.O. Box 10 51 44<br />

40042 Düsseldorf, Germany<br />

Telephone: +49 211 6871-358<br />

Telefax: +49 211 6871-365<br />

E-mail: redaktion@bdguss.de<br />

Published by:<br />

DVS Media GmbH<br />

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© <strong>2019</strong> DVS Media GmbH · Düsseldorf<br />

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ISSN 0935-7262<br />

74

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