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The Mountain Times - Volume 48, Number 37: Sept. 11-17, 2019

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MOU NTA I N TI M E S

Volume 48, Number 37 The best things in life are FREE! I flatter myself. Sept. 11-17, 2019

By Robin Alberti

PUG PROM

Pugs stole the show at

the 17th Pug Social in

Killington Sept. 7. Pugs

came dressed in their

best attire and best

costumes.

Page 5

9/11

Wednesday marks

the 18th anniversary

of Sept. 11, when two

hijacked planes intentionally

crashed into

the World Trade Center

and the Pentagon. A

total of 2,743 people

were killed in Lower

Manhattan and 184

were killed in Washington.

Hubbardton

Battle Field will host a

remembrance.

YOGA IN THE PARK

The last in a series of

FREE yoga in the park

classes on the Center

Street Marketplace Park

in Downtown Rutland

is Wednesday, Sept. 11.

Selina Ferrandino will

lead the vinyasa class at

7 p.m. All are welcome!

CALLING INVENTORS

Up to $3 billion in

research funding up

for grabs. Program

managers from federal

agencies that spend

$3 billion in research

grants each year are

coming to Vermont!

Page 5

Diamond Run

Mall to close

By Ed Larson

RUTLAND—The

Diamond Run Mall, which

has seen numerous store

closures over the past

several years, is closing and

reorganizing into a venue

of mixed usages.

A spokesman for the

Zamias Corporation, which

manages the Mall, has said

the company is not sure

when the final closing date

will be but there are firm

indicators that that day is

closing in rapidly.

Old Navy and a few others

have until the end of

October, per their leases, to

KMS debuts first-of-itskind

downhill mountain

bike program

KILLINGTON — Killington Mountain School has

debuted a new downhill mountain bike program, which

started this fall.

“We are the first to offer a full-time, competitive

middle- and high-school level downhill mountain bike

program at the academy and club development levels,”

explained Head

of School Tao

Smith.

The new program

has a dedicated

downhill

coach and

student-athletes

will compete on

vacate.

The repurposing will be

a non-traditional enclosed

mall, if and when it occurs,

according to Zamias.

The mall is currently

owned by an Israeli Investment

Organization, which

backs a New Jersey LLC

which brought Zamias

back into the mall via a

purchase agreement.

Zamias plans to meet

with representatives of Rutland

Town in the very near

future to communicate

plans for redevelopment

possibilities.

Mall closure >

“Being the first to

offer such a program

shows that we are the

most committed to

the sport,”said Smith.

race circuits as a KMS downhill mountain bike team.

“This program will raise the profile of KMS as a leader

in downhill mountain biking and as a committed sports

academy,” said Smith. “Being the first to offer such a program

shows that we are the most committed to the sport.”

KMS trains at Killington Resort located just one mile

from the KMS campus. After a five-year build-out with

Gravity Logic, Killington is now the largest bike park in

the East with 35 miles of downhill mountain biking trails

and further expansions underway. The resort offers a

combination of flow, technical terrain, and jump trails

– all which make Killington an ideal location for KMS’s

youth downhill mountain bike team. Additionally, KMS is

situated in close proximity to the Eastern State’s Cup Race

circuit (the largest Enduro and downhill mountain biking

circuit in the U.S.) as well as World Cup mountain bike

training venues including Windham, Monte Saint Anne,

Tremblant, Mountain Creek, and Burke.

While this program represents a new commitment to

downhill mountain biking, the sport is not new to KMS. Its

students and alumni have become leaders of the growing

sport, competing and winning at elite levels nationwide.

KMS alumni and Pittsfield, Vermont, native Mazie

KMS mtb > 17

After student count mix-up, Rochester,

Stockbridge see ed tax savings

By Katy Savage

A student miscount

in the White River Valley

Supervisory Union has been

resolved with a district-wide

savings of $350,000.

The new homestead

education tax rate is $1.49 for

Rochester residents and $1.6

for Stockbridge residents,

which is slightly lower than

the estimated rates in March

of $1.51 for Rochester and

$1.7 for Stockbridge.

The owner of a $250,000

home can expect to pay

$3,725 in taxes in Rochester

and $4,000 in Stockbridge.

“Everybody is very happy

By Paul Holmes

Spartans descend on Killington, Sept. 14-15

For the eighth year in a row, Spartan men and women will race over obstacles and up and

down Killington’s mountains. Race distances vary from 3-30+ miles with obstacles.

now,” Superintendent Bruce

Labs said.

The White Valley Supervisory

Union spent six weeks

recounting its student population

after the homestead

education tax rate was about

17% higher than expected

for some residents.

Tax fix > 6


2 • LOCAL NEWS

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Courtesy Castleton University

CU cuts ribbon on new resort program

Castleton University celebrated the grand opening of the newly renovated Castleton Lodge at Killington, the residence

hall for students in the university’s new Resort and Hospitality Management Program in partnership with Killington

Resort, on Sept. 5. The new Castleton Lodge was formerly the Butternut Inn, located at 63 Weathervane Drive.

VERMONT YOUTHWORKS

RUTLAND, VT

18 - 24 year olds who have struggled to

find a well paying job.

Earn $2,000 in our 8 - week, part-time

paid program (if you qualify).

Fall Session Starts September 16th!

Dates:

September 16th, 2019 – November 7th, 2019

Days & Times:

Monday – Thursday - 9am - 3pm

Rutland sees shortage of qualified cops

By Ed Larson

The sheriff of Washington County

recently stated that he has had to

turn down some prisoner transport

requests due to a shortage of deputy

sheriffs.

Many departments statewide are

experiencing a shortage of sheriffs,

partly due to the drug epidemic.

Rutland County Sheriff Stephen

Bernard said he currently needs at

least three more full-time deputies

as well as six more part-time deputies.

The problem is finding qualified

personnel.

According to Bernard, there is a

problem that he calls the “what does

it really matter generation.” As the

hiring process begins, candidates

are interviewed and instructed to be

honest and show integrity, he said.

Bernard said that his department

has a stringent hiring policy.

Other factors include disparity in

retirement. One group plan allows

for mandatory retirement at age

50 with 20 or more years of service

while another group plan calls for

mandatory retirement, at age 62,

with 30 or more years of service. The

plans are legislatively mandated

for various functions ranging from

patrol, security, traffic control,

civil process to prisoner transport.

Bernard indicated that the Vermont

Sheriff’s Association has been working

to change that program.

Bernard said he offers the second

highest starting law enforcement

wage in Rutland County, as he had

been losing deputies to other agencies.

Several years ago, the Rutland

County Sheriff’s Department would

receive five or six applications per

month. Now, the department sees

two or three per month.

Bernard said that as of yet, his

agency has not had to turn down

transport requests from the courts

or corrections, as his department

works closely with the Court Clerk’s

Office in Rutland for scheduling.

There have been some changes in

status conferences to accommodate

availability of transport.

He noted that the day after Labor

Day his agency transported six

prisoners to court hearings and is

averaging around nine per day all

week. Some of those transports

come from other state correctional

facilities, such as Springfield rather

than just Marble Valley Regional

Correctional Facility in Rutland.

Qualified cops > 10

Contact: Chrispin White

802-560-4281

cwhite@vtadultlearning.org

KEEP OUR

MOUNTAINS

GREEN!

RECYCLE ME!

Paper recycling supports carbon sequestration!

Asphalt Sealcoating

thedrivewaydoctorsvt.com

(802) 549-4323


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 LOCAL NEWS • 3

New restaurant

comes to Killington

By Katy Savage

Tom Moore remembers when he accidentally got his

first job in Killington as a dishwasher.

Moore, who had long worked in the restaurant industry,

came to Vermont to be a ski bum. One day, he offered to

help the chef of the former Pepper’s when the restaurant

was down a dishwasher. Moore did so well, he was jokingly

put on the schedule.

“I told them, ‘I don’t want a job,’” he said.

But Moore agreed to help just because.

“It was just fun,” he said. “I got to know everybody on the

mountain.”

Moore worked as a server at the Wobbly Barn for 20 years

until last winter. Now, Moore is opening his own restaurant

in Killington.

Hops on the Hill, serving Vermont craft beer, Vermont

cider, wine and locally-sourced pub-style food, is opening

Nov. 1, taking the place of Rutland Beer Works at the Mountain

Green Resort condominium building.

Moore and his business partner Buddy Herron, who

have a combined decades’ worth of experience in restaurants,

wanted to try it themselves.

“It’s nice to do it for ourselves now instead of doing it for

somebody else,” Herron said. “To enjoy it—to enjoy going

to work—is cool.”

Moore and Herron met each other while working as

bartenders/servers at the Rutland Country Club. They’ve

long talked about what they would do if they owned their

own restaurant.

“We both enjoy this stuff,” Herron said. “We like going to

creative restaurants and trying all the beer.”

Moore and Herron are turning the industrial-style

space at Mountain Green, with 86 seats, into their own. Old

bowling seats and a bowling alley turned into a table greet

you at the entrance. The inside has been repainted and the

kitchen has been upgraded as has the artwork and sound

system.

Moore and Herron started working at Rutland Beer

Works last March for the owner Dale Patterson, who also

owns Hop’n Moose in Rutland.

Patterson, a friend of theirs and longtime member of

Rutland Country Club, needed help running the restaurant

Hops> 6

Submitted

The Diamond Run Mall in Rutland Town seen from above.

Mall closure: Diamond Run to close

>

from page 1

The mall still pays impact fees to the City of Rutland

under the Act 250 permit it acquired when the mall was

originally built. The fees were originally $100,000 per

year, but were decreased with the loss of its three anchor

stores. The impact of the mall’s closure on the remaining

impact fees is undetermined.

Thus far, s everal small businesses departed after being

advised of eviction for failure to pay rent. They stated

the mall used to work with them during slow periods but

would no longer do so.

At least one business, Mountain Man Music, is moving

into downtown Rutland City. A private city business

group is actively recruiting the remaining mall stores to

potentially move into downtown Rutland City.


4 • LOCAL NEWS

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Fly to Boston.

Connect to the world.

Depart from Rutland, VT, and easily connect

to over 500 flights and 100 additional

markets from Cape Air’s hub in Boston.

With free parking in Rutland, all you have to

do is sit back and enjoy the ride.

Rutland City Parks department seeks

to lease vacant CSJ gym

By Ed Larson

The Rutland City Recreation and Parks

Department is proposing to lease the

gymnasium at the former College of St.

Joseph in Rutland.

That proposal from Recreation &

Parks Director Kim Peters went to committee

to discuss and report back to the

full Board of Aldermen.

There may be one drawback to the

proposal, which also requests $20,000

from the city Zamias Fund to help pay

for the first year of a three-year lease

proposal.

City Assessor Barry Keefe said that if

the college leases the gymnasium to the

city, it then becomes a taxable property.

Keefe based his determination on Vermont

statutes dealing with the leasing of

tax exempt property or even if the lessee

is a tax exempt entity.

There is no differentiation between

lease and rent,” Keefe said.

The current assessed value of the gymnasium

is $2,558,800. Overall, the college

property is valued at over $15 million

and if there is no change in the current

status on April 1, 2020 the entire property

becomes taxable on the grand list.

The Vermont State Tax Department

also agreed that if the status of the college

does not change by April 1, 2020 the full

value becomes taxable at both the state

education tax and municipal tax levels.

The long time city assessor indicates

that it has been a long time since Rutland

City has seen a $16 million jump in the

grand list.

Keefe stated that he has made it

known that on April 1, 2020 he will do his

job.

PICO SKI CLUB’S ANNUAL

SKI & SNOWBOARD SALE

FRI. OCT. 4: 5 - 9 p.m.

SAT. OCT. 5: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

SUN. OCT. 6: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Credit Cards Accepted

Rutland

Enjoy the ride.

Boston

Block Island

CONSIGNMENT DROP-OFF DATES

PLEASE VISIT WWW.PICOSKICLUB.COM/SWAP TO REGISTER

PICO RETAIL SHOP

Saturday, Sept. 28: from 3-5 p.m.

Sunday, Sept. 29: from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Wednesday, Oct. 2: from 4-6 p.m.

PICO BASE LODGE

SNOWSPORTS ROOM

Thursday, Oct. 3: from 4-6 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 4: from 11 a.m. - 9 p.m

Consignment of modern alpine, snowboard, telemark & skinning /

AT equipment (no traditional XC skis), and gently used, clean, ski,

snowboard and athletic winter clothing (no street clothing please).

All equipment must meet current safety standards.

FRIDAY OCT. 4

5 - 9PM

Pico Base Lodge Courtyard

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PICO BASE LODGE PICO MOUNTAIN RESORT ROUTE 4


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 LOCAL NEWS • 5

By Robin Alberti

Pugs’ party

On Saturday, Sept. 7 Green Mountain Pug Rescue held its

17th annual Pug Social on the Sherburne Library field

in Killington. Participants played pug games, entered

contests, paraded in costume and enjoyed the day.

Board mulls school ‘moisture’ issue

By Curt Peterson

The future of The Prosper Valley

School, which has been closed due

to moisture/mold issues for a year,

drew a sizeable contingent from

Pomfret at the Windsor Central

district’s board meeting, Sept. 9.

Prosper Valley elementary students

have been attending Woodstock

Elementary School while

engineers have studied and

tested various strategies for

mitigating moisture and mold

in their closed school.

“I want to be very clear,”

district board chair Paige

Hiller said, “there will be no

vote tonight.”

She called the discussion for “information

gathering only” including

comments from the public.

District Finance and Operations

Manager Richard Seaman said the

estimated cost to make the building

safe and healthy for students and

staff approaches $570,000, which

Seaman called a “ballpark figure.”

No bids or estimates have been

obtained.

Funding could come from a bond

issue, redeemable for over 10 years,

Seaman said, which would raise

tax rates throughout the district by

about a half a cent over the payback

period. If the entire cost was

included in one year’s budget, he

estimated the effect on the tax rate

would be about five cents.

Superintendent Mary Beth Banos

emphasized that Prosper Valley is

considered a very valuable asset

for the district and all efforts will

be made to get it back in service to

students.

Buildings and Grounds Manager

Joe Rigoli explained the historic

moisture and mold problems,

saying a $25,000 engineering study

The building creates pressure

underneath that “forces” the

moisture into the vacuum in

the interior space above.

determined there is no “water

source” from which the moisturecaused

problems — including

recurring damage to floor coverings

and tile, delamination of cabinets

and shelving, and significant mold

infestations — could be originating.

Instead, Rigoli said, naturally-produced

moisture is being “wicked”

through a sand underlayer, through

the concrete building slab and into

the building. The building creates

pressure underneath that “forces”

the moisture into the vacuum in the

interior space above.

Mitigation, Rigoli said, would

include sufficient air dehumidifying

equipment, improved drainage,

roof modifications, regrading

and removal of landscaping and

interior materials and treatments

that resist moisture accumulation.

He described various degrees of investment

ranging from $130,000 to

$570,000 and thinks the work could

be completed within six to eight

months once it started.

Asked how certain he was that

the proposed measures would be

successful, Rigoli said, “90%.”

Annual electric bills for the

school were $18,000 when it

was open, Seaman said, and

with the heavy-duty dehumidifying

system Rigoli estimated

costs could be two or three

times that amount, which

might be offset with a solar

installation.

Pomfret resident and former

School Board member Seth Westbrook

suggested the roof might

actually be the water source the

engineering firm failed to identify,

running down to the foundation,

then being sucked by interior

vacuum to the center of the building,

where monitors have shown

it accumulates, then wicked up

through the concrete.

Deanna Jones, also from Pomfret,

said it would be important to know

how the district will use Prosper Valley

when renovated before taxpayers

are asked to vote on spending

the required funds.

The district board will study

Rigoli’s and Seaman’s reports, take

public input into consideration and

decide on the best next action.

Table of contents

Local News ................................................................ 2

State News ................................................................. 7

Opinion ..................................................................... 8

News Briefs ............................................................. 10

Calendar .................................................................. 12

Music Scene ............................................................ 16

Spartan Event ......................................................... 18

Living ADE .............................................................. 28

Food Matters ........................................................... 32

Pets .......................................................................... 36

Mother of the Skye .................................................. 37

Columns .................................................................. 38

Service Directory .................................................... 40

Switching Gears ...................................................... 41

Classifieds ............................................................... 44

Real Estate ............................................................... 46

MOU NTA I N TI M E S

is a community newspaper covering Central

Vermont that aims to engage and inform as well as

empower community members to have a voice.

Polly Lynn-Mikula

Jason Mikula

Lindsey Rogers

Katy Savage

Krista Johnston

Curtis Harrington

Julia Purdy

Curt Peterson

Cal Garrison

Dom Cioffi

Editor & Co-Publisher

Sales Manager & Co-Publisher

Sales Representative

Assistant Editor/Reporter

Graphic Designer

Distribution Manager

Mary Ellen Shaw

Paul Holmes

Kevin Theissen

Kyle Finneron

Flag photo by Richard Podlesney

©The Mountain Times 2019

The Mountain Times • P.O. Box 183

Killington, VT 05751 • (802) 422-2399

Email: editor@mountaintimes.info

mountaintimes.info

Dave Hoffenberg

Robin Alberti

Gary Salmon

Ed Larson


6 • STATE NEWS

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Attorney General pushes

efforts to stop robocalls

Attorney General Donovan, Sept. 5, urged the Federal

Communications Commission (FCC) to encourage telecom

companies to implement call blocking and call authentication

solutions that would protect consumers from

illegal robocalls and spoofing. The letter to the FCC comes

after Attorney General Donovan and a bipartisan, publicprivate

coalition of 50 attorneys general and 12 phone

companies announced a set of anti-robocall principles to

fight illegal robocalls.

“Last week we took a step toward ensuring that phone

companies will do more to help Vermonters answer their

phones without annoyance or fear of fraud by implementing

anti-robocall strategies,” said Attorney General

Donovan. “Today we are calling on the FCC to do its part to

protect consumers and put a stop to illegal robocalls.”

In their comments to the FCC, the coalition of attorneys

general state that all telecom providers should:

• Offer free, automatic call-blocking services to all

customers. Such technology should prevent illegal

robocalls while still allowing emergency alerts and

automated calls that customers have signed up for.

• Monitor network traffic to identify patterns consistent

with robocalls and take action to cut off the

calls or notify law enforcement.

• Implement the STIR/SHAKEN call authentication

technology to help ensure that telephone calls are

originating from secure, verified numbers.

• Develop caller ID authentication to prevent robocalls

to landline telephones to reduce the risk of

scams affecting elderly consumers.

Many of these actions are also covered in the Anti-Robocall

Principles, a set of eight principles focused on addressing

illegal robocalls through prevention and enforcement

that were announced last week. Twelve phone companies,

including Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint, have

already signed on to the principles.

Tax fix: Student recount prompts school tax revision

>

from page 1

Superintendent Bruce

Labs said he thought they

had 179 equalized pupils

in the district. The state

estimated the district had

170 students.

“We couldn’t have

lost nine kids over five

months,” Labs said. “We

had to basically prove to

them that it wasn’t 170.”

Administrators

reviewed three years of

Hops: Hops on the Hill replaces Rutland Beer Works

>

enrollment data. “We literally

went through each

student one by one and

where they lived,” Labs

said.

When the recount was

done, the supervisory

union ended up with 181.5

equalized pupils.

Labs said his staff found

two Rochester students

were tuition students in

other towns that weren’t

from page 3

and asked Moore to buy it last winter. Moore instead offered

to run the restaurant for Patterson. Moore officially

signed a lease Aug. 1 this year after deciding last season

that he wanted to turn the restaurant into his own.

“A lot of people have said to us ,‘You’re crazy, it’s been so

many things,’” Moore said.

Many businesses have failed at that location and

Moore joked that the basement of the restaurant is like a

graveyard filled with pieces the old restaurant owners left

behind.

Moore hopes his years of experience combined with

high-quality food make the restaurant a success.

“We want to give people who are visiting Killington a

true Vermont experience,” Moore said.

Their 10-person staff will consist of friends and family.

Steve Campbell, the former chef at Harpoon Brewery, is

joining them with a menu of pub-style food with a local

twist. “I do see it as a viable business going year-round

with all the work Killington has done with the year-round

business we have,” Moore said.

accounted for in previous

enrollment counts.

Town clerks in Rochester

and Stockbridge said

those that paid their taxes

already will be credited

on their next quarterly tax

bill. Those that paid in full

will be reimbursed.

“We’re shooting for as

quickly as possible but it

will take some work to get

those tax bills re-issued,”

Stockbridge Town Clerk

Lori Scott said.

Agency of Education

Director of Communications

and Legislative

Affairs Ted Fisher said the

agency relies on supervisory

unions to inform

them of incorrect taxes.

Fisher said no other

adjustments have been

made to tax rates in other

communities so far.

By Katy Savage

Tom Moore and Buddy Herron plan to open Hops on the

Hill in Killington on Nov. 1.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 STATE NEWS • 7

$3B in research funding up for grabs at inventors’ event

By Anne Wallace Allen/VTDigger

The federal agencies

that spend $3 billion each

year in research grants are

visiting Vermont for the first

time Monday, Sept. 16, to

introduce themselves to

local entrepreneurs.

Program managers from

11 large agencies including

the Department of Energy,

Department of Defense

and the National Institutes

of Health will sit down individually

with Vermont entrepreneurs

at a University

of Vermont event to hear

about their work and help

them assess whether they

are candidates for grants

that could help them turn

their ideas into businesses.

In the past, these Small

Business Innovation

Research (SBIR) grants

have helped Vermont

companies move from an

idea to commercialization.

David Bradbury, executive

director of Vermont Center

for Emerging Technologies,

or VCET, estimated that

businesses associated with

VCET have won $7 million

or $8 million in SBIR

grants over the last several

years. Many more Vermont

companies could apply for

the 5,000 annual awards,

he said.

“If you think about the

breadth of what the federal

government wants to solve

around climate, health

care, defense, food systems,

virtually any company that

isn’t a pure retail operation

may find relevance there,”

said Bradbury, who will

speak on a panel discussion

after the event.

Creative Microsystems

Corp., which makes augmented

reality displays, has

won between $8 million

and $10 million in SBIR

grants over the years, said

co-founder Bill Parker. The

Waitsfield company, which

has 26 employees, has long

worked with the Navy and

other federal agencies,

and is now getting ready to

commercialize its technology

for the first responder

market.

Creative Microsystems

received its first SBIR grant

in the 1990s; it has won

about 15 of the grants since,

said Parker. The money

enabled the company to

continue doing research.

“It was critical, because

it gave us the freedom to

step outside of our commercial

work and do things

that were interesting where

we didn’t have a product

yet, and didn’t have a way to

generate revenue,” Parker

said. “It allowed us to come

up with a proposal of how

we would provide it to the

government as a customer,

and that’s a leverage piece

that’s very important. The

time that it takes to do this

work costs money.”

Other Vermont companies

that have won SBIR

funding include BioTek

Instruments, Inc. in Winooski,

Green Mountain

Semiconductor and Packetized

Energy in Burlington,

GreenSea Systems, Inc.

in Richmond, Benchmark

Space Systems in South

Burlington, Healthy Design

Ltd. Co. in Rutland County,

and Concepts NREC in

White River Junction. SBIR

publishes a full list of the

awardees on its website,

sbir.gov.

Courtesy of VCET

David Bradbury is the executive director of

Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies.

The Sept. 16 SBIR Road

Tour is a rare opportunity

for people in Vermont to

speak directly with the program

managers. Normally

the SBIR tour visits large

cities; it has never visited

Vermont, said Darcy Carter,

director of the U.S. Small

Business Administration’s

Vermont office — and that’s

reflected in the relatively

low number of SBIR grants

to Vermont companies.

In a face-to-face meeting,

Carter said, entrepreneurs

can find out more

about what the federal

agencies need.

“You can be someone

who doesn’t even have a

business yet, but you have

an idea,” she said. “Based

on your skill set and what

interests you, how you can

do some match-making

with these agencies and

what they are looking for.”

The SBA’s Small Business

Development Center is

working with the multitude

of local entities that

exist to help entrepreneurs

commercialize their ideas,

including UVM Innovations,

the state Agency of

Commerce and Community

Development, Vermont

Technology Council, VCET,

the Vermont Technology Alliance,

Generator Makerspace,

Vermont EPSCoR,

LaunchVT and others.

“Everyone is trying to

refer people to the best

resources to get to the next

step,” Carter said. “There

have been plenty of awards

given in Vermont, but

there’s a lot more opportunity

out there.”

In 2016 – the last year

that SBIR posted its annual

report online – 11 federal

agencies awarded $2.6

billion to small businesses

through SBIR and STTR,

the federal government’s

small business technology

transfer program.

The grants are known as

Vt. inventors > 10

Being Pain-Free Has Made

a Huge Difference For Me

“Now I can walk with confidence. I can garden,

play with my dogs, take care of my pigs. These

procedures have been almost life-changing in giving

me the opportunity to do the things that I like to do

without pain. My care at Rutland Regional Medical

Center was excellent. They were kind, considerate

and respectful. I highly recommend them.”

Amanda Bodell, Waltham, Vermont

Watch Amanda’s video at http://bit.ly/RRMCPatientStories

160 Allen Street, Rutland, VT | www.RRMC.org | 802.775.7111

3 Albert Cree Drive, Rutland, VT

802.775.2937

www.vermontorthoclinic.org


Opinion

8 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

OP-ED

Time to pass

more gun laws

By Clai Lasher-Sommers

Another series of mass shootings—this time in

Dayton, El Paso, Mobile and Odessa—ushered in the

expected “thoughts and prayers” from elected officials

across the nation. Forty people were killed and

73 more were injured over the span of just a few weeks

in those four shootings alone. The usual, performative

hand wringing began, and quickly subsided. Gun

violence prevention was discussed only as far as it was

politically expedient and not a second longer.

Once again, we are burying the dead, nursing the

wounded, and trying to comfort the living. Once

again we are fully equipped with the solution, yet held

hostage by the gun lobby. What is abundantly clear is

that we cannot expect leadership from Washington to

tackle the issue of gun violence.

Thankfully though, Vermont leaders have, at times,

shown a willingness to stand up to the corporate gun

lobby. The year 2018 saw a suite of common-sense

gun violence prevention measures passed through

the legislature and signed by our governor.

In contrast, this past year was an incredible disappointment

as Gov. Phil Scott suddenly fell back in line

with the corporate gun lobby, vetoing a waiting period

bill that the data shows would save lives. I know the

Gun laws > 9

LETTERS

In support of student-led climate

change strikes

Dear Editor,

Greta Thunberg is a

Swedish schoolgirl who

has autism; she tends

to see things as black or

white. At 11 years old, she

learned what climate scientists

predicted for our

planet if society did not

drastically reduce greenhouse

gas emissions; she

became depressed, took

to bed and refused to eat.

By age 15, Greta was back

at school but skipped

classes every Friday to sit

in front of the Swedish

Parliament with a sign that

read, “Strike for Climate.”

She knew that the survival

of human civilization depended

on the world’s

leaders taking bold action

to address climate change.

And she knew that her

generation would be the

first one to live with the

dire consequences of doing

nothing.

Over the past year,

thousands of other school

children around the

world followed Greta’s

example and began to skip

school to demonstrate

their frustration with the

lack of commitment to

address climate change.

Concerned students

from around the world

are organizing massive

demonstrations in over

100 countries to try to

convince political leaders

to take action now—before

it is too late. The

students chose Sept 20-27

as a week of action, and

have asked for adults to

join them.

In response to their

plea, a rally is planned for

Friday, Sept. 20, starting at

11 a.m. at the Manchester

Town Green, near the

roundabout in the middle

of town. It is vital that as

many adults as possible

show up on Sept. 20 as

a visible sign of support

for our youth. Climate

scientists are in agreement:

global warming,

with the resultant sea

level rise and changes

in weather patterns that

are occurring around the

world, pose an existential

threat to civilization. The

science is crystal clear.

These changes are the

result of human activity;

the changes are accelerating;

and we must act NOW

to have any chance of

stopping the worst-case

scenarios. The good news

is, we have the knowledge

and technology to reverse

Strike > 9

You’re small in the grand

scheme of things

Dear Editor,

Being the invisibly

small creatures we are, the

anthropocentric egotism

of humankind seems

ridiculously out of proportion

to our place in the

cosmos. We are dots on a

dot in a dot.

We are

dots on a

dot in a

dot. And,

dots don’t

matter.

And, dots

don’t matter.

In a universe

of unfathomable

gigantism,

dots

only matter

when they

clump together.

Individual dots are

expendable. You wouldn’t

see a dot or even miss it.

The weight and volume

of the universe is characterized

by four distinct

basic elements: clusters,

filaments, sheets and

voids. And, the voids get

the last word in the sizingup

game. What the empty

voids lack in weight they

make up for it in volume,

taking up most of the space

in the universe. Moreover,

voids are like traffic cops,

they have a strong influence

on how and where

galaxies move and go.

Astronomers estimate

there are a trillion suns in

our galaxy we call the Milky

Way, which is 100,000 lightyears

wide. Our sun is one

of them. But with billions,

maybe trillions of galaxies

in the universe, poor little

humans reach a point of

true insignificance under

this one sun, on this one

planet, aptly

named by the

renowned

astronomer,

Carl Sagan,

the “blue dot.”

Humans so

thoroughly

vanish into

the big picture,

you’d have to wonder

what all the fuss is about.

So the next time you’re

feeling full of yourself,

thinking you’re special

or better than others, go

outside to stand under that

fuzzy band of light in the

night sky. Just remember,

as you look up in awe at

the vastness above you,

in the scheme of things,

you’re merely a little bony

but tasty morsel to a big

black bear. But be comforted

in knowing that in a

few digestive hours inside

the bear you’ll once again

soon be part of the basic

molecular elements from

whence you came.

Vidda Crochetta,

Brattleboro

What price, progress?

Dear Editor,

“What song do you play

for a highway?” commenter

Colleen Goodhue

asks in her column, “Top

to Bottom,” in the Times

Argus-Rutland Herald

Sept. 7-9.

A common answer

among long-time and

lifelong Vermonters might

be: a dirge for a way of life

changed forever.

Goodhue gives the

story of the building of Interstate

89 as told through

eyewitness accounts and

memories of those who

worked on it, business

owners, and landowners

in the path of the massive

divided highway. Most of

By RJ Matson

her story is set in central

Vermont as the final segment

was completed in

Montpelier in 1970.

The tone is one of excitement

and triumph of

Progress, linking Highgate

to Southern New England

with a seamless ribbon of

asphalt, setting the stage

for Chittenden and Franklin

counties’ boom. Jobs!

Commute times cut in

half! No more traffic lights

and bad roads! Tourism!

Growth!

All these benefits of the

interstate were touted and

still are. Newcomers, commuters

and travelers laud

I-89 because the highway

Progress > 47

Where have all the leaders gone?

Dear Editor,

As we look around at

today’s landscape it is easy

to question “where have

all the leaders gone?”

Effective leadership

seems to be absent on

every front and it appears

that things are not about

to get better any time

soon.

When I speak of leadership

I have a very simple

definition: It is the “influence

of others.” A very

simple definition, which

most folks don’t seem to

realize.

In essence, we are

all leaders in some way,

shape or form, whether

we are: Husbands or

wives, fathers on mothers,

housewives or house

husbands. Whether we are

farmers or farmworkers,

student, teacher or principal,

factory worker or factory

manager, bank teller

Leaders > 9


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 CAPITOL QUOTES • 9

CAPITOL QUOTES

The DMV should not use its trove of

personal information as a tool to make

money. Nobody—from agencies like the

DMV to large corporations like Facebook

and Google—should be profiting from

sharing or selling personal information

without meaningful consent,”

Said Sen. Bernie Sanders Sept. 9.

“It’s not just the blatant, selfserving

lies, it’s the blatant, selfserving

corruption. This is why

the founders included an anticorruption

Emoluments Clause in

the Constitution. And this is why I

joined a lawsuit to enforce it,”

Said Sen. Patrick Leahy Sep. 10.

>

global warming and mitigate

the worst of climate

change. We can save the

future for our children

and grandchildren. BUT

WE’RE NOT DOING IT!

That’s why Greta

Thunberg and thousands

of other school children

are striking. That’s why

>

Leaders: Leadership is not a one-way street

from page 8

of bank vice president, order to be fully successful

patient, nurse or doctor, in life.

citizen voter or politician,

As we look at today’s

church member or social environment it is

minister.

abundantly evident that

We are all leaders because

not enough folks actu-

we influence those ally try to create effective

around us — either positively

relationships. We selfishly

or negatively. Most push our own agenda

of us don’t realize that we without proper regard and

actually occupy such an consideration of those

important or influential around us.

position in our relationships

The keys to any ef-

with others. Nor do fective relationship are

we actually think about respecting viewpoints and

how we as leaders can beliefs of others and the

positively influence the ability to communicate

thought, words and deeds respectfully with others.

of others.

This doesn’t mean that

The very basic skills we have to agree with the

for effective leadership other person’s viewpoints

include the ability to build or beliefs, but we must

and maintain effective respectfully seek to understand

relationships with others.

their point of view.

This skill is imperative for Unfortunately it appears

any individual to master in

that folks believe

Strike: Support upcoming climate strike in Manchester

from page 8

adults in Manchester and

around the country and

globe are supporting the

student strikes. The problem

is not technological;

the problem is a lack of

political will.

The strike organizers

know that nothing will be

done unless and until political

leaders see that the

populace cares about the

issue of climate change.

Carl Bucholt,

Manchester

Bucholt is a member of

Transition Town Manchester

and Earth Matters,

two local environmental

groups.

that the one who shouts

the loudest is right. Or the

one who can belittle the

other is right.

We don’t actively think

about how our thought,

words, deeds and behavior

impact those with

whom we live, work, worship,

golf, attend meetings

or just communicate in

general.

Each of us must understand

this leadership role

and deliberately reflect on

our current leadership’s

impact and how we actually

would like to influence

others.

We have a responsibility

to those around us to

continuously improve our

own leadership knowledge,

style and ability.

Richard Tanhauser,

Shoreham

Diana and I had a great time walking

in the Pride Parade today. Vermont

and the Scott Administration support

LQBTQ+ rights and accept all in the

Green Mountain State,”

Said Gov. Phil Scott Sept. 8

“One of the greatest and most powerful

weapons used by the fake and corrupt

news media is the phony polling

information they put out. Many of

these polls are fixed, or worked in such

a way that a certain candidate will look

good or bad. Internal polling looks

great, the best ever!”

Said President Donald Trump Sept. 10.

>

Gun laws: Close the ‘Charleston Loophole’

from page 8

governor values the lives of Vermonters.

My hope is that he will come back

in 2020 ready to buck the gun lobby

and do right by his constituents. The

Legislature has shown great tenacity

and I applaud their

outspoken commitment

to passing gun

violence reforms

when they return

to the state house

in January. Hopefully

this time the

governor will do the

right thing—sign

gun safety legislation and save lives.

Passing a 72-hour waiting period

to purchase any gun and closing the

Charleston Loophole are two meaningful

steps that Vermont legislators

should take when they return to the

State House in January that would make

our state and country a safer place.

While many are no doubt familiar with

the concept of waiting periods, the

Charleston Loophole remains relatively

obscure. Under current law, people who

buy a gun from a licensed dealer have

to go through a background check. The

FBI has up to three days to complete

this check. But if it doesn’t complete

Thankfully though,

Vermont leaders

have, at times,

shown a willingness

to stand up to the

corporate gun lobby.

the check during this time period, gun

dealers are allowed to sell the firearm

anyway. This loophole allowed a white

supremacist to purchase the gun he

used to kill nine people at a black

church in Charleston,

South Carolina

in 2015.

We all know what

we have to do, but

to do it our leaders

must show courage

and listen to the

majority of Vermonters

rather than

the gun lobby. Because the majority of

Vermonters want gun safety legislation.

Poll after poll backs this up.

Vermonters, like Americans everywhere,

have had enough. Enough of

the fear, the bloodshed, the dead, the

wounded and the excuses. We want our

children, our family and our neighbors

to live without fear of being shot. We

want to continue the great tradition

Vermont has of leading the country,

of being brave in the face of adversity,

and of choosing our people over special

interests.

Clai Lasher-Sommers is the executive

director of GunSense Vermont.


10 • NEWS BRIEFS

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Vt. inventors: Invited to meet granting agencies

from page 7

>

non-dilutive capital, meaning they aren’t a

loan and the grantors do not take an equity

position in the company.

SBIR grants are awarded in two phases,

with the first phase a smaller amount, usually

about $150,000, and the second phase

from $750,000 to $1 million.

For Creative

Microsystems, the

first $75,000 grant

in the mid-1990s

enabled Parker

and his wife, Julie

Parker, who is the

co-founder, to

develop an early

idea.

“We already had a pretty good idea of

what we needed to do; we just didn’t have

the freedom or the funds to do it on our

own,” said Parker. “We put together a prototype,

and it got picked up by the technical

press, and that led to additional support

from NASA, and that went on to put us into

visibility.”

Creative Microsystems has since won

contracts with the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines,

Air Force, U.S. Special Operations

Command and NASA.

SBIR grants are competitive, and the application

process is long and complex; Parker

said it takes his company about a month

to write a Phase II proposal. And applicants

might wait nine months or more to find out

if they were awarded a grant. The state, the

feds, and various local partners used to pay

SBIR grants are awarded in

two phases, with the first

phase a smaller amount,

usually about $150,000,

and the second phase from

$750,000 to $1 million.

for a commercialization advisor that helped

companies apply for SBIR grants, but the

position was eliminated, said Bradbury.

He’d like to see the position restored.

“It takes some skill and nuance to know

how to speak with a program manager and

learn some of the specifics of the application,”

he said. “It

really isn’t easy for a

generalist or a firsttime

entrepreneur

to understand and

be really competitive

with their

application.”

That said,

Bradbury sees the

Sept. 16 event as a valuable opportunity for

Vermont entrepreneurs.

“We’re recommending it to all of our

contacts, and we worked with 259 companies

last year,” he said.

This year’s Northeast SBIR tour is also

aimed at entrepreneurs in Maine, New

Hampshire, New York and Massachusetts.

It runs from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 16 at the

University of Vermont’s Dudley H. Davis

Center.

They’re very approachable,” said Carter

of the program managers. “They are really

making that effort to make sure womenowned

businesses, minority owned businesses

are going after these opportunities.

That’s their mission: To pay attention to

small businesses. A lot of innovation starts

with the smallest businesses.”

Rutland woman arrested after crashing

into Toyota dealership, fleeing scene

A Rutland woman was arrested after

she allegedly struck three new vehicles at

the Alderman Toyota dealership in Rutland,

Sept. 2, police said.

Stephanie Murray, 41, of Rutland, was

arrested Sept. 5 for leaving the scene of an

accident, violating conditions of release

and resisting arrest, police said.

Police said parts of Murray’s black

Chevrolet Cruze were left behind at the

accident. Through tips, police located her

2017 Chevrolet Cruze on Maple Street in

Rutland with damages that matched.

Police said the rear of three 2019 Toyota

Rav 4s were damaged in the crash. The

damages are estimated to total $40,000.

Murray is scheduled to appear in Rutland

Criminal Court on Nov. 18.

>

Stephanie Murray

Qualified cops: Sherriff seeks a few good candidates

Submitted

from page 2

Time and distance become a factor in out-of-area transports.

He also indicated that there is a statewide sheriff’s transport management plan that

is utilized frequently by Rutland, Bennington and Addison County. It takes effect when

one agency is short of transport officers and can request available units from other

Counties, if there are available personnel.

Chittenden County has been utilizing video conferencing for arraignments and

Bernard indicated this may be the future;however, there are still requirements for

transporting Vermont’s prisoner populations established by the Legislature. Therein

lies another issue. Funding for prisoner transports is substantially less per hour than

for certain security functions, highway traffic control or oversized load escorts.

Law enforcement agencies statewide have been actively recruiting, however there is a

shortage of officers. States such as New Hampshire, which enacted a statewide 20-year

retirement plan for all officers, have seen officers migrating eastward from Vermont.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 NEWS BRIEFS • 11

Quilts awarded: 2019 ‘People’s Choice’ announced

WOODSTOCK—Billings Farm & Museum has

announced the results of the 2019 “People’s Choice”

awards for the 33rd Annual Quilt Exhibition,which

closes Sept. 15.

Over 15,000 visitors viewed the exhibition and

nearly 1,000 ballots were cast for favorite quilts. The

quilts were judged split into two categories: full and

small/medium sized.

Full size quilts

First place: “Cathedral Window” by Audrey Ward,

Barnard; Second Place: “Fiery Stars in the Garden”

by Josette M. Jones, Windsor; Third Place: “Double

Wedding Ring” by Sandra S. Palmer, Hartland.

Small/Medium size quilts

First: “15 White Sheep” by Beverly T. Ricker; Wilder;

Second: “Craning to Talk to the Moon” by Judi Simon-

Bouton, Hartford; Third: “Circle #1” by Linda Diak,

Chester.

Jurors’ choice awards

At the exhibition opening, the Jurors’ Choice

Awards were presented to Chance Palmer of Hartland

for his quilt, “Vermont Wild Animals Out at Night,” by

juror Colleen O’Neil; “In the Direction of Life,” made

by Susan Damone Balch of Reading, selected by

juror Kathie Beltz and Lynne Croswell of Ludlow, was

selected by juror Faith Evans for her quilt “X Marks

the Spot.”

The Billings Farm & Museum Staff Choice was

awarded to Josette M. Jones of Windsor, for her

quilt “Fiery Stars in the Garden.”

Billings Farm & Museum is located at 69 Old River

Road in Woodstock. For more information visit

billingsfarm.org.

“Double Wedding Ring”

“15 White Sheep”

“Craning to Talk to the Moon”

Photos courtesy of Billings Farm & Museum

“Circle #1” “Fiery Stars in the Garden” “Cathedral Window”


Calendar

12 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

SPARTAN RACES

SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SEPT. 14-15

By Robin Alberti

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11

Patriot Day at Hubbardton10 a.m.

Hubbardton Battlefield is open free of charge on Patriot Day for Day of

Remembrance, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monument Hill Road, Hubbardton.

Active Seniors Lunch

12 p.m.

Killington Active Seniors meet for a meal Wednesdays at the Lookout

Bar & Grille. Town sponsored. Come have lunch with this well-traveled

group of men and women. $5/ person. 908-783-1050. 2910 Killington

Road, Killington.

Compost Talk

1 p.m.

Composting Basics at Thompson Center, 99 Senior Lane, Woodstock.

Learn the basics of Vermont Universal Recycling Law effective July

1, 2020, about keeping food scraps out of household trash. Q&A,

backyard composters for sale, information. Register in advance: 802-

457-3277.

The Rutland Farmers’ Market

3 p.m.

The outdoor summer market is held every Wednesday, 3-6 p.m. in Depot

Park (in front of WalMart), Rutland. 75+ vendors selling farm fresh

veggies and fruits, flowers, specialty foods, hot foods, eggs, artisan

cheeses, handcrafted breads, maple syrup, Vermont crafts, much

more. vtfarmersmarket.org.

Open Studio Hub

3 p.m.

Chaffee Art Center opens doors to teens and young people Wednesday,

3-6 p.m. A place to create, image, inspire. Free. Draw, paint, craft,

do homework, listen to music, read, create a club, join yoga, creative

space, and more. 16 S. Main St., Rutland. chaffeeartcenter.org.

Brandon Book Sale

4 p.m.

Brandon Free Public Library holds used book sale, through October.

Wednesdays, 4-6 p.m. Fridays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1

p.m. Amazing selection for all ages, fiction and non-fiction. For May,

BOGO. 4 Franklin St., Brandon.

Heart of Ukulele

5 p.m.

Chaffee Art Center holds informal ukulele group Wednesday, 5-7 p.m.

Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.

Community Trail Build Evening

5:30 p.m.

Weekly mountain bike ride at various locations throughout Slate Valley

Trails and beyond. slatevalleytrails.orgfor details and locations weekly.

Rides 1.5-2 hours, varied terrain, no drop rides. info@slatevalleytrails.

org. Poultney.

Rotary Meeting

6 p.m.

The Killington-Pico Rotary club cordially invites visiting

Rotarians, friends and guests to attend weekly

meeting. Meets Wednesdays at Clear River

Tavern in Pittsfield, 6-8 p.m. for full dinner

and fellowship. 802-773-0600 to make a

reservation. Dinner fee $21. Killington-

PicoRotary.org

Meditation Circle

6:15 p.m.

Maclure Library offers meditation

circle Wednesdays, 6:15-7:15

p.m. 802-483-2792. 840 Arch

St., Pittsford.

Learn to Square

Dance

7 p.m.

The Cast Off 8’s square dance

club holds intro to square

dancing at Lothrop School

Gym, 3477 Route 7, Pittsford.

7-8:30 p.m. Casual dress. Try

easy calls, no dancing skills

required. Another session, Sept.

18, same time, same place.

castoff8s.com.

Free Summer Wellness

7 p.m.

Join Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center

for a free session of Vinyasa yoga

with Selina Ferrandino, in Center Street

Marketplace, Rutland. 7-8:30 p.m. RSVP on

Facebook - Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12

Tunbridge World’s Fair

8 a.m.

148th Tunbridge World’s Fair, Sept. 12-15. Today, gates 8 a.m.-9 p.m.

Carnival rides, fair food (some is local and fresh!), maple building, pig

races, children’s barnyard, historical reenactments on the hill, agriculture,

and more. Today: Agricultural Education Day and Veteran’s Appreciation

Day. Plus, pony pulling, harness racing, sheep dog trials, horse

show ring, dairy show, 4-H presentation, Larkin Dancers, Chris Herrick

Magic, Mountain House Cloggers, poultry show, more. tunbridgeworldsfair.com.

Admission. 1 Fairground Lane, Tunbridge.

Thursday Hikers

9 a.m.

Hike the less-taken trial north along Glen Lake to Moscow Pond.

Moderate. Meet at Godnick Adult Center, 1 Deer Street, Rutland, to car

pool. Bring lunch. No dogs allowed. For more info 802-747-4466.

Group Trail Run

9 a.m.

Slate Valley Trails group holds evening group trail runs,

9-10:30 a.m., Fairgrounds Trailhead parking lot, 125

Town Farm Road, Poultney. At least a 5-mile run at

social pace. If enough for two groups, a 12-mile route

will be offered. Bring water, snack.

Playgroup

10 a.m.

Maclure Library offers playgroup, Thursdays, 10

a.m.-12 p.m. Birth to 5 years old. Stories, crafts,

snacks, singing, dancing. 802-483-2792. 840

Arch St., Pittsford.

Story Time

10 a.m.

Story time at West Rutland Public Library.

Thursdays,10 a.m. Bring young children

to enjoy stories, crafts, and playtime.

802-438-2964.

Killington Bone Builders

10 a.m.

Bone Builders meets at Sherburne Memorial

Library, 2998 River Rd., Killington,

10-11 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Free,

weights supplied. 802-422-3368.

Mendon Bone Builders

10 a.m.

Mendon Bone Builders meets Thursdays at

Roadside Chapel, 1680 Townline Rd, Rutland

Town. 802-773-2694.

Killington Farmers’ Market

3:30 p.m.

The Killington Farmers’ Market held at Church of Our Saviour on Mission

Farm Road, off Route 4. Weekly market, Thursdays, 3:30-6:30

p.m.

Bingo

4:30 p.m.

Post 31 American Legion in Rutland offers Bingo. Doors open 4:30

p.m. Games start 7 p.m., end 9 p.m. 20 games including jackpots and

horse races. 33 Washington St., Rutland. 802-773-9777.

Petra’s Wellness Studio

5 p.m.

Yomassage with Petra O’ Neill, LMT. RSVP to 802-345-5244. Howe

Center, 1 Scale Ave., Rutland.

Bridge Club

6 p.m.

Rutland Duplicate Bridge Club meets Thursday, 6-10 p.m. Godnick

Adult Center, 1 Deer St., Rutland. 802-773-9412.

All Levels Yoga

6:30 p.m.

Chaffee Art Center offers all level yoga class with Stefanie DeSimone,

50 minute practice. $5/ class, drop-ins welcome. 16 South Main St.,

Rutland. Bring a mat.

Ron Thompson Concert/Chat

6:45 p.m.

Ron Thompson will give concert and chat at 6:45 p.m following the

Killington Farmers’ Market. Author of “On Cue - Managing Anxiety,

Inviting Excellence.” Gives talk about expression without anxiety, with

musical examples. Refreshments follow. 316 Mission Farm Road, off

Route 4, Killington.

Meditation Group

7:15 p.m.

Chaffee Art Center holds meditation group Tuesday, Thursday, Friday,

7:15-7:45 a.m. Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 13

Tunbridge World’s Fair

7 a.m.

148th Tunbridge World’s Fair, Sept. 12-15. Today, gates 7 a.m.-9 p.m.

Carnival rides, fair food (some is local and fresh!), maple building,

pig races, children’s barnyard, historical reenactments on the hill,

agriculture, and more. Today: Horse pulling, harness racing, oxen and

steer cart class, horse show ring, dairy show, 4-H presentation, Larkin

Dancers, Chris Herrick Magic, Tim McGraw Tribute band, Keith Urban

Tribute Band, more. tunbridgeworldsfair.com. Admission. 1 Fairground

Lane, Tunbridge.

TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR

THURSDAY,SEPT. 12 AT 7 A.M.

Courtesy of Tunbridge World’s Fair


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 CALENDAR • 13

Level 1 Yoga

8:30 a.m.

Level 1 Hatha Yoga at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury, RYT 500. 3744

River Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.

Creative Space

10 a.m.

Chaffee Art Center holds creative space Friday, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Bring

tools/supplies to create works of art with other inspiring artists. Open to

all. Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.

Story Time

11 a.m.

Sherburne Memorial Library holds story time Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m.

Stories, songs, activities. All ages welcome! 2998 River Road, Killington.

802-422-9765.

Brandon Book Sale

11 a.m.

Brandon Free Public Library holds used book sale, through October.

Wednesdays, 4-6 p.m. Fridays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1

p.m. Amazing selection for all ages, fiction and non-fiction. For May,

BOGO. 4 Franklin St., Brandon.

Knitting Group

2 p.m.

Maclure Library offers knitting group, Fridays, 12-2 p.m. 802-483-

2792. 840 Arch St., Pittsford.

Spartan Open House/Dinner

2 p.m.

Killington Resort hosts open house and friday night welcome dinner,

pre-Spartan Race Weekend. Open house 2-6 p.m.; dinner follows.

Meet racers and top athletes. Tickets spartan.com.

Rochester Farmers’ Market

3 p.m.

Rochester Farmers’ Market on the Village Park, Route 100. Fresh

flowers, seasonal veggies and fruits, honey, maple products, handmade

items, jewelry, baked goods, live music and much more. 3-6

p.m. Fridays through October.

Ludlow Farmers’ Market

4 p.m.

Every Friday, Memorial Day to Columbus Day, 4-7 p.m. on the front

lawn of Okemo Mountain School, 53 Main St., Ludlow. 30+ local vendors.

Rain or shine.

Open Gym

6 p.m.

Friday night open gym at Head Over Heels, 152 North Main St.,

Rutland. 6-8 p.m. Ages 6+. Practice current skills, create gymnastic

routines, learn new tricks, socialize with friends! $5/ hour members; $8/

hour non-members. Discount punch cards available. 802-773-1404.

Pot “Lucky” Supper

6 p.m.

Castleton Community Center hosts rocking pot luck supper. Bring a

side dish, salad, or dessert for dinner. Following, Revived 45s Plus program

of songs/mucis from 50s and 60s rock and roll. $2 suggested donation.

RSVP by Sept. 11 at 802-468-3093. 2108 Main St., Castleton.

The Fretless at Chandler

7 p.m.

Chandler Music Hall welcomes The Fretless, Canadian fiddle foursome,

with traditional Irish folk music. Tickets $10-$35, chandler-arts.org. 71

Main St., Randolph.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 14

Spartan Race

6 a.m.

Killingon Resort hosts the Spartan Race, Sept. 14-15. “Joe’s Backyard”

will challenge the best athletes at the home of the iconic race. Today,

Ultra (waves start 6 a.m.), Beast (waves start 7:30 a.m.) and Kids’

Races (starts 9 a.m.). Spectating encouraged. Vendor village. Get full

details at spartanrace.com. Aroo!

Tunbridge World’s Fair

7 a.m.

148th Tunbridge World’s Fair, Sept. 12-15. Today, gates 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

Carnival rides, fair food (some is local and fresh!), maple building, pig

races, children’s barnyard, historical reenactments on the hill, agriculture,

and more. Today: Oxen pulling, Livestock Cavalcade, Lynyrd

Skynyrd Tribute band, Aerosmith tribute band, horse show ring, goat

show, swine show, Frazer’s Judging Arena showings, Larkin Dancers,

magic, more. tunbridgeworldsfair.com. Admission. 1 Fairground Lane,

Tunbridge.

Pancake Breakfast Buffet

8 a.m.

Monthly pancake breakfast at Masonic Lodge, 63 Franklin St., West

Rutland, 8-11 a.m. $9 adults, $3 for ages 4-12, free under age 4. Today,

food drive collects non-perishables for West Rutland food bank. Monetary

donations accepted, too.

Young Professionals Summit

8:30 a.m.

Fifth annual Young Professionals Summit of Vermont, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

at Paramount Theatre, 30 Center St., Rutland. $30 registration includes

summit, networking, refreshments, drink ticket. A day of leadership

training and professional development. ypsummivt.com

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

SUMMIT OF VERMONT

SATURDAY, SEPT. 14 AT 8:30 A.M.

GMC Fall Hiking

9 a.m.

Green Mountain Club/Killington Section Outing invites the public to

join weekly outings. This week, hike north on the Appalachian Trail/

Long Trail past the shelter. Inspect rock work done over the summer

to improve the trail. Moderate. Approximately 4 miles. For more info

802-775-6208.

Vermont Farmers’ Market (Rutland)

9 a.m.

The outdoor summer market is held every Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in

Depot Park (in front of WalMart), Rutland. 75+ vendors selling farm

fresh veggies and fruits, flowers, specialty foods, hot foods, eggs,

artisan cheeses, handcrafted breads, maple syrup, Vermont crafts, and

much more. vtfarmersmarket.org.

Brandon Book Sale

9 a.m.

Brandon Free Public Library holds used book sale, through October.

Wednesdays, 4-6 p.m. Fridays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1

p.m. Amazing selection for all ages, fiction and non-fiction. For May,

BOGO. 4 Franklin St., Brandon.

Walk Out of the Darkness Rutland

9 a.m.

Fundraising walk raising awareness and funds for American Foundation

of Suicide Prevention. Registration is free, open to public. Donations

accepted until Dec. 31. Held Main Street Park, Rutland. Check-in/

registration, 9 a.m. Walk begins 9:30 a.m., ends 12 p.m. 802-353-8113;

ceastman.afsp@gmail.com.

Zumba for Kids

10 a.m.

Special story hour with local Zumba instructor, at Chittenden Public

Library, 223 Chittenden Road, Chittenden. Zumba for kids, read books

about dancing, free play, snack. Geared at kids age 5 and under; but all

welcome. Free, open to public.

Open Gym

11 a.m.

Saturday morning open gym at Head Over Heels, 152 North Main St.,

Rutland. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. All ages welcome. Practice current skills, create

gymnastic routines, learn new tricks, socialize with friends. $5/ hour

members; $8/ hour non-members. Discount punch cards available.

802-773-1404.

Kids’ Saturday Classes

11 a.m.

Chaffee Art Center offers different activity for kids each week - painting,

cooking, craft making and more. $10, pre-register at 802-775-0036;

$15 drop in. 16 S. Main St., Rutland. chaffeeartcenter.org.

Q&A with Stephanie Jerome

11 a.m.

Have questions for Vt. House Rep. Stephanie

Jerome? Maclure Library welcomes

her the second Saturday of each

month to answer questions from the

public, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 840

Arch St., Pittsford.

Courtesy Rutland Young Professionals

Ferns Walk and Talk

1 p.m.

Ferns of the Northeast walk

and talk program at Mount

Independence State

Historic Site, 497 Mount

Independence Road,

Orwell. 1-3:30 p.m.

Forest ecologist Lynn

Levine leads program.

$5 adults; free under

age 15. 802-948-2000.

Commnity Block

Party

4 p.m.

Town of West Rutland

second annual community

block party in

conjunction with school’s

homecoming weekend. On

the Town Hall Green, Marble

Street; 4-9 p.m. Games, vendors,

food trucks, music. Free

admission, bring a chair.

Saturday Gravel Rides

4:30 p.m.

Analog Cycles leads weekly 20-35-mile

gravel rides from Baptist Church Parking

lot on East Poultney Green. Mix of road/dirt

road/double track and easy single track. Gravel

bike approved. Hard terrain, slacker pace. No drop rides. Rain or

shine, unless lighting. Bring legit bright light lights, a tube, and water.

301-456-5471.

Bingo

5:30 p.m.

Bridgewater Grange Bingo, Saturday nights, doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Games start 6:30 p.m. Route 100A, Bridgewater Corners. Just across

bridge from Junction Country Store. All welcome. Refreshments available.

Carleton Watkins Talk

7 p.m.

Tyler Green (art historian, critic, author, podcaster) speaks about

groundbreaking 19th century photographer Carleton Watkins and

the surprising relationships between Watkins, New England, and the

national park idea. Held at Billings Farm & Museum, 69 Old River

Road, off Route 12, Woodstock. Light refreshments. Free, reservations

recomended: 802-457-2355, reservations@billingsfarm.org.

Movie Nights

8 p.m.

Mad Hatter’s Scoops holds outdoor movie nights Friday-Saturday, 8

p.m. Family friendly. Weather permitting. 40 Summit Path, Killington.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 15

Spartan Race

8 a.m.

Killingon Resort hosts the Spartan Race, Sept. 14-15. “Joe’s Backyard”

will challenge the best athletes at the home of the iconic race.

Today, Beast (starts 8 a.m.), Sprint (starts 10 a.m.), and Kids’ Races

(starts 9 a.m.). Spectating encouraged. Vendor village. Get full details

at spartanrace.com. Aroo!

Calendar, page 14


14 • CALENDAR

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Continued from page 15

Tunbridge World’s Fair

8 a.m.

148th Tunbridge World’s Fair, Sept. 12-15. Today, gates 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

Carnival rides, fair food (some is local and fresh!), maple building, pig

races, children’s barnyard, historical reenactments on the hill, agriculture,

and more. Today: steer contest, Antique Tractor Pull, horse show,

junior dairy show, swine barn show, Larkind Dancers, more. tunbridgeworldsfair.com.

Admission. 1 Fairground Lane, Tunbridge.

PSIA James Leder Memorial

1 p.m.

Killington Golf Course hosts Professional Ski Instructors of America

(PSIA) to raise money for James Leader Memorial Scholarship. 1

p.m. registration, 1:30 p.m. shotgun start. $60/ player. Sign up at

802-422-6700; details at killington.com. East Mountain Road,

Killington.

Board Game Afternoon

1 p.m.

Hubbardton Battlefield holds Revolutionary War

board game afternoon, 1-4 p.m. Strategy games

and scenarios. Examples of painted miniatures.

Battlefield walk after gaming. For ages 12+. 802-

273-2282. Monument Hill Road, Hubbardton.

Annual Meeting

2 p.m.

50th annual meeting of Middletown Springs

Historical Society held at Historical Society

building, on the Green. Dessert buffet, business

meeting, review of the year, plans for the future,

election of new trustees. Presentation follows:

“Frisbie’s Fourth Lecture: Things Left Out of the

History of Middletown, Vermont, 1867.”

Wildlife Art Show Reception

3 p.m.

Rutland County Audubon presents 2nd Wildlife

Art Show at Stone Valley Arts at Fox Hill,

Poultney. Opening reception, 3-5 p.m.; open

weekends 1-4 p.m. for viewing, and weekly during

regular hours. Free. 145 E. Main St., Poultney. 802-325-2603.

FALL BIRD WALK

TUESDAY, SEPT. 17 AT 7:30 A.M.

Submitted

Chandler Film Society

4 p.m.

Film Society for the 21st Century at Chandler Center for the Arts.

Today, screening of “Singin’ in the Rain.” Discussion follows. chandlerarts.org.

Connection Support Group

4:30 p.m.

NAMI Vermont’s connection support group at Rutland Mental Health

Services, 78 S. Main St., Rutland. 4:30-6 p.m. First and third Sunday of

each month. Free recovery support group for people living with mental

illness. Learn from one another, share coping strategies, offer mutual

encouragement and understanding.

Devil’s Bowl Race

5 p.m.

Devil’s Bowl Speedway Dirt Track Racing: Stove Depot Championship

Finale. Sportsman Modifieds, 50 laps; Plus Enduro 100. $15 adults,

seniors $13, kids 12 and under are free. 2743 Rt. 22A. Track line: 802-

265-3112. devilsbowlspeedwayvt.com.

Meditation Group

5:30 p.m.

Chaffee Art Center holds meditation group Sunday, 5:30-6 p.m. Donations

appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.

Heartfulness Meditation

7:45 p.m.

Free group meditation Sundays, Rochester Town Office, School St.

Dane, 802-767-6010. heartfulness.org.

MONDAY, SEPT. 16

Killington Yoga

9:30 a.m.

All Level Flow Yoga, 8:30 a.m. at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury,

RYT 500. 3744 River Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.

HAVE AN EVENT?

CONTACT US.

events@mountaintimes.info

Killington Bone Builders

11 a.m.

Bone Builders meets at Sherburne Memorial Library, 2998 River Rd.,

Killington, 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Free, weights supplied.

802-422-3368.

Rutland Rotary

12 p.m.

Rotary Club of Rutland meets Mondays for lunch at The Palms Restaurant.

Learn more or become a member, journal@sover.net.

Monday Meals

12 p.m.

Every Monday meals at Chittenden Town Hall, 12 noon. Open to public,

RSVP by Friday prior, 802-483-6244. Gene Sargent. Bring your own

place settings. Seniors $3.50 for 60+. Under 60, $5. No holidays. 337

Holden Rd., Chittenden.

Playgroup

1 p.m.

Maclure Library offers playgroup, Mondays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Birth to 5

years old. Stories, crafts, snacks, singing, dancing. 802-483-2792. 840

Arch St., Pittsford.

Bridge Club

4 p.m.

Rutland Duplicate Bridge Club meets Monday, 12-4 p.m. in Engel Hall,

Christ the King Church, 12 Main St., Rutland. 802-773-9412.

Tobacco Cessation

5 p.m.

Quit smoking, e-cigs, and JUUL - free help! Want to quit smoking/

vaping, but nothing seems to help? Join a group and get free nicotine

patches, gum or lozenges. Group/replacement therapy doubles your

chances of staying quit for good! Free. 802-747-3768. Mondays, 5-6

p.m., RRMC CVPS Leahy Center, 160 Allen St., Rutland.

Walking Group

5:15 p.m.

Chaffee Arts Center holds walking group Monday, 5:15 P.M. Open to

all. Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.

Fundraiser Dinner, Auction

6 p.m.

Pawlet Public Library Board of Trustees presents live and silent auction

at The Barn Restaurant, 6-9 p.m. Open to the public, supports free

library programs, new books for all ages. RSVP to 802-325-3123;

advance reservations required. $25/ each. 5581 VT-30, Pawlet.

Garden Club Lecture

7 p.m.

Rutland Garden Club holds author lecture at Godnick Center, 1 Deer

St., Rutland.

Vermont Adult Learning

Vermont Adult Learning will offers free citizenship classes. Call Marcy

Green, 802-775-0617, and learn if you may qualify for citizenship at no

cost. 16 Evelyn St., Rutland. Also, free classes in reading, writing, and

speaking for English speakers of other languages. Ongoing.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 17

Fall Bird Walk

7:30 a.m.

Join Slate Valley Trails and local birder for Fall Bird Walks, 7:30-11 a.m.

along trails in Slate Valley Trail system. Meet at D&H Trail crossing, Main

St., Poultney (next to LiHigh). Bring water, bug spray, binocs, cameras,

field guides (if any). All welcome. jptilley50@gmail.com.

Mendon Bone Builders

10 a.m.

Mendon Bone Builders meets Tuesdays at Roadside Chapel, 1680

Town Line Road, Rutland Town. 802-773-2694.

Tobacco Cessation

11 a.m.

Quit smoking, e-cigs, and JUUL - free help! Want to quit smoking/

vaping, but nothing seems to help? Join a group and get free nicotine

patches, gum or lozenges. Group/replacement therapy doubles your

chances of staying quit for good! Free. 802-747-3768. Tuesdays, 11

a.m.-12 p.m. at Heart Center, 12 Commons St., Rutland.

Petra’s Wellness Studio

12 p.m.

Kripalu Yoga with Petra O’ Neill, LMT. RSVP to 802-345-5244. Howe

Center, 1 Scale Ave., Rutland.

Petra’s Wellness Studio

5:30 p.m.

Yomassage with Petra O’ Neill, LMT. RSVP to 802-345-5244. Howe

Center, 1 Scale Ave., Rutland.

Taking Off Pounds Sensibly

6 p.m.

TOPS meets Tuesday nights at Trinity Church in Rutland (corner of West

and Church streets). Side entrance. Weigh in 4:45-5:30 p.m. Meeting

6-6:30 p.m. All welcome, stress free environment. 802-293-5279.

Bereavement Group

6 p.m.

VNAHSR’s weekly bereavement group, Tuesdays at 6 p.m. at Grace

Congregational Church, 8 Court St., Rutland. Rev. Andrew Carlson

facilitates. Free, open to the public. 802-770-1613.

Bocce Ball

6 p.m.

All ages welcome to play free bocce on the grass of Ludlow’s Veteran’s

Park. Free refreshments served. Across from Fletcher Memorial Library,

Ludlow.

Rutland Area Toastmasters

6 p.m.

Develop public speaking, listening and leadership skills. Meets first

and third Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m. in Courcelle Building, 16 North St Ext.,

Rutland. toastmasters.org, 802-775-6929. Guests welcome.

Legion Bingo

6:15 p.m.

Brandon American Legion, Tuesdays. Warm ups 6:15 p.m., regular

games 7 p.m. Open to the public. Bring a friend! Franklin St., Brandon.

Level 1 Yoga

6:30 p.m.

Level 1 Hatha Yoga at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury, RYT 500. 3744

River Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.

Library Program

7 p.m.

Don and Carol Thompson visit Fair Haven Free Library with presentation,

Resorts of Lake Bomoseen. Information on hotels and stories

shared. Free, open to public. Refreshments. 107 N. Main St., Fair

Haven.

Heartfulness Meditation

7:30 p.m.

Free group meditation Tuesdays, Mountain Yoga, 135 N Main St #8,

Rutland. Margery, 802-775-1795. heartfulness.org.

Chess Club

9 p.m.

Rutland Rec Dept. holds chess club at Godnick Adult Center, providing

a mind-enhancing skill for youth and adults. All ages are welcome;

open to the public. Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m. 1 Deer St., Rutland.

Bridge Club

10 p.m.

Rutland Duplicate Bridge Club meets Tuesday, 6-10 p.m. in Engel Hall,

Christ the King Church, 12 Main St., Rutland. 802-773-9412.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 CALENDAR • 15

2019

2020

SEA 2018

2019

PARAMOUNTVT.ORG

30 CENTER ST. RUTLAND, VT • 802.775.0903

SON

NEW SEASON ON SALE NOW!

SEPT

19

SCOTT STAPP

of Creed

The Space Between

The Shadows Tour

THE FOUR

ITALIAN

TENORS

SEPT

20

SEPT

21

C is For Celebration

SEPT

28

OCT

2

OCT

3

WYNONNA

JUDD & THE

BIG NOISE

OCT

5

OCT

11

JUSTIN

HAYWARD

The Voice of

The Moody Blues

OCT

13

PINK

MARTINI

Feat. China Forbes

OCT

16

OCT

17

TENTH

AVENUE

NORTH

OCT

20

26

KIP MOORE:

Room To Spare

Acoustic Tour

OCT

Special Guest: Tucker Beathard

NOV

9

NOV

16

JOURNEYMAN:

A TRIBUTE TO

ERIC CLAPTON

Featuring Kofi Baker

NOV

22

NOV

23

www.natalieandonnell.com

DEC

1

NATALIE

MACMASTER &

DONNELL LEAHY:

A Celtic Family Christmas

DEC

20

TWELVE

TWENTY-FOUR

A Holiday Rock Orchestra

THE INTERNATIONAL SENSATION

JAN

3/4

JAN

11

JAN

12

Comedian

BOB

MARLEY

JAN

25

FEB

15

FEB

21

RICHARD

MARX

An Acoustic Evening

of Love Songs

FEB

28

FEB

29

MAR

1

MAR

13

MAR

17

Russian National

Ballet Presents

SWAN LAKE

MAR

21

MAR

27

MAR

28

APR

20

APR

30

MAY

27

TROUBADOURS:

A TRIBUTE TO

JAMES TAYLOR

& CAROLE KING

PLUS

BROADCASTS FROM


16 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

[MUSIC Scene] By DJ Dave Hoffenberg

WED.,

SEPT. 11

BRANDON

6 p.m. Neshobe Country

Club: Ryan Fuller

PAWLET

7 p.m. The Barn Restaurant

and Tavern:

“Pickin’ in Pawlet”

QUECHEE

6 p.m. Public House:

Blues Night with Arthur James

RANDOLPH

6:30 p.m. One Main Tap

and Grill:

Open Mic with The Bubsies

WOODSTOCK

6:30 p.m. 506 Bistro and

Bar: Live Jazz Pianist

THURS.,

SEPT. 12

BARNARD

5:30 p.m. Feast and

Field:

Music on the Farm with The

Fretless

BOMOSEEN

6 p.m. The Lake House:

Aaron Audet

KILLINGTON

6 p.m. Liquid Art:

Open Mic with Tboneicus Jones

7 p.m. The Foundry:

Joey Leone

PITTSFIELD

8 p.m. Clear River Tavern:

The Bubsies

RUTLAND

9:30 p.m. The Venue:

Krishna Guthrie

FRI.,

SEPT. 13

BOMOSEEN

6 p.m. Iron Lantern:

Marcos Levy

6 p.m. The Lake House:

Ryan Fuller

BRANDON

6 p.m. Red Clover Brewing:

George Nostrand

7 p.m. Brandon Music:

Barn Opera presents The Magic

Flute

KILLINGTON

7 p.m. The Foundry:

Jenny Porter

RUTLAND

7 p.m. The Draught

Room in The Diamond

Run Mall: Duane Carleton

9:30 p.m. The Venue:

Karaoke with Jess

10 p.m. Center Street

Alley: DJ Dirty D

SAT.,

SEPT. 14

BOMOSEEN

6 p.m. Iron Lantern:

Heart to Heart

BRANDON

7 p.m. Brandon Music:

Barn Opera presents The Magic

Flute

KILLINGTON

3 p.m. Umbrella Bar:

Duane Carleton

7 p.m. Summit Lodge:

Duane Carleton

7 p.m. The Foundry:

Ryan Fuller

7:30 p.m. McGrath’s

Irish Pub: Live Music

9 p.m. Jax Food and

Games: The Idiots

LUDLOW

8 p.m. The Killarney:

Sammy B

QUECHEE

7 p.m. Public House:

Ert and Burnie

RUTLAND

7 p.m. The Howlin’

Mouse Record Store:

Cancer Benefit Round Two with

Animal, Adhara, Shun, Blind

Threat and No Soul

SUN.,

SEPT. 15

KILLINGTON

5 p.m. The Foundry:

Jazz Night with the Summit

Pond Quartet

7 p.m. Moguls Sports

Pub: Duane Carleton

9 p.m. Jax Food and

Games: Jenny Porter

PITTSFIELD

6:30 p.m. Clear River

Tavern:

Pittsfield Fire Dept Appreciation

Supper with The Bubsies

RUTLAND

7 p.m. The Hide-A-Way

Tavern: Julia Riback

STOCKBRIDGE

12 p.m. Wild Fern:

Cigar Box Brunch w/ Rick

Redington

1 p.m. Wild Fern:

The People’s Jam

MON.,

SEPT. 16

BETHEL

3 p.m. Farmers Market:

Silas McPrior

LUDLOW

8 p.m. The Killarney:

Open Mic with Silas McPrior

PITTSFIELD

7 p.m. Clear River Tavern:

Dave Richardson

TUES.,

SEPT. 17

CASTLETON

6 p.m. Third Place Pizzeria:

Josh Jakab

LUDLOW

7 p.m. Du Jour VT:

Open Jam Session with Sammy

B and King Arthur Junior

POULTNEY

7 p.m. Taps Tavern:

Open Bluegrass Jam Hosted by

Fiddle Witch

QUECHEE

6 p.m. Public House:

Open Mic with Jim Yeager

RUTLAND

9:30 p.m. The Hide-A-

Way Tavern:

Open Mic with Krishna Guthrie

9:30 p.m. The Venue:

Karaoke with Jess

7:30 p.m. McGrath’s

Irish Pub: Live Music

9 p.m. Center Street Alley:

DJ Mega

9 p.m. Jax Food and

Games: King Arthur Junior

PAWLET

9:30 p.m. The Hide-A-

Way Tavern:

Karaoke 101 with Tenacious T

7 p.m. The Barn Restaurant

and Tavern:

Brooke Blanche & Dylan Walshe

QUECHEE

7 p.m. Public House:

Jacob Green One Man Band


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 LOCAL NEWS • 17

Pies raise $28,000

Sixth annual Pie-in-the-Face-for-Chase set records

KILLINGTON—Over 1,000 pies were

thrown and a record-setting $28,000

was raised for Chase Keuhl and the

Phelan McDermid Syndrome Foundation.

Event co-founder DJ Dave

Hoffenberg also broke a record as the

top fundraiser, bringing in $3,000 and

getting hit with 142 pies, ina variety of

flavors!

Chase Keuhl was shown the red carpet

treatment, arriving in a luxury van

and was all smiles throughout the day

at Moguls in Killington.

Organizers thank all the businesses

who donated to support the 6th annual

Pie-in-the-Face-for-Chase and also the

37 members of the 2019 Pie Class.

Some other participants took pies,

too, including Diane Linnehan, the

director of operations for PMSF, who

got hit with one that was bought by Sue

Lomas, founder of PMSF.

Upcoming:

Stay tuned to Pie in the Face for

Chase Facebook page to learn about

two big events coming up in 2020: the

Race for Chase will be held in March

at Pico and the 7th Annual Pie-inthe-Face-for-Chase

event at Moguls

Sports Pub next September.

Submitted

The 2019 “Pie Class” — 37 local celebrities who volunteer to get pies in their face for charity.

KMS mtb: School launces first of its kind MTB program

>

from page 1

Hayden, is one such leader.

A professional mountain

biker, Hayden represented

the USA at the 2017 World

Mountain Bike Championships

in Australia,

finishing ninth in the

junior women’s downhill.

In 2018, she finished

third in a UCI World Cup

downhill mountain bike

race in Mont St. Anne,

Quebec, then two weeks

later landed a silver medal

in skicross at the 2018 FIS

Junior World Championships

in Cardrona, New

Zealand. This year, Aug.

29-Sept. 1 she competed

as part of the USA National

Team at the Mountain Bike

World Championships

in Mont-Sainte-Anne,

Quebec, finishing 22nd in a

competitive field.

The new mountain bike

team will join KMS’s other

cycling and athletic programs

that have a proven

track record of success,

said Smith. In order for

student-athletes to get the

very most from the worldclass

training venues, KMS

employs “professional and

experienced coaches that

are the best in the country,”

Smith added.

KMS’s downhill mountain

bike team is led by a

new coach: Jason DiDomenico.

DiDomenico has been part of the Killington

community for over 25 years, but his passion for all

things two-wheeled began much earlier. He started

racing motocross at age 5 and grew up traveling and

competing. He turned professional at 16 and raced AMA

Supercross and the AMA outdoor national series. When

not racing motocross, DiDomenico was racing BMX and

mountain bikes. After his racing career, he transferred

to the technical side and managed several different bike

shops in the Killington Area. He has been a volunteer

coach with the local youth mountain bike club for years

and enjoys riding with his family.

“I am thrilled to be a part of this new team at KMS,”

said DiDomenico. “I have a true passion for the sport

Photo by Jason DiDomenico

KMS Downhill MTB team member Gabe Johnson drops

in at the start of the Killington Eastern Cup Race Aug. 3.

and for helping others to

develop their skills.”

“DiDomenico’s vast

technical knowledge

combined with the understanding

of what it takes

to be a successful professional

athlete will benefit

the KMS and local athletes

tremendously,” said Davis

Willis, assistant head of

school and chief operating

officer at KMS.

KMS riders participated

in their first event as a

mountain bike team on

Aug. 4, when the MAXXIS

Eastern States Cup Enduro

& Downhill was held at Killington

Resort. KMS rider

Gabe Johnson stood atop

the podium in first place

for the U12 class and teammate

Owen Crossman

finished on the podium in

fifth in a stacked U15 class,

DiDomenico said.

KMS boasts an academic

track record equal

to its athletic prowess,

Smith added. KMS graduates

have matriculated at

Dartmouth, Boston College,

Babson, Middlebury,

Colby, Bates, St. Lawrence,

Stanford, Villanova,

McGill, Furnham, Lindenwood,

UNH, UVM, Utah,

Denver, Boulder, Sierra

Nevada College, to name

just a few.

The KMS structure and curriculum enables ideal

student-athlete balance and teaches life-long skills

of time management, independence, leadership, and

accountability that serves students well through college

and beyond, Smith continued. The entire experience at

KMS – from athletics and academics to social consciousness

locally and globally – is aimed toward the

same goal: to create life-long learners who know how to

train to excel, he said.

“KMS takes you places,” is more than just the school’s

motto, Smith said. “With the foundation established

here at KMS, we truly believe our student-athletes are

prepared to be the leaders of tomorrow, helping to solve

the most pressing issues of our time.”


18 • SPARTAN RACE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

SEPTEMBER 1 4 & 1 5, 2019

It’s the call of Spartans ready to tackle the course

at the startline. Ready, set, go!

Race time

About 10,000 spectators are expected to

come to Killington for this year’s Spartan Race

Sept. 14-15. New for this year, parking fees are

now included in the registration fee. Spectators

will no longer have to pay for parking, but

will need to purchase a Festival Pass. Spectator

passes are available online in advance

for $20 each day. Day passes will be available

onsite for $25. Spectator passes will include

a round-trip gondola ticket. You must have a

white Spartan wristband to get on the lift. The

Dan Brown Band will be performing from 6

p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday at K-1’s Mahogany

Ridge Bar. There will also be performances at

the Snowshed Umbrella Bar on Friday from

3 p.m. to 6 p.m. with Chris Pallutto as well as

Saturday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. with Duane

Carleton.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 SPARTAN RACE • 19

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20 • SPARTAN RACE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

The Spartan Race weekend is comprised of three

different races happening at Killington Resort:

the Sprint; the Beast; the Ultra Beast. Kids as young

as age 4 can also participate in Junior Spartan races

Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 14 and 15.

Commitment drives Spartans to complete the Trifecta

If you’ve done one Spartan race and are considering another, chances are you’ve heard of the Spartan Trifecta. Conquer

the Spartan Sprint, Super and Beast in one calendar year to complete your Trifecta.

It’s a fact that commitment holds us accountable: accountable to train, eat and think like a Spartan. Commit to the Spartan

Trifecta and push your mind, body and spirit to achieve the strongest, fastest and most resilient version of yourself.

5 reasons to join the Spartan Trifecta tribe

1) You’ll do things you never thought you could do.

2) You’ll earn respect. Because you don’t get Trifecta for “trying.”

3) It will force you to get stronger and run faster.

4) Instead of looking back on life and wishing you had the guts to do a Trifecta, you get to look at all your medals.

5) You’ll travel and make tons of new friends.

Courtesy of Spartan.com

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The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 SPARTAN RACE • 21

Sprint

3-5 miles

20-23 obstacles

40 minutes fastest time

The Sprint may be Spartan’s shortest distance race, but

it’s still a favorite among both new and returning racers. It’s

the perfect distance for those looking to start their Spartan

journey. The Sprint also allows returning racers a manageable

distance to see how far they can push themselves. With

20-23 obstacles over 3-5 miles, you’ll never run the same

race twice. Once you complete the sprint you are one third

of the way to your Spartan Trifecta — the ultimate Spartan

achievement.

Schedule:

Sunday

10 a.m. Elite men

10:15 a.m. Elite Women

10:30-11:00 a.m. Start times by age group

11:15 a.m.-12 p.m. Morning start times

12:15 p.m. Afternoon start times

The Beast

12-14 miles

30-35 obstacles

3 hours fastest time

If you’re looking to unleash your inner beast and go to

places you never imaged, the Spartan Beast is perfect for

you. With 12-14 miles and 30-35 obstacles between you

and the finish line, the Spartan Beast will test everything

you’re made of: your strength, your endurance, your

resolve. The unpredictable terrain and Spartan Obstacles

are masterfully designed to push you deep into

your discomfort zone, and well past those self-imposed

obstacles you once considered your limits.

Schedule:

Saturday

7:30 a.m. Elite men

7:45 a.m. Elite women

8 a.m.-9 a.m. Start times by age group

9:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Morning start times

1:00 p.m. Afternoon start times

Sunday

(No Elite heats)

8-8:30 a.m. Start times begin by age group

8:45 a.m. Morning start time begin

Ultra Beast

26+ miles

60+ obstacles

7 hours fastest time

The Ultra Beast is the pinnacle Spartan event in the

world. The standard Ultra Beast is held over 26-plus

miles, and it’s not for the faint of heart — you’ll face epic

terrain, punishing obstacles, and even some surprises

thrown in. The Ultra Beast is the only Spartan event

featuring strict time cutoffs that must be met. Please

note that not everyone who signs up for an Ultra Beast

will actually finish.

Schedule:

Saturday

6 a.m. Elite

6:15 a.m. Age group

6:30-7 a.m. Open start times

“Whatever you can do, or dream you can,

begin it now, for boldness has genius, power,

and magic in it.”

– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Kids’ Races

Competitive 2-mile race: ages 10-11 and 12-13

Saturday- 9 a.m. Males, 9:15 a.m. females

Sunday- 9 a.m. Males, 9:15 a.m. females

Open 2-mile race: ages 10-13

Saturday- 12 p.m.

Sunday- 12 p.m.

Open 1-mile race: ages 7-9

Saturday- 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m.

Sunday- 10 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m.

½ mile race: ages 4-6

Saturday- 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m.

Sunday- 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m.


22 • SPARTAN RACE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Photos by Paul Holmes

New for 2019!

Register online

runreg.com/climb-the-moose

free t-shirt

with entry before Sept. 30.

the moose

MOOSALAMOO

VERMONT

Come Climb the Moose at Moosalamoo National Recreation Area

in Salisbury, Vt. on Saturday, Oct. 12, at 8 a.m.

This inaugural 3-mile uphill trail run, and mountain bike, to Silver

Lake trailhead in Goshen, is an ideal introductory race for trail

runners and mountain bikers on an old logging road.

Start and awards ceremony at Branbury State Park on Lake

Dunmore. Camping available.

runreg.com/climb-the-moose


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 SPARTAN RACE • 23

What obstacles will a Spartan have to conquer on his or her path through

the Killington course? It depends on the course and it changes year to year,

but rest assured they’ll be dozens of creative and, often excruciating, challenges

and few will master them all! Here are some of the staples often seen

at such a race. Remember: they are only a small sample!

While the obstacles are the most entertaining to watch (failing and

subsequent frustration is often on display), spectators ought not forget that

each Spartan has traveled many miles and vertical feet up and down the Killington

mountains to reach this point. In fact, the “death march” up straight

up Flume to Killington Peak (often placed at the end of this particular race)

probably receives the most profanities of any “obstacle” on the course!

Hitting and surpassing personal limits of mental and physical exhaustion

is a common theme at Spartan events. But it’s also what makes the final

obstacle, the fire pit hurdle to the finish line (pictured below), all that much

more rewarding!

PARALLEL BARS

The parallel bars can be placed up and down

or at varying distances apart adding to the

challenge. Tip: Keep your momentum going

and use your swing to your advantage.

WALL

Walls typically 7-11 feet tall are very common

obstacles in OCR challenges. The objective is

simple: get over the wall. This means running

at it, jumping to get a grip on the top and then

hoisting yourself over. Tip: Swing one heel up on

the wall and use your leg strength to get your hips

up and over. (Giving or receiving help from your

fellow Spartan racers is also permitted!)

TARZAN ROPES

The Tarzan Ropes are among

the most difficult obstacles at most

Spartan races. The object is to grasp

a hold of the first rope and swing

from rope to rope all the way to

the end then ring a bell. Tip: when

you’re close enough to the end, use

your feet to hit the bell!

LOG TOPS

Balance atop a series of

logs over various heights.

This is a test of balance.

This one definitely takes

practice and a lot of focus!

Tip: Keeping consistent

momentum helps with

balance, looking a few

steps ahead will help you to

anticipate where your balance

will need to be.

WARPED WALL

Run up the quarter pipe “Warped Wall” obstacle

and grab the bar at the top. Then pull yourself over the

bar and lower yourself down a rope from the platform

at the top. It’s an intimidating obstacle as the bar

seems impossibly high, but a confidence-boost once

accomplished. Tip: run fast and go for it!

TRAVERSE WALL

A.K.A. the bouldering wall, challenges

racers to traverse horizontally across a

wall or series of walls using only the hand

holds and foot holds provided (usually

rocks or blocks). If you fall off or use the

top of the wall, you’ve “failed” the obstacle

and must do burpees. Tip: keep your hips

close to the wall.

By Paul Holmes


24 • SPARTAN RACE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

DIAMOND EXPRESS

BUS SCHEDULE

www.thebus.com | 802.773.3244 (ext.177)


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 SPARTAN RACE • 25

18:00

2019

14:31

14:37

12:00

12:00

8:49

7:30

7:22

6:00

2:30

0:52

2:30

Sprint

Beast

Ultra

Data courtesy of Spartan.com

Chart shows the fastest, median and slowest finishing times for each Spartan race division.

Elite first place finishing times —women & men:

0:58:15

2:45:31

8:48:26

0:52:29

2:30:33

7:22:50


26 • SPARTAN RACE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Killington Spartan Race weekend: what to know before you go

Friends and family of Spartan racers will be able to

watch participants conquer obstacles, dominate the finish

line and receive a medal!

Cheering fans along the course help to motivate racers

to get over yet another wall and move on to the finish line.

Spectators will also enjoy music, raffles, entertainment,

and festival challenges at the K-1 Festival Village.

Most importantly, fans will receive a front row seat

to watch racers from a safe, comfortable, and relatively

mud-less (no promises) Spartan Race festival ground area.

And, when it’s over, they receive muddy hugs from thrilled

Spartan athletes.

With hundreds of people either participating in, or

cheering on a friend or family member in the Spartan Race,

Killington is going to be a busy place Sept. 14-15. To help,

we’ve assembled this handy guide to help you navigate the

event and make the most of your time. Here are the basics:

Race schedule

The races will be held throughout the day Saturday and

Sunday, Sept. 14-15, with four types of races: Spartan Ultra

Beast (two laps of the Spartan Beast); Spartan Beast, 12-14

miles with 30-35 obstacles; and Spartan Sprint, 3 miles with

20-23 obstacles.

Each of these races features an “elite” and “open” division

with age category start-times in heats of up to 250

racers in each division taking off from the start line every 15

minutes.

Start times Saturday: Ultra Beast 6-7 a.m.; Beast 7:30

a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Kids 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Start times Sunday: Beast 8-9:30 a.m.; Kids 9 a.m.-1:30

p.m.; Sprint 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Tickets

Spectator tickets are $20 per person when bought online

(available until Friday, Sept. 13) and are $25 thereafter.

Spectator tickets can be purchased onsite the day of the

event (cash only.) Spectator passes will include a round-trip

Gondola ticket; you must have a white Spartan wristband

to be able to get on the lift.

Parking

There is no charge for parking this year.

Continued > 27


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 SPARTAN RACE • 27

Shuttles

Free shuttles run between Snowshed, Ramshead and K-1 5 a.m.-12 a.m. Saturday and 6

a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday. Bus stops are located at the courtyard entrance of Snowshed, Ramshead

next to Killington Road and Bay 4 of the K-1 parking area.

If you need to make it farther down the mountain, The Bus runs hourly between the

resort and the city of Rutland. There is no charge to be picked up from the resort, but cash

fare is $2 per person if picked up elsewhere. See page 24 for schedule.

View the Peak

Some of the best views of the race and the mountains themselves are from the K-1 Gondola.

Watch Spartans tackle obstacles on the gondola ride up and at the top near the Peak

Lodge.

Gondola rides are free with a Spartan spectator pass and to Spartan athletes. The

gondola operates 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Killington’s hiking and mountain biking trails from the

peak are not permitted on Spartan weekend. But take a short 5-10 minute walk from the

top of the gondola to the actual Killington Peak at 4,241-feet above sea level for spectacular

360-degree views from Vermont’s second highest peak!

Live music

The Dan Brown Band will be performing from 6-9 p.m. on Saturday at K-1’s Mahogany

Ridge Bar. There will also be performances at the Snowshed Umbrella Bar on Friday from

3-6 p.m. with Chris Pallutto as well as Saturday from 3-6 p.m. with Duane Carleton.

SUDOKU

How to Play

Each block is divided by its own matrix of nine

cells. The rule for solving Sudoku puzzles are

very simple. Each row, column and block, must

contain one of the numbers from “1” to “9”. No

number may appear more than once in any

row, column, or block. When you’ve filled the

entire grid the puzzle is solved.

Solutions > 44

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

CLUES ACROSS

1. Babies’ eating accessories

5. Charge on a coat of arms

9. Set of five

11. California town

13. One who cites

15. Elected official

16. Japanese delicacy

17. Couldn’t be happier

19. Enormous

21. Hunter’s tool

22. Georgia rockers

23. Cold wind

25. Beginner

26. Where you sleep

27. Without

29. We all have them

31. Spoiled

33. Platform

34. Drama and horror are two

36. In abundance

38. Turf

39. Inventor Musk

41. Negative answers

43. French river

44. Saps of energy

46. Type of sandwich

48. Sets apart again

52. Engage in a contest

53. Sufferings

54. Freestanding sculpture

56. Digs into

57. Fish have them

58. Speaks

59. Storage unit

CLUES DOWN

1. Spread over

2. Dyes

3. British thermal unit

4. Small city in Maine

5. Having an affection for

6. Welsh for John

7. Plays that ridicule

8. Not of your right mind

9. A way to get there

10. Hideaways

11. Relating to neurons

12. “Family City USA”

14. Proof of payment (abbr.)

15. Flew high

18. Wreaths

20. Got rid of

24. Shortly

26. Confer

28. Monies given as support

30. German electric car

32. Objects of an earlier time

34. Flat-bottomed boats

35. Small waterbird

37. Willingness to please others

38. Military actions

40. Brooklyn hoopsters

42. Took to the seas

43. Romanian city

Solutions > 44

45. What the sun eventually does

47. Titans’ DC Dean

49. Resentful longing

50. Ceases to live

51. Pouches

55. Humbug

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LivingADE

28 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

This week’s living Arts, Dining and Entertainment!

The World’s Fair begins in Tunbridge, Sept. 12

Sept. 12-15—TUNBRIDGE—

The Tunbridge World’s

Fair has run continuously

since 1867 except in 1918,

due to the great flu epidemic,

and during World

War II.

The earliest known

photograph of the fair at

its current location dates

from around 1880. A onemile

race track for the Tunbridge

Trotting Park can be seen near the First Branch of the

White River. Horse racing was extremely popular, and

a grandstand and judge’s stand were soon built. Floral

Hall followed for all the competitive farm arts and

crafts. Later, concessions and amusements moved in

and parking fields to the south of the fairgrounds were

created.

In 1902 after going strong for a good 35 years the fair

incorporated under the Union Agricultural Society,

and as a result, received the 2012 Vermont State Centennial

Award for non-profit businesses.

Today, over 200 years since its inception, the Tunbridge

World’s Fair is still going strong, attracting visitors

from near and far.

Always 10 days after Labor Day, the 148th fair dates

are Sept. 12-15, 2019. For more information visit tunbridgeworldsfair.com.

Sept.

12

Courtesy Tunbridge Fair

Learn composting basics

Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 1 p.m.—WOODSTOCK—

What will you do with your food scraps on July 1, 2020?

That’s when Vermont’s Universal Recycling Law will

require all Vermonters to keep their food scraps (except

meat and bones) out of their household trash.

Ham Gillett, outreach coordinator for GUV (Greater

Upper Valley Solid Waste Management District) will

answer questions and talk about options for food scraps

and composting. Ham will be selling discounted “Soil

Saver” backyard composters for $30 and “Sure-Close”

food scrap pails for $5 to participants. Limit one each

per household. Additional “Soil Savers” may be purchased

for $50. Please register in advance by calling

(802)457-3277. The talk will be held at the Thompson Senior

Center located at 99 Senior Lane in Woodstock.

‘On Cue’ author Ron Thompson to talk, perform

Thursday, Sept. 12, at 6:45

p.m.—KILLINGTON—Ron

Thompson, author of “On Cue,

Managing Anxiety, Inviting Excellence”

— a guide to allowing your

creativity full expression without

being hampered by excess anxiety

— will present a talk complete

with musical examples, at Church

of Our Saviour in Killington, immediately

following the Killington

Farmers Market on Thursday,

Sept. 12 at 6:45 p.m.

Thompson, a psychologistmaster,

works with people who

recognize that excess performance

anxiety is keeping them from experiencing

full expression in their

chosen area.

He uses the Masterful Life-

Performance model to empower

them toward experiencing peak

performance in any area of their

lives. He offers personal and group

workshop trainings, guiding

people through a process by which

they identify and increase the

sources of performance confidence,

stimulate their creative

process, and thereby raise the degree

of excellence and enjoyment

in their chosen performance.

Thompson will give musical

examples on his trumpet during

his talk. He studied at Juilliard

School of Music. At 19, he became

the youngest trumpeter in a major

American symphony orchestra,

winning an audition for the National

Symphony in Washington,

D.C.

Talk and performance will be

at held at 316 Mission Farm Road,

across from the Killington Skyeship

Gondola.

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Central Vermont

Fine Dining

Coffee Houses

Local Favorites

& More

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 LIVING ADE • 29

Castleton University

to host cannabis

conference

Friday, Sept. 13, at 1 p.m.—CASTLE-

TON—Castleton University is hosting a

one-day conference to celebrate the official

launch of its new Cannabis Studies

Certificate Program on Friday, Sept. 13.

The “Cannabis: The Vermont Way”

conference will include information

and discussion about cannabis from

business, advocacy, legal, cultivation,

culinary, and health and wellness perspectives.

Lieutenant Governor David Zuckerman

will give the conference’s keynote

address. Zuckerman has been an

outspoken advocate for cannabis

reform in Vermont, supporting

a tax and regulate plan and

supporting the personal

possession plan.

The conference,

which will

begin at 1 p.m. in Castleton University’s

Hoff Hall, will also include two panel

discussions featuring Spencer Bell of

Northeast Hemp Commodities, Tim Fair

and Andrew Subin of Vermont Cannabis

Solutions, Cabot Marijuana Investor

Tim Lutts, Jessilyn Dolan of the Vermont

Cannabis Nurses Association, and other

cannabis professionals.

Alumnus Chef Joe Lewi will host a

cannabis cooking demonstration (using

CBD oils and extracts only), and there

will be an opportunity for networking.

“Cannabis: The Vermont

Way” is a free conference, but

registration is encouraged

at castleton.edu/cannabis-conference

or

at the door prior to

the event.

Rutland Young Professionals’

fifth Summit is Saturday

Saturday, Sept. 14, at 8:30 a.m.—RUT-

LAND—The Rutland Young Professionals

(RYP) are inviting young professionals from

around Vermont to attend the fifth annual

Young Professionals Summit of Vermont

scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 14 in downtown

Rutland at the Paramount Theatre.

The annual, statewide event will be held

from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with networking

to follow. Registration is $30 and includes

morning refreshments and a drink ticket for

the evening networking.

The full-day networking and learning

event will feature professional development

tracks with unique focus areas

including imposter syndrome, leadership,

involvement, and love your life with work/

life balance. Expert guest speakers will lead

three different sessions in each professional

development track to offer attendees a wellrounded

day of activities and lectures.

To cap off the full-day of learning Dr.

Karlyn Borysenko of Zen Workplace will

deliver the keynote, “Playing Politics: The

Psychology of the Human Workplace.” Dr.

Borysenko’s keynote will use science to help

attendees understand how human beings

Expect the Deliciously Unexpected

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make decisions at work and how to improve

office effectiveness.

To finish off the day of leadership training

and professional development, guests

are invited to stay for the networking event

on the stage of The Paramount Theatre for a

cash bar and appetizers starting at 5 p.m.

Katye Munger, Summit planning coordinator

and RYP member said: “These development

tracks will allow our state’s young

professionals to spend a day thinking

deeply about their confidence, community

involvement, and wellness. We know this

year’s Summit will be beneficial for a wide

audience of young professionals and look

forward to sharing the day with our peers

from around the state.”

In the five-year history of the Summit,

guest speakers and attendees have

included state officials as well as business

leaders such as Congressman Peter Welch

and Governor Phil Scott. Over the past four

years, 600 young professionals have gathered

in downtown Rutland for the summit.

Tickets to the Summit are $30, tickets

to the networking event after are $10. For

more information, visit ypsummitvt.com.

Hungry?

Our Executive Chef will surprise you

with a fresh & delicious 3-course meal:

Starter, Entree, and Dessert for $35*

Enjoy this special dining experience every

Sunday & Monday night at The Red Clover

* Plus tax & gratuity

Does not include beverages

Take a look

in our

Menu

THE

B O O K

FR

July - No

Restaurant Open Thursday - Monday, 5:30 - 9pm

802.775.2290 l RedCloverInn.com

Innkeepers@RedCloverInn.com

7 Woodward Road, Mendon, VT

Just off Route 4 in the heart of the Killington Valley

35

of the

best menus in

Produced by The Mountain Times © 2019 • Menus are samples


30 • LIVING ADE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Saturday, Sept. 14, at 7

p.m.—WOODSTOCK—Awardwinning

art historian, critic,

author and podcaster Tyler

Green will be speaking about

groundbreaking 19th century

photographer Carleton Watkins

on Saturday, Sept. 14, at 7 p.m.

at the Billings Farm & Museum

Visitor Center. A signing of

Green’s book, “Carleton Watkins:

Making the West American,”

will precede the talk, beginning

at 6 p.m. This lecture event is a

collaboration between Marsh-

Billings-Rockefeller National Historical

Park and Billings Farm & Museum. Light

refreshments will be provided.

Green’s talk explores the surprising

relationships between Carleton Watkins,

New England, and the national park

idea – including connections to Frederick

Billings and Woodstock, Vermont.

Considered the greatest photographer of

the 19th Century, Watkins’ work contributed

significantly to the evolution of

national identity, an idea Green examines

in-depth in his book.

Green is the producer and host of

The Modern Art Notes podcast, which

debuted in 2011 and is America’s most

downloaded audio program about art.

He lectures extensively and has authored

numerous articles and op-eds about art

and non-profit art institutions in both

digital and print publications. “Carleton

Watkins: Making the West American” is

his first Build book; a it Knight won the Contest 2019 California

Book Award gold medal.

Together, Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller

NHP and Billings Farm & Museum

comprise much of the former estate of

Frederick Billings. Early in his career as a

land lawyer in San Francisco, Frederick

Billings worked with Carleton Watkins,

before going on to serve as a railroad

president, agricultural innovator, and

conservationist. In July of 1861, Watkins

trekked into Yosemite Valley with the

National Park photographer > 32

If you would like to participate in our Build a Knight

Contest, please sign up at the information table

located on the back porch of the library. Then meet us

back at the table at 1pm with a parent or guardian.

by one vote in 1852?

We will hand out a roll of Reynolds Wrap to each

contestant and that child will have 10-15 minutes to

turn their grown-up into a knight in shining armor.

Prizes will be awarded for best attempt.

Limited to 10 participants.

and at Norwich University.

Welcome one and All to the

Vermont Fairy Tale Festival

A Celebration of Vermont’s Public Libraries

Hosted September by the Sherburne 21, 2019, Killington Memorial Library, VT

2998 River Road, Killington, VT

September 21, 2019 (10 a.m.-4 p.m.)

Brandon Public Library: Gnomes

Greetings from your festival hosts! The Sherburne Memorial Library is happy to host the festival

again this year. All of our events are outside this year and we are thrilled to have some fabulous

Vermont Public Libraries that have volunteered to showcase their favorite fairy tales. Add to that

three wonderful storytellers, talented musicians, food & craft vendors, costumed characters and free

books and you’ve got a wonderful day out for the whole family! We’re also welcoming our Vikings

back for the second year! Should you need anything, our information table is set up at the center of

our back porch and the volunteers there can answer any questions you might have about the day’s

events or things to do in the area. Welcome to the Vermont Fairy Tale Festival!

Participating Libraries and Chosen Tales/Themes:

Hartland Public Library: East of the Sun, West of the Moon

Kimball Public Library: Hansel & Gretel

Poultney Public Library: Baba Yaga

Our Musicians

Art scholar Tyler Green to speak on

19th century photographer whose work

inspired the birth of national parks

The Royal Court

The Royal Court will be in session from 11-12:30 and

from 2-3:30. Anyone who can stand before the Court

and either tell of a good deed done or a favorite book

Tyler Green

read (and why) shall be Knighted as a proud defender

of the Kingdom.

Come one, Come All to the

Vermont Fairy Tale Festival

Hosted by the Sherburne Memorial Library,

2998 River Road, Killington VT

September 21, 2019

10am-4pm

Come dressed as your favorite

Fairy Tale Character!

Admission: A non-perishable

item for the food bank or the

humane society.

Local Artisans & Crafters

Fairy Tale Booths Sponsored by

Vermont Public Libraries

Storytellers, Costumed

Characters

Sponsored by:

Photo Opportunities

Knights & Vikings

Sherburne Memorial Library: Guardians of Ga’Hoole

Swanton Public Library: Costumed Characters

O'hAnleigh is Irish-American folk music with roots that rock. Tom Hanley, Becca

Hanley and Cindy Hill bring the traditions of Irish immigrant culture, history,

literature and music to life with dynamic performances including rousing drinking

songs, toe-tapping

talk

pub favorites,

about

haunting

a

ballads,

lecture

sizzling fiddle

not

tunes,

given

and

Sunday, Sept. 15, at 2 p.m.—MIDDLETOWN

originals based

SPRINGS—The

on Irish myths

50th

and

annual

legends.

meeting

O'hAnleigh

of the

is available for concerts,

private Middletown parties, pubs Springs and restaurants, Historical Society weddings, will fairs, farmers markets, and

convene at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 15, at the

festivals. We particularly delight in bringing history to life in song at civil war

Historical Society Building. Following a dessert

encampments, buffet, a review history of the year’s fairs, accomplishments

Renn Faires and Steampunk Expos.

Dorset Village Library: Alice in Wonderland

Highgate Public Library: Snow White & Rose Red

Maclure Public Library: The Wizard of Oz

Dragon Egg Scavenger Hunt

We have hidden a dozen or so dragon eggs

around the property. If you happen to find

one, bring it to the information table on the

back porch where you can keep it or trade it

in for a prize. Please, only one per family so

that all have a chance to play!

Vermont Fairy Tale Festival

Come dressed as your favorite Fairy Tale Character!

Admission: A non-perishable item for the food bank or the humane society.

Local Artisans & Crafters, Original Fairy Tale Booths,

Storytellers, Costumed Characters,

Photo Opportunities, Knights & Vikings

‘Frisbie’s Fourth Lecture’ a historical

and plans for the future will be presented. After,

historian Philip Crossman will give a presentation,

“Frisbie’s Fourth Lecture: Things Left Out

of the History of Middletown, Vermont, 1867.”

In February and March of 1867, Judge

Barnes Frisbie delivered three lectures to the

citizens of Middletown which were published

later that year as the History of Middletown,

Vermont.

At 52 years old, Barnes was too young to

have been part of the first settlement himself

but he was well-connected and observant

enough to collect stories from elderly living settlers

or from their descendants and friends.

Phil Crossman’s imaginative PowerPoint

“Fourth Discourse” will introduce a few things

that Barnes Frisbie decided not to tell us, didn’t

have time to tell us, didn’t know we would want

to know, or didn’t know himself. For example,

what was his relationship to the frisbie that

we all played with growing up? And how did

Middletown miss getting a presidential library

Come one, Come All to the

Hosted by the Sherburne Memorial Library,

2998 River Road, Killington VT

September 21, 2019

10am-4pm

Philip Crossman has spent most of his

career teaching the humanities to high school

and college students. He currently works as

an administrator at Community College of

Vermont (CCV) and teaches part-time at CCV

Come dressed as your favorite

Fairy Tale Character!

Admission: A non-perishable

item for the food bank or the

humane society.

Local Artisans & Crafters

Fairy Tale Booths Sponsored by

Rockingham Free Public Library: Norse Tales

South Burlington Public Library: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Wells Village Library: The Princess & the Frog

Vermont Public Libraries

Storytellers, Costumed

Characters

Photo Opportunities

Sponsored by:

Knights & Vikings

Submitted

Historian Phillip Crossman

Submitted

Judge Barnes Frisbie published a

book on Middletown Springs,1867.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 LIVING ADE • 31

Walk for health three Saturdays in

September raises awareness

Fall focus: to prevent suicide and child abuse, support palliative care

Saturday, Sept. 14, at 9:30 a.m.—

RUTLAND—This fall, teams from

Community Health are walking with

friends, neighbors, families, organizations,

businesses and supporters

who care about the health and wellness

of our community and specifically

to prevent suicide and child

abuse and support palliative care.

Teams from Community Health’s network

of medical, dental and behavioral

health practices will be shoulder

to shoulder with walkers in Rutland

on three Saturdays in September.

The Walk Out of the Darkness will

be held on Saturday, Sept. 14, and

is part of a nationwide effort by the

American Foundation for Suicide

Prevention (AFSP) to raise the awareness

of suicide and efforts to prevent

it. Their goal is to reduce the annual

suicide rate 20% by the year 2025.

Community Health’s Behavioral

Health Leader Chris Chadwick said

his team, which will be walking on

Sept. 14, has recently taken special

training on suicide prevention and

understands the power of community

support.

The importance of walks like

this is to shine light onto a darkness

that impacts our patients, friends

Sept.

14

and family members whose lives

have been impacted by suicide,”

Chadwick said. “We want

to show strength and

unity for those who

continue to feel

alone.”

Suicide prevention

was one of

the health issues

identified in the most

recent Community

Health Needs Assessment,

created every three

years by health care organizations

in the Rutland region. The report

recommended increased awareness

and “community approach and

education.”

The walk will be held from 9:30

a.m.–12 p.m. starting at Rutland Main

Street Park, 5 South Main Street in

Rutland.

Upcoming:

On Saturday, Sept. 21, The

Vermont Great 2.4.6.8k is a walk or

run event where team Community

Health will be racing and raising

funds for the palliative care program

at Rutland Regional Medical Center.

Palliative care improves the quality of

life for individuals with serious or lifethreatening

illnesses and supports

the families of these individuals. The

race begins at 10:30 a.m. on

Center St. in Rutland.

On Saturday, Sept.

28 from 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

a team from Community

Health will also

be joining the Walk for

Children, taking place

in Rutland and Montpelier.

These walks are to

unite and educate the community

and “send the important

message that there is something that

everyone can do to help. You don’t

have to be a parent to care for the

future of Vermont’s children.

Community Health is the largest

network of primary care, pediatric

and dental services in Rutland and

southern Addison Counties with offices

in Rutland, Brandon, Castleton,

West Pawlet and Shoreham. Community

Dental offices are located in

Rutland and Shoreham, Community

Health Pediatrics is in Rutland and

Community Health’s Express Care

centers, open seven days a week, are

located at the Rutland and Castleton

Community Health Centers. For more

info visit chcrr.org.

Happy, Healthy &

Hassel-Free!

Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom

Apartments, Optional Dining,

Living and Health services,

Vibrant social Atmosphere

55+ Independent

Senior Living

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE

Community Tour Wednesdays at 12:30 p.m.

www.SummitPMG.com • 802.776.1000 • 5 General Wing Road, Rutland, VT

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE

You’re Lost…

You’re Laughin’…

You’re LOVIN’ it!

You’re Lost…

You’re Laughin’…

You’re LOVIN’ it!

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MA

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE

You’re Lost…

You’re Laughin’…

You’re LOVIN’ it!

You’re Lost…

You’re Laughin’…

You’re LOVIN’ it!

12-acre “Under the Sea” Maze,

New this Year…

Smartphone Games &

Pedal Go-Karts!

Livestock Barn * Play Area

* Mini Maze

12-acre “Under the Sea” Maze,

New this Year…

Smartphone Games &

Pedal Go-Karts!

Livestock Barn * Play Area

* Mini Maze

13 Acre “KIDS 12 COLOR Acre “UNDER THEIR THE WORLD SEA” Maze,

New this Year …

WITH KINDNESS” Maze with Clues, Punches,

Smartphone Games & Pedal Go-Karts!

Smartphone Games, Bridges

Livestock Barn • Play Area • Mini Maze

Mini Maze • Livestock Barn • Play Area

with GIANT

SNACK

CORN

SHACK

PIT, Pedal

& WAGON

Karts, Duck

RIDES

Races

ON

&

THE

more!

WEEKENDS!

12-acre “Under the Sea” Maze,

New this Year…

Smartphone Games &

Pedal Go-Karts!

Livestock Barn * Play Area

* Mini Maze

SNACK SHACK & WAGON RIDES

ON THE WEEKENDS!

SNACK SHACK & WAGON RIDES

ON THE WEEKENDS!

Admission $12 Adults - $10 Kids (4-11) & Seniors • Open 10-5 – Closed Tuesdays

SNACK Moonlight Madness SHACK every & Saturday WAGON until 7p.m. RIDES in Aug., 9p.m. ON Sept. THE & Oct. WEEKENDS!

Admission $12 Adults

$10 Kids 4-11 & Seniors

Open 10-5 – Closed Tuesdays

Moonlight Madness every

Admission $12 Adults

$10 Kids 4-11 & Seniors

Open 10-5 – Closed Tuesdays

You’re Lost…

You’re Laughin’…

You’re LOVIN’ it!

You’re Lost…

You’re Laughin’…

You’re LOVIN’ it!

12-acre “Under the Sea” Maze,

New this Year…

Smartphone Games &

Pedal Go-Karts!

Livestock Barn * Play Area

12-acre “Under the Sea” Maze,

New this Year…

Smartphone Games &

Pedal Go-Karts!

Livestock Barn * Play Area

* Mini Maze

Admission 741 Prospect $12 Hill Adults Rd, Rutland, - $10 VT Kids • hathawayfarm.com (4-11) & Seniors • 802.775.2624 • Open 10-5 – Closed Tuesdays

Moonlight Madness every Saturday night with admission until 9pm

741 Prospect Hill Rd, Rutland, VT • hathawayfarm.com • 802.775.2624

SNACK SHACK & WAGON RIDES

ON THE WEEKENDS!

Saturday night admission until 7pm in Aug,

9pm in Sept & Oct

741 Prospect Hill Rd, Rutland Town, VT

hathawayfarm.com • 802.775.2624

Admission $12 Adults

Pawlet library hosts dinner

and auction fundraiser

Monday, Sept. 16, at 6 p.m.—PAWLET—The Pawlet

Public Library Board of Trustees will present a silent and

live auction at The Barn Restaurant in Pawlet on Monday,

Sept. 16, from 6-9 p.m. This fundraiser, open to the public,

supports free library programs and new books for adults

and children. Advanced reservations for dinner at $25 per

person are required. Call the library at 802-325-3123.

Pawlet resident Bob Ebling will man the gavel for the

auction. Over 40 items will be available for live or silent

auction bidding. Items includes bed and breakfast overnights,

pottery lessons, a harvest dinner for six at a private

home, foliage airplane rides, and much more.

For more information visit pawletpubliclibrary.wordpress.com,

or stop by the library to view the items at 141

School Street in Pawlet.

12 Acre “UNDER THE SEA” Maze,

New this Year …

Smartphone Games & Pedal Go-Karts!

Livestock Barn • Play Area • Mini Maze

12-acre “Under the Sea” Maze,

New this Year…

Smartphone Games &

PYO

beginning mid

Sept

SNACK SHACK & WAGON RIDES ON THE WEEKEN

Submitted


Food Matters

32 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

KILLINGTON, VT | (802) 422-2787 | LIQUIDARTVT.COM

Back Country Café

The Back Country Café is a hot spot

for delicious breakfast foods. Choose

from farm fresh eggs, multiple kinds of

pancakes and waffles, omelet’s or daily

specials to make your breakfast one of a kind. Just the right heat Bloody

Marys, Mimosas, Bellini, VT Craft Brews, Coffee and hot chocolate drinks.

Maple Syrup and VT products for sale Check Facebook for daily specials.

(802) 422-4411.

Choices Restaurant

& Rotisserie

Chef-owned, Choices Restaurant and

Rotisserie was named 2012 ski magazines

favorite restaurant. Choices may

be the name of the restaurant but it is also what you get. Soup of the day,

shrimp cockatil, steak, hamburgers, pan seared chicken, a variety of salads

and pastas, scallops, sole, lamb and more await you. An extensive wine

list and in house made desserts are also available. choices-restaurant.com

(802) 422-4030.

MORE

THAN

COFFEE

COFFEEHOUSE

& EATERY

8AM-3PM MON-WED / 8AM-10PM THURS-SUN

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • OPEN MIC THURSDAY @ 6PM

Birch Ridge

Serving locals and visitors alike since 1998, dinner

at the Birch Ridge Inn is a delicious way to

complete your day in Killington. Featuring Vermont

inspired New American cuisine in the inns dining

room and Great Room Lounge, you will also find

a nicely stocked bar, hand crafted cocktails, fine

wines, seafood and vegetarian options, and wonderful house made desserts.

birchridge.com, 802-422-4293.

Clear River Tavern

Headed north from Killington on Route

100? Stop in to the Clear River Tavern

to sample chef Tim Galvin’s handcrafted

tavern menu featuring burgers, pizza, salads,

steak and more. We’re in Pittsfield, 8 miles from Killington. Our live music

schedule featuring regional acts will keep you entertained, and our friendly

service will leave you with a smile. We’re sure you’ll agree that “When You’re

Here, You’re in the Clear.” clearrivertavern.com (802) 746-8999.

Charity’s

A local tradition in Killington for over 43

years, Charity’s has something for everyone

on the menu. Soups, salads, tacos,

burgers, sandwiches and more, it’s all

mouth-watering. A children’s menu is available and large parties are more than

welcome www.charitystavern.com (802) 422-3800

Countryman’s Pleasure

With an authentic, old-world ambience, we havebeen

attracting foodies from all over since before

they were called foodies. The charming country

farmhouse dining rooms have been refreshed while

maintaining the cozy, fine dining experience. Serving

exceptional European cuisine with a menu that

features locally-sourced meats, uniquely inspires chef specials. So, if you live

near or far, and want to share an evening of great food and drink – escape to

Countryman’s Pleasure in Rutland…it’s always a pleasure. countrymanspleasure.com

(802) 773-7141

National Park photographer: Charleton Watkins’ images spurred creation of yosemite

from page 30

>

intent to create images that would

convey the scale and beauty of the

landscape.

Using a 2-foot-by-3-foot camera

of his own design, hundreds of glass

plate negatives, and 2,000 pounds

of gear, he emerged two months

later with 30 of the most influential

photographs ever captured.

His Yosemite portfolio circulated

among intellectuals and politicians

in the east, and ultimately helped

spur the legislation, signed by

President Lincoln in 1864, protecting

that special place from development.

Yosemite went on to become a

national park in 1890.

An exhibition of eight of Watkins’

Yosemite prints, meticulously

reproduced from originals in the

Billings Family Archives at Billings

Farm & Museum, are currently on

display at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller

NHP.

Titled “Creating an American

Landscape,” the show is part of an

ongoing series of exhibitions at the

national park exploring the role

of art in the American conservation

movement. The exhibit is on

display at the Carriage Barn Visitor

Center at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller

NHP and can be viewed daily 10

a.m. – 5 p.m. through Oct. 31.

Park Curator Ryan Polk said,

“Due to a series of tragic events,

Watkins, the man, was relatively

unknown until Tyler Green painstakingly

reassembled the 19th century

world around him. His book is

a tremendous achievement.”

“Billings Farm & Museum is delighted

to partner with the Park in

welcoming Tyler Green to share his

insightful perspectives on Carleton

Watkins, whose story touches on

Frederick Billings, Woodstock, and

the amazing photographs that we

hold in our collection,” said David

Simmons, president of the Woodstock

Foundation.

Admission to the program and

book signing is free; reservations

are strongly recommended: call

802-457-2355 or email reservations@billingsfarm.org.

21 Years Serving Guests

At the Covered Carriageway

37 Butler Road, Killington

birchridge.com • 802.422.4293

Welcome

Spartans

Dinner served

from 6:00 PM

Tuesday thru Saturday

Reservations welcomed

Carbo or Keto

We have your

fuel for

the Beast!


Food Matters

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 • 33

Dream Maker Bakers

Dream Maker Bakers is an all-butter, fromscratch

bakery making breads, bagels, croissants,

cakes and more daily. It serves soups,

salads and sandwiches and offers seating

with free Wifi and air-conditioning. at 5501 US

Route 4, Killington, VT. Open Thurs.- Mon. 6:30 a.m.-3p.m. No

time to wait? Call ahead. dreammakerbakers.com 802-422-5950

dreammakerbakers.com

The Foundry

at Summit Pond

Enjoy an intimate dining menu or tavern

specials at Killington’s only waterside dining

that also has live entertainment every

Friday and Saturday. Appetizers include crab cakes, buffalo drumsticks and a

cheese plate while the entrees include chicken Marsala, meat loaf, steamed

lobster and more. The tavern menu features nachos, fried fish sandwich, teriyaki

steak sandwich and others. www.foundrykillington.com (802) 422-5335

McGrath’s

Irish Pub

Coffee Roasters

Arabica - Single Origin

802-773-9535

Inn at Long Trial

Looking for something a little different? Hit up

McGrath’s Irish Pub for a perfectly poured pint

of Guinness, Inn live music at on the weekends and delicious

food. Guinness not your favorite? They also

L ng Trail

have Vermont’s largest Irish Whiskey selection.

Rosemary’s Restaurant is now open, serving dinner.

Reservations appreciated. Visit innatlongtrail.

com, 802-775-7181.

JAX Food & Games

At Killington’s hometown bar, you’re bound to

have a good time with good food. Starters, burgers,

sandwiches, wraps and salads are all available.

With live entertainment seven days a week,

they’re always serving food until last call. www.

supportinglocalmusic.com (802) 422-5334

Jones’ Donuts

Offering donuts and a bakery, with a

community reputation as being the best!

Closed Monday and Tuesday. 23 West

Street, Rutland. See what’s on special at

Facebook.com/JonesDonuts/. Call (802)

773-7810

Killington Coffee Roaster

We roast small batch single origin coffee.

Our offerings are from Africa, Central/

South American and Indonesia. We offer

1 lb and 3 lb bags. Located at the Killington

Motel. (802) 773-9535

Open

Thurs. - Mon. 6:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Check out our NEW dining area!

All butter from scratch bakery making

breads, bagels, croissants, cakes and more.

Now serving soup, salad and sandwiches....

seating with Wifi and AC.

Killington Market

Take breakfast, lunch or dinner on the go

at Killington Market, Killington’s on-mountain

grocery store for the last 30 years.

Choose from breakfast sandwiches, hand

carved dinners, pizza, daily fresh hot panini, roast chicken, salad and specialty

sandwiches. Vermont products, maple syrup, fresh meat and produce along

with wine and beer are also for sale. killingtonmarket.com (802) 422-7736

or (802) 422-7594.

Lake Bomoseen Lodge

The Taproom at Lake Bomoseen Lodge,

Vermont’s newest lakeside resort & restaurant.

Delicious Chef prepared, family

friendly, pub fare; appetizers, salads,

burgers, pizzas, entrees, kid’s menu, a great craft brew selection & more.

Newly renovated restaurant, lodge & condos. lakebomoseenlodge.com, 802-

468-5251.

Liquid Art

Forget about the polar vortex for a while

and relax in the warm atmosphere at Liquid

Art. Look for artfully served lattes from

their La Marzocco espresso machine, or if

you want something stronger, try their signature cocktails. Serving breakfast,

lunch and dinner, they focus on healthy fare and provide you with a delicious

meal different than anything else on the mountain.

MENDON MINI GOLF

S N A C K B A R

Mendon Mini Golf & Snack Bar

5501 US Route 4 • Killington, VT 05751

802.422.5950

Breakfast • Pastries • Coffee • Lunch • Cakes • Special Occasions

&

Lookout Tavern

Enjoy our new rooftop patio for lunch or dinner with

an amazing view of the mountain. Select burgers,

salads, sandwiches and daily specials with

K-Town’s best wings. lookoutvt.com (802) 422-

5665

Mad Hatter’s Scoops

The sweetest spot in Killington, Mad Hatter’s is

your premier ice cream destination! Mad Hatter’s

offers all your favorite ice cream flavors,

sundaes, shakes and home-made waffle cones!

Weather permitting, enjoy movies outdoors

on the big screen, Friday and Saturday nights!

40 Summit Path, Killington (802) 422-3335.

Mendon Mini Golf and Snack Bar serves a variety

of dining options that include Handmade Burgers,

Dogs, Grilled Chicken, Fish, Hand-cut Fries, and

many other meals and sides. Also choose from 11

flavors of Hershey’s Ice Cream. 776-4921

Coffee Roasters

Arabica - Single Origin

802-773-9535

1946 US Route 4, Killington, VT

802-773-9535

Classic Italian Cuisine

Old World Tradition

~ Since 1992 ~

fresh. simple.

delicious!

1/2 price appetizers

& flaTbreads

from 4-5 p.m.

Open

for the summer

closed Wednesdays

pasta | veal

Chicken | seafood

steak | flatbreads

For reservations

802-422-3293

First on the Killington Road


Food Matters

34 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

SEPT. 1 4 - 1 5,

2019

WELCOME

SPARTANS! AROO!

Moguls

Voted the best ribs and burger in

Killington, Moguls is a great place

for the whole family. Soups, onion

rings, mozzarella sticks, chicken

fingers, buckets of chicken wings, salads, subs and pasta are

just some of the food that’s on the menu. Free shuttle and

take away and delivery options are available. (802) 422-4777

Mountain Top Inn

Whether staying overnight or visiting for

the day, Mountain Top’s Dining Room &

Tavern serve delicious cuisine amidst one

of Vermont’s best views. A mix of locally

inspired and International cuisine – including salads, seafood, poultry and a

new steakhouse menu - your taste buds are sure to be satisfied. Choose from

12 Vermont craft brews on tap.Warm up by the terrace fire pit after dinner! A

short drive from Killington. mountaintopinn.com, 802-483-2311.

Peppino’s

Chef-owned since 1992, Peppino’s offers

Neapolitan cuisine at its finest:

pasta, veal, chicken, seafood, steak,

and flatbreads. If you want it, Peppino’s

has it! Aprés-hour daily features half price appetizers and flatbreads.

For reservations, call 802-422-3293. peppinosvt.com.

Red Clover Inn

Farm to Table Vermont Food and Drinks.

Thursday night Live Jazz. Monday night

Chef Specials. Open Thursday to Monday,

5:30 to 9:00 p.m. 7 Woodward Road,

Mendon, VT.

802-775-2290, redcloverinn.com

Rosemary’s

Rosemary’s will be open Friday and

Saturday nights from 6 - 9 p.m. during the

Summer season serving a delightful menu

of fresh and superbly seasoned selections. Built around an indoor boulder, we

also feature an illuminated boulder garden view, and photographs capturing

the Inn’s history. Chef Reggie Serafin , blends the flavors of Ireland with those

of countryside New England created with a host of fresh local Vermont and

New England seafood products. We take pride in serving you only the best

quality, and supporting the local farmers. Reservations Appreciated.

(802) 775-7181

Seward’s Dairy

If you’re looking for something truly

unique and Vermont, check out Seward

Dairy Bar. Serving classic homemade

food including hamburgers, steaks, chicken, sandwiches and seafood. Craving

something a little sweeter? Check out their own homemade 39 flavors of

ice cream. Vermont products also sold. (802) 773-2738.

Sugar and Spice

Stop on by to Sugar and Spice for a home style

breakfast or lunch served up right. Try six different

kinds of pancakes and/or waffles or order up

some eggs and home fries. For lunch they offer

a Filmore salad, grilled roast beef, burgers and

sandwiches. Take away and deck dining available.

www.vtsugarandspice.com (802) 773-7832.

Sushi Yoshi

Sushi Yoshi is Killington’s true culinary adventure.

With Hibachi, Sushi, Chinese and Japanese, we

have something for every age and palate. Private

Tatame rooms and large party seating available.

We boast a full bar with 20 craft beers on

draft. Lunch and dinner available seven days a week. We are chef-owned

and operated. Delivery or take away option available. Now open year round.

www.vermontsushi.com (802) 422-4241

Open Daily for

Lunch & Dinner

BURGERS

BURRITOS

SEAFOOD

CRAFT BEER

BEST WINGS

FISH & CHIPS

SANDWICHES

BBQ RIBS

NACHOS

DAILY SPECIALS

T YOU COVERED

KIDS MENU

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happy hour 3-6p.m.

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED AT THE

Hungry? Menu

JONES

DONUTS

“Jones Donuts and Bakery is a

must stop if you reside or simply

come to visit Rutland. They have

been an institution in the community

and are simply the best.”

Take a look in

THE

B O O K

FREE

July - Nov. 2019

• A Farm to Table Restaurant

• Handcut Steaks, Filets & Fish

• All Baking Done on Premises

35

of the best menus

in Central Vermont

Fine Dining

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Institute of

America

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WED, THURS & SUN - 5:00-9:00 P.M.

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• Over 20 wines by the glass

• Great Bar Dining

• Freshly made pasta

CHECK OUT OUR NEW ROOFTOP PAVILION!

2910 KILLINGTON ROAD, KILLINGTON VT

802-422-LOOK LOOKOUTVT.COM

open wed. - sun. 5 to 12

closed mon. + tues.

23 West St, Rutland

802-773-7810

All entrées include two sides and soup or salad

422-4030 • 2820 KILLINGTON RD.

WWW.CHOICES-RESTAURANT.COM


BB A

KIL

Food Matters

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 • 35

Great Breakfast Menu

Mimosas ~ Bellinis ~ Bloody Marys

Protein Breakfast Bars (Vegan + Paleo)

Yield: 12

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 15 minutes

Total time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

1 cup desiccated coconut

1/2 cup shelled hemp seeds

1/2 cup sesame seeds

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 180C / 350F and line a brownie

tin with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, combine the coconut, seeds, nuts,

raisins and cinnamon.

In a large saucepan, melt the cashew butter with the

maple syrup on a medium heat. Once it’s well combined

and smooth, remove from the heat and stir in the

vanilla extract.

Add the contents of the bowl to the saucepan and mix

until everything is well combined. If you need to, you

can add a small drop of water to help it stick together.

Transfer to the brownie tin and press down as firmly

as possible to create a flat, even layer.

Courtesy Wallflowerkitchen.com

1/2 cup pumpkin seeds

1 1/2 cups mixed nuts, chopped into small chunks

(I added cashews, walnuts, almonds & pistachios to a

high-powered blender and pulsed for a few seconds)

1/2 cup raisins

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 cup cashew butter, or nut butter of your choice

4 tbsp maple syrup or date paste

1 tsp vanilla extract

Bake for approximately 15 minutes until golden

brown.

Leave to cool completely before cutting into 12 bars.

Keep in an air tight tin for up to a week. Enjoy!

These bars are:

• Dairy-free & vegan

• Gluten-free, grain-free & paleo-friendly

• Soy-free

• High in plant-based protein (10g per bar!)

• Kid-friendly (perfect for quick breakfasts)

Recipe couresty of wallflowerkitchen.com

EGGS • OMELETTES • PANCAKES • WAFFLES

Open Friday-Monday at 7 A.M.

923 KILLINGTON RD. 802-422-4411

follow us on Facebook and Instagram @back_country_cafe

Vermont

Gift Shop

RUTLAND

CO-OP

grocery

I

household goods

77 Wales St

(802) 773-2738

produce

health and beauty

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

LARGEST SELECTION OF ICE CREAM TREATS!

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

Celebrating our 74th year!

Open Daily 6:30 a.m.

Specials

Daily

WEEKLY

SPECIALS

1807 KILLINGTON ROAD

vermontsushi.com

802.422.4241

Tuesday to Sunday 11:30 AM to 10:00 PM

HIBACHI | SUSHI | ASIAN

20 Craft Beers on Draft • Full Bar • Takeout & Delivery • Kid’s Game Room

MONDAY Closed

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Good GuysALL NIGHT

$10 Flight Night

$4 Vermont Drafts

25% off with Vt. ID

or bike pass

(2) per guest

Kids eat FREE hibachi

with each purchase of an adult hibachi meal.

Some exclusions apply.

SPECIALS VALID AT KILLINGTON LOCATION ONLY

All specials are for dine in only. Not valid on take out or delivery. Cannot be

combined with any other offer. Other exclusions may apply.

Come to our sugarhouse fot the

best breakfast around!

After breakfast, check out

our gift shop for all your

souvenier, gift, and maple

syrup needs. We look forward

to your visit!

Serving Breakfast & Lunch

7a.m. - 2p.m. daily

Breakfast all day!

Sugar & Spice Restaurant & Gift Shop

Rt. 4 Mendon, VT

802-773-7832 | www.vtsugarandspice.com


36 • PETS

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Rutland County Humane Society

Now is the PURRfect time to add a feline to your family!

Pictured are five of 12 cats that came in from one home!

They are all sweet and have lived with dogs and young children,

so they will adjust to any type of home. We have many

more cats and some kittens. All are waiting to join your

family! We are open Wednesday thru Saturday from noon to

4:30 or call 802-885-3997 for more information.

This pet is available for adoption at

Springfield Humane Society

401 Skitchewaug Trail, Springfield, VT• (802) 885-3997

Wed. - Sat. 12-4p.m. Closed Sun. Mon. Tues •spfldhumane.org

ANDY - 4-year-old neutered

male. Domestic

Short Hair. Black. - I love

the balls with bells in them,

so if you could get me some

of those, I would really appreciate

that.

MICKEY - 15-year-old

spayed female. Domestic

Short Hair. Gray. I may be

an older girl, but I still have

a lot of spring in my step.

MISSY - 13-year-old

spayed female. Domestic

Long Hair. Black and

white. I am a calm, independent

lady who is looking

for a quiet home to spend

my days.

ONYX - 9-year-old spayed

female. Domestic Short

Hair. Black and white. My

previous human moved

away and wasn’t able to

take me along, and sitting

on someone’s lap sounds

pretty cool.

BROOKS

COMET - 3-year-old neutered

male. Pit bull terrier

mix. I need to be your only

dog, and I would not be

good candidate for the dog

park.

PENELOPE - 1-year-old

spayed female. Domestic

Long Hair. Black and white.

I don’t like other cats. Really.

I want to be the only

cat in your life.

I’m a 1-year-old neutered male. Before I came to Lucy

Mackenzie, I used to hang around outdoors in somebody’s

yard. I’m still timid, especially around humans, but I’m getting

more and more used to them every day. I’m very good

friends with a lot of the other cats here, too, I’ve not made

friends with any dogs yet (least not any real friendships that

will last), but if they are low-energy and friendly enough, I

would definitely consider living with one in a new home as

well) ! Lucy Mackenzie Humane Society is located at 4832

Route 44, West Windsor. We’re open to the public Tuesday

through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. and noon to 7 p.m. on

Thursdays. Reach us daily at 802-484-LUCY.

This pet is available for adoption at

Lucy Mackenzie Humane Society

4832 VT-44, Windsor, VT • (802) 484-5829

Tues. - Sat. 12-4p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. • lucymac.org

ALLEY - 3-year-old neutered

male. Domestic Short

Hair. Gray. I am currently

hanging out in a big room

with some other cats and

we all get along.

APRIL

8-year-old spayed female. Domestic Short

Hair.Tortie. Hello! I love playing with toys and

getting belly rubs.

All of these pets are available for adoption at

Rutland County Humane Society

765 Stevens Road, Pittsford, VT • (802) 483-6700

Tues. - Sat. 12-5p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. • www.rchsvt.org

PIKACHU -1-year-old neutered

male. Terrier mix. I

know Stay and I’m learning

Sit but I still need a little encouragement!

MAYA - 2-year-old spayed

female. Domestic Short

Hair. Brown tiger and white.

Me and my kittens were in

foster care for a while and

now that the kids are grown

up enough to be out on their

own, it’s time for me to find

my forever home, too.

OTIS - 10-year-old neutered

male. Terrier mix. I’m

a sweet older fella and I’m

looking for a loving home

and a soft couch where I

can enjoy my golden years.

TOBY - 2-year-old neutered

male. Boxer mix. I came to

RCHS after my previous

owner decided she could

not give me the time and

attention I needed.

MUSH - 9-year-old neutered

male. Domestic

Short Hair. Orange tabby.

I am an indoor only cat and,

boy, would I like it to stay

that way.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 MOTHER OF THE SKYE • 37

Aries

March 21 - April 20

Who knows what will come out of

this? You’re the one with all the

power in the situation, so don’t let anyone

trick you into thinking that you need to go

out of your way. I see some potential for

other people’s motives to be a little twisted.

You might want to keep your eye on that.

What also seems clear is that you need to be

pumping up the volume on your work; not

just in the way of outer success, but from

the point of view of what purpose does it

serve relative to the greater whole. Money?

Fame? They don’t cut it in the long run. It

comes down to love at the end of the day.

Taurus

April 21 - May 20

People don’t give you the credit you deserve.

Either that or they have blinders

that prevent them from seeing who you are.

Some of you feel unworthy due to this lack

of recognition. Others don’t give a hoot

what others think because deep down inside,

you know who you are. At this point

things are coming together in a way that

will show the world how much you have

to offer. Be prepared to enter the limelight

and watch people get blown away by your

accomplishments. Whatever you’ve been

working on is ready to come to fruition,

and when it does, everything will change.

Gemini

May 21 - June 20

Things that have been in the works for

four or five years are just about ready to

hatch. You’ve made it this far. Keeping up

the good work is where it’s at. The expression,

There’s many a slip between the cup

and the lip,” is well suited to your current

affairs. This means that even though things

are pretty much ripe, you need to remain

vigilant as you cross the finish line. Expect

detractors to show up to bollix things up,

and/or, challenges and snafus that serve to

distract you and rattle your confidence. For

the next month or so, keep your eye on the

prize and don’t fall asleep at the switch.

Cancer

June 21 - July 20

You’ve undergone a deep metamorphosis

in the last year or so. Your values,

your work, your sense of self, and your relationship

dynamics have shifted in more

ways than one. With what’s fallen away, the

sense of unknowing has left you wondering

what’s next. When things shift like this, it

takes time for life to replenish us. You can

run around filling the void with one thing

or another, but it doesn’t always work. In

some cases, you know enough to wait on

the will of Heaven. Be wary of the need to

grasp at straws. At a major milestone, quick

fixes don’t go with the territory.

Leo

July 21 - August 20

Only you can own the fact that this is

taking you to a deeper place. If the

changes of the last year have made you

realize how fragile life is, grab yourself by

the horns and remember that everything

has a limited life span, and “nothing gold

can stay.” When the rug gets pulled out

from under us it’s best to hold on and wait

for the next phase of our journey to materialize.

What they don’t tell us in school is

that we get just so much time to do certain

things. When the jig is up, we need to learn

how to stand on the shoulders of every experience

and move on from there.

Virgo

August 21 - September 20

This is one of those times when a deeper

look at yourself is in order. I say this

because whoever you thought you were, or

think you are, is gone with the wind. There

are moments when you are more than clear

about this, and the idea that you’ve lived

this long and still don’t have the answer

makes you nervous. Don’t let it get to you.

At times like this what’s really happening

is, you’re getting closer to the truth. So the

question is, when you hit the bottom line

where do you go from there? The only way

out is up. Raise your consciousness high

enough to let leaps of faith lead the way.

Libra

September 21 - October 20

There’s lots of last-minute stuff adding

to an already over the top schedule.

Things would be easier if you had some

help, or if others didn’t keep bailing out.

Your tendency to feel like it’s your job to

keep things together makes it hard to cope

with situations where everything is nuts.

Give yourself permission to ask for support

if you need it. It might also make sense to

let people have it if they’re too spaced out

to notice that they’re expecting too much.

It’s OK to be less than perfect. And, in case

you haven’t noticed, life always hits a tipping

point a month before your birthday.

Scorpio

October 21 - November 20

You’re in one of those phases where the

next round of inspiration is nowhere

in sight. When things get like this it can be

depressing. We start to wonder, “Why does

nothing seem to be working?” or, “Is there

more to life than this?” This is where we

start to look around, wishing that life would

take us deeper into the mystery. The daily

grind may have its good points but when

you wake up feeling empty inside, filling

the Void becomes an issue. This time the

cure for what ails you, ain’t “out there”.

Settle down and figure out how to pull your

inspiration from within.

Copyright - Cal Garrison: 2019: ©

Sagittarius

November 21 - December 20

You are doing better than ever. In so

many ways, your story looks absolutely

wonderful. As the goodness and blessings

pile up, part of you wonders when, or

if, the other shoe will drop. In some cases

this trepidation centers on how to remain in

control in your relationships. You’ve got it

made in many ways, but old stories haunt

you with the thought that this bubble could

burst at any moment. When things get like

this, it’s best to haul back and remember that

there are only two emotions on this planet:

love and fear. The message is; don’t let fear

overtake love and ruin your relationship.

Capricorn

December 21 - January 20

ou’re pretty sure of yourself. There’s

Ynothing wrong with that; it’s good to

be clear about your position. As the next

few months unfold that sense will be validated

by external circumstances. In a few

months, the long awaited dream could be

in your pocket. Part of you knows this, and

can feel it – but deep down inside you are

just as aware of all the things that you keep

well hidden. In your private moments, you

wonder if those issues will spoil the party.

It might be time to bring them to light,

because they will bring you down if you

continue to let them run you from within.

Aquarius

January 21 - February 20

ou have been spinning your wheels in

Ymore ways than one. The deeper part

of you is dying to settle into doing things

that mean something. The everyday routine

pays the bills, but your heart and soul are

elsewhere, wishing you could do your own

thing. It looks to me like that possibility is

right around the corner. If you’re hesitant

about taking time out, or even quitting your

post and going after your heart’s desire,

don’t let your money issues keep you stuck

here. From what I can see, a whole new

ballgame is on the menu, and it will mark

the beginning of the rest of your life.

Pisces

February 21 - March 2

At this point you have more than one

option. Deciding which way to turn

is the kicker. After more than your share

of difficulties, feeling confident about your

choices isn’t easy. Others have their opinions.

Being swayed this way and that is a

pitfall. The way everyone else sees it has

nothing to do with you; as a matter of fact,

it could have too much to do with them,

and their interests. If something looks like a

rat and smells like a rat, it probably is one.

Now would be the time to keep your own

counsel and trust your innate intuition, and

your instincts to be your guide.

Till death do us part

This week’s horoscopes are coming out under the light

of a void-of-course, Capricorn Moon. This week, I have

done a bunch of readings for people who are wrestling with

the age-old question of what to do

about their relationships. As you

can imagine, this topic comes up

all the time.

We have been educated to

view this area of our lives with rose

colored glasses. The standard take

Mother’s

Celestial

Inspirations

By Cal Garrison

PETRA’S

Wellness Studio

on the subject is that we grow up

and at a certain point in time, the

perfect person comes along to

make our life complete. We fall in

love, get married, and stay together

with our one and only, until death

do us part. This belief is entrenched

in the collective consciousness. All of us are convinced that

it happens to everyone. If you stop to look around, that’s ridiculous,

because it doesn’t happen that way — to anyone.

The model of what happened between us and our

parents holds huge clues as to what our adult relationships

will look like. The horoscope reveals everything about that,

if you know what to look for. I have also noticed that people

with Aries rising wind up alone at the end of the day. If they

do find themselves in a relationship they have to be with

someone who doesn’t need them and/or, with someone

who loves the fact that they are so totally independent. To

sum up it up: not all of us came here to mate.

Relationships have a life-span. Some last as long as it

takes for them to brush shoulders at a cocktail party. Some

are one-night-stands. Some last for a few weeks or months.

Others can last for a few years, or go on for 10 or 15 years.

Sooner or later, these connections reach an impasse,

or a point where staying together makes it impossible for

each individual to be who they are. At these junctures, the

“till death do us part” concept, and the belief in the one and

only inevitably causes them to do their best to make it work.

They spend a fortune on marriage counselors, without

realizing that they have completed their Karma together

and any attempt to make it work is counterproductive.

Doing so interferes with their spiritual growth — not only

that, it holds up the line — because another partner, with

whom they have made a contract, is waiting in the wings to

come in and teach them a little more about love, and about

themselves.

If we hold on to the belief that we’re here to stick it out no

matter what, one way or another we wind up killing each

other, and we miss the lesson. I invite you to take what you

can from this week’s ‘scopes.

Camille’s

“Area’s Largest and Most Popular Consignment Shop”

New Fall & Winter Styles

Great selection to choose from

Now accepting fall and winter clothing

Mon-Sat 10-5 • 802-773-0971

44 Merchants Row, Rutland, VT

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Petra O’Neill | (802)345-5244 | petraoneill.wixsite.com/petraswellnessstudio

Mother of the Skye

Mother of the Skye has 40 years of experience as an astrologer and tarot consultant. She may be reached by email to cal.garrison@gmail.com

802-770-4101

Karen Dalury, E-RYT 500• killingtonyoga.com

Hatha & Vinyasa

New Student Special:

5 classes for $30

3744 River Rd. Killington, VT


Columns

38 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

Wet and wonderful: bogs and fens

“Squish, squash.” I was walking gingerly on a soft,

spongy carpet of sphagnum moss in a northern Vermont

bog. Magenta blossoms decorated the sheep laurel shrubs

that lined the edge of the open wetland – beyond them

the pointed spires of balsam fir and black spruce reached

towards the sky. Ahead of me, the

white tufts at the ends of cotton

grass waved in the breeze. I took

another step. There was a sucking

sound, and a cold, wet feeling

as my right foot suddenly sank a

couple of feet into the bog. It was

The Outside

Story

By Susan Shea

Looking Back

By Mary Ellen Shaw

challenging to get it out without

falling in entirely, but I finally extricated

my muddy boot .

This bog had formed in a

depression surrounded by ridges,

a kettle hole where a chunk of ice

had remained after the glacier retreated. When the ice

block melted, it left a pond sealed by a clay bottom. Over

millennia, the remains of plants and animals had filled in

the pond, but because of the acidic, anaerobic (low in oxygen)

environment, they had only partially decomposed,

forming peat. The peat provided a surface for other plants

to grow on, and their interlacing roots had created a mat

over the bog, which in the center was floating on water. A

bog mat is similar to a “saturated sponge sitting in a sink

of dishwater,” writes naturalist Charles Johnson in his

book Bogs of the Northeast. Since the mat is permanently

saturated with acidic water, decomposition slows, causing

more peat to accumulate.

Like most bogs, the bog I explored has no inlet or outlet

and receives almost all of its water and nutrients from

precipitation. Only plants adapted to a nutrient-poor

environment can grow here,

making the bog a different

world from the surrounding

forest. Shrubs in the heath

family such as leatherleaf,

bog rosemary, and Labrador

tea (which has fuzzy leaves

were brewed for tea by

native Americans) specialize

in the acidic conditions

that are common in bogs.

Carnivorous pitcher plants,

sundews, and bladderworts

It’s interesting how our priorities change as we age.

Something that was of little or no importance to us in our

youth suddenly becomes front and

center!

Many of my friends have had to

search for a primary care doctor in

the last few years. The doctors I had

in my younger days, from the 1950s

up until the 1970s, had local roots.

They came back to their hometown

after getting their medical degrees.

Today, most of the primary

care doctors are not from this area.

Those who come here tend not to

remain for very long which means

the “hunt is on” way too often to find a doctor.

It’s nice to establish a relationship with your doctor so

that he or she gets to know the “whole person” and not just

the factual information that is on a chart.

Back in the ’50s when I was a child, the doctors made a

“house call” if you didn’t feel well enough to get out and sit

in their office for an appointment. What a treat that would

obtain additional nutrients by trapping and digesting

insects.

Fens are another type of wetland often mistaken for

bogs. Like bogs, they have a saturated peat mat. But

because they receive inputs of mineral and nutrient-rich

water from springs or seasonal streams, fens are more

alkaline than bogs, and support different, more diverse

vegetation. The first fen I visited looked like a wet lawn that

hadn’t been mown for a while. It was covered with sedges,

grasses, and non-sphagnum mosses and dotted with hundreds

of pink and white showy lady’s slippers in bloom.

According to Johnson, there is a continuum of peatland

types between bogs and fens, depending on the water

sources, the amount of minerals and nutrients carried in,

and temperature and precipitation patterns, particularly

the timing of wetting and drying. Those fens that overlie

calcareous bedrock such as limestone and receive a

regular inflow of calcium-laden groundwater are hotspots

of botanical diversity and are called rich fens. Rare orchids

and other uncommon plants may grow here.

Many animals, including spruce grouse, black-backed

woodpeckers, palm warblers, bog lemmings, and redbacked

voles, spend part of their lives in bogs and fens.

Because they are unusual natural communities, a number

of bogs and fens in our region have been conserved. Some

are open to the public and have had boardwalks installed to

make them more accessible and to discourage people from

walking on (and possibly falling through) the bog mat.

In Vermont, Moose Bog in the Wenlock Wildlife Management

Area near Island Pond and The Nature Conservancy’s

Chickering Bog (actually a fen) in Calais both

have boardwalks. New Hampshire Audubon’s Ponemah

Bog (a poor fen) near Nashua and two bogs in the

Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge near Jefferson are also

good places to experience

the wonder of

peatlands.

Susan Shea is a

naturalist, conservationist,

and freelance

of Brookfield, Vermont.

The illustration for this

column was drawn by

Adelaide Tyrol. The Outside

Story is assigned

and edited by Northern

Woodlands magazine.

Doctor-patient relationships

be today! I remember Dr. Clarence Fagan coming up the

sidewalk with his black bag. It seemed like he solved all my

medical problems back then with a shot of penicillin in my

derriere!

Dr. William Powers became our family doctor at some

point. I remember having a pain in my right side one Sunday

when I was probably around 13 years old. This prompted

my mother to call him as she thought I had appendicitis.

He stopped by and said it appeared that I just had a kink in

my appendix and it would most likely go away as quickly as

it came. My mother was told to keep an eye on me all day.

Apparently, she wasn’t taking any chances about a possible

trip to the hospital because she pressed my pajamas and

a robe … just in case! The doctor was correct and I went

nowhere.

That memory of my mother ironing reminds me that

she used to iron everything from underwear to sheets and

towels. As I got older I could never see the logic in doing

that. Thank goodness most things are permanent press

these days.

Even in the ’70s there was no hesitation to call a doctor

on a weekend. My husband, Peter, who was my fiancé at

Looking back > 39

Adaption’s power

Humans are very good at adapting to our changing

world. Adaptation is a change in behavior that allows us to

be better suited for our current environment.

Anticipation of change is often more powerful than the

long-term effect of the change itself. When we imagine

a terrible event, such as being

paralyzed, we imagine an awful

life – no way we can be happy. But

studies show many paraplegics

are happy, for they adapt to their

“new normal” and find purpose in

their life.

On the flip side, imagining we

Money

Matters

By Kevin Theissen

win the lottery can produce strong

feelings of euphoria. Yet, after a

period of time, lottery winners

are found to be just as happy (or

unhappy) as they were before.

They adapt to their “new normal”,

and life goes on.

This same adaptation happens with companies. Since

companies are run by humans, it is natural to expect they

will adapt to their changing environments.

Recently, we have been bombarded with news about

trade wars, tariffs, speculation on taxes etc. These all represent

changes in the economy, and a manic-depressive

stock market often responds to these news reports.

Changes in policy may pose a challenge for companies

in the short term, but no policy or change will force companies

to lose money in perpetuity. They will adapt.

Adaptation is not instantaneous. It can be dependent

on the individual, institution and/or situation. There will

often be a learning curve and some difficulty when adapting

to new lifestyles, rules and circumstances.

For speculators, those who focus on price movements

over short periods of time, change and surprise are the

enemies. There isn’t much help I can provide this group

other than to advise them to stop speculation and start

investing.

For in vestors, those who invest in companies for the

long term, it is not so much a concern. There may be some

short-term pain as companies adjust and adapt, but those

adjustments may be for the ultimate profit of the company

(and shareholder).

The need to adapt and change is one reason why I

believe patience is one of the greatest virtues an investor

can develop.

Kevin Theissen is the owner and financial advisor of

HWC in Ludlow.

Breaking the branch

Question: Kelly and Jim are playing in a tournament.

On the 16th hole Jim’s ball rests in the rough just barely in

the tree line. He takes a practice swing along the intended

line to the green and brakes a

branch. He then decides to play in

a new direction. Because the new

direction is not improved by the

breaking of the branch, Jim says

there is no penalty. Kelly says there

is a penalty. Is Kelly correct?

Rules of the

Game

By Alan Jeffery

Answer: As soon as Jim bent

the branch, the area and line of the

intended swing was improved even

if he plays in a different direction.

The penalty for the breaking of the

branch is not avoided even if he plays in another direction

and the breaking of the branch has no effect on the swing in

another direction. Kelly is correct. She knows the rules. See

USGA Official Guide to the Rules of Golf, 13-2/24, effective

2019.

Golf clinics continue on Saturday mornings 10:30 a.m. to

noon at Green Mountain National Golf Course.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 COLUMNS • 39

It’s back!

Two years ago, I undertook a social experiment

with my son, which resulted in a nowclassic

tale among my family and friends.

It started with me wanting to teach my son a

lesson about facing fears. The idea was to have

him face a relatively innocuous fear and then

overcome it, thus bolstering his confidence

that he can push

through seemingly

difficult situations.

That, to me, this is

a valid exercise. However,

many people

have shuttered when

I told them what I

The Movie

Diary

By Dom Cioffi

did, convinced that I

took things too far.

It started with me

trying to convince

my then 13-year-old

son to join me at the

theater to see Stephen King’s horror film,

“It.” Initially, he was indifferent to going,

even after I played him the online trailer.

However, after a couple clown nightmares,

he became officially petrified and flat-out

refused to go.

Each night during this week leading up

to the film’s release, I mentioned going and

each time I brought it up, he became more

and more reluctant to join me.

Normally I would succumb to his

wishes, but I genuinely got concerned that

he was letting an unfounded fear disable

him. So, I used the leverage of a new airsoft

gun to get him onboard.

Reluctantly, he finally agreed to go.

The crowds were discernibly bigger than

normal, which led me to think that “It”

was going to be a big winner at the box office. My hunch

turned out correct as the movie made history as the largest

opening for a horror film.

Once inside the theater, just prior to the film beginning,

I reiterated my mantra that horror films are just pretend.

The whole point is to let the fear wash over you with the

understanding that it’s all fictional. The bonus is that scary

movies are great exercises in facing your fears because

there’s no harm in engaging in them (the same can’t be said

for skydiving).

Even with my pep talk, he still seemed skittish, but I gave

him reassurance and credit for being there.

Unfortunately, in the first five minutes of the film something

completely horrific happened that set the tone for the

rest of the picture. My son became virtually unglued at the

scene and as such, curled up in a ball, put his hands over his

ears, and nuzzled into my shoulder.

I encouraged him to be brave, but he was having none

of it. Thankfully, after a few minutes he relaxed back into

his seat and continued watching. A few more startling moments

occurred in the next half hour before he leaned into

me and stated that he had to go to the bathroom. I told him

to hurry, knowing that he would lose track of the storyline if

he was gone too long.

A good seven to eight minutes went by before I finally got

up to look for him. Sure enough, when I walked out of the

theater, he was standing in the lobby near the exit doors. I

motioned for him to come back, but he shook his head no.

While I could appreciate his defiance under the circumstances,

I was determined to see this lesson through. I

walked over to him and in my best dad voice, made it clear

that we were walking back into the theater together.

He begrudgingly joined me and settled back into his

seat. About ten minutes went by before he nudged me on

the arm. “Dad, we have to go,” he stated. “I just peed my

pants.”

I looked at him in shock; he stared back at me with

a blank look on his face. For a moment, I pictured myself

receiving the Worst Father of the Year award, but then my

sixth sense kicked in.

“Your lying,” I responded, hoping secretly that I was right

and would not have to go home knowing I forced my son

into a situation where he publically wet his pants.

“OK, fine,” he responded. “But if this freaky clown stuff

keeps up, I’m going to have a real accident!”

On that note, I told him that if he didn’t man-up and

watch the rest of the film without distraction, airsoft gun

would never materialize. From that point on, he never said

another word and in fact, by the end of the film seemed

desensitized by the clown and his horrifying antics.

Once we emerged from the theater, I congratulated

him on his courage, even mentioning how creative (albeit

desperate) his incontinence act was. We had a good laugh

and then talked about fear and its ability to keep us from

living life.

It is now two years later and the follow-up film, “It:

Chapter Two,” has been released. And wouldn’t you know

it, my son begged me to go. It seems his fear of scary movies

fizzled away with the first film and he now considers horror

his favorite genre.

I’ve taken a lot of abuse over the last two years because

of this story, but in hindsight, I’m glad I did it. Sure, it was a

rough lesson, but the result was positively empowering.

Unfortunately, “It: Chapter Two” is nowhere near as

good as the first picture. While the first film embodied fear

at a primal level, the second installment felt more like a bad

joke.

Check this one out if you’re a fan of the series, just don’t

expect the same level of terror and dread.

A clownish “C-” for “It: Chapter Two.”

Got a question or comment for Dom? You can email him

at moviediary@att.net.

Looking back: The old family doc

from page 38

>

the time, passed out while coughing from bronchitis and

landed practically underneath our dining room table. Peter

had come to our house to have dinner with my mother and

me. I called Dr. Brislin, who was our doctor at the time, and

asked his advice. He said he would be right up and arrived

at our house at 7 p.m. on a Sunday night. Peter was given

a shot of penicillin and the

doctor suggested he spend

the night here. Our guest

room was readied and Peter

headed right to bed. I think

he slept better than either

my mother or I who listened

for any sign of distress in the

night.

I have heard both our

friends and neighbors in my

age group express a sense of

contentment about living

Gone are

the days

when a shot

of penicillin

was all that

we needed

to cure our

medical

problems.

close to the hospital. In the case of my husband and me, all

we have to do is look out our south windows and there it

is…just a little over a mile away! That distance has served

us well on a couple of occasions now that we are in our

“senior” years. Did that thought ever enter our heads in

our younger days? Absolutely not!

Of course, your family doctor will not be coming to

the hospital to take care of you like in yesteryear. You

will be under the care of a hospitalist. From all reports

that seems to work well so just think of it as a “sign of the

times”.

A family doctor isn’t the only type needed by us as we

age. These days most people in my age group are seeing

doctors for joint replacements, cataract surgery and

other conditions that require a specialist. Gone are the

days when a shot of penicillin was all that we needed to

cure our medical problems.

Often we discover that having a hospital nearby isn’t

sufficient for all of our medical issues. Having to drive to

Burlington, Hanover, Albany or Boston is a trip that most

of us “locals” will have to make at some point in our lives.

It’s not possible for all specialists to be located in Rutland,

as convenient as that would be.

So think back to the days of the doctor walking up your

sidewalk with his little black bag. Wasn’t life easy then?

My husband and I are grateful for our wonderful primary

care doctor and for all the services offered at Rutland Regional

Medical Center. Everyone is doing his or her part

to keep us well but as they say, “Aging isn’t for sissies!”

Please call or

check us out

online for this

week’s movie

offerings.

Movie Hotline: 877-789-6684

WWW.FLAGSHIPCINEMAS.COM


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Service Directory

40 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

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The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 SERVICE DIRECTORY / SWITCHING GEARS • 41

RASTA debuts new trails

Thanks to a $41,500 Recreational Trails Program grant

awarded to the Rochester-Randolph Area Sports Trail Alliance

by the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation

in June, the 3-mile Rochester Valley Trail network is

now complete.

Daughters, LLC finished the three-mile Old Gent’s

summit loop and the new

Peavine Valley Trail. The

Old Gent’s loop climbs via a

looped system to a vista on

Sugar Knob, from behind

the USFS Rochester Ranger

Station Visitors’ Center. A

new connector trail was also

completed in August, which

links the Rochester Valley

Trails with the village of

Rochester.

In June, the 23-mile

Green Mountain Trail network

joined RASTA and the

organization is now looking

to connect the two networks.

According to RASTA

president Angus McCusker,

15 miles of new singletrack

were recently approved as

part of the Robinson Integrated

Resource Project. The

approved trails would also

By Mike McDonnell

Volunteers work on new mountain bike trails in Rochester.

connect with the Vermont

Huts Association’s Chittenden

Brook Hut, which opened in 2018.

As part of that effort, the organizations are collaborating

with the USFS to reinstate the Contest Trail, the first mountain

bike trail built on National Forest land in Vermont, and

which once connected Pittsfield with Rochester.

Once completed, the trail systems will create a 30-mile

loop between Rochester

and Pittsfield, with only six

miles of road riding. RASTA

estimates that the cost of

constructing those 15 miles

of connector trails will be

$479,650.

The trails are part of

the Velomont Trail effort,

which, if completed

would connect 12 Vermont

Mountain Bike

Association chapters and

partners with the ultimate

goal to link existing mountain

bike networks from

Massachusetts to Canada

with 70 percent being

singletrack trails. “We are

looking at forming a Velomont

chapter of VMBA

this fall, to establish a

board with representation

from the 12 partners with

existing trail networks,”

said McCusker.

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42 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

NOTICE OF SALE

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholders

and mortgagees of lands in the Town of Killington, in

the County of Rutland and State of Vermont, are hereby

notified that the amounts payable under the Ordinance

to Levy a Special Assessment to Finance the Town of

Sherburne Sewage System for year 2015B, 2017 and 2018

remain, either in whole or in part, unpaid upon the following

described lands in the Town of Killington to wit:

Being all the same lands and premises conveyed to

Edwin J. Fowler by Quit Claim Deed of John R. Canney, III,

Trustee of the Estate of Rome Family Corporation dated

July 8, 2004 and recorded in Volume 257 at Page 411 of the

Town of Killington Land Records (3.13 acres North Side of

Route 4-Tax Map 22-236 - Parcel 11024).

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for real estate

taxes, and subject to any lien of the Town of Killington

for assessments under the Ordinance to Levy a Special Assessment

to Finance the Town of Sherburne Sewage System

for years 2019 and thereafter.

Reference may be had to said deeds for a more particular

description of said lands and premises, as the same appears

of record in the Killington Land Records.

NOTICE OF SALE

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholders and

mortgagees of lands of in the Town of Killington, in the

County of Rutland and State of Vermont, are hereby notified

that the taxes assessed by Town of Killington for the

years 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018, and the assessments of the

Town of Killington under the Ordinance to Levy a Special

Assessment to Finance the Town of Sherburne Sewage

System for the years 2015, 2015B, 2016, 201 7, and 2018 remain,

either in whole or in part, unpaid upon the following

described lands in the Town of Killington to wit:

Being all right, title and interest in and to the land and

premises, and any improvements thereon, conveyed to

Rickev, LLC by (i) Quit Claim Deed of Kevin DellaBianca

dated January 4, 2004 and recorded January 15, 2004 in

Volume 250, Page 84 of the Killington Land Records, and (ii)

Quit Claim Deed of Frank P. Clukey and Barbara E. Clukey

dated December 6, 2005 and recorded in Volume 272 at Page

477 of the Killington Land Records, and which Rickev, LLC

holds under that certain Declaration of Condominium for

The Heights at Killington dated April 12, 2008 and recorded

in Volume 303 at Page 1 of the Town of Killington Land

Records, as amended by First Amendment to the Heights

at Killington Declaration dated December 23, 2010 and

recorded in Volume 321 at Page 292 of the Town of Killington

Land Records.

Excepting the premises, rights, and interests conveyed by

Rickev, LLC by the following:

1. Warranty Deed to Tighe and Lorie J. Mathieu

dated 12/23/10 and recorded in Volume 321 at Page 315;

2. Warranty Deed to Paul and Emiko Zackin dated

4/7/11 and recorded in Volume 323 at Page 321;

3. Warranty Deed to Stafan K. and Elizabeth M.

Haselwandter dated 12/9/11 and recorded in Volume 327 at

Page 364; and

4. Warranty Deed to Paul N. and Dianne L. Heath

dated 12/9/11 and recorded in Volume 327 at Page 369.

Reference may be had to the above referenced deeds and

instruments for a more particular description of premises,

And so much of said lands will be sold at public auction

at the Killington Town Clerk’s Office, a public place in said

Town, on the 8th day of October 2019, at 10 o’clock in the

morning, as shall be requisite to discharge said sewer

assessments with interest, costs and other fees allowed by

law, unless previously paid.

Pursuant to 32 V.S.A. §5254(b), an owner of property

being sold for taxes may request in writing, not less than

twenty-four (24) hours prior to the tax sale, that only a

portion of the property be sold. Such request must clearly

identify the portion of the property to be sold and must

be accompanied by a certification from the District

Environmental Commission and the Killington Zoning

Administrative Officer that the portion identified may

be subdivided and meets the minimum lot size requirements.

In the event that the portion so identified by the

taxpayer cannot be sold for the amount of the unpaid tax

and costs, then the entire property will be sold to pay such

unpaid taxes, interest and costs.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 27 day of August, 2019.

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes ,Town of Killington

rights, and interests described herein.

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for real estate

taxes for years 2019 and thereafter, and subject to any lien of

the Town of Killington for assessments under the Ordinance

to Levy a Special Assessment to Finance the Town of Sherburne

Sewage System for years 2018 and thereafter.

And so much of said lands will be sold at public auction

at the Killington Town Clerk’s Office, a public place in said

Town, on the 8th day of October 2019, at 10 o’clock in the

morning, as shall be requisite to discharge said taxes and

assessments with interest, costs and other fees allowed by

law, unless previously paid.

Pursuant to Title 32 Vermont Statutes Annotated ( “32

V.S.A.”) §5254(b), an owner of property being sold for taxes

or assessments may request in writing, not less than twenty-four

(24) hours prior to the tax sale, that only a portion

of the property be sold. Such request must clearly identify

the portion of the property to be sold and must be accompanied

by a certification from the District Environmental

Commission and the Killington Zoning Administrative

Officer that the portion identified may be subdivided and

meets the minimum lot size requirements. In the event that

the portion so identified by the taxpayer cannot be sold

for the amount of the unpaid taxes, assessments, interest,

costs, and fees, then the entire property will be sold to pay

such unpaid taxes, assessments, interest, costs, and fees.

Taxpayers are further advised of their right to request a

hearing before the Town of Killington Board for the Abatement

of Taxes in accordance with the provisions of 24 V.S.A.

§1535 respecting abatement of taxes and/or assessments.

Taxpayers wishing to have such a hearing must contact Town

Clerk Lucrecia Wonzor, 2706 River Road, Killington, VT. 05751,

for the Town Board of Abatement, to request such a hearing.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 6th day of September 2019.

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes , Town of Killington

NOTICE OF SALE

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholders

and mortgagees of lands in the Town of

Killington, in the County of Rutland and State of

Vermont, are hereby notified that the amounts

assessments and payable under the Ordinance to

Levy a Special Assessment to Finance the Town

of Sherburne Sewage System for year 2011, 2012,

2013, 2014, 2015, 2015B, 2016, 2017 and 2018

remain, either in whole or in part, unpaid upon

the following described lands in the Town of Killington

to wit:

Being all the same lands and premises conveyed

to Gordon M. Goes and Sammi Goes by Quit Claim

Deed of Gordon M. Goes dated January 23, 2006

and recorded January 30, 2006 in Volume 282, Page

536 of the Town of Killington Land Records (22 Old

Route 4, Tax Map 22-235).

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for

real estate taxes and subject to any lien of the Town

of Killington for assessments under the Ordinance

to Levy a Special Assessment to Finance the Town

of Sherburne Sewage System for year 2019 and

thereafter.

Reference may be had to said deeds for a more

particular description of said lands and premises,

as the same appears of record in the Killington

Land Records.

And so much of said lands will be sold at public

auction at the Killington Town Clerk’s

Office, a public place in said Town, on the 8th of

October 2019, at 10 o’clock in the morning, as shall

be requisite to discharge said assessments, with

interest costs and other fees allowed by law, unless

previously paid.

Pursuant to Title 32 Vermont Statutes Annotated

( “32 V.S.A.”) §5254(b), an owner of property

being sold for assessments may request in writing,

not Jess than twenty-four (24) hours prior to the

tax sale, that only a portion of the property be sold.

Such request must clearly identify the portion of

the property to be sold and must be accompanied

by a certification from the District Environmental

Commission and the Killington Zoning Administrative

Officer that the portion identified may

be subdivided and meets the minimum lot size

requirements. In the event that the portion so

identified by the taxpayer cannot be sold for the

amount of the unpaid assessments, interest, costs,

and fees, then the entire property will be sold to

pay such unpaid assessments, interest, costs, and

fees.

Taxpayers are further advised of their right to

request a hearing before the Town of Killington

Board for the Abatement of Assessments in accordance

with the provisions of 24 V.S.A. § 1535

respecting abatement of assessments. Taxpayers

wishing to have such a hearing must contact Town

Clerk Lucrecia Wonzor, 2706 River Road, Killington,

VT. 05751, for the Town Board of Abatement,

to request such a hearing.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 27th of August,

2019.

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes

Town of Killington


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 • 43

NOTICE OF SALE

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholders

and mortgagees of lands in the Town of Killington,

in the County of Rutland and State of Vermont, are

hereby notified that the taxes assessed by Town of Killington

for the years 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018, and

the assessments of the Town of Killington under the

Ordinance to Levy a Special Assessment to Finance

the Construction of a Sewer Main in Alpine Drive for

the years 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 remain,

either in whole or in part, unpaid upon the following

described lands in the Town of Killington to wit:

NOTICE OF SALE

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholdersand

mortgagees oflands in the Town of Killington, in

the County of Rutland and State of Vermont, are hereby

notified that the taxes assessed by said Town for the year

2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 remain, either in whole

or in part, unpaid upon the following described lands in

the Town of Killington to wit:

Being an 8.38 parcel ofland with all improvements

thereon depicted as “PARCEL A BRENDA HALL ONEY

BK 89 AT PG 65 AUGUST 6, 1986 AREA= 8.38 ACRES” on

a survey entitled “BOUNDARY & SUBDIVISION PLAT

NOTICE OF SALE

Being all the same lands and premises conveyed to

Dewey Burleson and Karl Montick by Warranty Deed

of William H. Shine and Jacqueline J. Shine dated

September 28, 2001 and recorded in Volume 204 at

Page 409 of the Town of Killington Land Records.

The interest of Karl Montick was conveyed to Dewey

Burleson by Quit Claim Deed dated October 16, 2015

and recorded in Volume 344 at Page 745 of the Town of

Killington Land Records (783 Alpine Drive - Tax Map

20-34 - Parcel 10576).

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for real

estate taxes for years 2019 and thereafter, and subject

to any lien of the Town of Killington for assessments

under the Ordinance to Levy a Special Assessment to

Finance the Construction of a Sewer Main in Alpine

Drive for years 2018 and thereafter.

Reference may be had to said deeds for a more particular

description of said lands and premises, as the

same appears of record in the Killington Land Records.

BRENDA HALL ONEY PROPERTY TO BE CONVEYED

TO THE TOWN OF KILLINGTON RIVER ROAD - TOWN

HIGHWAY NO. TOWN OF KILLINGTON - COUNTY OF

RUTLAND STATE OF VERMONT” prepared by Vermont

Survey Consultants, LLC dated November 12, 2010 and

recorded on May 17, 2011 in Map Slide 819B of the Town

of Killington Land Records, together with any and all

improvements thereon.

Being a portion of the land and premises conveyed to

Brenda Hall Oney by Quit Claim Deed of Florence Taylor

Hall dated August 6, 1986 and recorded in Volume 89 at

Page 65 of the Town of Killington Land Records. Reference

is also made to a corrective Warranty Deed from Florence

Taylor Hall to Brenda Hall Oney dated

September 5, 1986 and recorded in Volume 89 at Page

382 of the Town of Killington Land Records (3095 River

Road - Tax Map 15-1 lAParcel 10384).

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for real

estate taxes for years 2019 and thereafter.

Reference may be had to said deed for a more particular

description of said lands and premises, as the same

appears of record in the Killington Land Records.

And so much of said lands will be sold at public

auction at the Killington Town Clerk’s Office, a public

place in said Town, on the 8th of October, 2019, at

10 o’clock in the morning, as shall be requisite to

discharge said taxes and assessments with interests,

costs and other fees allowed by law, unless previously

paid.

Pursuant to Title 32 Vermont Statutes Annotated (

“32 V.S.A.”) §5254(b), an owner of property being sold

for taxes or assessments may request in writing, not

less than twenty-four (24) hours prior to the tax sale,

that only a portion of the property be sold. Such request

must clearly identify the portion of the property

to be sold and must be accompanied by a certification

from the District Environmental Commission

and the Killington Zoning Administrative Officer that

the portion identified may be subdivided and meets

the minimum lot size requirements. In the event that

the portion so identified by the taxpayer cannot be

sold for the amount of the unpaid taxes, assessments,

interest, costs, and fees, then the entire property will

be sold to pay such unpaid taxes, assessments, interest,

costs, and fees.

Taxpayers are further advised of their right to

request a hearing before the Town of Killington Board

for the Abatement of Taxes in accordance with the

provisions of 24 V.S.A. §1535 respecting abatement of

taxes and/or assessments. Taxpayers wishing to have

such a hearing must contact Town Clerk Lucrecia

Wonzor, 2706 River Road, Killington, VT. 05751, for the

Town Board of Abatement, to request such a hearing.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 27th day of August,

2019.

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes

Town of Killington

And so much of said lands will be sold at public

auction at the Killington Town Clerk’s Office, a public

place in said Town, on the 8th day of October, 2019, at 10

o’clock in the morning , as shall be requisite to discharge

said taxes with interest, costs and other fees allowed by

law, unless previously paid.

Pursuant to Title 32 Vermont Statutes Annotated (

“32 V.S.A.”) §5254(b), an owner of property being sold

for taxes or assessments may request in writing, not less

than twenty-four (24) hours prior to the tax sale, that

only a portion of the property be sold. Such request must

clearly identify the portion of the property to be sold

and must be accompanied by a certification from the

District Environmental Commission and the Killington

Zoning Administrative Officer that the portion identified

may be subdivided and meets the minimum lot size

requirements. In the event that the portion so identified

by the taxpayer cannot be sold for the amount of the

unpaid taxes, interest, costs, and fees, then the entire

property will be sold to pay such unpaid taxes, interest,

costs, and fees.

Taxpayers are further advised of their right to request a

hearing before the Town of Killington Board for the Abatement

of Taxes in accordance with the provisions of 24 V.S.A.

§1535 respecting abatement of taxes. Taxpayers wishing

to have such a hearing must contact Town Clerk Lucrecia

Wonzor, 2706 River Road, Killington, VT. 05751, for the

Town Board of Abatement, to request such a hearing.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 10th day of September,

2019.

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes

Town of Killington

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholders

and mortgagees of lands in the Town of Killington, in

the County of Rutland and State of Vermont, are hereby

notified that the taxes assessed by said Town for the years

2016, 2017 and 2018, and sewage disposal charges under

Title 32 Vermont Statutes Annotated (“V.S.A.”) §3615

assessed by Sherburne Fire District No.1 for the years

2017 and 2018, remain, either in whole or in part, unpaid,

upon the following described lands in the Town of Killington,

County of Rutland, and State of Vermont:

Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to

R.O.C. Associates, Inc. by Warranty Deed of Resort Investors,

Limited dated April 3, 2013 and recorded in Volume

333 at Page 902 of the Town of Killington Land Records

(1986 Killington Road - Tax Map 29-260 - Parcel 11498).

Reference may be had to said deed for a more particular

description of said lands and premises, as the same

appears of record in the Killington Land Records.

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for real estate

taxes for years 2019 and thereafter, and subject to any

lien of Sherburne Fire District No. 1 for sewage disposal

charges for years 2019 and thereafter.

And so much of said lands will be sol~t public auction

at the Killington Town Clerk’s Office, a public place in said

Town, on the 8th day of October, 2019, at 10 o’clock in the

morning, as shall be requisite to discharge said taxes and

assessments, with interest, costs and other fees allowed by

law, unless previously paid.

Pursuant to Title 32 Vermont Statures Annotated (“32

V.S.A.”) §5254(b), an owner of property being sold for

taxes or sewage disposal assessments may request in

writing, not less than twenty-four (24) hours prior to the

tax sale, that only a portion of the property be sold. Such

request must clearly identify the portion of the property

to be sold and must be accompanied by a certification

from the District Environmental Commission and the

Killington Zoning Administrative Officer that the portion

identified may be subdivided and meets the minimum

lot size requirements. In the event that the portion so

identified by the taxpayer cannot be sold for the amount

of the unpaid taxes, assessments, interest, costs, and

fees, then the entire property will be sold to pay such

unpaid taxes, assessments, interest, costs, and fees.

Taxpayers are further advised of their right to request

(i) a hearing before the Town of Killington Board for the

Abatement of Taxes in accordance with the provisions of

24 V.S.A.§ 1535 (respecting abatement of taxes), and (ii) a

hearing before the Sherburne Fire District No.1 Board of

Abatement of Taxes in accordance with the provisions of

24 V.S.A. §2488 (respecting abatement of sewage disposal

charge assessments). Taxpayers wishing to have such

hearings must contact Town Clerk Lucrecia Wonzor,

2706 River Road, Killington, VT. 05751 (for the Town

Board of Abatement), and Christopher Karr, Chair of the

Prudential Committee of Sherburne Dire District No. 1,

12706 River Road, Killington, VT 05751 (for the Sherburne

Fire District No. 1 Board of Abatement), to request

such hearings.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 6th day of September

2019.

David W. Lewis

Fire District Collector

Sherburne Fire District No.l

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes

Town of Killington

Lucrecia Wonsor

Town Clerk

Mary Furlong

Town Clerk

Sherburne Fire District No.1


Classifieds

44 • The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

REAL ESTATE

KILLINGTON: 10 ACRES,

DRIVEWAY IN & HOUSE

SITE CLEARED! Perfect

getaway location. Short

drive to Killington’s Skyeship

on Route 4. Great mountain

range southeast yr-rd views.

This 10.3 Acres. Gravel

driveway already in as

well as cleared & seeded

pr oposed flat home site. via

gravel driveway. Permitted

for 4-BR modified mound

septic system design. Ready

for your proposed home. Has

easements to a Verizon cell

tower for maint & elec utility

to a well house for a former

base lodge. Just reduced

to $90K CONTACT: SKI

COUNTRY REAL ESTATE

(Chris or Tricia) 802-775-

5111.

KILLINGTON—2 BDRM 1.5

bath condo, Mountain Green

bldg. 2. FP, ski lockers,

health club membership.

$92K. Owner, 800-576-

5696.

LAND: Killington:

ANTHONY WAY, 1.4 acres

with access to sewer line,

$59,900. Ski Country Real

Estate, 335 Killington Rd,

802-775-5111.

LAND FOR SALE: Improved

building lot in Killington

neighborhood with ski home

benefits. Views. Call 802-

422-9500.

ERA MOUNTAIN

Real Estate, 1913

US Rt. 4, Killington—

killingtonvermontrealestate.

com or call one of our real

estate experts for all of your

real estate needs including

Short Term & Long Term

Rentals & Sales. 802-775-

0340.

>

PUZZLES on page 41

KILLINGTON PICO

REALTY Our Realtors have

special training in buyer

representation to ensure a

positive buying experience.

Looking to sell? Our unique

marketing plan features your

very own website. 802-422-

3600, KillingtonPicoRealty.

com 2814 Killington Rd.,

Killington. (next to Choices

Restaurant).

KILLINGTON VALLEY

REAL ESTATE Specializing

in the Killington region

for Sales and Listings for

Homes, Condos & Land

as well as Winter seasonal

rentals. Call, email or stop

in. We are the red farm house

located next to the Wobbly

Barn. PO Box 236, 2281

Killington Rd., Killington.

802-422-3610, bret@

killingtonvalleyrealestate.

com.

PEAK PROPERTY

GROUP at KW Vermont.

VTproperties.net. 802-

353-1604. Marni@

peakpropertyrealestate.

com. Specializing in homes/

condos/land/commercial/

investments. Representing

sellers & buyers all over

Central Vt.

THE PERFORMANCE

GROUP real estate 1810

Killington Rd., Killington.

802-422-3244 or 800-

338-3735, vthomes.com,

email info@vthomes.com.

As the name implies “WE

PERFORM FOR YOU!”

PRESTIGE REAL Estate of

Killington, 2922 Killington

Rd., Killington. Specializing

in the listing & sales of

Killington Condos, Homes,

& Land. Call 802-422-

3923. prestigekillington.

com.

Want to submit a classified?

Email classifieds@

mountaintimes.info or call

802-422-2399. Rates are 50

cents per word, per week;

free ads are free.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

SKI COUNTRY Real Estate,

335 Killington Rd., Killington.

802-775-5111, 800-877-

5111. SkiCountryRealEstate.

com - 8 agents to service:

Killington, Bridgewater,

Mendon, Pittsfield,

Plymouth, Rochester,

Stockbridge & Woodstock

areas. Sales & Winter

Seasonal Rentals. Open 7

days/wk, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

BUSINESS OP-

PORTUNITIES

RESTAURANT FOR LEASE

in Woodstock on Rt 4. Next

to 4-season motel (www.

sleepwoodstock.com), 8

mins to the Village, 15 mins

from Skyeship Gondola.

Immediate business from

motel guests. Newly painted,

repaved parking, 1,248 sq

ft, 50+ seating plus picnic

tables. Turn-key operation

for restaurant, bakery

catering. Reasonable rent/

lease.

COMMERCIAL SPACE

AVAILABLE with another well

established business. Small

or large square footage.

Close to ski shop, restaurant

and lodging. Great location

for any business. Call 802-

345-5867.

RENTALS

GREAT FAMILY home for

winter rent! 4BR/3 bath

with sauna, outdoor hot

tub, fireplace, ski storage

room. $15k/ season. Nice

neighborhood off Rt. 100N

near GM golf course. 802-

729-0268.

SUDOKU

ESTABLISHED WEEKEND

ski house has space

available. Bedrooms have

private baths, no bunks, two

per room, singles or couples,

on the Access Rd. walkway

close to nightlife. No full

timers/pets/children. Send

inquiries to tlr@gmail.com.

WINTER FAMILY

S K I S H A R E S

AVAILABLE! Beautiful

6BD, outdoor hot tub, close

to everything! Full or

half shares. We have

two teens. Dec to April.

Call Sue at 781-234-

8123. CEDARWALK AT

KILLINGTON.

PICO Village Winter

Rental: 3 BR 2 BA Furnished

and equipped. Short walk to

the lifts. $14,000 plus utilities.

Call Louise Harrison, 802-

747-8444.

RUTLAND - 1 BR furnished

Apt. Available now, $1,250/

mo. all utilities included. Off

street parking. Great back

yard! 1st/ security - Lease

terms flexible. 802-345-

3913.

KILLINGTON SEASONAL

rental 2 BR, 1 BA, woodstove,

excellent location. $8,000

seasonal + utilities. 781-749-

5873, toughfl@aol.com.

KILLINGTON YEAR

ROUND APT. RENTAL

3-BRs 1.5 baths, partially

furnished. References. Judy

802-345-0719.

PROCTOR 1 bedroom, offroad

parking $950 includes

heat, hot water. First last and

deposit, no pets, no smoking

802-459-3432.

PICO ONE BR winter rental.

Available Nov 1 thru April

30. Fully furnished and

equipped top floor. All utilities

included! $8,400/season.

Call Louise Harrison 802-

747-8444 or email Louise@

LouiseHarrison.com.

KILLINGTON SEASONAL

rental 3 BR, 2 BA, fireplace,

dishwasher. $9,000, Nov.

1-April 30, + utilities. 781-

749-5873, toughfl@aol.com.

KILLINGTON ROYAL

FLUSH Rentals/Property

management. Specializing

in condos/winter &

summer rentals. Andrea

Weymouth, Owner. www.

killingtonroyalflush.com,

802-746-4040.

WINTER SEASONAL

rentals. 1 bedroom apartment

or 4 bedroom home.

killingtonhouserentals.com.

802-558-6738.

NEWLY RENOVATED

large 1 bedroom apartment.

Mendon. Includes

everything. No pets. $1,150/

mth plus deposit. Jamie 802-

558-0244.

KILLINGTON SEASONAL

RENTAL 4 BEDROOMS,

4 bathrooms, hot tub, flat

driveway, fireplace and only

1 mile to Skyeship. Nov-May

$12,000 plus utilities. Call

Jack at 516-993-3799 or

973-478-0893

EQUAL HOUS-

ING OPPORTU-

NITY

All real estate and rentals

advertising in this newspaper

is subject to the Federal

Fair Housing Act of 1968

as amended which makes

it illegal to advertise “any

preference, limitation or

discrimination based on

race, color, religion, sex,

handicap, family status,

national origin, sexual

orientation, or persons

receiving public assistance,

or an intention to make such

preferences, limitation or

discrimination.”

This newspaper will not

knowingly accept any

advertisement which

is in violation of the law.

Our readers are hereby

informed that all dwellings

advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal

opportunity basis. If you feel

you’ve been discrimination

against, call HUD toll-free at

1-800-669-9777.

FIREWOOD for sale, we

stack. Rudi, 802-672-3719.

VERMONT CASTINGS

Defiant Encore woodstove.

Never used. $800. Call Dotty

802-342-6150.

PIRELLI SNOW TIRES.

Four 235/60/R18 tires. Used

one winter season. Call

Dotty 802-342-6150

MAZDA2 2011 2011Mazda2

$700 Call Michael 802-558-

9708

FOR SALE CONDOMINIUM,

3 large rooms plus storage

room (1396 sq. ft.); Including

office furniture, furnishings,

Law Library (personal items

not included); Used as a law

office over 44 years, suitable

for any office; Configuration

may be changed; Parking;

Located in Rutland City

on busiest highway in the

County. Enjoy the benefits

of Vermont living: skiing,

hiking, camping, lakes for

sailing, fishing, boating.

$75,000. Call 802-775-5066,

802-459-3350, 802-558-

2383.

FREE

FREE COUCH blue plaid,

comfy, clean and ready for

a new home. Must pick up.

Pico. 734-777-5724.

FREE LOWREY electric

organ MX2. 802-417-5131.

FREE REMOVAL of scrap

metal & car batteries. Matty,

802-353-5617.

SERVICES

CHIMNEYS CLEANED,

lined, built, repaired. 802-

349-0339.

POWER WASHING

SPECIALISTS. Call Jeff at

First Impressions, 802-558-

4609.

(CHARGE MONTHLY IN

SYSTEM)

LOT CLEARING and

stumping. 802-672-3719,

802-558-6172.

BEAUREGARD PAINTING,

30 years experience, 802-

436-1337.

FOR SALE

EMPLOYMENT

KING BED, brass

headboard, linens included.

Excellent, reasonable, mustsee.

Rutland 802-773-7687.

MASTER BEDROOM

furniture: Dresser, bureau,

2 night tables. Frank, 802-

353-8177. $100.

WRIGHT CONSTRUCTION

now accepting applications

for full-time carpenters &

laborers. Health ins, paid

vacations, 401K. Competitive

wages. 802-259-2094/

info@wrightconstruction.

com.


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 CLASSIFIEDS / REAL ESTATE • 45

PAINTER EXTERIOR

through Fall season. Drivers

license required. 802-770-

5543.

PUB/PREP COOK needed.

Call Inn at Long Trail for

interview. 802-775-7181.

BIKE MECHANIC/Retail

Help. Busy Killington bike

shop looking for parttime

seasonal help. Start

immediately. Experience

preferred, but training

available for the right

persons. Competitive

salary DOE. EOE. Send

qualifications, availability

and contact info to tracy@

snowsportsmarketing.com.

PART TIME Waitstaff

needed at Drewski’s. Please

call 802-422-3816, email or

stop in for an application.

MOGULS SPORTS PUB

help wanted: waitstaff,

kitchen staff, line-cook,

bartender, dishwasher,

doorperson. Apply in

person at Moguls M-F, on

the Killington Access Road.

802-422-4777.

COOK POSITION available.

Thursday-Sunday. Please

call 802-773-7141.

CASHIER: A.M. preferable.

PT/FT/Year round.

Competitive wage. Killington.

Please call 802-558-0793.

HOUSEKEEPER: The

Birch Ridge Inn at Killington

seeks innkeepers assistant

for house keeping and

breakfast service. Full/Part

time. $13 to $15 per hour.

For an interview call 802-

422-4293.

SNOWMAKING Killington

Resort is now hiring. All

positions. Training, uniforms,

perks provided. Visit www.

killington.com/jobs to view

all open positions or our

Welcome Center at 4763

Killington Rd. (800) 300-

9095 EOE.

BANQUET STAFF Killington

Grand Hotel is now hiring

banquet staff. Visit www.

killington.com/jobs to view

all open positions or our

Welcome Center at 4763

Killington Rd. (800) 300-

9095 EOE.

COOKS Killington Resort,

all skill levels, multiple

locations. Uniforms, free

meal and other perks

provided. Visit www.

killington.com/jobs to view

all open positions or our

Welcome Center at 4763

Killington Rd. (800) 300-

9095 EOE.

DELI: Sandwich/Prep cook.

Experience would be great,

but if you enjoy working

with food, we will train.

Competitive wage. Please

call 802-558-0793.

KILLINGTON DELI/Vt

Liquor Outlet is hiring for

deli/liquor store help. Yearround

position, M-F. Access

to ski pass. Apply in person

at Killington Deli, Route 4.

NORTH COUNTRY Property

Management looking for

hard working individuals

to join our team. Full-time

position providing building

and grounds maintenance

for properties in the Rutland/

Killington, VT area. Must

have valid drivers license

and be able to work overtime

during winter months for

snow removal. Contact

Jim at 802-773-4322 for

interview.

WANTED

HIGHEST PRICES PAID

- Back home in Vermont

for a Spring visit and hope

to see new and returning

customers for the purchase,

sale and qualified appraisal

of coins, currency, stamps,

precious metals in any

form, old and high quality

watches and time pieces,

sports and historical

items. Free estimates. No

obligation. Member ANA,

APS, NAWCC, New England

Appraisers Association.

Royal Barnard 802-775-

Is your child a non-reader or 2-4 years behind in reading or writing?

Do you know an adult who cannot read?

My passion for 54 years has been to work with at risk readers from 3-93.

Accelerated results guaranteed.

Free testing and consultation.

Sliding scale.

we offer excellent

benefits, including:

Call Janie Feinberg at 802-234-7296

References available upon request.

• 40% discount at our

stores and online

is hiring for our

Holiday hustle

& Bustle

We are looking for the

following seasonal positions:

call center representatives

In North Clarendon & Manchester

distribution center & operations clerks

In North Clarendon

• Potential for

full-time employment

0085. Visit www.vermontcountrystore.com

Click on the CAREERS link at the bottom of the page.

• Free on-site

fitness center

NOTICE OF SALE

Courtesy Vermont Association of Snow Travelers

Doug Todd of Chittenden receives an award for being

named snowmobiler of the year, Sept. 7.

Local named snowmobiler

of the year

Doug Todd of Chittenden and 4th generation owner

and president of Todd Transportation in Rutland was

named Vermont Snowmobiler of the Year at the 52nd

annual meeting of the Vermont Association of Snow

Travelers (VAST), The meeting was held on Sept. 7 at

Northern Vermont University in Lyndonville.Tim Mills,

VAST president, presented the award.

The award is given to an individual who has demonstrated

their commitment to the sport, a true volunteer,

unselfishly giving of oneself, above and beyond. The individual

must be involved in snowmobile organizations

striving to make the sport even more enjoyable in the

future. The winner is forwarded to the American Council

of Snowmobile Associations (ACSA) for consideration for

U.S. Snowmobiler of the Year.

A longtime member of the Chittenden Dammers

snowmobile club, Todd currently serves as trail master of

the club while previously serving as the president.

The resident and nonresident owners, lienholders

and mortgagees of lands in the Town of Killington,

in the County of Rutland and State of Vermont,

are hereby notified that the taxes assessed by said

Town for the year 2016, 201 7 and 2018 remain, either

in whole or in part, unpaid upon the following

described lands in the Town of Killington to wit:

Being all and the same lands and premises

conveyed to Thomas Bentley and Mark L. Cardillo

by Warranty Deed of Edward Maurice Flynn dated

April 27, 2016 and recorded in Volume 347 at Page 92

of the Town of Killington Land Records (905 Killington

Road, Unit R-43 - Tax Map 22-199-R43 - Parcel

10990).

Subject to any lien to the Town of Killington for

real estate taxes for years 2019 and thereafter.

Reference may be had to said deed for a more

particular description of said lands and premises,

as the same appears of record in the Killington Land

Records.

And so much of said lands will be sold at public

auction at the Killington Town Clerk’s Office, a public

place in said Town, on the 8th of October 2019,

at 10 o’clock in the morning, as shall be requisite to

discharge said taxes with interests, costs and other

fees allowed by law, unless previously paid.

Pursuant to Title 32 Vermont Statutes Annotated

( “32 V.S.A.”) §5254(b), an owner of property being

sold for taxes may request in writing, not less than

twenty-four (24) hours prior to the tax sale, that only

a portion of the property be sold. Such request must

clearly identify the portion of the property to be sold

and must be accompanied by a certification from

the District Environmental Commission and the

Killington Zoning Administrative Officer that the

portion identified may be subdivided and meets the

minimum lot size requirements. In the event that

the portion so identified by the taxpayer cannot be

sold for the amount of the unpaid taxes, interest,

costs, and fees, then the entire property will be sold

to pay such unpaid taxes, interest, costs, and fees.

Taxpayers are further advised of their right to request

a hearing before the Town of Killington Board

for the Abatement of Taxes in accordance with the

provisions of 24 V.S.A. § 1535 respecting abatement

of taxes. Taxpayers wishing to have such a hearing

must contact Town Clerk Lucrecia Wonzor, 2706

River Road, Killington, Vt. 05751, for the Town Board

of Abatement, to request such a hearing.

DATED at Killington, Vermont this 6th of September

2019.

Chester Hagenbarth

Collector of Taxes

Town of Killington


46 • REAL ESTATE

The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

802.775.5111 • 335 Killington Rd. • Killington, VT 05751

www.2040UpperMichiganRoad.com

Pittsfield - Brookside is a unique residence of exceptional quality where you can

experience the idyllic Vermont lifestyle - one where the stream sets the tone for the

day, where dogs play in the brook, bonfires blaze at night and reading next to the

stream is a piece of heaven. Surrounded by miles of protected lands, you can take a

leisurely stroll on the private nature paths or connect to the extensive network of old

roads and trails in the Green Mountain National Forest. A stones’ throw from Vermont’s

VAST trail network, you can enjoy hiking, biking, snowshoeing and snowmobiling

right from your door. The house has been extensively remodeled with top-of-the-line

materials and carefully selected blends of regional woods, which reflect the beauty of

the surrounding forest and the history of New England. Offered fully furnished with

high end furniture and accessories, you can settle in and appreciate the serenity of this

special place today – Offered at $389,000

See videos of all our listings on

YouTube!

2814 Killington Rd.

802-422-3600

www.KillingtonPicoRealty.com

SKI OR BIKE HOME - SHUTTLE

HIGHRIDGE

1BR/1BA, $124,900

2BR/2BA $219,900

woodburning fireplace

Indoor pool/outdoor whirlpool

* furnished & equipped

KILLINGTON 10 ACRES

• Short drive to Rte 4 Skyeship

• Year-round SE mtn range views

• Flat Homesite is cleared & seeded

• Gravel driveway in, ready for bldg

• 4BR ST apprvd mound septic

design

• JUST REDUCED! $90,000

MTN GREEN – MAIN BLDG#3

• Renovated south facing 1BR/1BA

• 750 sq.ft., Luxury vinyl plank floors

• Stainless appliances.

Wd burning fplc

• Large deck, furnished $119K

KILLINGTON GATEWAY- TOP/END UNIT

• 2BR/1BA, 974 sf, on one level

• gas heat & fplc, tiled kitch &BA flrs

• Cath ceiling w/ sky lt, open flr plan

• Cherry kitchen cabinets, AC

• Covered deck, private ski locker

• furnished & equipped $125,000

LOCATION & TRAIL VIEWS

5BR, 3.5BA, Landscaped 3AC, Pond

• Flat paved driveway, hot tub-gazebo

• heated o/sized 2-car garage

• fieldstone fireplace,

• Viking appliances

• walk-out unfinished basemt

$1,150,000

THE LODGES - SKI IN & OUT

• 1-LVL 3BR/3BA, Furnished &

equipped, Wash/Dryer, patio

• Gas fplc, gas range, gas heat

• Mud-entry w/ cubbies+bench

• Double vanity, jet tub,

• Common: Indr pool $449K

KILLINGTON CTR INN & SUITES

• Completely Renovated 2BR/3BA

w/one LOCK-OFF unit

• Stone-faced gas f/plc, W/Dryer

• Tiled floor to ceiling shower

• Outdr Pool. Short walk to shuttle &

to restaurant. Furnished $222K

HAWK MOUNTAIN

• 3BR, 1.5 BA, 1.3 Acres,

1,480 sq.ft.

• new baseboards

• new shake shingle roof

• furnished & equipped

$250K

TIMBER FRAME + 2-CAR GARAGE

• 3BR,3BA en suites+1/2bath,

1,728 fin sf+full basemt.

• 2013 constructed,

spectacular Pico mtn. views

• Radiant heat - basement!

• Paved driveway $499K

WINTER VIEWS OF SUPERSTAR!

• On cul-de-sac, great LOCATION!

• 3BR, 2.5 3,470 sf, a/conditioning

• Ctl vac, chef’s kitch, butler’s pantry

• Cedar closet, office, master suite

• 3 car garage, storage, screened porch

• Deck, unfinished basemt,++

$789,500

REALTOR ®

Daniel Pol

Associate Broker

Kyle Kershner

Broker/Owner

Jessica Posch

Realtor

Lenore

Bianchi

‘tricia

Carter

Meghan

Charlebois

Merisa

Sherman

Pat

Linnemayr

Chris

Bianchi

Over 140 Years Experience in the Killington Region REALTOR

Katie

McFadden

Michelle

Lord

MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE

MLS

®

PEAK

PROPERTY

G R O U P

AT

802.353.1604

VTPROPERTIES.NET

IDEAL PROPERTIES CLOSE TO

KILLINGTON, OKEMO OR WOODSTOCK!

HOMES | CONDOS | LAND

COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT

Marni Rieger

802.353.1604

Marni@PeakPropertyRealEstate.com

59 Central Street, Woodstock VT

505 Killington Road, Killington VT

ATTN KILLINGTON INVESTORS! PRIME LOCATION--STRONG

COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY--BASE OF THE KILLINGTON RD!

ABSOLUTELY ONE OF THE BEST SPOTS IN KILLINGTON! Fabulous Retail

Property on 17 acres consists of a main building w/11,440 sq. ft. on 3 levels w/

elevator. The X Country Ski Center w/1,440 sq. ft. & direct access to xcountry/

snowshoe trails & Green Mountain Bike Trails! 18 hole championship disc golf

course & 3 extra build lots. $1,350,000

INVESTMENT OPP CLOSE TO KILLINGTON!

DIRECT ACCESS TO VAST! 15 guest rooms w/

private baths, 48 seat restaurant, comm kitchen,

4 bed/1 bath innkeepers home, greenhouse,

barn & more! $599K

RENTAL INVESTMENT IN KILLINGTON! 5 bedroom

DUPLEX. The top floor unit (3 bed/2.5 bath) has open floor

plan w/eat in kitchen, living area w/ fireplace, great deck,

master suite. Walk-out/lock-out lower level 2 bed/1.5 bath,

open floor plan w/eat in kitchen, living area w/ fireplace.

Rental income of over $32K! $389,900

AMEE FARM LODGE - RELAXED COUNTRY ELEGANCE.

MINUTES TO KILLINGTON! 15 guest rooms, 37 acres, awesome views,

endless hiking & biking trails, farm w/large barns.

STRONG RENTAL OPPORTUNITY! $1,600,000

SERENITY AWAITS! Lovingly maintained 3 bed/2

bath home w/ views! Endless recreation here on

100 acres, year round brook & loads of land to

hike/snowshoe, snowmobile or hunt on. VAST

trails are close! Minutes to Killington! $349,900


The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019 REAL ESTATE • 47

>

Progress?: I-89 came with a moral price for many

from page 8

makes it so much easier and faster to get

around. It would be the best thing for

Vermont since sliced white bread.

On the other hand, Goodhue doesn’t

shy from mentioning the negative impacts.

Wetlands were filled and hills were leveled.

Local businesses, backyards and orchards

were obliterated; farms were dismembered.

I-89 was experienced by many as a

major assault on a way of life that lifelong

Vermonters as well as seasoned transplants

would die for.

Case in point: Romaine Tenney, now

remembered perhaps only by those who

lived locally in the ‘60s.

I grew up in Claremont, New Hampshire.

We took Route 131 when we visited

relatives in Rutland and we kids always

looked forward to seeing the dilapidated

farmhouse and barn on the first bend in

Ascutney, with cows grazing on the hillside

and, if we were lucky, the old farmer with

the long beard, clad in

a peaked cap and wellworn

work overalls,

perhaps crossing from

the barn to the house.

His name, we were

told, was Romaine Tenney.

My stepfather was an editor at the then

Daily Eagle out of Claremont. I was dimly

aware of the controversy over the interstate

and its interchange planned for Ascutney.

One very early morning in 1964 he got

notification of a major fire over in Ascutney

and he jumped in the car and went.

The house and all had burned to the

ground.

Yankee magazine printed the following

story in its March/April 2013 issue,

contributed by Howard Mansfield.

Romaine was a well-liked local figure.

He lived in the house he had been born in,

off the grid long before it became trendy,

didn’t own a car or tractor, milked his cows

by hand and worked his farm with horses.

The 1843 brick house was comfortable,

trimmed out in Gothic gingerbread, with a

graceful carriage barn on one side.

Tourists often stopped to snap pictures

and Romaine was pleased to pose for them.

A photo shows he was good-looking in a

weathered way, with twinkling blue eyes.

“Romaine Tenney was the Vermont

[tourists] wanted to find,” wrote Mansfield.

Romaine owned 90 acres with hayfields,

an orchard and a 10-acre woodlot. The

Tenney parents had bought the property

in 1892. Born in 1900, Romaine was the

only kid who never left except for military

service, looking after his widowed mother

and running the farm. He kept the main

house just as it had always been, frozen in

“Romaine Tenney was

the Vermont [tourists]

wanted to find,” wrote

Mansfield.

time.

As the surveyors laid out the path of the

interstate, Romaine’s cow barn appeared

in their crosshairs. The crew leader was

impatient to finish up for the day, a member

of the survey crew recalled. “And that’s how

the Interstate highway ended up going

right through the property. If it had gone

five degrees one way or the other, you know,

things would have been very different. But

highways have to go somewhere,” the man

told Mansfield.

The state department of transportation

gave Romaine until April 1, 1964, to vacate

the premises. He didn’t budge. The earthmoving

equipment started working around

him, driving through his front yard. “By

June, the crew was dynamiting within

300 yards of the house,” Mansfield wrote.

“Rocks from one blast had gone through a

wall.”

The state offered him $10,600, then

$13,600. He refused to

take it.

Three months later,

as Romaine watched

from the porch, the

sheriff, armed with a

court order, emptied Romaine’s barn and

sheds and piled everything to one side.

That night, Romaine Tenney set fire

to all his buildings, including his house,

with himself locked inside. He had let his

livestock loose and sent his dogs outside

before setting the fire. At first no one

imagined Romaine had also perished, but

the state fire marshal, in sifting through

the debris, discovered a rifle that had been

fired and charred bones. The animals were

rounded up by neighbors.

Romaine had dropped hints to family

members in the days before, which they

took as just kidding.

The house site and barnyard are now

buried deep below Exit 8, and the ledge

underlying the hillside pastures has been

blasted out. The transformation is so

complete that I can’t begin to recognize any

trace of the Tenney farm.

The Weathersfield section of I-89 was

opened two years later, with a ribboncutting

ceremony attended by Democrat

Gov. Phil Hoff and Republican Sen. George

Aiken, among others. They were all smiles.

Because, as Aiken said in 1961 of the earlier

Interstate 91, “We’re on the verge of the

greatest development Vermont has ever

seen.”

While letters of sympathy poured in to

the Tenney family from around the country,

the Tenneys told Mansfield that the state

never offered official condolences.

Julia Purdy, Rutland

72 Windrift Ridge Road, Killington $ 575,000

This unique, 3 bdrm , 3 bath, modern home, situated

on a wooded lot overlooking nearby Pico Mountain

Ski area, offers unexpected privacy and stunning

mountain views.

20, 21, 22

Grow Your Life in Killington

KILLINGTON VALLEY REAL ESTATE

Bret Williamson, Broker, Owner

298 Prior Drive, Killington $ 1,2000,000

This 4934 square foot, exquisitely detailed Tudor style

home is in a class by itself. A five bedroom home,

surrounded by the grandeur of the green mountains.

1800’s Colonial

13 acres 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, small pond

& out building in Pittsford. Stainless

Steel appliances, 2 decks, Gazebo, Hot

Tub , John Deere mower/ snow blower

$175,000

Bob 802-770-2042,

vt101@aol.com

For Sale

4552 VT Route 107, Stockbridge $129,000

Many opportunities for this home located minutes to I-89

and 20 min drive to Killington. Excellent rental history,

recently renovated improvements including a new

standing seam metal roof, windows, doors, and more.

Cricket Hill, Killington $

555,000

This 4-bedroom, 4-bath home with inground pool is a

ten minute drive from Killington Resort with stunning

views of Pico Mountain. The competitively priced home,

is being sold furnished.

View all properties @killingtonvalleyrealestate.com

Office 802-422-3610 ext 206 Cell 802-236-1092 bret@killingtonvalleyrealestate.com


48The Mountain TimesSept. 11-17, 2019

BIKE PARK

SEASON PASS

Buy your 2020 Bike Park Season Pass now and ride free for the remainder of the

season. Get an adult season pass for $ 359 and for youth under 19, just $ 249.

Vermont Resident Youth Pass $ 99, plus $ 129 rental add-on.

killington.com/bikepark

*Prices valid through January 16, 2020. All pass sales are subject to 6% state sales tax.

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