Dirt and Trail October 2019

RobRidefast

SA's Adventure Magazine

RIDE MORE, STRESS LESS!

OCTOBER 2019

www.dirtandtrailmag.com

SA’S ADVENTURE MAGAZINE

REVOLUTIONARY

A SMART APPROACH

BUI LT T O GO

AN ALL-NEW

A S FA R A S Y

DAR E T O TAK

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

BREED OF

ENDURO.

THE 2016 2-STROKE ENDURO MODEL RANGE.

SA LAUNCH TEST: 2020

HUSQVARNA ENDURO

The joy of the ride is often in nding routes that nobody else has used – reachin

destinations that few others would dare to aim for. The 2016 Husqvarna Motorc

2-stroke enduro bikes rely on exceptional agility, a broad powerband and light

weight – letting you easily explore wherever you choose to go.

FREESTATE - Husqvarna Central, Bloemfontein – (051) 430 1237

CIT

Holeshot Motorcycles, Boksburg – (011) 823-5830 Husqvarna West – (010) 443 3776

Belville (021) 945 8019

EASTERN CAPE - Auto Motorcycles, Port Elizabeth – (041) 581 1699

MPUMALANGA - Vans Husqvarna, Middleburg – (013) 282 0766

a Feb17 DT.indd 1

OCTOBER 2019 RSA R35.00

19010

2017/01/20 8:53 PM

9 771815 337001

BMW GS TROPHY 2019

KTM ADVENTURE

RALLY

NEWS / BIKE SETUP TIPS / NATIONAL ENDURO

KTM MOTOHALL / KX 250 BUILD

SA BUILT FLAT TRACKER


K&N Style Filters

Available sizes 28, 35, 39, 42, 48,

52, 54 and 60mm R125.00

8000Ma

Jump Starter & Power Bank R1299.00

18L / min

RAC610 Inflator R449.00 RTG5 Gauge R249.00

Bike and ATV Covers

Available sizes S - XL

From R270.00

Ring Globes

H7 150% Power R330.00

H4 150% Power R290.00

EMGO Top Box

R990.00

DESCRIPTION PART NO. SRP Inc. Vat

SMART CHARGER 1 AMP DFC150 R599.00

SMART CHARGER 3.5 AMP DFC530 R899.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSA004 R999.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSA008 R1349.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSD004 R1199.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSD008 R1499.00

Rim Locks Front and Rear

From R48.00

R110.00 R465.00

Tubeless Puncture Kits

License Disc Holders

R168.00

Bar Ends

R100.00

Hand Guards

Various Colours available

ABS Plastic R470.00

Alloy R990.00

Scooter V Belts

From R110.00

Tyre Levers

From R95.00

Jerry Cans

From R450.00

Fork Boots

from R120.00

PBA DEALER LISTING

PBA DEALER LISTING

PART NO. DESCRIPTION PRICE

50081406/L CARB CLEANER 400ML 50.00

50201414/L TERMINAL PROTECT RED 50.00

50201415/L TERMINAL PROTECT BLUE 50.00

50320400/L BRK,CLTCH,CHAIN CLEANER 44.00

50500192/L CHAIN LUBE 150ML 34.00

50500193/L CHAIN LUBE 400ML 69.00

50510403/L CHAIN WAX 400ML 71.00

50510404/L CHAIN WAX 150ML 34.00

51528262/L PETROL INJECTOR CLEANER 10.00

53203200/L AIR FILTER SPRAY 55.00

53203500/L AIR FILTER OIL 500ML 55.00

53204005/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 5l 325.00

53204400/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 400ML 47.00

53780300/L SPARK 300ML 44.00

55000314/L TYRE FIX 200ML 45.00

56000001/L FORK OIL SYN 5W 125.00

56000002/L FORK OIL SYN 10W 125.00

56000003/L FORK OIL SYN 2.5W 135.00

56000400/L MOUSSE LUBRICANT 100.00

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS GAUTENG MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ZEEMANS ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES 012 011 435 342 7177 7474

FAST BIKING KTM ACCESSORIES 011 012 867 342 0092 7474

GAME FAST KTM MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 867 7000 0092

MOTO-MATE GAME MOTOR RIVONIA SERVICES 011 234 849 5275 7000

MOTO-MATE EDENVALE RIVONIA 011 234 027 5275 0545

MOTO-MATE KCR MOTORCYCLE EDENVALE FANATIX 011 975 027 5405 0545

PRIMROSE JUST BIKING MOTORCYCLES 011 016 828 421 9091 1153

RANDBURG KCR MOTORCYCLE MOTORCYCLES FANATIX 011 792 975 6829 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

MPUMALANGA

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES

BIKE CITY

011 792 6829

013 244 2143

MPUMALANGA

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143

NORTHWEST

BIKERS NORTHWEST PARADISE 018 297 4700

INSANE BIKERS PARADISE BIKERS 014 018 594 297 2111 4700

MOTOS INSANE @ BIKERS KLERKSDORP 018 014 468 594 1800 2111

WATER MOTOS RITE @ KLERKSDORP MOTORCYCLES 018 771 468 5050 1800

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES LIMPOPO

015 297 3291

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

PERRY’S M/CYCLES BALITO 031 110 0056

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

RIDE PERRY HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA GLEN ANIL 035 031 789 566 1851 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

CAPE PERRY’S PROVINCE M/CYCLES HILLCREST

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT

031 765 2560

021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC CAPE PROVINCE BELVILLE 021 945 3724

TRAC-MAC CRAIGS M/CYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND FITMENT 021 510 939 2258 8944

TRAC-MAC WYNBURG

BELVILLE 021 761 945 4220 3724

NEVES TRAC-MAC MOTORCYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND WORLD CC 021 930 510 5917 2258

WICKED TRAC-MAC CYCLES WYNBURG 021 510 761 2968 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES FREESTATE MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC

SALLEYS YAMAHA

FREESTATE

021 930 5917

051 430 3326

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326


EDITOR: ROLEY FOLEY

On a tour of the facilities, the new CEO

noticed a guy leaning against a wall. The

room was full of workers and he wanted to

let them know that he meant business.

He asked the guy, ‘How much money do

you make a week?’

A little surprised, the young man looked at

him and said, ‘I make R1500 a week. Why?’

The CEO said, ‘Wait right here.’ He walked

back to his offi ce, came back in two

minutes, and handed the guy six grand in

cash and said, ‘Here’s four weeks’ pay.

Now GET OUT and don’t come back.’

Feeling pretty good about himself the CEO

looked around the room and asked, ‘Does

anyone want to tell me what that goof-ball

did here?’

From across the room, a voice said, ‘That

was the pizza delivery guy.’

Always, be lekker!

See you on the trails!

CONTENTS: OCTOBER 2019

THE TEAM:

EDITOR:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

DESIGN:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sinead Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

Sean Hendley

bestbikemagazines@

yahoo.com

071 684 4546

ACCOUNTS &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Office no (011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

CONTRIBUTORS:

Kurt Beine

Zygmund Brodalka

Tristan Foley

Mike Wessels

Jaun Delport

Shado Alston

22: COVER STORY: 2020 HUSQVARNA 32: FEATURE: KTM ADVENTURE RALLY 2019

38: FUN RACING: STOFSKOP 2019 40: SA BUILD: HONDA FLAT TRACKER

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Digital or hard copy.

44: FEATURE: BMW GS TROPHY 2019 70: FEATURE: BIKE SETUP & ERGONOMICS

2 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Piston and Gasket Sets

Cranks, Conrods and Camshafts

Cylinder Kits, Rebores, Main Bearings and Clutch Plates

VALVES,STEM SEALS AND SPRINGS

Email:G124@mweb.co.za

EMAIL:

no 4 Fifth avenue

Northmead

Benoni

011 425 1081/4


ought to you by

Top tips for getting

a perfect fit of

motorcycle helmet:

We all know that wearing the correctly sized helmet

is extremely important - not just from a safety

perspective, but also for comfort. Whether you’re

new to two wheels or just looking to buy a new

helmet, check out these tips to ensure you get the

right fit…

Start with a base measurement

Get your hands on a tape measure - or go into your

local motorcycle clothing dealer - then use the size

guide to find out which size would be best for you.

This base measurement gives you a starting place

in a helmet range. In-between sizes? Then try both

on. Some Helmets can offer different thickness of

cheek pads too, to ensure you get the best and most

comfortable fit.

Try it on

Pulling the chin straps wide apart will squash the

foam inside the cheek pads, making it easier to slip

the helmet over your head without getting stuck.

While it may look like the right size for you on the

chart, it’s important to try on the helmet for fit.

TOP TIP: The easiest way to get your helmet on

is to put it over the back of your head first, not

directly over the top. The back of your head is the

largest area to get your helmet over, so starting

there and working the helmet forward - rather

than down - is much easier.

Check for gaps in the padding

Once the helmet is on, it’s important that the foam

all around the head is compressed - this shows that

the helmet fits properly in all areas. Check there’s

no excessive clearance between your head and

the padding in key areas of the helmet, such as the

cheeks and across the forehead.

Make sure there’s no wiggle room

For the perfect fit, the helmet should feel snug and

secure but not uncomfortable. Try and wiggle the

helmet from side to side and lift the back - if it’s the

right fit, then the helmet shouldn’t move too freely or

lift away from the head when pulled. A well-trained

dealer will be able to test how the helmet fits and

move it around on your head to ensure it fits well.

TOP TIP: Bear in mind that helmet sizes vary

across the style and make of helmet, so make

sure to try out a few different styles to find the

perfect helmet fit for you.

Noise cameras

rolled out in

France… Imagine!

A French town on the outskirts of Paris Orly airport

has begun tackling loud motorcycle exhausts, by

installing a ‘noise radar’ capable of identifying the

offending vehicle, pinpointing their location and

automatically issuing a ticket.

Located in the centre of Villeneuve-le-Roi, as

reported by Reuters, the system is set to go live once

a law permitting the technology is passed, with the

device linked to Police CCTV cameras in order to

automatically issue fines.

France already employsa noise vehicle limit, however

it relies on the police’s ability to catch them in the act.

Created by Bruitparif, this new system instead, uses

four microphones to measure decibel levels every

tenth of a second. This can then be used to track

the original source of the noise, illustrated as a series

of coloured dots behind the machine, known as

‘acoustic wake.’

Away from the urban sprawl, noise is now also being

tracked in the hills of Saint-Forget, outside Paris. A

popular route with bikers, a further two devices are

set to be installed in central Paris in September. Ah

well… Sometimes it better to live in Africa.

distributed by

4 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


TWOTHOUSENDANDTWENTY

As worn by

Ryan Villopoto

Contact DMD on 011 792 7691 or visit www.dmd.co.za to find your nearest ANSR Racing Dealer


ought to you by

Piaggio Group Reports

Unit Sales Up 5.9%

With many brands walking on pins and needles, the

Piaggio Group is celebrating a strong first-half to the

2019 sales year, with overall unit sales up 9.2%.

That number isn’t just all Vespa scooters though

(however, the Italian brand does sell quite a few of

those), as Piaggio reports that its motorcycle sales

saw a 14% bump in gross revenue.

The Italian conglomerate pegs the new Moto Guzzi

V85 TT for the sales boom over last year, which is

quite a feat since 2018 was a strong year for the

Piaggio Group as well.

As such, Piaggio has sold 215,900 motorcycles and

scooters in the first half of 2019, compared to the

203,900 from the same time period last year.

On the finance side of the equation, the picture

is even stronger, with net sales at €583.4 million,

which is a 12.1% increase over the 2018 figure for

the combination of Q1 and Q2. For the Piaggio

Group, Asia is the leading territory for growth, with a

20.2% uptick in unit sales, and a 28.8% increase in

revenue.

The Western markets were strong, but not as rosy,

with the combined European and American markets

(we have no idea why Piaggio lumps these two

markets together, FYI) showing a 4.6% increase in

unit volumes, with a 9.4% increase in revenue.

All said and done, the Piaggio Group made €134.3

million (EBITDA) in the first half of this year, which is

a 15.2% increase over 2018.

So – why are we telling you all of this? Well because

Aprilia and Guzzi will be back in SA soon, brought in

by The Italian motorcycle Importers.

More info: (010) 443-4596 www.italianmi.co.za

Holeshot Motorcycles

on the move.

The Terminal Centre in Boksburg is becoming something

of a motorcycle hub, with two of South Africa’s longest

established motorcycle dealerships around the corner from

each other. The Holeshot family has just moved in with their

range of Husqvarna motorcycles, accessories and used bikes

of all shapes and sizes. Around the corner is the Shimwells

outfit with their range of Yamaha motorcycles, parts and

accessories. A one stop motorcycle destination… for sure!

When we were there they were still sorting and unpacking and

stuffs – but more news soon.

The centre is c located adjacent to the N12 Highway in Bartlett

Boksburg and is easily accessible via Trichardt road and Dr

Vosloo road. Same number as always. (011) 8235833

Full story soon.

distributed by

6 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


ought to you by

Yamaha reveals

all-new WR250F

for 2020.

In our July issue, we brought you news about

the yamaha dirtbike lineup that is expected for

2020 – but Yamaha left a late-ish surprise for

everyone. In early September they send us some

info about the new WR250F…

Yamaha has revealed their most powerful

WR250F enduro to date, complete with a YZ250F

motocross-derived engine, new chassis and revised

suspension.

Now in its twentieth year of production, this latest

incarnation promises to be “The most advanced

250cc four-stroke enduro bike ever built by

Yamaha,” with the closed-competition-only machine

also receiving multiple fuel maps, which can be

customised using an app on your smartphone.

Revised engine

At the beating heart of the updated machine lies

a 250cc reverse-head, single-cylinder four-stroke

engine, complete with a new forged aluminium

piston for an increased compression ratio.

Alongside this come revised exhaust cam timing

and intake port valve seats, boosting the bike’s low

to mid-range torque. Elsewhere, Yamaha have also

done away with the previous bike’s 10-hole injector

and replaced it with a 12-hole alternative, complete

with a 44mm Mikuni throttle body.

Just some of the many alterations to the engine,

the revisions have resulted in a claimed increase in

power throughout the entire rev range, as well as

greater performance at higher RPM.

Shaved weight

For added poke, Yamaha have also shaved weight,

adding a lighter, more compact 390W starter motor,

alongside a less-substantial, more durable clutch.

Elsewhere, the bike has gained a new bilateral

aluminium beam frame, complete with straight fuel

tank rails to help improve feedback on the trails as well

as achieve around a 15% improvement in rigidity.

Mounted on the new rails is a larger capacity fuel

tank, with capacity boosted by 0.5 litres to 7.9

overall. To gain the extra space, Yamaha have

extended the tank downwards towards the centre

of the bike, helping to improve the overall balance of

the machine.

They’ve also added a lightweight skid plate,

produced in plastic resin, also designed to protect

the frame, water pump, hoses and engine cases. It

will also tackle dirt and mud ingress.

Improved handling

Helping to keep the bike in a straight line is new

suspension at the front and rear, with 1mm wider

25mm KYB fork tubes based on the YZ250F,

complete with enduro-specific settings. To the

rear, the bike gets a YZ250F-derived shock, with a

stronger and lighter coil spring saving a further 350g.

New technology

To help control power delivery, Yamaha have also

equipped the WR with a handle bar-mounted dual

engine map switch, allowing you to swap between

two factory modes.

Maps can also be customised to rider preference

within the Power Tuner app, before being uploaded

to the bike’s Communication Control Unit.

With 16 adjustable values available for fuel injection,

and ignition timing alongside three factory base

set-ups, the app also features a race log, engine

diagnostics and the ability to share information with

other riders.

We sure do hope to get one for a ride soon...

distributed by

8 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


BUY ANY YZ MODEL

AND GET A FREE TICKET

TO RYAN VILLOPOTO’S

RIDING MASTERCLASS

2018 YAMAHA YZ250F Limited Edition

OFFER INCLUDES A FREE

bLU cRU STICKER KIT AND ACERBIS MX STAND

ALL THIS FOR ONLY

Including bLU cRU pack!

T-shirt • Yamalube Care Pack • bLU cRU Sticker Pack

R87, 950

INCLUDING VAT.

www.yamaha.co.za · +27 11 259 7600 ·

Facebook: Yamaha Southern Africa · Instagram: @yamahasouthafrica

AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL YAMAHA DEALER. COLOURS ARE LIMITED. E&OE.


ought to you by

World of Yamaha

now open to the

Public for Retail.

Kelvin, Sandton,

Gauteng

“We are proud of the facilities we have here at World

of Yamaha and customers are welcome to purchase

from our range of motorcycles, marine products

and apparel” says Robin van Rensburg, Managing

Director of Yamaha Distributors SA.

World of Yamaha will be trading from 09:00 to 17:00

Monday to Friday and 09:00 to 14:00 on Saturdays

as of Monday 02 September 2019.

For sales queries you can contact Michael Creevy

on (011) 259 7850.

World of Yamaha is now officially open to the public

for retail with the full range of Motorcycles, Marine

products, Golf Cars , Power Products as well as

Spares and Accessories products for sale.

World of Yamaha has been open as a business

centre, events facility and Showroom to showcase

the brands range of products from 2011.

If you have never been to World Of Yamaha, do

yourself a favour and go and kuier, It’s really quite

something – and they serve the cheapest graze and

coffee on the planet!

Powerbronze Huggers

for your Adventure bike.

Give the rear end of your bike a Powerbronze Rear

Hugger. Each Rear Hugger comes pre-drilled with

all mountings – no drilling, no cutting, no tie-wraps!

All of the Rear Huggers are made from a high impact

plastic for a smooth internal finish and “rolled” edges,

and all brackets and necessary fixings are supplied.

Powerbronze Rear Huggers use ‘Posi-Flex’; steel

sleeved rubber mounting points to dampen vibration

and avoid cracking.

Many of their Rear Huggers have chain-guards built

into the shape where appropriate. Over the last

couple of years Powerbronze has introduced a range

of vented Rear Huggers for some models, with the

option of gold or silver coloured mesh vents for that

extra style. Standard finishes for the Powerbronze

Rear Hugger range (vented or otherwise) are Gloss

Black and Carbon Look.

At your dealer. Web: www.trickbitz.co.za

distributed by

10 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


360° TURBINE TECHNOLOGY:

REDUCES UP TO 30% OF HEAD IMPACT AT

CONCUSSION LEVEL

REDUCES UP TO 40% OF ROTATIONAL

ACCELERATION TO HEAD AND BRAIN

REMOVABLE BACK

PROTECTOR

CHEST HARNESS FOR

ROCK-SOLID FIT

NON-STOP

NON-STOP

HELMET & HYDRATION

PROTECTED AND FUELED UP FOR THE THRILL!

THRILL

YOUR

THRILL

The GPX 3.5 Helmet uses 360° Turbine brain rotation

and concussion reduction technology to keep you safe

on the trail — while a hardy hydration/stowage

system keeps you fueled up until the finish line.

LEATT.COM


ought to you by

ASW Racing gear

hits SA Soon.

ASW Racing has been gearing off-road passion

for more than 30 years. With a love for off-road,

brothers Paulo and Dimas Mattos didn’t realise

that they would turn 1986 into a historic year for

Brazillian motocross when they created ASW

– AERO Sport Wear. With a strong vision and

will to succeed, the brothers put their dreams

into practise, and today ASW is the #1 Brazillian

offroad brand.

In 1986 a dream became a reality as they begin

production of off-road gloves with one seamstress

and a secretary… The brothers brand gradually built

popularity among riders and Aero Race Wear went

fast forward….

In 2018 the expansion of ASW Racing as an

international Brazilian brand was continuous. The

company, which has a long tradition of supporting

the presence of Brazilian athletes in international

competitions and has presence in various parts of

Latin America, is now the official sponsor of the

English Motocross team Kawasaki’s Dixon Racing

Team. Development and passion, exciting new

horizons are evolving for ASW. 2018 saw the brand

officially enter the blue ribbon MXGP series. Now,

ASW is available for distribution within the EMEA

territory.

In 2019 ASW won its first MXGP Championship with

Courtney Duncan on the Dixon Kawasaki KX250f.

Late 2019 ASW will hit South African shores with

MX Gear and Protective Wear. MTB and Adventure

Bike Gear will follow in 2020. ASW Product will

be available online and through selected dealers

around SA…

More info soon, watch this space! Trade equiries:

0794942007

Facebook and Instagram - @

ASWRacingSouthAfrica

distributed by

12 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


ONLY 10 UNITS AVAILABLE

DL250A L9 NOW ON SPECIAL

Now only R70 990.00 Including VAT

For more Infomation visit your

nearest Suzuki authorized dealer!

www.suzukimotorcycle.co.za suzuki_motorcycle_s.a @MotorcycleSA


ought to you by

Snow+Rock Enduro 2019

Afriski Mountain Resort is once again hosting an

enduro for riders of all capabilities.

Deep in Lesotho’s beautiful Maluti Mountains, Afriski

has teamed up with Wild West Enduro Track to

create an event that promises fun for beginners, a

rewarding challenge for intermediate enduro riders

and a chance for advanced bikers to hone their skills.

As this event takes place at the end of October, snow

may be a little thin on the ground – but there’ll be no

shortage of rocks and beautiful scenery.

“We’re delighted to be hosting Snow+Rock Enduro

once again,” commented Peter Peyper, Afriski Sales

& Marketing Director. “The variety of terrain around

Afriski – both high altitude and lowland – means

that riders of all skill levels will find something to

surprise, delight and challenge them. This is a

great opportunity for enduro riders to boost their

confidence and get to grips with the kind of riding

that only Lesotho offers,” he added.

The routes for this year’s event will feature key

vantage points where supporters can gather to

cheer on their favourite rider. The added benefit is

that the course for Snow+Rock Enduro is outside

the restricted area for this year’s Roof, so riders

can practice in similar altitude conditions without

contravening the rules.

This year’s route will offer participants the chance

to experience both the mountains and lowlands

of Lesotho, as Martin Schultz Snow+Rock Enduro

Route Director points out. “The Lowland Ride can

be self-navigated as a race against your mates, or

enjoyed as a guided group outride. The second day’s

40km Altitude Ride takes things up a notch – literally

– thanks to its combination of technical sections and

flowing terrain.

Again, it can be raced or taken at your own pace,”

added Martin. Both days riding will offer great routes

a GPS is essential.

“We’re certainly encouraging riders to bring their

families to Snow+Rock Enduro,” said Francois

Marais, one of the founders of the event and owner

of Wild West Enduro Track. “As well as watching

the riders tackle the mountains, partners and kids

can enjoy their own adventures with a wide variety

of activities on offer at the resort before heading to

Africa’s highest restaurant to cool down with a Maluti

beer or warm up with a mug of hot chocolate.”

• How to enter: Visit www.racecontrol.co.za/

• Accommodation options: a range of options at

Afriski, from a backpacker lodge to ski chalets. See

www.afriski.net/accommodation/ for details.

www.afriski.net/events/2019/10/snow-rockenduro-2019/

distributed by

14 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


• MULTIPLE ROUTES CATERING FOR NOVICE, INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED RIDERS

• ROUTES FALL OUTSIDE OF THE RESTRICTED AREA SO GREAT TRAINING FOR MOTUL ROOF

OF AFRICA

• ALL INCLUSIVE ACCOMMODATION PACKAGES TO SUIT ALL BUDGETS

• BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY FOR A FUN FILLED WEEKEND IN THE MOUNTAINS!


ought to you by

Givi: Sensible

adventure stuff…

GRT717 UNIVERSAL 5 litre TOOL BAG

This cool little universal tool bag with 5 litre capacity

is aimed at off-road and enduro rider and has

reflective strips so your mates don’t ride into you

in the dark and can be incorporated into and as

part of Givi’s other soft bag modular systems. It is

UV resistant, so it won’t perish in the sun as well

as waterproof so your tools don’t rust. Standard

features also include the following:

• Roll down closure system to ensure fully

waterproof

• Reflective print for improved visibility

• Rigid internal base equipped with a flip-off closure

for the tool box hatch

It can be attached to a motorcycle saddle, the

front mud-guard or combined with, or as an extra

compartment on the GRT718 soft saddle bags.

GRT718 universal saddle bags

For those extreme adventures riders out there, here

is a pair of 15 litre Givi GRT718 saddle bags that

secure over the seat of most enduro bikes and are

waterproof to keep your spare undies and socks

dry. They also have some straps to turn them into

shoulder bags to easily get them to your digs from

your bike with a few extra features like:

• Roll down closure system to ensure fully waterproof

• Belts for attachment to the motorcycle frame

• Hook and loop fastening and a central safety belt.

• Reflective insert and print for improved visibility

• Rapid attachment straps at the top and base

of the bag to mount the GRT717 bag or other

compatible load

Check out www.dmd.co.za for more cool products

and your nearest stockist.

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It’s almost like a plug & play system made to fit.

Available for most model dirtbikes and adventures,

including:

BMW: F650GS/F800GS.

HONDA: XL650/700 TRANSALP. XRV750 AFRICA

TWIN. NC700/750

KAWASAKI: KLR650

KTM: 950 ADV,990,1190

TRIUMPH: TIGER 800XC

YAMAHA: XT600R/X, TW200

At your dealer. www.trickbitz.co.za

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16 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


ought to you by

Bike Tyre

Warehouse news:

Bike Tyre Warehouse in Midrand has already been

awarded top retailer in S.A. for the premium tyre

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Visit them at Unit 9 Sable Park, 997 Richards Drive,

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18 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


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BBS D&T Oct'19.indd 1

2019/09/10 12:29 PM


ought to you by

The Big Orange

Fire Engine Bike

So the concept seems feasible and has possibly

been attempted before on ATV’s and side by sides

with varying degrees of success.

However, when two Austrian giants in the form of

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engines on a grand scale worldwide, collaborate

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get to the fire along short cuts a heck of a lot quicker

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distributed by

20 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Pics and story Glenn Foley, Mike Wessels, ZC Marketing and friends.

RAMABANTA TO HA TLALIS

AND BACK AGAIN.

Ask

HUSQVARNA 2020 SA LAUNCH

any rider in SA what their

favorite riding spot is – and most

will reply – Lesotho. That’s where

the launch of the MY20 range of

Husqvarna enduro bikes took

place. It was awesome to ride

some of the old haunts – and to

introduce some of the newer bike

peeps to such a beautiful place…

22 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


We have brought you all the info on

Husqvarnas 2020 enduro lineup in

previous issues, but let’s face it – until

you actually get to ride a motorcycle, the

facts and figures mean very little really.

What a perfect setting for a launch

– the famous Ramabanta trading post

Adventures – a place synonymous with

riding in Lesotho – and a place where

many riders have cut their Lesotho

teeth on famous passes like Baboons.

A Motley crew of motorcycle

personalities made the very best of the

opportunity – and we literally rode the

wheels off the new bikes.

The bikes:

Husqvarna has a bike for everyone. Two

of each model were on hand for us to

ride and compare for the day – and there

was literally no rush, so we got to ride

and play with each of them to get a real

feel of what the new bikes have to offer.

And to be quite frank, this is one brand

that has a heck of a lot on offer.

We often ask how it is that this group

manages to produce a new bike every

three years – and when compared to

other manufacturers, manage to have so

many different models available.

The question is actually quite a

simple one to answer. They ONLY build

motorcycles. Not cars, not golf carts,

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019 23


TE150i

TE250i

TE300i

FE250

FE350

FE450

FE501

ships, propellers or power products.

Their focus is 100 percent two wheeled

pleasure. And this pays huge dividends

when it comes to market share – and

giving riders what they want.

I hear the clever oakes saying what

about Husqvarna chainsaws? Well,

those are still made in Sweden and not

China would you believe? A completely

different firm.

The bikes are proudly produced and

manufactured by a giant in Austria.

So two completely separate entities –

do not confuse them.

Present for duty in Ramabanta:

Peeps:

It was a great spread of rider skills

present – from virtual newbees, to

old school wobblers like this one, to

some MX stars and some very fast

enduro racers. Leading the pack was

Husqvarna’s enduro stars, William

Oosthuizen and Brett Swanepoel. Those

boys are unbelievably talented, so fast

and incredibly patient with our mixed

bag of riders. The lekker thing about

having such a mixed bag along is the fact

that you can swap notes on the bikes.

Bikes:

The fuel injected Smokers include the

new, fuel injected TE 150, the New TE 250,

the new TE 300.

Four-Stroke Tech included the FE 250,

FE 350, FE 450 and the big daddy FE501.

The route:

To wake everyone up, the Husky team

started the day with a lekker rocky

descent down a gnarly slope and into

the riverbed where the boys spent an

hour just hooning around and posing for

photos.

From the riverbed it was back onto

the trail some cool winding bronze riding

interspersed with rocky passes – nothing

too hectic – and down into another,

bigger riverbed section where the guys

had worked a great little corner/ flat track

section of about 3 KM’s where we could

chop and change and try each bike. The

trail included fast sandy corners, a little

rocky climb, an few small whoops and

donga’s, so really cool to test each bike.

7 bikes, 2 odd laps on each. 14 laps as

fast or as slow as you like. Tooooo cool.

We rode and laughed and roosted each

other. Some riders took an involuntary

swim, others came unstuck on the off

camber slopes, but we got a very good

idea of what each bike was really like.

Then there was a treat in store.

Baboons pass – which used to The

Roof Of Africa’s signature pass. Now it

is considered to be a pleasant Sunday

ride for the Hard Enduro guys. The new

bikes just make it easy and the skill of

the riders has just improved so much

over the years. The pass is a real treat

– we rode to the crest of the mountain,

stopped for some pics and back down

again. The smiles (or in some cases,

grimaces), just got bigger, and the riders

got braver…

The trails, some of which we

recognized from previous Lesotho rides

wound their way up to Ha Tlalis where we

were treated to some juicy burgers and a

little snore on the soft green grass – and

then we did the whole route in reverse

back to the lodge. Can life get better?

A perfect day of riding. About sixty

kays of lekker-lekker. Challenging,

without being ridiculous and the fireside

chats and bench racing under the

Basotho sky with the Husqvarna South

Africa that evening rounded things off

perfectly!

There is quite simply nothing better

than mates and motorcycles.

Some thoughts on each bike.

We are not going to bore you with all of

the tech specs on each machine – but

we’d rather let you know what each

bike feels like to ride. But we do need to

include a few key points on all of the new

models. They are, after all pretty much,

brand new motorcycles for 2020:

• New frame on all models with

increased longitudinal and torsional

rigidity.

• New TE 150i with electronic fuel

injection and electric start.

24 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


• Two-stroke 250 and 300i models have a

secondary ambient air sensor on the TPI.

• Updated WP XPLOR fork with new midvalve

piston and setting.

• Updated WP XACT shock with new main

piston and setting.

• All-new exhaust systems across all

models for improved performance and

durability.

• Improved cooling circuit with radiators

placed 12mm lower.

• New fuel tank design.

• Updated four stroke engines.

• Updated TE 250i/300i cylinder for

improved two-stroke performance.

• Lighter than last year. The new carbon

composite subframes alone weigh 250g

less than on the previous models. Nips

and tucks on each model shave off even

more weight.

• No Kickstarts. Except on the 150i.

Kickstarter kits are, however available

if you’d like to fit one. They reckon that

the new Lithium Ion Batteries are more

than up to the task. We had no issues on

this ride even though a few of us ended

up upside down…

• The seat heights are lower. 20mls

across the range – 10 mls off the seat, and

10 mls off the linkage, but the bikes still

have the same ground clearance as last

years model. Great for us short legged

wobblers.

• New bodywork: Slimmer ergo’s.

“Their focus is 100 percent two

wheeled pleasure. And this pays

huge dividends when it comes to

market share – and giving riders

what they want.”

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019 25


Lesotho is a land of winding

mountain passes.

The Two Strokes:

3 full sized enduro models for the

2020 season, the new 150, the 250

and the 300 – all with TPI:

The 150:

New to the Husqvarna lineup is

the 150. TPI has sorted this little

bike right out. It’s very quick, very

nimble and the smallest of the

bunch without being left behind.

In the correct hands, this bike is

a race winner, but for someone

learning to ride it offers excellent,

user friendly power and smooth

performance. It shares all of the

high end components from it’s

bigger siblings – so you really do

get what you pay for.

Little bike? If you know

Francois from Wild West, you’ll

know how short he is. He raved

about the ergonomics – and

the good news is that even us

slightly bigger boertjies enjoyed

riding it just as much. Give her

a rev and she flies. Muscling

the bike over the rocks is easy

because the bike is so small and

light. Too much fun.

Mike says:

The 150 for me is always fun to

ride, the light weight enables you

to manipulate the bike into any

position with ease and when you

thought it couldn’t get better , it

did with the surprising throttle

response on the bike it really has

more bottom end than any of its

predecessors, no doubt a weapon

of choice in the technical stuff.

The TE250.

The days of hard hitting enduro

two strokes are basically over.

Riding this bike makes it quite

easy to understand why many

riders are moving from the bigger

300 and even the four strokes.

The 250 is just so easy to ride and

more than powerful enough to

tackle – well – anything really –

and the way that Husky has tuned

the engine means that you won’t

have your arms ripped out.

The 250 really works best if you

attack more and live in the midrange

so it makes for a naturally

more attack-minded bike. Power

is crisp and predictable and when

she gets her revs up, she flies

26 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


The FM18C will fit Dunlop

Motorcycle tyres 120/80 and all

90 and 100 series tyres.

• Designed exclusively for off-road competition,

the mousse insert replaces the inner tube

• Made up of a honeycomb structure

• Designed to prevent tyre deflation in case of

puncture caused by perforation, shock or pinching

GEOMAX AT81 CROSS

COUNTRY

• AT81 rear tread block shape and distribution

plus DIRTuitive Grip Design (DGD) tread

blocks help the tyre penetrate down through

the surface dirt for extra traction across a

broad range of off-road applications

• Newly formulated high-wear-resistant rear

tyre compound offers enhanced chipping,

tearing and wear appearance

• Geomax AT81 RC (Reinforced Construction)

rear tyre carcass features four nylon plies

• Lateral grooves on the shoulder tread blocks

provide additional biting edges and also allow

the tread blocks to be more flexible

GEOMAX MX-33 MX TYRE

• Soft terrain tyre, with an unusually wide scope

of application

• Optimized performance combined with improved

durability when used on intermediate terrain

• Enhanced traction/slide control through pattern

optimizing and new compound

• Better control and shock absorption thanks to a

redesigned casing construction

DUNLOP MOTORCYCLE TYRES PROUDLY DISTRIBUTED BY

Henderson Racing Products - 011 708 5905

Available at selected dealers nationwide

AT81EX GUMMY REAR ENDURO

Ever wonder how EnduroCross riders manage to

find traction over the extreme terrain they compete

on? Dunlop’s D756EX has been a trade secret for

years, winning numerous championships. Now that

tyre has been replaced with the all-new Geomax

AT81 EX that features even greater grip and

performance.

The AT81 already has a championship-winning

record, scoring numerous titles in AMA National

Enduro competition, Grand National Cross Country,

and other series. The new AT81 EX was built on the

same winning tread pattern and construction as

the AT81, but adds ultra grippy compounds to the

equation.

Available in 110/100-18 rear size, the AT81 EX is

made for a wide variety of extreme conditions—not

just EnduroCross—and was developed with the help

of Cody Webb and Destry Abbott.

Webb, who used the new AT81 EX en route to

winning the 2017 EnduroCross title, had this to say

about the new tyre. “The AT81 EX has been amazing

and I was shocked how much better it made my

rear shock feel going over obstacles and absorbing

them. It’s great for trail riding and any type of

extreme terrain.”

“I can honestly say the AT81 EX is the best advantage

you could have to help you win races,” said multitime

off-road champion Destry Abbott. “I’m able to

go up things I couldn’t with a regular tyre, especially

in rocky, slippery conditions. I’ve been using it for

EnduroCross racing and extreme rides and it has

helped me with my confidence too.”


along. The bike is light, nimble and crisp

with no big hits, just smooth tracking

all the way from the bottom. Technical

Thomasses will love the light weight and

sharp handling. A magic, fun bike to ride.

It’s a bit like cheating really…

Mike Says:

The modern 250 2T is light years ahead

and definitely closing the gap on its bigger

brother the famous 300, this bike is so

manageable with its power, and while

still having the light feel on the bike. Can

see why these bikes are becoming more

popular in the hard enduro scene. The

power delivery is way smoother than the

300 though giving you ample control in

slippery conditions. Not to mention the

handling on the new Husky’s. I love the

feel of the Linkage suspension on the new

range.

The TE 300.

Huskys big daddy in the two stroke range.

It is no surprise why this motorcycle

is so popular all over the world. It can be

ridden smoothly at a reasonable pace – or

if you need to hit a big step up or whatever,

you can use some serious torque, whack it

and let fly. The first thing you notice about

the 300 TPI is how quick the throttle action

“I love the feel

of the Linkage

suspension

on the new

range.”

is. Instant response, no lag. One of the

testers along was complaining about his

2018 300 – specifically about the fact that

the “Jetting” did not feel quite right. We

quizzed him after his ride on this one – his

words – “this thing is flippen perfect!”

Put very simply the 300 feels exactly the

same as the 250 to us but with significantly

more grunt. That sounds obvious to say

but they are very similar bikes with the

same good chassis feel, the 300 has faster

throttle response and lots of race attitude.

Mike Says:

Although every rider on this trip had his

own favorite bike , the 300 was mine. It

was the first bike of the fleet I rode and

it was love at first site I guess. The 300 is

super light yet has that serious 2 stroke

kick which really excites. It’s no wonder

that they so popular in the enduro scene. I

spent most of the launch on the beastly 300

and this bike makes navigating Lesotho’s

unforgiving terrain a walk in the park with

that almost 4 stroke like torque which

pulls you through the boulders almost

effortlessly, this game in handy especially

over the infamous “baboons pass!”

The Four Strokes:

Four bikes to play with for 2020 – 250, 350,

450 and 501. A proper barrel of fun!

The FE 250:

We cannot explain how much improved

this bike is over last years model. OK We

can. It’s as if Husqvarna shrunk the bike

down a bit, made it faster and gave it

significantly more torque right through the

rev range. ‘Strue! Of all the bikes we rode,

this is the one that felt the most different to

previous models. What was pretty lekker

is the fact that William Oosthuisen had his

championship leading 2019 250 race bike

with him for this launch so we were able

to do a direct comparison on the two. We

rode the new bike up Baboons – and his

bike down. The new bike is shorter and

feels so sharp!

Then at the end of the day we had a

good ol fashioned drag race on the tar –

and the new 250F Smoked the 2019. But it

has to be said that in that same drag race

Don Fourie’s first

dirtbike ride in ages...

Basotho Roadblock

28 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


the 250 2-stroke smoked both the

four strokes.

The 2020 FE 250 is a brilliant

enduro weapon. Fast, agile and

so well planted and it makes such

good torque for all kinds of riding.

Go and ride one yourself – you’ll

see what we mean.

Mike Says:

The 250 this year really impressed

all of us. Glenn and I agreed that

this bike is fiercer than before yet,

it’s still smooth and possibly the

easiest most adaptable bike to ride

as you can just hop on and within

minutes feel as if you have been

riding the bike for years. It’s very

different to the previous 250F’s.

This bike has serious bottom end

which, without you even having

to open the gas it just tracks up

the rocks like nobody’s business.

Well impressed – With William

Oosthuisen in the saddle, this bike

has proved that even a 250f has the

legs to run in front with the big boys

, maybe it’s not the size that counts

after all.

The FE350:

For us, a 350 four-stroke is just

about the perfect size for doing

anything. It is significantly quicker

than the 250 – but, maybe just a bit

more manageable than a 450.

Maybe? More about that in the

450 blurb. The 350 has a smooth,

sweet motor, but it isn’t mad

powerful for a variety of reasons.

The 250 and 350 obviously really

stood out in the tighter sections,

and feel light and nimble through

the trees. Open the throttle wide on

the 350 and you know for sure that

you are on a bigger displacement

bike. We have no idea why Japanese

manufacturers have not considered

this displacement as an option.

Decent torque and power down low

and open the throttle, she flies

along.

Mike says:

The 350 for me was a real treat ,

easier on the arms than a 450 and

plenty enough power as we all

know how many riders out there

really use the full power of a 450 ,

this bike really bridges that gap and

Husqvarna made the transition a

real smooth one this 2020.

The FE450:

Here is something that we noticed…

Husqvarna has smoothed the 450

right down and made it so easy to

ride. It is not quite as nimble as the

smaller displacement bikes, but

it certainly does not bully a rider

like the traditional 450 does. As it

happens, we rode the 450 directly

after the 501 and were amazed at

how a 450 can feel so much lighter

Fully kitted and ready

to go racing...

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019 29


and turn so much better… almost as well

as the 350 to be honest.

No mistake it is still a lot of motorcycle,

but chassis wise it feels light and nimble,

she tracks well, turns on a penny if you use

the throttle judiciously (Hows that for a

big word huh?). Crack the throttle though

and you know exactly what you are riding

– a rip snorting four fiddy that will drag

your ass to the moon if you let it…

Mike Says:

I know that the 450 was Dylan Smith’s

favorite bike of the day as we couldn’t get

him off the thing, but man oh man I could

see why.

It’s such a great bike with plenty of

power. The bottom end is way smoother

for me than before which makes you

almost not realize how fast you really

going. Once again complimenting the

WP suspension on these bikes really

completes the package.

I felt safe on this bike and smooth and

you know what they say - smooth is fast.

The FE501:

If there is one bike of this batch that

still gives a sensation of greater weight

because of the gyroscopic forces of all

those additional spinning parts, this is it.

It’s like there’s an invisible hand pushing

the bike in the direction it wants to go.

When you open the throttle, you can feel

and hear that there is an awful lot going on

as it grabs you by the seat of your pants

and hauls you into oblivion. We know

exactly why people love this configuration

and hard adventure comes to mind. This

bike is built to rail the dunes and head out

into the Ver Verlaate Vlaaktes. But it is still

supremely capable in the tougher stuff

that we rode.

So impressive for a big bore thumper…

Mike says:

Oh boy this bike really separates the men

from the boys when horsepower is your

thing. When you lean back in the thick sand

and open her wide you better hold on - this

bike has legs on her. What I love about

his bike it’s an all-rounder you can travel

high speeds covering plenty distance in no

time and you can still navigate through an

endurocross track if you must.

It just does it all and quite effortlessly

to be frank.

But wait! There’s more:

There is a catalogue full of go-fast goodies

specifically for the new Husqvarna range,

from trick pipes, to fancy suspension and

all sorts.

You can also get out there looking

factory.

Husqvarna has teamed up with some

premium gear manufacturers and they

offer a full lineup of branded riding gear at

most of their stores, so whatever you need

from boots to pants and shirts and casual

wear. Go and have a looksee, the faster you

look, the faster you ride!

Conclusions:

Lesotho, a bunch of dirtbike enthusiasts

and some great motorcycles. What could

possibly be wrong in the world? And there

really is a bike for everyone.

Oh yes! Did we mention that the new

300 has won Erzberg already? Cool huh!

Husqvarna truly is a force to be

reckoned with in the world of riding offroad.

Go and ride one for yourself. You’ll see

what we mean.

www.husqvarna-motorcycles.co.za for

your nearest dealer.

Old tech meets new...

The sand track was

brilliant fun...

Someone shared

their thoughts on

Baboons Pass

“Lesotho, a bunch of dirtbike

enthusiasts and some great

motorcycles. What could

possibly be wrong in the

world? And there really is a

bike for everyone.”

Tech man Stefan

was on hand to set

the bikes up.

The amazing

Husqvarna SA team.

30 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com

REVOLUTIONARY

A SMART APPROACH

Simply put, the new TE 300i is the perfect machine to

explore new ground and go where few have gone before.

The trusted 2-stroke is exceedingly simple to manage

and for 2020, features a host of new developments which

enhance its class-leading performance. With electronic

fuel injection, smooth power delivery and impressive

torque and power, the TE 300i retains the traits it’s

become renowned for. However, with advancements

to the frame and bodywork, it offers an even more

controllable and thrilling ride.

BUI LT T O GO

A S FA R A S Y

DAR E T O TA

THE 2016 2-STROKE ENDURO MODEL RANGE.

The joy of the ride is often in nding routes that nobody else has used – rea

destinations that few others would dare to aim for. The 2016 Husqvarna Mo

2-stroke enduro bikes rely on exceptional agility, a broad powerband and lig

weight – letting you easily explore wherever you choose to go.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

FREESTATE - Husqvarna Central, Bloemfontein – (051) 430 1237

CIT

Holeshot Motorcycles, Boksburg – (011) 823-5830 Husqvarna West – (010) 443 3776

Belville (021) 945 8019

EASTERN CAPE - Auto Motorcycles, Port Elizabeth – (041) 581 1699

MPUMALANGA - Vans Husqvarna, Middleburg – (013) 282 0766


THE ORANGE

GATHERING

2019 KTM ADVENTURE RALLY.

32 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


An army of ardent orange

adventure riders descended on

the sleepy town of Clarens in

the Free State last month.

By all accounts, the The

2019 KTM Adventure Rally

was hosted at the Golden Gate

Resort from 5-8 September was

one of the most memorable

editions to date.

For the first time in history, riders

were given the opportunity to experience

the Golden Gate National Park on their

motorcycles. True to the spirit of adventure

that the weekend evoked, the route

traversed the untouched heart of Golden

Gate where spectators included herds of

wildebeest and other roaming beasts.

Three routes were created to cater

for riders of different experience

and skill levels. The Green route

comprised of mostly open dirt roads

that straddled the line between South

Africa and Lesotho. The Red route

was that next step-up with sections of

technical riding but left enough time to

soak in the Maluti mountain scenery.

The Orange route was not for the

faint-hearted and tested both man and

machine. Riders faced everything from

daunting downhills and gnarly climbs

to exceptionally technical terrain.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019 33


Pillions were mostly treated to a taste

of the action on the Green and Red route

– many of which were wives that used the

opportunity to spend some time in the saddle

to instruct there other halves.

Adding an extra element of excitement

was the Ultimate Race.

Over the course of the weekend riders

faced various challenges in an effort to win

the ‘ultimate prize’ – an all-inclusive trip to

Morocco for the 2020 Merzouga Rally, with a

fully-kitted out KTM 790 Adventure R. After

fighting tooth and nail for what is surely

every adventure-seekers dream, the top two

contenders were the very talented Keegan

Eich and Cayle Dormehl.

The pics tell the story.

What a lekker event!

Ultimate Race winners Keegan

Eich and Cayle Dormehl.

“After months of planning and countless trips

down to Clarens we were able to deliver and

execute the most successful KTM Adventure

Rally to date,” said KTM South Africa’s

Marketing Manager Riaan Neveling.

34 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


ADVENTURE RALLY

-SOUTH AFRICA 2019-

Photo: ZCMC

THANK YOU FOR JOINING US,

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!

By definition, ADVENTURE is an exciting, unusual or even bold undertaking.

On a KTM ADVENTURE RALLY you will discover the true meaning of ADVENTURE and what

it means to embrace the KTM spirit. Charging down epic dirt roads, powering through

unchartered forests, conquering extreme riding territory and sharing it all with likeminded

riders.


K T M P E O P L E

Andrew Miller and friends.

Start them young...

The power scares me...

Team TRAX KTM.

Alfie Cox with Franziska on the back... brave girl...

Dit was nou Rof!

“Epic! That’s the one word that

comes to my mind summarising

this weekend’s KTM Adventure

Rally. There’s nothing more

exciting than spending a

weekend with like-minded

people, exploring breath-taking

South African landscapes on a

motorcycle and sharing in on the

day’s war stories over a hearty

dinner in the evening. This event

lived up to the KTM spirit like no

other and I can’t wait for 2020

to come for the next edition of

this truly special event,” said

KTM South Africa’s Managing

Director Franziska Brandl.

36 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019


K T M P E O P L E

Gio Sala gives Riaan some pointers for Austria.

Alfie Cox and his crew.

Quick breather on the mountain.

KTM Peeps everywhere!

Ross Branch panelbeats a helmet.

Team Omega.

Team RAD Moto KTM.

The Garveys.

There were even visitors from Israel who came along.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019 37


Pics by ZC Marketing & Jaun Delport. Words by Jaun Delport

Stofskop 2019

When Glenn told me that I had to go and

cover the Stofskop event this year, I was

a bit miffed, because I was going to miss

Joburg day, a music festival that happened

in Emmarentia.

Well, guess what? They can keep that

one – Stofskop was a proper party all of it’s

own.

I had no idea what to expect – a bunch

of bikes of all shapes and sizes racing

around a flat track. Ho Hum… man you

need to get there – this is without a doubt

the most Redneck event that I have ever

been to. So much fun!

Leave your Ego and dignity at the door

and ride for the sheer love of petrol!

I got there really early coz I knew that

the boss would be checking up on me.

Set up the Gazebo and took a little walk

around the pits. There were bikes of all

shapes and sizes present from li’l race

scoots like PGO’s, mopeds and the famous

Vesparadoes, to a variety of traditional

dirtbikes. But those were kinda boring…

I saw bikes that were built long before

I was even born. A Harley Sportster that

had been pimped out, a stretch scooter,

fast on the straights bit not so good on the

corners - and then there was a stunning

600 flat tracker built by Justin Steyn.

Brian Capper rocked up as Captain

America and proceeded to race the new

Husqvarna 701 Svartpilen – and he won

on that. It was interesting to see the mixup

of races – most were just along for the

hoot, but some contenders came in full-on

serious mode – and as they overtook, they

were hooted at by the slower guys.

Lots of dusty smiles all over the place,

music playing, bikes revving, even an

impromptu ladies wrestling match on the

track – 80’s flashback supreme!

Lots of fun. Huge grins all around. A few

spectacular crashes. Everyone a winner!

My mate Ronaldo Marais came along

and raced his KX 450. Here’s what he had

to say:

One for the books. An odd event of note.

It was my first oval racing experience and

man what an incredible day. A bunch of

dirt heads that get together in Randfontein

to race around a dirt oval. People dressed

up in funny outfits, racing. It felt like I was

part of a crash bandicoot race. The main

purpose of the event is to have fun and

enjoy a bit of weirdness.

Racing around an oval is definitely not

for the faint of heart. There was some

really intense moments and moments of

pure joy and adrenaline.

Three heats of 4 laps each. I did pretty

well for the first time racing oval and it

was a breath of fresh air to take part in an

event that was so different, really different!

A massive thank you to the organizers of

the event who did a fantastic job.

They had to manage a variety of

motorcycles and categorize them as best

they could, and boy did it work. -Renaldo

Marais


A BSA on the dirt...

Tinkerbell leads the charge on his Pitbike...

Captain Capper

on his Husqvarna

Svartpilen.

A cool Bell Helmet was given away...

Check the extended

scoot ridden by

Clint Buckham from

FastHouse.

Old school.

Classic RM

Riders of all generations take part.

The Rednecks were there!

Renaldo Marais...


Photos by Duane Coetzee

Dust Kicker!

Justin Steyn’s Honda RS600 flat track bike. Local Is Lekker!!

Flat track racing is all the rage in Europe

and the States, but it hasn’t really caught

on in South Africa yet. There’s no official

race series there—just the occasional

‘run what ya brung’ shindig, like Stofskop,

where the emphasis is on fun rather than

hard-nosed competition.

That hasn’t stopped Johannesburg local

Justin Steyn from building his ideal flat

track rig though—a replica of Honda’s late-

80s RS600 race bike.

The RS600 was the baby brother to the

dominant RS750, purpose-built for short

tracks and TT circuits. It was never a

production model, and there are very few

examples out there, but it was basically

a works HRC XR600R motor in a Knight

Racing frame.

The idea was sparked when Justin entered

Stofskop (translated from Afrikaans as

‘dust kick’). He started on his Honda

CR250R, then closed out the day running

laps on a mate’s BSA bobber.

“I was hooked and wanted to build

something more suited to flat track racing,”

he tells us. “I wanted to feel the slide—and

the CR250 on MX tires wouldn’t allow it.”

“So I set out to find a donor. I thought I’d

build something that would tick two boxes:

A cheeky bread ‘n milk runner, as well as a

flat track weapon for those odd occasions.”

Justin found a 1998 Honda XR600R at a


Honda dealership, that had gone in for some work.

It was clean and licensed, so he snatched it up and

immediately put his credit card to work.

First on the list was a full body kit from Redmax

Speed Shop in the UK. The kit included the tank, tail,

seat, fork guards, front number plate, and a set of flat

track bars. Next up was a pair of 19” Sun rims and

new spokes, from Central Wheel Components.

Justin’s budget didn’t go as far as sourcing an

original (or replica) Knight frame though, so the

XR chassis would have to do. He roped in his good

friend ‘Uncle Phil’ to tackle the fabrication side of

things—the same gentleman who helped out on his

previous CB550 Dick Mann replica project.

Phil de-tabbed the frame, and made up a new set of

triple clamps to hold a pair of early-2000s Yamaha R6

Showa forks. Justin had a pair of Honda CR250 rear

hubs lying around, so the guys shaved the sprocket

mounts off one of them to use it up front, and laced

up the wheels.

Rather than try to get the CR hub to play nice with

the XR’s swing arm, Justin figured he’d install a CRF

swing arm instead. But that was easier said than

done; Phil ended up welding the XR arm’s pivot

spindle to the CRF unit, and shortening it by 60 mm.

And since it was a custom arrangement already, he

added new shock mounts to convert it to a dual

shock setup, “in keeping with the 80s flava.” A pair

of Bitubo shocks rounded out the package. (Justin at

CycleWorx was responsible for the suspension work

at both ends).

Since the motor was running strong, Justin focused

the engine work around the intake. He slapped on a

brand new 38 mm Keihin CR carb, along with a few

carb upgrades from Tokyo Mods. Phil fabbed up a

new exhaust too (there’s a Yoshimura sticker on it,

for the sake of appearances).

Justin didn’t go completely overboard though. He

cut costs by hanging onto parts like the OEM brakes,

switchgear and controls. And he kept the front brake

too, to keep a measure of day-to-day usability.

The first iteration of the build wrapped up the

night before the last Stofskop event. After just a few

hundred meters of shakedown, Justin was lined up

to race.

“I heard the announcer giving some love to two

South African moto legends, and thought ‘ah f**k,

I’ve got to race these guys’. I grabbed a handful

of throttle and lit up the rear tyre, but she started

gaining traction and I realized I was up front—I had

the holeshot!”

“The rest of the day went much the same, winning all

but the last heat. I was stoked, the bike performed

brilliantly, and having the right flat track setup is

what got the wins.”

That was last year, and all the work since then has

been focused on cosmetics and tweaks. The bike

now wears its intended livery—a killer retro HRC

scheme done by Wicked Wayne paints, along with

fresh gloss on the frame and motor.

Richie at Racestar Graffix sorted Justin out with

a bunch of custom decals, including some Knight

Racing stickers to throw off pundits, and an OEM

style warranty info decal for the tail. Then Alf at

E.C.C. Customs reassembled everything, ran through

a couple of mechanical niggles and “tuned her to run

beautifully.”

Justin’s RS600 replica is picture-perfect, and dropped

a few jaws when it lined up for the 2019 Stofskop.

What a cool local build!

Justin in action at

Stofskop 2019

Justin and his 600


BMW R NINE T BY INJUSTICE CUSTOM


Words: Sean Hendley | Photo Credits: Sean Hendley, Braam Smit, Clint Pienaar, Byron Coetsee, Tayla Photography

Have you ever tried

‘Trials’ riding? You know,

where you jump on a light

weight low slung specially

adapted bike and try

ride over some really

challenging obstacles,

all the while keeping

your feet on the pegs

and remaining standing.

Sounds tough, but doable

doesn’t it? Now chuck

in some single figure

temperatures, mist, rain

and visibility down to a

meter or two, all the while

trying to follow a line on

a GPS. Now it is starting

to sound a whole lot

tougher all of a sudden.

Well ….. Try doing all

of that on a 250kg beast

of an adventure bike

and competing against

a bunch of lunatics who

thrive on this kind of

insanity! Welcome to the

GS Trophy ……….!

44 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


As I sit down to write this article it is

exactly 4 days since returning from the

2019 GS Trophy in Dullstroom and I am

still tender in places that I thought that I

had broken off and left on the mountain.

My first few nights back home I slept like

a baby ….. Waking up and crying every

few hours. Lately I’ve started sleeping like

the dead, my wife literally checked my

pulse last night in anticipation of a huge

life insurance pay-out. She seemed quite

disappointed to find me still alive, frankly,

when I realised the feeling had started

returning to my body so was I.

It must be said in my defence that

I only found out that I was going to

be competing in the media challenge

about 10 days before the event, so I was

“I figured watching

a couple of Charlie

Boorman/Ewan

McGregor videos doing

the ‘Long Way up, down

and around” would

suffice….. it wasn’t

anything like that,

man was I in for

a shock?”

completely unprepared. I figured watching

a couple of Charlie Boorman/Ewan

McGregor videos doing the ‘Long Way up,

down and around” would suffice ….. it

wasn’t anything like that, man was I in for

a shock?

The only competitor riders briefing

to be held in warm sunshine

during the whole event.

The general attendees are treated to

a lekker outride or two or three, some a

bit more challenging than others but all

scenic and all generally a lot of fun. They

are able ride at their leisure and stop for

happy snappy’s, occasionally following

the competitors to watch the various

technical challenges. And then they are

able to escape the miserable and cold

weather into one of the numerous cosy

pubs and restaurants in and around the

Tonteldoos/Dullstroom area.

The GS Trophy is a lot of fun for

the non-competitive GS owner, always

being held in the some of the best and

most scenic riding locations around our

beautiful country. The event site is always

well laid out with a lot to do, including

Make Life a Ride

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 45


a BMW Boutique, Motorrad workshop,

food & beverage stands of the highest

quality and a grand stand to watch the

competitive skills challenges.

In the main tent is always live music

and big screens showing competitor

scores, pics and videos of the day’s

shenanigans and a fully catered dinner

all included in your entry price. Choosing

to camp on site is always a fun option

if you want to be in the thick of things,

however a lot of delegates do choose to

avail themselves of the local hotels and

B n’ B’s. There is never any shortage of

things to do and see at the Trophy and it

is always such a good week end away.

Things are much different for the

competitors…

Camping is compulsory, regardless of

temperatures allegedly dropping to minus

six degrees Celsius in some tents. Five

thirty a.m. seemed to be the favoured

starting time for most of the challenges

…. Even in the thick mist and rain at subzero

temperatures.

DAY 1, Thursday was officially a slow

day. The day started off at six a.m. with

our first GPS challenge. We were set off in

60 second intervals and had to follow a

A very nervous father and son,

Mike and Brandon Grimstead

listening to the results ..... Brandon

did make it into Team SA

line on the GPS up and down a beautiful

kopje on the other side of the lake from

the events venue.

The idea was to zoom in your

navigator as much as possible and try

keeping the icon on the line by riding

your GS carefully and slowly allowing the

‘Navigator’ to update. This wasn’t fast but

a great test of our navigation skills. Then

there was the team waypoint challenge,

where teams had to find a point on the

kopje only marked on the GPS. The media

were allowed to wander around and get

some great photos. Then it was back to

the main site for a quick hearty breakfast.

On the way back to site, Jana Botha of the

ladies team a had a small mishap and ended

upside down in the lake, a bit chilly a few

blue marks to be sure she was soon back on

her bike after her team mates and a couple

of competitors got her right side up.

After brekky it was onto the fitness

test. Although a tough challenge it too

wasn’t particularly fast. Firstly, a run up

a hill around a marker and back down to

the starting box, in full kit sans a helmet

carrying two tyres. Then onto the bike lift.

Lay your bike down on either side twice

alternately and lift it upright again on a

slope without assistance.

At this point a big shout out must

go to Charine van Niekerk, the tiniest

competitor with the biggest heart. Picking

up a big 1250GS is no mean feat for a big

beefy man, let alone a petite lady. But

BMW Finance supplied the coffee

for free for the entire event and

were the most popular attraction

at the event in the chilly weather.

46 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


GS 1200

54 400km, choice of two

From R159 900

GS 1200, 2015

63 000km

From R133 999

HP 850 GS, 2019

8 000km, tall screen, bashplate, choice

of two

From R159 900

S 1000 R, 2018

3 900km

R145 000

GS ADVENTURE, 2014

4 600km

R159 000

R nine T, 2019

4 000km

R138 999

R nine T, 2017

2 000km, Roland Sands Seat

R121 000

K 1600 GT, 2014

4 700km

R126 000


after a lot of spirited encouragement from

fellow competitors she soon had her bike

up on its wheels.

The final part of the test was to push

your bike up a 30° hill into a box, turn it

around without cheating or touching the

sides and then stop back at the bottom

of the hill in the start box, once again

in full kit and sans helmet. A lot of us

chose to take the 60 point penalty and

start the engine and walk our bikes up in

first gear. Only the toughest of the tough

opted to push their bikes ‘dead’ up the

hill including most of the ladies. HUGE

RESPECT to them.

Next was the technical skills test.

We were given the workshop space and

correct tools to remove and replace the

rear wheel. Once again, not fast even

thought there was a 5 minute time limit.

Then we finally got to ride and

headed out into the mountains outside

Dullstroom on a +/- 50 kay red loop. Man

this is a beautiful part of the country.

There were one or two ‘oopsies’ but

no medics needed or anything to write

home about. After a short tar liaison we

were back in Dullstroom for a quick bite

to eat before the team figure 8 challenge

in the town square with great spectator

value and attendance. By this time the

weather was starting to turn a bit nasty

as we headed back to the main venue for

the slow race and garage race in front of

the main grand stand. By now a lot of the

general attendees to the event had arrived

and were out in force showing their

support for the competitors. Eventually

the ‘slow day’ ended off with the official

opening ceremony and welcome by all the

dignitaries and brilliant, (well-deserved

dinner) and some great live entertainment

that had a lot of us singing along.

DAY 2 of the GS Trophy 2019 truly was

the Spirit Of Adventure.

We set off at around 05H30 in a bone

chilling 6° Celsius. Added to that was a

biting wind and a thick mist that gave

us only a few meters worth of visibility.

This was quite interesting, considering

that the day had mostly been allocated to

BLACK ROUTE challenges, the gnarliest

and toughest challenges you can imagine

on any bike let alone a big adventure

bike. The first challenge for the day was a

GPS navigation challenge up the kopje in

minimal visibility and over mist slickened

rocks. Everybody fared well at this with

one or two tumbles here and there, but

everybody was still smiling by the time

we got back for breakfast.

Then it was a liaison section to a big

mountain just outside Tonteldoos along

railway service and district roads. Just

to make things interesting the mist had

really settled in and developed into a

misty rain, not quite enough to settle the

dust but good enough to foul up your

visor and reduce visibility even more.

Most of us were riding with our visor

up with the mist and dust punishing our

eyeballs. Just in case the competitors

found this a bit boring the organisers

set up a technical sand obstacle along

the way. The level of sand riding from all

the competitors is extremely high but

the obstacle soon had everyones skills

pushed to the limit.

After another short liaison was a water

obstacle - just in case we weren’t all wet

and cold enough from the rain that had

now developed from the mist.

(Side note - apparently some

spectators following the competitors

Are we at the Pearly Gates...

48 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Waiting in the mist and the rain for their

turn at the sand pit challenge. Temperature

around 6 degrees with a wicked wind chill

dropping it even more.

Chantell Blake-Visser

Despite the icy breeze the spectators jovially

supported the competitors to the end.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 4 9


had to be treated for hypothermia

- just so you know how tough the

competitors really are). On viewing the

water obstacle it seemed fairly simple,

until it was explained that you had to

enter at an acute angle, change direction

around a marker post then change

direction again to get to the finish box,

essentially doing a S turn over round,

moss covered rocks while standing on

the pegs, not putting your foot down or

spinning the rear wheel. I do believe that

there were only one or two clear rounds,

but quite a few did end up going for an

impromptu swim and getting soaked to

the bone.

The rain started up again in a bit more

earnest turning the district roads and

twee spoor paths towards the BLACK

ROUTE mountain climb into a slick

grease. One of the marshals commented

that riding in these conditions was like

wrestling a rhino on ice. He was correct.

As one might expect there were tumbles

aplenty.

Now the thing with this slick mud is

that it sticks to the tyres of the bikes

turning them into slicks with zero

grip, but it also comes off at the most

inconvenient opportunities. This was

to be the case on the very challenging

mountain climb, as each rider passed

over the obstacles the already rain

slickened rocks got coated in an ever

thickening slime of mud gradually

enhancing the difficulty level. I, for one

threw my bike at the scenery twice with

me bouncing head over heels backwards

down the rock face, eventually convincing

me that a DNF was a judicious choice.

The F850GS I was using for the event

stood up quite well to the abuse, after

bouncing off the scenery I expected a lot

more serious damage than just a broken

mirror. With one or two drops here and

there mostly everybody cleared the

obstacle. I felt particularly chastised for

not completing the challenge, especially

so when a mountain taxi consisting of a

Always standing up, Always with your

feet on the pegs and going as fast as

possible as slowly as you dare, it is all

about balance and control.

Another

BLACK

ROUTE hill

climb victim...

tractor and trailer filled with goods and

passengers cleared the same obstacle

with aplomb and grace cheerily waving as

they went by.

We passed each other a few more times

on the way to the waypoint and back

down the ‘challenge’ section. The route

to the waypoint was a fairly technical

outride but a lot of fun in some of the

most spectacular mountain vistas around.

The slick mud was prevalent on the twee

spoor and got incrementally worse as the

rain got harder and there were a few more

wobbles and falls particularly from me,

leaving some interesting blue marks and

sore ribs.

Once back down the mountain and

onto the district and farmers roads it

was the “rhino wrestling” challenge into

Tonteldoos for a lekker hamburger and

coffee and a sit around the fireplace at

Highside Tavern to warm up a bit and to

share war stories.

The final challenge for the day was

a slide turn into a demarcated box, dab

your foot onto a target and go back out

the way you came in and stop in the start

box again, all the while standing on the

foot pegs and not touching the barrier

lines. All the competitors gathered around

and cheered each other on, there is such

camaraderie and a joyful spirit among

the competitors. After a short mass ride

liaison we were back at the event site in

Dullstroom, still damp, still misty and

the temperature never rising above 9°

C, but everybody was still smiling. What

a great day of fun in the rain and mud,

I haven’t done this since I was a kid. At

this point I most thank and congratulate

the organisers and marshals for putting

on a fantastic event in some very trying

conditions, and yet they all kept on

smiling and encouraging the riders all day

albeit it through chattering teeth.

DAY 3 was a bit more of a relaxed affair.

We set off at a much more civilised

eight thirty a.m., but it was no less

challenging and exhausting come the end

50 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


of the day. The weather had cleared

up and the sun tried to stave off the

icy wind. Unsuccessfully! The first

challenge for the day was to push

each team member’s bike across a

narrow bridge with the engine dead

and the rider on the bike, once again

feet always on the pegs. Then a stand

up and foot ups zig zag obstacles

over undulating rocky terrain

awaited us.

The marshals were all very

confused when I kept calling for my

moms cat. One even asked me if they

should look for the poor creature as I

seemed quite distraught about it.

After a quick snack back at camp

we were divided up into groups

and sent out with a marshal on an

outride towards Lydenburg through

the mountains that we all just rush

past on our way to Pilgrims Rest,

Bourke Luck, the Pot holes and etc. I

can really recommend slowing down

a bit through this area, turning off

into the small dorpies and making

the trip part of your holiday. Just

rushing to your destination you miss

out on so much of the beauty and

culture in the area. As media we had

to run ahead of all the really skilled

and extremely fast competitors

to try and grab a couple of photo

opportunities while trying not to die,

which very nearly did happen, but

it’s all very worth it once checking

the photo’s at the lunch stop. Then

it was back to Dullstroom Town

Square for another tech challenge in

front of the town folk and tourists,

once again a very well-attended and

supported spectacle. By now a lot

of us were really getting tired of the

seemingly never ending challenges

- only to be told we still had quite

a few more to go back at the event

site in front of the grand stands filled

with spectators.

By the time we got there Thomas

Bohm had worked the spectators up

into a bit of frenzy, just in case we

weren’t really feeling the pressure.

Braam Smit, a brilliant GS rider and

an even better showman, went first

and got them even more worked up

with his skill and antics. Following

that act was really daunting, but we

all muddled through as the wind got

even colder and sharper.

After a bit all the media were

summoned to a meeting with

Edgar Kleinbergen, (S.A. Motorrad

boss man), and Kelly Cleverdon,

(Motorrad National Brand Manager).

We possibly all accepted the

invitation to skip out on the final tech

challenges and get out of the cold a

little bit too quickly.

After the formalities, it was

back to our digs for a shower

and get dolled up for the nights

festivities where all the winners were

announced and final formalities done

before the party of all parties kicked

off with Clint & Co. on stage.

The Results are always interesting

and I think BMW is really onto a

great concept with the Trophy

challenge. An ordinary Joe or Jill

can buy a GS, do a few courses,

enter the regional challenges and

end up qualifying and representing

their country at an international,

regardless of age, sex or creed. This,

without having to spend gazillions

of rands and a lifetime of singularly

focused dedication, focus, sacrifice

and commitment required of the

likes of the Springbok athletes of

every discipline or etc. You, me, our

neighbours, basically anybody can

achieve the honour of representing

South Africa competitively on the

international stage, and that is very

apparent in the winners chosen

to represent S.A. in next year’s

International GS Trophy in New

Zealand.

52 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Chantell Blake-Visser of Danabaai took

the overall win in the ladies category, but

also beat out of the chaps in the Eastern

Cape regional selections to be captain of

the Eastern Cape Team.

Christelle van der Meulen took second

place with Liesl Geyser in third. Chantell

and Christelle go over to Spain shortly to

compete for a spot on the international

ladies team.

Team Western Cape consisting of B.J.

Vosloo, Wayne van der Linde and Cobus

Theron took overall honours in the team

category. Cobus also took 1st overall in

the individual category, with B.J. grabbing

2nd overall from Brandon Grimstead of

the Free State team in third.

These three lads are now the official

South African team to represent us in New

Zealand at the International challenge

and they have big shoes to fill. Our South

African Teams have won the last two

international GS Trophy challenges on the

trot quite decisively and two of our lady

competitors have made the international

team both times.

Byron Coetsee, a blogger from

Cape Town and a member of the 2016

international winning team won the

media challenge and was chosen as the

media liaison rider to keep us up to date

on the New Zealand happenings. Big

congratulations to them, all thoroughly

well-deserved on all counts.

Judging by all the extremely emotional

responses from all the winners and the

crowd alike, I do believe that everybody

knows the honour, hope and expectations

bestowed on these guys and girls and we

wish them all the best of luck.

Our humble advice to you is this. Get

to the GS Trophy, compete if you like but

just get there. You will be very happy that

you did.

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Our Sean looking

for his dignity...

All smiles, all the time ..

The bike of choice for the

international GS Trophy in New

Zealand in February 2020.

Jana Botha getting upside

down and landing in the water

- note the smiley face for just

such an occassion. Despite

landing upside down in the

water Jana was still having fun.

Byron Coetsee, winner of the

media challenge joins the team

in New Zealand as the media

liaison officer, with Edgar

Kleinbergen.

Liesl, Christell and Chantell.

From left to right - Thomas Bohm (Organiser of the 2019 GS

Trophy), Brandon Grimstead - 3rd overall, BJ Vosloo - 2nd overall,

Cobus Theron 1st overall, Edgar Kleinbergen(Motorrrad SA Boss).

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 5 3


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Mix FM Radio DJ Al Your Pal tries the Kymco UXV700.

Last year, I was roped in

to take part in the annual

Quads 4 Quads Event that

runs between JHB and

Richards Bay. It was my first

time on the event, and the

first time that I had ridden

a dirt bike since I was a

Teenager. I had such a jol

on that 250 Husqvarna that

I promised myself to make

this an annual pilgrimage.

It really is a great time for a

great cause.

Earlier this year, I was involved in a car

accident which left me a little bit worse

for wear – not serious, but I was a little

bit banged up. This cast a bit of doubt

as to whether I’d be able to participate

again. The Organisers called about the

station getting involved again – heard my

dilemma and promised to come back with

something suitable.

Kymco has recently started importing

their range of machines back into SA – and

I have been offered one of their big side by

sides for the journey. Never having ridden

(Or is that driven?) one before, The guys

from the Adventure Company invited me

along on their Koppies ride just to get a

grip and feel for things, before heading out

on a 1000KM adventure.

We assembled at the start point

early in the morning and Linex Lifestyle

Centre’s Mark Roach brought along the

Kymco. A very professional guy – he took

time to explain the workings of it all to

my better half Zuchke and I and he spent

the first part of the trail tailing us on his

Yamaha Dirtbike, giving us pointers.

I need to say that, compared to the

bike I rode last year, this thing is like

cheating. It’s big and spacious and

comfortable, so you can chat away

just like you do in a car – and it goes

EVERYWHERE. Well except for on the

really narrow trails that were designated

for bikes only. The automatic gearbox

makes things really simple. Everything

that is supposed to happen happens

56 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Some awesome

rides in the pipeline!

www.adventurecompany.co.za for details.

Sat 26th October - Day Ride, Donga Dash in

Greylingstad.

Sat 23rd November - Sunfields ride - Balfour

- a fundraising ride come and join the fun! An

awesome way to start the Christmas season!

Weekend January 24th: Waterberg mountain

ride - An awesome weekend away in the

Waterberg mountains. All welcome.

Sat Feb 8th: Farm ride, Parys always Lekker,

come and join the fun!

Saturday Feb 29th - Cosmos Run on the East

Rand.

Weekend 21st March. Swazi Mangala... a

fantastic two day ride through Eswatini.

Easter weekend 27th April - Dumbe mountains

at the fantastic Natal Spa Resort.

June 27th Tri Nations Adventure: SA,

Swaziland Mozambique - a fantastic

adventure...

More to follow soon! Watch this space.

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eally smoothly and seamlessly. A bit like

like a luxury car.

The only small issue that I had for the

first couple of kilometres was getting used

to the left hand drive – your brain tells

you to veer off to the right all the time…

but you do get used to that quite quickly.

To say that I am impressed is an

understatement. This buggy just makes

life so easy.

I saw lots of bikes and quads battling

away over the rocky mountain passes. We

had the opportunity to sit back, watch the

fun – and when there was a gap, engage low

range, 4wd and slowly creep up the hills.

It’s like cheating! So soft and

comfortable – and we got more than

one or two envious looks from some of

the riders who had come unstuck… and

we actually parked on one of the hills,

hopped out, helped a guy out – hopped

back in again and took off again. Such a

pleasure.

Having a chat with the Mrs after the

ride – she was equally impressed. She

felt safe and comfortable – and bar the

moaning about her helmet hair, really

loved the outing.

Last year, she did my backup for the

trip. This year she is up front with me –

and she is really looking forward to the

adventure.

If you are coming along, look out for us.

We’ll be the couple in the Kymco who are

dry and cozy and smiling while we help

people up the mountain passes. Not the

other way round like last year.

See you out there.

Thank you Linex Lifestyle Centre for

the ride. I look forward to seeing you guys

out there.

Linex Lifestyle Centre (011) 251-4000

Al and Zuchke with Linex

Lifestyle Centre’s Mark Roach.

58 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


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• Kaifa gas-reservoir shocks with adjustable pre-load, compression and rebound

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FLANAGAN AND OOSTHUISEN

TAKE CENTRE STAGE

South Africa’s top enduro

talent went head-to-head

in Robertson this weekend

for the fifth round of

the National Enduro

Championship.

In what is described as the

valley of ‘wine and roses’,

hard enduro fans were met

with a scene of guts and grit

as riders navigated through

some of the country’s most

unforgiving terrain…

E1: Husqvarna star Oosthuizen

unbeaten:

Pepson Plastics Husqvarna star William

Oosthuizen made it five South African

National Enduro Championship E1 class

wins out of five starts at the tough and

testing Robertson Enduro over the weekend

as he led another strong team performance

in the Western Cape. Oosthuizen’s

teammates similarly ignored the trappings

of the valley of wine and roses as Brett

Swanepoel ended second in open class E2

and Matthew Green rode home fourth in

200cc E1.

“I could get used to this!” Mossel Bay star

William Oosthuizen beamed after extending

his unbeaten streak to five wins this season.

“It was also good for the championship

thanks to Bradley Cox ending second ahead

of my main championship rival Lloyd Kirk

for the first time and that gives us a bigger

points gap going into the last round.

“Well done Ant for the perfect preparation

and thanks as ever to Pepson Plastics

Husqvarna Racing supported by Liqui Moly

for an incredible machine. “Now I really

have butterflies in my tummy ahead of the

final round of the championship in PE early

60 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


in October — we have worked so hard for this - so Rover

Enduro is going to be a really big weekend for all of us!”

Salt Rock KZN charger Brett Swanepoel meanwhile

enjoyed his best outing of the enduro season with

a strong second in E2 in Robertson to move up to a

provisional joint third in that title chase. “Robertson

was a great weekend — I’m getting back to where I

need to be and I am most excited for the last race of

the season,” Brett confirmed. “Thanks to my incredible

Pepson Plastics team for a perfect Husqvarna again

this weekend — now we can look ahead to ending the

season in style.”

Nottingham Road KZN youngster Matthew Green also

enjoyed a strong weekend in Robertson, riding home

fourth in E1 as he continues in his chase for third in

the title race. “We had a good fight out there today and

I’m satisfied with fourth,” Matthew admitted. “It was

another strong result towards our championship, which

reshuffled around me this weekend and we are still right

in there in the fight for third in E1, so let’s see what the

final round brings in October…”

“It’s all done and dusted in Robertson,” Husqvarna

South Africa Motorcycles brand manager Fred Fensham

concluded. “William goes five for five in E1 and now

heads to the last round with a bigger points gap, Brett

had an awesome ride to second in E2 and Matt fought

for fourth in E1. “Hats off to Ant for perfect prep and the

awesome family support we have — that was another

great day for Pepson Plastics Husqvarna supported by

Liqui Moly.”

Altie gives the guys

some pointers...

Kirsten Landman

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 6 1


SO GOOD IT FEELS LIKE YOU’RE CHEATING

DUNLOP TYRES – PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY HENDERSON RACING PRODUCTS

E2: Yamaha’s Flanagan dominates:

Kyle won the E2 Category on his YZ250X

and the overall for the day and is currently

leading the E2 championship.

“This race was probably the most

physically demanding races of the SA

Enduro Series this year. The terrain was

really in your face all the time with little

to no time to catch your breath and then

there was the intense heat as well. Glad to

have walked away with the win and extend

my points lead even though I suffered from

dehydration on the final lap.”

Some of the other blue bike riders also

had a great event:

Lloyd Kirk came into the fifth round with

not much time on the bike after suffering

a knee injury and round 4. “First lap I

suffered from bad arm pump and just

struggled to get going. By the end of Lap 1

I had finally found my rhythm and started

to pick up the pace. By the middle of the

3rd lap I could feel my that I was not fit

enough as my body started to cramp

badly and felt very drained from the

heat”. Lloyd placed a respectable 3rd for

the day in the E1 category and is currently

2nd in the championship.

Bruce May had a good day out on his

YZ250FX. “The Robertson terrain really

suits my riding style and I’m comfortable

in the Robertson sand. I knew I had

to push hard in the first section make

some headway and avoid the dust”

Bruce placed 1st overall for the day in

the Masters category and increased his

championship lead.

Denzil “The General” Torlage had a great

ride aboard his YZ250X. “The course was

very physical with some large step down

sections that almost caught me out a few

times. I am really happy to walk away with

a podium finish” Denzil finished the day

off in 3rd place in the Masters category.

62 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Some pointers for

the junior loop.

Some riders did

weeding

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 6 3


KTM’s Cox on podium on the brand

new 150…

Front and centre in the Brother Leader

Tread KTM team is Bradley Cox. While

the multi-disciplined star has taken the

National Cross Country Championship by

storm, the enduro side of his season has

been quiet by his own high standards.

This weekend, however, brought the

breakthrough that Cox had been waiting

for. It was a proud moment for the orange

team as Cox crossed the finish line to

snatch up second in the prestigious E1

Class and fourth overall.

“Hours and hours have gone into my

enduro riding and it finally paid off

this weekend! To say I’m stoked is an

understatement,” said Cox.

Adding to his excitement was his first

experience racing the 2020 KTM 150 EXC

TPI. The new generation of KTM enduro

machines were recently launched in South

Africa – you read all about them in last

months issue.

“I super enjoyed the KTM 150 EXC TPI.

The first 15km’s were pretty fast, and then

the next 15km’s were gnarly rock beds.

The bike was just perfect for everything

– it was so clean off the bottom-end

and I was pretty much in second gear

everywhere. The chassis was so good in

the fast stuff too, it felt unreal. I’m really

happy on it and think KTM have hit the

nail on the head with this bike,” said Cox.

Rounding out the Brother Leader Tread

KTM team was Scott Bouverie and Kirsten

Landman in the E2 Class, who finished in

fifth and twelfth respectively.

A great event and an awesome race by all

accounts, Well done to the entire CSMX

team and Altus de Wet for hosting a great

National Enduro and Regional event.

Cox flies on his 150

Oosthuisen

Kyle Flanagan

Steve Thompson

and William

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64 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


K161882

All 2020 KX models have arrived

For more information visit www.kawasaki.co.za


After the four-stroke motocross

bikes took over the world — sadly

only Yamaha and the European

brands stayed in the two-stroke

business. Just imagine what

would have happened if the Other

Japanese brands had continued

to offer and develop two-strokes

for motocross.

KX250

B y M a r i o K r i e k

Even if they couldn’t justify all-new designs, they

could have fitted the old two-stroke engines into

the more modern four-stroke running gear. It is

not a stretch to see that Kawasaki could have

used the KX250F four-stroke chassis to build a

modern KX250 two-stroke…

I have owned a few CR500AF Honda’s, but I

always wanted a modern 250 Two- Stroke MX

bike. The thing is, the 500’s are saught after and in

demand, but they are not rideable on the current

tracks in SA, that are built more like super cross

tracks - and to be honest, in my opinion the 250’s

would probably do quicker lap times.

66 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Lucky me! I ended up with a 2008 KXF250

with a blown motor, and I had a good 2001

KX250 2- Stroke motor...

YES! That’s when I decided to build a new

KX250 AF (alluminium-frame), something

Kawasaki never did.

Here’s the process:

• I did a complete motor rebuild on the 2001

Two-stroke , new Crank, piston kit, V-Force

2 reed valves, and clutch kit and lots more,

the motor was ceramic coated in black just

like the 1985 KX250 replica I wanted ...

1. We had to chop out a piece of the frame...

2. A new section was turned.

• The frame and swing arm and a few other

parts were vapour blasted to match the

grey 1985 KX 250.

• New Gold Excel rims and Haan spokes

fitted perfectly with the original KX hubs.

Bridgestone tyres were fitted.

• A KX replica customised full sticker kit

wrapped the specially imported old school

Green full plastics kit… very nice, and I

had a custom KX replica seat made up by

Nithrone seats Cape Town !!!

The biggest mission with the build was to

fit the motor into the 2008 KXF250 frame,

As per pics, the bottom half was cut away,

and PSP Engineerings- Paul Simons laser

cut and CNC machined the new submount-frame

from a block of Alu for me.

TBR engineerings Tim Bosson welded it

up to factory spec to handle the tracks of

today.

The radiators had to be custom made to

accommodate the exhaust and I used the

Two-stroke airbox rubber since the 4-stroke

one sits too high up!

A few brackets were added and changes

were made for engine mountings, otherwise

it all went together very well...

Basically Everything on the bike is new, and

refurbished ...

A Huge thanks to TRP Distribution, FMF SA

importers for organising the full new FMF

pipe. Straight bolt on!!

Now finally finished, this KX 250 - Stroke

definitely turned out to be one of my

favourite builds....

It’s a bike that can be raced against the new

2019’s - although I would never be able to

race it and destroy such a beaut that should

rather be on display!

I think most guys out there that have

restored Vintage bikes and classic MX bikes

would know the amount of time and money

that goes into a rebuild like this, which

makes it difficult to take it in the dirt...

I hope this build inspires many more guys

to get those old bikes fired up and in new

condition. It often costs more to rebuild a

3. And welded in to fit the engine

vintage replica than what it’s worth, but it’s

totally worth it in the end!!

General break down of

the bike build:

New Excel rims, 18 and 21 inch.

New Haan spokes. All new bearings ,

swing-arm / linkages/ wheels/ and more…

New Bridgestone tyres and tubes.

Custom made radiators.

4. We had to also make new mounting brackets.

Full FMF exhaust.

All new plastics, covers and sticker kit.

Complete new motor.

New carb.

Full front and rear suspension service and

seals.

And so much more...

Thanks - Mario @ Dirtrider Motorcycles

Cape Town

www.dirtridermotorcycles.co.za

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 67


FITNESS OVER 40

By Mandy Thomas, BASE FIT : Specialised in Fitness For Dirt Bike Riding

When we hit the forties, the importance

of exercise increases as our bodies can

begin to store fat more easily, our bones

can become more brittle and we can

start to lose muscle. But the good news it

that we can counterbalance all that with

the correct regular exercises and fitness

components. For dirt biking, it’s not

enough to just do cardio or lift weights,

we need to focus on stability work,

particularly around the core region.

Most people don’t realise it but improved

overall stability will in turn improve your

ability to ride for longer as you will be

saving energy. As we age, one of the first

things to go is our ability to balance and

counterbalance. If you keep that in check,

the rest of your fitness will flow easily.

We have selected 5 core stability

exercises which you can do at home two

to three times a week, which will give you

the foundation of your fitness. Use these

exercises as the building blocks onto

which you can add strength and cardiovascular

components.

Beetle: Start with pressing a Swiss ball

between both legs held up in the air as well as

your arms. Drop your left leg to the floor while

simultaneously dropping your right arm above

you to the ground, keeping them both straight.

Then switch. Make sure your supporting leg

and arm is pressed hard into the ball when

you extend your other arm and leg to the floor.

Reverse Hyper Extensions: Lie face down

on a Swiss ball, with your hips on the ball and

your hands on the ground in front of you. Lift

your legs off the ground as high as you can

by engaging your glutes ad lower back. Keep

your legs as straight as possible at all times.

Hold for two counts, then slowly lower your

legs back down.

Windmills: Lie on your back with your legs

straight up in the air so they are 90 degrees to

the floor, with a Swiss ball between your calves.

Keeping your legs as straight as possible slowly

lower them towards the floor, as far as you can,

on your right side, while maintaining the 90

degree angle. Use your arms to support your

body, then return your legs to the start position,

and repeat to the left side.

Knee Tucks: Start in a push-up position

with your shins on the ball, back flat. Engage

your core and keep your back flat as you draw

your knees into your chest as close as you

can. Then extend both legs back out to the

starting position.

Roll Outs: Place your elbows on a swiss

ball, feet on the floor, body in a straight line.

Now extend your elbow forward by rolling

the ball forward, while keeping your body

still. Roll the ball back to you by bringing your

elbows back towards you. Keep your body still

throughout the exercise. This is a movement

that requires coordination and self-awareness.

68 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Other reasons it is so important to

keep fit over 40 are:

• MEMORY OF A SIEVE: As you get

older your memory declines! No good

forgetting where you are when riding

mountain passes! Working out improves

the rate that your brain gets oxygen and

thereby your memory.

• ENGINE HUM: Keeping fit improves

your immune system and boosts your

body’s ability to resist infections.

• MADE OF STEEL! Keeping your fitness

up, increases the strength of your bones,

critical for dirt- biking!

• COLD FEET! Exercise keeps your

circulation strong, strengths your heart

muscles, lowers your blood pressure, and

reduces the fatty deposits around your

organs.

• STRESSED ERIC! Most people over

40 have a stressful life and experience

anxiety. Working out is the perfect way to

relieve stress and frustrations on a daily

basis.

• BACK OFF! Lower back pain is no good

when it comes to riding. A strong core

with well stretched out hip flexors and

hamstrings will keep you comfortably in

the saddle feeling great.

If you need help getting your fitness for

riding to the next level or you just don’t

know where to start, then get hold of us

at Base Fit. Our Base Fit team of coaches

are trained to get you maximal results for

your riding fitness.

Please also send your questions

to mandy@basefit.co.za and I will

address them. If you found this article

helpful please follow us on Instagram

#basefitsportfitness and https://web.

facebook.com/basefitsportfitness/

ACCELERATE YOUR

FITNESS FOR ENDURO

“I couldn’t podium

without BaseFit”

– Bruce Viljoen

Bruce Viljoen #44

Multiple GXCC & Northern

Regional Champion

www.basefit.co.za

THE AUTHORITY IN

FITNESS

FOR DIRT BIKERS

Contact us NOW at: info@basefit.co.za | 082-461-1443

Photo by: Chantelle Melzer Photography


Bike setup and

Ergonomics

S e t y o u r b i k e u p f o r t h e r i d e

You’ll sometimes hear us going

on about a bikes ergonomics.

Loosely, ergonomics is the

relationship and comfort

between the motorcycle and

the rider. How you fit. Your

relationship from seat to

footpegs to handlebars.

How important is your bikes

setup? It’s probably more

important than how fast it goes

because a well set-up bike makes

you a smoother ride.

Ultimately – if you are

comfortable on your bike, you

will be a better rider. Here is

some stuff that you might know –

but then again, you might not…

And the basics apply to

all motorcycles – dirtbike,

adventure and road.

There are a lot of tweaks and adjustments

you can make so the bike fits you right.

New bikes don’t just roll out of the crate

ready to sell, so the dealer makes the final

adjustments and install items like wheels,

handlebars, seats, and mirrors. Some of

these items come with marks on them to

aid dealers in setup: match up the marks

and they are “ready to go.”

Or are they? Those marks are just a

middle-of-the-range best guess. And what

if you’re buying a new-to-you used bike?

Do you know how the previous owner

adjusted it?

The reality is that bikes have many

adjustment points. You should know what

they are and how to adjust them to make

yourself more comfortable and give you

the best possible control.

Whenever we test a bike, we either set

them up ourselves or occasionally have

the luxury of having a factory rep do it

for us. It’s not fair of us to complain about

a motorcycle that has the capability of

being adjusted correctly, but is not.

The 10-to-15-minute setup session

with a bike is pretty much the same one

every rider should be performing, but

not everyone knows how. Not every bike

has every one of the adjustments, but 90

percent of this guide will be applicable

to 90 percent of motorcycles. This might

be the best 20 minutes you ever spent on

your bike — and it might save you cash

and sore muscles.

“The reality is that

bikes have many

adjustment points. You

should know what they

are and how to adjust

them to make yourself

more comfortable

and give you the best

possible control.”

70 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


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Handlebars

Setting up your handlebar:

With your stock bar, loosen the clamp bolts and

experiment with rotating the bar forward and

back to open or close up the cockpit. The two

things you want to pay attention to are the bar’s

rise (height) and sweepback (the angle of the

grips). Still not right? Don’t try to bend your bar—

find a replacement with the rise and sweepback

you want.

Get that bar so that your chest, shoulders,

wrists, and arms feel best. Once they do, lock the

bar down. Note that rise changes with bar rotation,

but sweep does not, so it’s possible to make the

handlebar feel funky (in a bad way). Make sure the

bar still clears the tank when the fork is turned all

the way to both steering stops.

Tension.

When mounting handlebars, the clamps and bars

should be clean and smooth. The bolts must be

tightened evenly. If one side is bottomed out and

the other is not, it can create an oblong clamping

surface on the round handlebar.

Straightening.

Never try to fix a bent aluminum bar by bending

it back to its original shape. Once bent past the

yield point, the bar will have a stress riser that will

eventually give way. The same holds true for steel,

although steel has much better fatigue properties

and can withstand more bending before failure.

Switches:

Once the handlebar is in position and tightened

down, move to the switches. You’ll likely have to

rotate them to make them visible and put them

within easy reach of your thumbs. Note that some

bikes’ electrical “clamshells” allow lots of rotation,

and others much less so.

Some are actually pinned in place to the

handlebar. You may have loosen the bars back up

to compromise between ideal comfort and control

usability. Usually, little or none of this is possible on

a bike with clip-ons, so just skip this step, but if you

have adjustability, try it out — it might save you

the cost and hassle of installing a more comfortable

handlebar, because the comfort you need might be

unlocked with some simple setup tweaks.

Your bars are

what keep you

in control of the

rest of the bike.

Setting up your levers:

When you’re sitting on the bike you want a

perfectly straight line from your elbow through

your wrist, continuing through your outstretched

fingers when those fingers are just resting on the

brake and clutch levers. Loosen your levers’ pinch

bolts and rotate the perch until they’re in the right

spot. Aftermarket levers may let you adjust reach

or provide a different curvature.

Grips:

Grips wear out, and even if they haven’t yet,

genuine MX grips on an adventure bike can be a big

improvement if you ride off road much. Blisters?

Try using “half waffle” grips, with waffle-ridged

surfaces on only half their circumference. Which

way do you mount them?

With the “smooth” part under your palm and the

waffle section under your fingers.

“When you’re sitting on the bike you

want a perfectly straight line from your

elbow through your wrist, continuing

through your outstretched fingers when

those fingers are just resting on the

brake and clutch levers.”

72 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


Set your levers

correctly.

Levers

Loosen the lever perches and work out where you

like those. As a general rule, you want your wrists

to be straight or nearly so when you’re in the

riding position, so you’re not squeezing levers with

your wrists bent (try making a fist with your wrist

straight and again with your wrist bent to see why).

On a dirtbike (standing up on the pegs), or you

happen to be a fairly tall rider, your angle of attack

on the bars comes in from much higher, so you

want to angle your levers down a bit.

If the bike is going on and off-road, make two

marks so you can easily switch between the two.

Some levers have reach adjusters built in.

Sit down and take some time and figure out how

your fingers interface with the levers. For instance,

we have pretty big paws, and normally cover the

clutch and brake with two fingers. Some peeps

like the brake lever as close to the bar as they can

get it. We like the clutch lever out a little farther,

because when you feather it on and off, you don’t

want to smash the knuckle of your ring finger

repeatedly.

One last thing: Road and adventure bikes have

mirrors that are integral to the clutch and brake

perches, and some do not. If your mirrors are

independent, give them a rough adjustment after

the levers are all set, and be prepared to fine-tune

‘em out on the road.

Step four: Cables

Cable slack is a stated measurement in most

service manuals, but they’re adjustable for a

reason. We like almost no free play in the “pull”

cables. Almost. But there must be a bit to prevent

the cables from jamming.

We normally adjust return cables to the factoryrecommended

freeplay, as they really don’t do

much to affect feel. This step is important because

excess slop can — and will — manifest itself as

a snatchy or jerky throttle. Make sure you leave

some slack, especially when the bars are at the

steering stops!

Unintended throttle usually ends badly…

You might want to

fit wider peg - and

on an adventure,

if youride off-road,

remove the rubber...

“On most ADV bikes, you want the pegs

positioned where you can comfortably

ride the bike while standing. Think about

how a horseman “posts” while standing

in the stirrups.”

Step five: Foot controls

Most bikes don’t have adjustment for the brake

pedal, but many bikes have a splined shift lever

and shaft. Adjust it so your foot can sit naturally for

upshifts and downshifts. This is often overlooked,

but a pair of too-tall boots can make upshifts

difficult, and similarly, a shifter that sits too far

up can make shift throw in one direction seem

ridiculous. Refer to your worshop manual for

adjustments.

Tip: Make a mark (A sharp screwdriver

works well) on the shaft as well as on the

shift lever in their original orientation so you

can “come back” to a setting that works, just

like you might do on the handlebar. It’s easier

than trying to “reclock” by one tooth at a time,

because remembering which teeth you had

matched up is nearly impossible after you pull

the shift lever completely off the shift shaft.

Pegs

On most ADV bikes, you want the pegs positioned

where you can comfortably ride the bike while

standing. Think about how a horseman “posts”

while standing in the stirrups. It’s difficult to

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 73


alter peg position, but wider aftermarket pegs make

standing more comfortable. Aggressive teeth on the pegs

improves grip, and an open “grid” design gives mud a

place to go.

Suspension

You can dedicate a whole magazine to suspension. But

modern suspension is very adjustable.

We do recommend that you set up suspension with

your dealer, but the modern stuff is so good, that you

can fiddle. Just make a note of the middle of the road,

factory setting so that if it gets worse you can work your

way back to the starting point…

Also bear in mind, that for the vast majority of riders,

the standard settings are usually pretty good.

Setting up a suspension correctly is as much art as

it is science, and perfection is not achieved quickly.

At minimum, most bikes at least have rear preload

adjustment; you should start here and set your sag.

There are a million articles out there on how to set sag

but a very easy rule of thumb is this: set up the bike so

the rear suspension compresses a third of its total travel

when you’re seated on the bike. If you’re fat like us, start

from the most preload and work your way softer.

If you do have front and/or rear compression or

rebound adjustments, it can pay to either check the

factory manual for a base setting, or simply turn the

clickers all the way in and out to find the total number of

clicks. Then start working up or down from the middle

until settings start to gel. (Or, again, if you are a skinny

ass, max the compression and then back off two clicks.

With rebound, do the opposite: all the way out and come

back in a click or two.)

If you’re lucky, you might have electronic

adjustments. This is far easier than trying to knock a

shock lock ring loose with an oversized screwdriver

and a hammer, but the same theory applies: Play with

things. Test it out. Find the limits, then home in on the

sweet spot.

Keep in mind that the suspension setting that makes

you comfy with soaking up bumps while cruising will not

be the same setting that gives you the maximum feeling

of control when you’re railing through the corners, so

you’ll probably end up with a compromise.

Don’t be afraid to write things down and play with the

settings. You might find something you love! This step

takes the most time, especially if you get fussy, but it

also yields the fastest or most comfortable riding, so it’s

worth taking some time.

Other stuff:

Adventure and road bikes have lots of other little

doodads that can be adjusted. Adjustable seats are

becoming somewhat common, and lots of bikes have

adjustable windscreens — some are powered, and

some are manually adjusted. Some can be tweaked on

the fly, others require the rider to stop before adjusting

anything on the bike.

These items are adjustable so they will fit you! Give

yourself the best chance at having a great time on your

bike!

We do these things each time we test a bike, and we

don’t mind — it makes the riding better — but, we meet

riders who have never fooled around with these simple

adjustments even though they have owned a bike for

years!

No Matter what you ride, take 20 minutes and set

your bike up.

It’s well worth it!

74 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019

Grab a buddy and set

up your sag.

“We do recommend that you set up

suspension with your dealer, but the

modern stuff is so good, that you can

fiddle. Just make a note of the middle of

the road, factory setting so that if it gets

worse you can work your way back to

the starting point…”


A250

A150 AU180 TT125

011 493 6001 / 011 493 6101

32 Hulbert Street, New Centre, Johannesburg, 2001

www.kazuma-sa.co.za


By Sean Hendley

TRIPPINʼ DOWN MEMORY LANE WITH

DARRYL HANCOCK.

As a kid growing up in the 70’s and

80’s in Kempton Park and visiting family

in Rosettenville, my whole life revolved

around racing BMX’s at national level and

when I wasn’t doing that I was tearing up

my folks lawn on my little 50cc Yamaha FS1.

The natural progression was to get a proper

dirt bike. So somewhere around ’84 or ’85

my Dad managed to get me a well-used

‘81/’82 Yamaha YZ 125 for not very much

money. My two best mates had similar

year RM125’s in the same sort of condition,

yet not being from wealthy families we

could never afford to go racing but always

managed to crash our brains out on a

regular basis. Then 1st team rugby, girls,

matric and the compulsory conscription

happened and real life started and when I

looked again I was knocking on 50’s door.

For a while after the army and before

real life got started happening properly I

managed to get down to Corobrik MX track

on a regular basis and occasionally to Back

of the Moon, Syringa and various other

tracks. Watching the likes of Wayne ‘Mad

Murdoch” Smith, Russel Campbell, Marcel

Guiguet and the rest of the wild men doing

amazing things on dirt bikes.

I recall a youngster that was doing

really well and eventually won the 80cc

championship that year, one Darryl

Hancock.

So, knocking on 50’s door I was feeling a

bit nostalgic and happened to find myself

in Rosettenville for some reason. I had a

bit of a wander around, passing the flat

where my Aunt, cousin and Gran lived -

incidentally right above where the first ever

Nando’s opened its doors. I carried on up

the road and found a cool bike shop, D.C.

Motorcycles and bumped into some old

mates from the trade I had worked with

many years before - and thus the trip down

memory lane continued.

I noticed some familiar old MX bikes

on the floor and asked my mate Derek

Robertson about them. He told me they

belonged to Darryl Hancock and were all his

old race bikes and some of his old helmets.

Brian, Derek and Dion from DC Motorcycles

do all the maintenance on his old bikes as

well as custom builds and restorations for

other customers over and above their usual

day to day business.

I immediately got my happy snappy

phone out and took a bunch of pic’s.

Derek then gave me Darryl’s contact

details and I made contact with him. This is

what he had to say;

“My riding career started when my

father bought me my first bike when I was 3

years old (an Italjet MD50), and that is when

many hard hours were spent with my father

Clive in pursuit of victories and a lifelong

bond. With a fair amount of success on the

little bikes, one fond memory was when I

was leading for the 1st time, at the far end of

the circuit my nose became extremely itchy

so being a 4year old, I stopped to scratch

it much to the disgust of my father……not

sure where I finished but a great memory

non the less.

76 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


In 1989 I won every championship

available to me on my KX 60 in Transvaal

(yip that old… and there were no Nationals

at that stage for that class) Corobrik

Bermbusters , Datnow Midvaal series,

Transvaal Championships, BobT Syringa

series while being sponsored by Ace Glass

and Dryden Steel and mostly my parents.

After a few years of graduating to the 80cc

class, I won the SA National Championship

on my Wyko Kawasaki sponsored KX80

in 1993 against some well-known riders

and champions to the name of Andre

David and Grant Langston who went on to

international status.

I continued to race for 1 year after

that in the 125cc Highschool class but

unfortunately could no longer continue

due to the rising costs of the sport. I have

included a famous picture of me that went

Viral after doing a photo shoot at Corobrik

on my CR125 where the front wheel was

photo shopped out (so no…that never

happened as my father was meticulous

with the maintenance on my bikes).

Ever since my last ’professional’ race

I ride every chance I get socially as the

thrill will never leave my blood and every

now and then we still have oopsies and am

currently sitting with a resume of 21 broken

bones to date ranging from pinkie fingers

to legs, and every time I have a setback like

this, all I can think about is how long to fix

my bike and when will my body be strong

enough to ride again…..I have started

collecting numerous bikes with sentimental

meaning (my 1980 Italjet, 1984 KX60, my

championship 1993 KX80, my 1993 CR125

and a few other bigger bikes), just proof

that this passion is clearly in my blood.”

Darryl also sent us a bunch of old

photo’s, newspaper clippings and even a

letter of congratulations from the Godfather

of the motorcycle industry himself, the

Managing Director of KMSA, Chris Speight.

It does sadden me a bit to see that a lot of

our legends of the motorcycle fraternity are

quietly disappearing from our memories

because the masses go for sports that only

require one ball.

We here at Dirt & Trail and our sister

magazine Ridefast will always endeavour to

do them the courtesy of remembering them

whenever we can and reminding all of you

out there what a great racing heritage we

have in this country.

“I have started collecting numerous

bikes with sentimental meaning (my 1980

Italjet, 1984 KX60, my championship 1993

KX80, my 1993 CR125 and a few other

bigger bikes), just proof that this passion

is clearly in my blood.”

78 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


The riders of the

50cc Pro class

take their turn on

the podium.


||| FEATURE: KTM MOTOHALL

ORANGE

HEAVEN

A visit to the KTM Motohall

Our Kurt Beine has just returned from

a trip across Europe – there’s a full

feature on that soon.

But while he was there, he visited the

new KTM Motohall. Impressive is the

understatement of the century.

Here are his impressions...

80 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


At the culmination of our 2712km tour of 5

countries on a KTM 790 S and a KTM 1290 S, my

sister and I were treated to a guided tour of the

newly built KTM Motohall, the world of Ready to

Race, built at a cost of 35 million Euro the museum

opened mid May this year. Situated in the middle

of Mattighofen Austria, Mattighofen being the

birthplace of all things KTM, the largest growing

motorcycle manufacturer in the world.

Vlad, a Romanian guy, was our designated tour

guide for the day.

He’s an accomplished enduro rider and extremely

knowledgeable of everything KTM.

KTM (Kraftfahrzeuge Trunkenpolz Mattighofen)

started out as a small metalworking business in

1934 producing their first motorcycle which was

built in 1951.

From there it went from strength to strength and

in 1955 a major shareholder, Ernest Kronreif renamed

it Kronreif & Trunkenpolz Mattighofen, retaining

the name KTM. For many years they built various

scooters, developed their own engines, various

enduro bikes and scramblers. In 1988 they stopped

scooter production and a year later, the founder,

Hans Trunkenpolz died.

Two years later, KTM filed for bankruptcy which

lasted four days and the company was split into 4

entities; radiators, motorcycles, bicycles and tooling.

Do you know why KTM’s are orange?

In 1994, a new motorcycle division was formed and

- up until that point, a variety of colours were used,

none synonymous with KTM.

The setup is mind blowing...

The dirty boys - past and present.

The fan wall - send them a pic...

A selection of road bikes.

Full carbon fibre X-Bow.

Need an engine?

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019 81


At the time all the major colours

were considered for the brand,

however most were already

synonymous with other makes.

Orange had not been used, so

orange it was, and has remained

synonymous with the brand ever since.

The “Ready To Race” motto was

adopted in later years when KTM

became famous for developing

race bikes that needed little or no

modification to race professionally.

That was just the beginning.

In 2001 KTM won the Dakar for

the first time and this company has

won it every year since… and you

can hear and learn all about this at

the KTM Motohall.

Our tour through the Motohall

showcased how engines are built;

2 stroke engines, 4 stroke single

cylinder and 2 cylinder engines; how

legendary WP suspension is race

tuned, how prototype clay models

are designed, the various aspects of

why and how frames are developed

and why KTM uses specific metals.

On show are many of their

scooter creations from the originals,

through to the X-Bow race car that

KTM built. The display includes

current road and adventure bikes

and next year’s MX models.

The legends hall pays tribute to

race winners over time with models

standing next to the very bikes

they won various events on, Dakar,

Enduro, Road racing and MX winners.

A suspended display of glass

and metal houses a huge array

of winner’s cups and trophy’s

suspended from the floor to the roof.

Many of the demonstration

stands are interactive. You can finetune

your own suspension, see why

and how suspension is adjusted,

understand how a motor works,

understand the workings of leading

KTM technology in ABS, traction

control and engine power modes.

In recent years, KTM was the

first with cornering ABS, cornering

traction control and off-road ABS

where the back wheel can be locked

and not the front.

The tour ends in the accessories

division where all sorts of KTM

clothing; shirts, pants, socks, caps,

shoes, sunglasses, kiddie’s stuff and

all the fun stuff is available to buy.

My credit card was groaning.

Amazing! Well worth your time and

a great way to kill a few hours. If ever

you are in the vicinity of Mattighofen

– even if you are a strange person

who is not a KTM fan, you just have to

visit the KTM Motohall.

Consider it a KTM pilgrimage!

The 1957 Apfelbeck. Shopping anyone? Some trophies...

One of KTM’s very first bikes, the R100.

Some serious history.

When the bikes went orange...

Binder along with all the other road heroes...

82 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


SA’S BEST STREET & SPORTBIKE

MAGAZINE IN STORES

NATIONWIDE EVERY MONTH!

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE


IS THIS WHAT THE WORLD HAS COME TO?

CAKE ELECTRIC ENDURO BIKE

There’s a neat little category opening up

somewhere between e-bikes and electric

motorcycles, and Cake’s new Kalk& (Kalk

and) is a perfect example. Weighing just 79

kg, with a range “over 86 km”, it’d be a super

fun dual sport commuter if it wasn’t for the

price tag.

The minute you ride a powerful,

lightweight electric bicycle like the Stealth

H-52 – or heck, even just anything with a

1,000-W motor in it – you start thinking:

something a bit more powerful than this,

with a bit more range, would make an

absolutely wild zero-emissions gigglemachine

commuter if you could get it street

legal, make it do highway speeds and keep

it lightweight and silly.

The Cake Kalk& is such a giggle machine,

and it’s got all the bits and pieces necessary

to make it street legal. Developed from the

company’s Kalk Or off-roader, it runs a 13.4-

hp motor putting out 42 Nm of torque –

enough for a top speed “over 90 km/h” that

won’t get you honked off the freeway on a

short stint. The battery offers a humble 2.6

kWh, but the range is more than enough for

daily duties round town or the odd blast up

a trail if you’ve got one close by.

It’s got programmable regen braking,

multiple riding modes, 220-mm motorcycle

brake discs front and rear, a mirror, LED

headlight and taillights, indicators, fenders,

plate holders and a set of dual-sport tyres.

It’s also got suspension that’s been

specially developed for it by Ohlins,

which is probably lovely to ride on, but it

contributes to the Kalk&’s biggest issue: the

price of €14,000 Dollars (or R170k in SA) is

just insane for what you’re getting. The Zero

FX, optioned up with a 7.2-kWh battery,

offers four times the power and better range

for R150k, and even that’s too rich for a lot

of riders. China’s Sur-Ron is doing a 10-kW

street bike with a bigger battery for R45k,

and rumor has it the company is working

on a street-legal version of its wicked Light

Bee off-roader that could match or beat the

Kalk& on performance for Chinese money

instead of Swedish.

That’s not to say the Kalk& doesn’t look

like a ball to ride, and a beautifully built

thing, but we can’t imagine it’s going to sell

in huge numbers at that price.

84 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2019


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