October 2019 Digital Issue

cjenk16

EQUIPMENT

ICON

Garland/Welbilt has

built a legacy of success

THE 2019

EQUIPMENT

TRENDS

REPORT

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOCUS

BEYOND THE

STATUS QUO

Equipment choices are

driven by consumer trends

CANADIAN PUBLICATION MAIL PRODUCT SALES AGREEMENT #40063470

COOKING

OUTSIDE

THE BOX

The Restaurant at Pearl Morissette continues to

attract attention for its unique business model

OCTOBER 2019 $4.00


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VOLUME 52, NO.9 | OCTOBER 2019

CONTENTS

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOCUS: A LOOK AT WHAT’S NEW IN EQUIPMENT OFFERINGS

IN THIS ISSUE

EQUIPMENT SPECIAL

25

31 STEEPED IN HISTORY

The story behind the

success of Garland/Welbilt

16

FEATURES

14 MENTORING MATTERS

Mentoring programs offer benefits

for employers and employees alike

15 TOP-30-UNDER-30

Daniela Alhanova, Assistant Food

& Beverage Manager, Sheraton

Centre Toronto is profiled

16 CULINARY ROAD TRIP

Well-travelled diners are fuelling the

popularity of globally inspired cuisine

ON THE COVER: Chef Daniel Hadida,

The Restaurant at Pearl Morisette

Photography by Jeff Kirk

35 BEYOND THE STATUS QUO

Consumer trends are driving

equipment choices in restaurants

39 THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

The 2019 Equipment Trend Report

49 TABLETOP TECH

Tableside and tabletop tablets

are gaining popularity

25 A YEAR IN NIAGARA: SUMMER

The third instalment in our series

on The Restaurant at Pearl Morissette

51 SHAKEN, NOT STIRRED

Sustainability is driving cocktail

innovation in Canadian restaurants

31

DEPARTMENTS

2 FROM THE EDITOR

5 FYI

13 FROM THE DESK OF NPD GROUP

52 CHEF’S CORNER: Angus An,

Maenam, Popina, Vancouver,

52

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 1


FROM THE EDITOR

SMART

SOLUTIONS

As any chef and restaurant operator will attest to,

food is typically considered the shining star in any

restaurant business. After all, it’s the dazzling array

of creative dishes that attracts consumer interest

— especially in our social media-obsessed world.

But, for food to be perfectly executed, prepared and presented,

equipment and technology are needed to take it to the next level.

With that in mind, this year we’re pleased to debut our first-ever

equipment-focused issue, highlighting the growing importance

of the tools of the trade.

As labour shortages continue to create uncertainty, equipment

now demands more attention from operators and chefs. In

the process, operators are learning to leverage technology, using

it as an enabler to make their businesses more efficient and

productive — all the while helping to solve some of the urgent

issues around recruiting and retention. Whether we’re talking

about POS systems, software programs that facilitate order taking

and reservations or ovens that help chefs prepare a range of

menu items, equipment is essential.

In recent years, technology has become a tool for disruption,

adding an important, extra layer to the production and delivery

of food. And as technology continues to gain

traction with, for example, a growing focus

on AI, expectations continue to evolve, resulting

in a discernible need for greater speed,

convenience and future-forward thinking.

Ultimately, for restaurants to be efficient

and profitable, operators and chefs need to

truly understand the pervasive trends shaping

the landscape. They also need to spend time

driving important results. Currently, according

to research by the Access Group in the U.S., 30

per cent of operators spend four hours a week

on office-based tasks. That means many operators

are experiencing a lack of freedom to focus

on delivering excellent customer experiences.

Similarly, just imagine how much time chefs

could gain back by having efficient equipment

and technology solutions in the kitchen.

At the end of the day, operators need to get rid of the

mentality that cheap and cheerful is best. Granted, saving money

is always a goal of any business, especially given recent research

by Access Group, which shows hospitality costs in the U.S. hit a

12-year high in 2018. That said, it’s time operators look at equipment

as an investment with the potential to help differentiate

their restaurants and ensure their future success and sustainability,

rather than just being another line item in their budget.

ROSANNA CAIRA rcaira@kostuchmedia.com

@foodservicemag

facebook.com/foodservicehospitalitymagazine

instagram.com/rosannacaira

NICK WONG, LOCATION PROVIDED BY VIA CIBO

2 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


order

tickets now

EST. 1968 | VOLUME 52, NO. 9 | OCTOBER 2019

EDITOR & PUBLISHER ROSANNA CAIRA

ART DIRECTOR MARGARET MOORE

MANAGING EDITOR AMY BOSTOCK

ASSOCIATE EDITOR DANIELLE SCHALK

MULTIMEDIA MANAGER DEREK RAE

DESIGN MANAGER COURTNEY JENKINS

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER/EVENTS

CO-ORDINATOR JHANELLE PORTER

DESIGN ASSISTANT JACLYN FLOMEN

DIRECTOR OF SALES CHERYLL SAN JUAN

ACCOUNT MANAGER ELENA OSINA

ACCOUNT MANAGER AMITOJ DUTT

DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS

DEVELOPMENT, U.S.A. WENDY GILCHRIST

CIRCULATION PUBLICATION PARTNERS

CONTROLLER DANIELA PRICOIU

ADVISORY BOARD

FAIRFAX FINANCIAL HOLDINGS LIMITED NICK PERPICK

FHG INTERNATIONAL INC. DOUG FISHER

JOEY RESTAURANT GROUP BRITT INNES

MTY GROUP MARIE-LINE BEAUCHAMP

PROFILE HOSPITALITY GROUP SCOTT BELLHOUSE

SOTOS LLP ALLAN DICK

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS JUDSON SIMPSON

THE MCEWAN GROUP MARK MCEWAN

UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH, SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY

& TOURISM MANAGEMENT BRUCE MCADAMS

WELBILT MARY CHIAROT

CO-HOSTS

ROSANNA CAIRA

Editor & Publisher

Kostuch Media Ltd.

NED BELL

Executive Chef

Ocean Wise

To subscribe to F&H, visit foodserviceandhospitality.com

Published 11 times per year by Kostuch Media Ltd.,

23 Lesmill Rd., Suite 404, Toronto, Ont., M3B 3P6. Tel: (416) 447-0888,

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MONTHLY NEWS AND UPDATES FOR THE FOODSERVICE INDUSTRY

NICK WONG [CHEF JOHN HIGGINS]

WINNERS’ CIRCLE

Kostuch Media Ltd. announces

2019 Pinnacle Award winners

Kostuch Media Ltd.,

publisher of industry

magazines Foodservice and

Hospitality and Hotelier, has

unveiled the 2019 winners

of its prestigious Pinnacle Awards.

This year marks the 31st anniversary

of the “Oscars of the industry.”

Over the past year, Company of the

Year, Montreal-based Copper Branch,

announced plans to open 50 new

locations over the next decade. Five

of these openings are slated to happen

within the next year, including

Copper Branch’s first-ever Vancouver

outpost and several spots located

in the Greater Toronto Area and

Montreal. In January, the company

opened two new stores in France, one

in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. and one in

New York City. Founder Rio Infantino

is also planning to open locations in

the Netherlands and Monaco.

This year, our Regional Company

of the Year, West, Surrey, B.C.-based

Joseph Richard Group, launched a

series of “ghost restaurants” to meet

growing consumer demand for delivered

meals. The company, which

owns 25 establishments — including

pubs, restaurants, liquor stores and

the Steveston Hotel — also signed an

operating agreement with the owners

of Glass House Estate Winery

and opened its Stanley Park Brewing

Restaurant and Brewpub.

Our Regional Company of the Year,

East, Ancaster, Ont.-based Balzac’s

Coffee Roasters, is celebrating its 25th

anniversary this year. Since opening

its first location in Stratford, Ont., the

much-loved coffee chain has opened

14 more coffee shops in the province

— the most recent in Toronto’s Billy

Bishop Airport — and has plans to

“FOR MORE THAN

30 YEARS,

WE’VE BEEN

SHINING THE

SPOTLIGHT ON

COMPANIES THAT

ARE ACHIEVING

SUCCESS

IN THE

HOSPITALITY

INDUSTRY

THROUGH

INNOVATION AND

A STEADFAST

FOCUS ON

EXCELLENCE,” SAYS

ROSANNA CAIRA,

EDITOR AND

PUBLISHER AT

KOSTUCH MEDIA

LTD. “THIS YEAR’S

WINNERS REFLECT

THE IMPORTANCE

OF DIVERSIFICATION

IN A LANDSCAPE

THAT CONTINUES

TO BE DISRUPTED.”

open four more.

It was a big year for Kitchener,

Ont.-based Charcoal Group, our

Independent Restaurateur. The company

has undertaken two extensive

renovations in recent months and

opened a number of new restaurants,

including an Oakville, Ont. outpost of

its Beertown Public Houses, followed

by planned openings in Toronto,

Barrie, Ont. and Guelph, Ont.

This year’s Chef of the Year is Alex

Chen. Since overseeing the genesis

of Boulevard Kitchen & Oyster Bar,

Chen has earned the restaurant a

full complement of accolades while

proving his culinary mettle — leading

Team Canada to a top-10 finish at

the 2013 Bocuse d’Or in Lyon, France

and steering Boulevard to the top spot

in both the 2015 and ’17 editions of

the Gold Medal Plates B.C. regional

championships.

Built on a reputation of reliability

and flexibility, Supplier of the

Year Flanagan Foodservice has been

providing exceptional service to the

foodservice industry for more than

40 years. This year, the company was

recognized for overall business performance

and sustained growth with the

Canada’s Best Managed Companies

designation and has requalified as one

of Canada’s Best Managed Companies

for the sixth year in a row. In

February, Dan Lafrance took the reins

as the new president of the Canadian

family-owned company.

In addition to its regular slate of Pinnacle Awards, this year, the Rosanna Caira Lifetime Achievement

Award will be presented to chef John Higgins, director of George Brown Chef School in Toronto.

Higgins has cooked for the Queen at Buckingham Palace, for heads of state in Washington and in some

of Toronto’s finest hotels, including the Four Seasons, the Sutton Place and the King Edward Hotel.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 5


FRESH FACED

Earls Restaurant Group has

given its Toronto flagship

location a makeover. The

renovation of Earls King

Street represents the first

location in Eastern Canada

to embody the brand’s new

vision — creating a collection

of independently compelling

restaurants. The restaurant’s

dining-room renovations were

unveiled in September, with a

lounge makeover set to follow

in 2020. The redesigned space

features an eclectic look and a

gallery-style local-art wall. “We believe local art creates a connection to the community

within a space,” says Kristin Vekteris, vice-president of Brand and Marketing at Earls

Restaurant Group. “With our vision to create a unique experience at each Earls location,

local art has been at the core of our design concept, to incorporate local personality

and culture.”

HOMECOMING

COMING

EVENTS

OCT. 22 MHA & MRFA Show, Victoria Inn Hotel,

Winnipeg. Tel: 888-859-9976; email: info@

oneshow.ca; website: oneshow.ca

OCT. 22-27 Devour! The Food Film Fest, Wolfville,

N.S. Email: lia@devourfest.com; website:

devourfest.com

NOV. 5 Canadian Restaurant Leadership

Summit, Arcadian Court, Toronto. Tel: 647-723-

7736; email: erick.bauer@npd.com; website:

restaurantsummit.ca

NOV. 29 31st-Annual Pinnacle Awards, Fairmont

Royal York, Toronto. Tel: 416-358-2511, ext. 235;

email: dpricoiu@kostuchmedia.com; website:

kostuchmedia.com/shop

FOR MORE EVENTS VISIT

foodserviceandhospitalitycom/events/

JOLLIBEE OPENS

NEW TORONTO

LOCATION

Mary Brown’s Chicken & Taters celebrated its 50th anniversary this summer with an

epic homecoming in St. John’s, N.L., including a new flagship location opened in the

city’s downtown core. The restaurant features a mural by local artist Kyle Bustin on the

building’s exterior, as well as an interior mural by another St. John’s artist, Julie Lewis.

The works are designed to highlight the city’s culture, history and family-oriented

values. As part of the celebration, corporate employees and franchisees from across

the country came together in St. John’s to celebrate the 50th anniversary through a

variety of local experiences, excursions and traditions, culminating in the reveal of the

exterior mural.

Jollibee opened its third location in the

Greater Toronto Area (GTA) on September

6 near Toronto’s Wilson subway station.

Canada continues to play a key role in

Jollibee’s expansion plans, as the chain progresses

in its goal to open 100 branches in

the country over the next five years. Toronto

Wilson Station marks Jollibee’s sixth location

in Canada, opening on the heels of

its first Alberta location in August, where

approximately 8,000 customers were served

on opening day.

6 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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RESTOBUZZ

Grant van Gameren has opened an intimate

30-seat wine bar, Piquette, in Toronto.

The concept features a rotating wine list

highlighting notable and hard-to-find

labels, with a focus on winemakers and

vineyards from around the globe. The menu

of small dishes showcases charcuterie

from Scott Draper, as well as dishes such

as amberjack crudo with local cucumbers

and fennel with tonnato sauce, habanero

and bonito...Manousha Inc. has opened

in Mississauga, Ont. The Middle-Eastern

concept will specialize in Mana’eesh — a

style of pizza-like flatbread. Diners can

choose from 25 different kinds of Mana’eesh

in four categories — meats, sweets, dairy

and vegan. The 12-seat restaurant will focus

largely on take-out and delivery and has

Piquette

partnered with multiple delivery services...

Privé Kitchen + Bar has opened in Vancouver.

The massive entertainment venue features more than 7,000 sq. ft. of interior space, a 2,000-sq.-

ft. patio and is designed as a combination of various concepts. It features a games lounge with

arcade machines, beer pong, table tennis, electronic darts, foosball, a dance floor and a DJ booth,

as well as karaoke. Privé’s food, wine, beer and drink menus are available in the dining room,

lounge, patio, at the bar or in private rooms. Bites range from brunch through appetizers and

late-night eats to entrées and large-party platters.

Opening a new restaurant? LET US IN ON THE BUZZ

Send a high-res image, menu and background information about the new

establishment to abostock@kostuchmedia.com

IN BRIEF

Tim Hortons has partnered with SkipTheDishes

to offer delivery services to customers across

select Greater-Toronto-Area (GTA) regions.

The brand’s full menu will be available through

the service...FAT Brands Inc. has opened a

new Fatburger location in Abbotsford, B.C. The

opening marks the brand’s 21st location in the

province...Jollibee has opened its first Alberta

location in Edmonton. This is the brand’s

fifth Canadian location. The brand celebrated

the opening with a series of giveaways...

DoorDash has expanded its door-to-door

delivery service to Montreal. The expansion

marks the company’s first predominantly

French-speaking market and first market

in Quebec...New York-based plant-based

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

restaurant chain by CHLOE. is entering Canada

with two confirmed locations in Toronto.

The first location is slated to open this fall in

Yorkdale Shopping Centre, with the second to

open in the city’s financial district in 2020...

Starbucks has rolled out its new strawless lids

in Toronto — the first city in Canada to offer

the new lightweight, recyclable lids for iced

beverages. The strawless lids will be rolled

out to the rest of Canada in 2020...Montrealbased

plant-based chain LOV open its first

Toronto location in September. This is the

brand’s first location outside of Quebec. The

concept is a fast-fine-dining experience that

combines culinary excellence and elegance

with affordable pricing and quick service...

Foodtastic Inc. has acquired the Chocolato,

Chocolate and Ice Cream Bar chain. Founded

in Quebec City in 2015, Chocolato has opened

Canada’s

Favourite Bakery

is Back!

For more information, please visit

saraleefrozenbakery.com/canada

to view our full line of products

or call 1-855-206-0443.


more than 20 locations in the last three years...

Mahony & Sons has rebranded to mahony and,

as part of the refresh, the Vancouver-based pub

concept partnered with chef Vikram Vij to update

its menu. Vij’s menu features classic offerings,

as well as “spiced-up pub fare”...Compass

Group Canada and Copper Branch have launched

an exclusive national partnership aimed at

improving the availability of plant-based options

in healthcare and post-secondary settings

in Canada. Under this agreement, Compass Group

Canada has the option to open up to 50 Copper

Branch locations over the next 10 years, with

five planned openings in the next year...Carl’s Jr.

has expanded its partnership with Beyond Meat

to launch its Beyond Famous Star with Cheese

burger in Canada, building on the product’s

success in the U.S....Pizza 73 has launched

new menu items, including cauliflower crust,

plant-based pepperoni, plant-based spicysausage

crumble and the Super Plant Pizza.

The menu offerings were launched in response

to customer demand for healthier options and

more flexible offerings...Subway has partnered

with Beyond Meat to test exclusive plant-based

COZY UP TO

FALL FLAVOURS

• Spice up drinks like lattes, hot chocolate or smoothies

• Incorporate into desserts such as ice cream, pastries,

cakes, cookies and donuts for a seasonal flavour boost

• Add to stews and soups for a warm, sweet and savoury

flavour combination

protein options in September. For the test, 685

participating restaurants in Canada and the U.S.

piloted the Beyond Meatball Marinara sub...7-

Eleven Canada has added Beyond Meat Pizza to

its Hot-to-Go menu at select Toronto locations.

The hand-panned, Beyond Sausage and Roasted

Veggie Pizza is made with Beyond Meat Italian

Sausage Crumbles, fire-roasted vegetables and

Canadian cheese...KFC recently tested plantbased

nuggets and boneless wings developed

by Beyond Meat at one of its Atlanta restaurants

in a one-day-only offer. Customer feedback will

influence the brand’s plans for broader tests or

a potential rollout. The brand has also reportedly

stated Canada can expect its own plant-based

offering to debut in the near future.

PEOPLE

Yum! Brands, Inc. has elected David Gibbs as

Chief Executive Officer, effective Jan. 1, 2020. He

ugar, nice...

will also servie on the company’s board, effective

Sugar,

nic

Nov. 1, 2019. Gibbs, who currently serves as Yum!

Brands president and Chief Operating Officer and

AND EVERYTHING

For these recipes, menu inspiration and

product information, visit Clubhouseforchefs.ca

clubhouseforchefs

ch4chefs

ugar, spice

CH4Chefs

Coconut Custard Baked in a Pumpkin

Coco

n e...

nic

Cinnamon

Sugar Donuts

*Reg. TM/MD McCormick Canada

oversees the global KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell

divisions, will succeed Greg Creed, who is retiring

at the end of 2019 following a 25-year career with

the company...Chef Antonio Park has partnered

Antonio Park

with Air Canada to

offer destinationinspired

meals on

select Air Canada flights

to Asia and South

America. Park’s menus

will be available in

Signature, Premium

Economy and Economy Class on all flights

from Canada to Japan and exclusively in

Signature Class on all other flights departing

Canada to Asia and South America...Yum! Brands

has named new CEOs for its Taco Bell and Pizza

Hut divisions. Mark King, former president of

Adidas Group North America, has taken the reins

at Taco Bell, while Artie Starrs, president of Pizza

Hut U.S., has been promoted to the chain’s CEO

position.

SUPPLY SIDE

Lamb Weston has introduced Stealth Fries Potato

Dippers — a new product made to help operators

serve dips in more delicious and easy ways.

Potato Dippers are designed to be the perfect

shape for scooping up dips and the Stealth

coating helps them stay crispy to carry the

weight of heartier dips...Winston Foodservice has

released a redesigned CVap product line featuring

aesthetic upgrades, as well as improvements in

the electronics, programming and functionality.

The new line is still powered by Winston’s

patented Controlled Vapor Technology (CVap)

and includes holding cabinets, cook-and-hold

ovens and retherm ovens of various sizes and

capabilities...Posera Ltd. has released a new

user interface (UI) for its Maitre’D POS system.

The new UI is specifically designed for Maitre’D

version 7.08. It features a contemporary design

with sleeker aesthetics and personalized menu

images, which optimize screen real estate and

make user navigation easier.

CORRECTIONS In the September 2019 issue of F&H,

a profile on Il Fornello incorrectly identified two new

restaurant openings in Barrie and Ottawa... In our

Show Preview, the product images for SBS and

Supramatic were flipped. We apologize for the errors.

10 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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FROM THE DESK OF NPD

THE GREAT

CANNABIS

DEBATE

Cannabis legalization offers significant

opportunities for savvy foodservice operators

Unless you’ve been living under

a rock for the past 12 months,

you’ve likely found yourself in the

middle of the debate on Canada’s

decision to legalize cannabis.

The federal Cannabis Act came into effect

October 17, 2018 and made Canada the

second country in the world, after Uruguay,

to formally legalize the cultivation, possession,

acquisition and consumption of cannabis

and its by-products. In fact, Canada is the

first and only G7 and G20 nation to formally

legalize cannabis in such a way.

Whether you agree or disagree with the

federal government’s decision, one thing is

certain — the new law has transformed the

role of cannabis in our society. Not long after

the Act was passed, several retailers opened

“cafés” that catered specifically to cannabis

users. And while most of these locations were

not operating legally, it’s become clear there’s

significant demand for cannabis and cannabis-related

products in both foodservice

and retail.

While foodservice operators are not yet

able to integrate cannabis into their offerings,

there’s been much discussion about the

next stage of legalization, which will include

edibles (food products containing THC) and

other forms of cannabis that can be used to

enhance certain food offerings (think oils,

salad dressings, seasonings, et cetera).

While we wait for these decisions to

be made, The NPD Group is looking at

how cannabis users differ from noncannabis

users.

UNDERSTANDING THE CANNABIS

USER AT FOODSERVICE

When comparing users to non-users at

foodservice, NPD’s data shows users tend to

skew younger, with the 34-and-under cohort

representing 45 per cent of traffic compared

to 33 per cent of non-users.

They’re also more inclined to make foodservice

purchases through retail (11 per cent

compared to nine per cent) and less inclined

to visit full-service restaurants (17 per cent

compared to 23 per cent for non-users). QSR

usage, on the other hand, remains steady

amongst users.

While users eat out at QSR as often as the

average CREST visitor, their brand preferences

vary slightly. They’re more inclined

to visit QSR pizza, burger and sandwich

concepts and less inclined to visit QSR coffee

locations (an ironic finding given the initial

media focus on “pot cafés” post-legalization).

All off-premise access modes are overdeveloped

among cannabis users, including

delivery. And while there’s no obvious daypart

that’s over-developed among cannabis

users, breakfast sandwiches and hash

browns are among the most over-developed

menu items.

In terms of beverages, alcohol consumption

is on par with cannabis users, while

coffee is under-developed. Soft drinks, iced

tea, smoothies and milkshakes are all overdeveloped.

Perhaps not surprisingly, salty

snacks and candy are both over-developed

with cannabis users as well.

It’s important to remember our understanding

of the cannabis user in foodservice

is just beginning to take shape. This is truly

a tipping point in Canadian history that will

present significant opportunities for savvy

retailers and foodservice operators committed

to spending the time to truly understand

this unique consumer and their demands.

Those who do it right will have a significant

first-move advantage when future legislation

is passed. FH

Vince Sgabellone is

a foodservice industry

analyst with The

NPD Group. He can be

reached at vince.

sgabellone@npd.com

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 13


LABOUR

MENTORING

MATTERS

For employees and businesses alike,

mentoring programs offer numerous perks

STORY BY REBECCA HARRIS

After nearly 40 years in the hospitality

industry, Kevin Murphy says

mentorship has been a long-term

commitment for his business.

“However, within the last five or

six years, it’s become so much more important

[due to] labour issues facing companies,”

says the president and CEO of Charlottetownbased

Murphy Hospitality Group (MHG).

“And no matter what business you’re in,

if you’re not investing in a mentoring program

or initiative, your labour issue will be

more acute.”

Across MHG, which includes 16 food-andbeverage

operations, two boutique hotels and

the Prince Edward Island Brewing Company,

mentoring is about nurturing a culture of

continuous learning. For example, MHG’s

Culinary-U program involves education sessions

eight times a year, with chefs developing

and coaching back-of-house teams on topics

essential to operating a successful kitchen.

The company also invites staff at various

levels — from chefs to managers — to participate

in business-planning sessions. “They feel

ownership and like they can contribute, but

we also want to teach them about the business

side of the [industry],” says Murphy.

Less formally, mentors in the organization

will identify promising employees and

help send them back to school. “A lot of

times, we’ll ask what education they have

and if they have any interest in going back to

school. We’ll help them do that and work the

schedule around them,” says Murphy. “A great

example is, two years ago, we had an assistant

manager with a diploma from the local college.

She was very bright and I said, ‘did you

ever think about getting a business degree?’

Well, this person is now graduating with a

business degree. And she’s still with us.”

For employees and businesses alike, there

are myriad benefits to mentoring programs.

On the mentee side, some well-known benefits

are improved skills, higher job satisfaction

and guidance on professional development.

For mentors, the rewards include recognition

as experts within the organization, learning

new perspectives and gaining personal satisfaction.

The translation for businesses? Happy,

engaged employees and greater retention.

According to a recent CNBC/Survey

Monkey Workplace Happiness Survey, companies

that embrace a culture of mentorship

boost workplace happiness and lower the

likelihood of losing their best performers. The

June 2019 survey of nearly 8,000 U.S. employees

found those with mentors are more likely

to say they’re satisfied with their jobs (91 per

cent compared to 79 per cent) and are more

likely to say their company provides opportunities

for advancement (71 per cent compared

to 47 per cent). Four in 10 workers who don’t

have a mentor say they’ve considered quitting

their job in the past three months.

Sodexo Canada has had a formal leadership-development

mentoring program in

place since 2010. The company spent the last

year consulting its operators and redesigning

and updating the program. As Ariane

Montcalm, director of Human Resources at

Sodexo Canada, explains, the new program

takes advantage of various forms of learning,

such as peer-to-peer and project-based. It will

consist of group-based mentoring with one

coach per three or four learners. Participants

will be supported by various modes of learning,

including group discussions, an online

curriculum, an on-the-job project and a series

of live and virtual learning events.

In the past, Sodexo Canada’s mentoring

programs have helped employees develop

skills, grow their relationship-building abilities

and develop a sharper understanding of

their own development path, says Montcalm.

In turn, mentoring allows the company to

develop its future leaders.

“Mentoring is a powerful form of learning

that can grow our emerging leaders,”

says Montcalm. “They can develop critical

and strategic-thinking skills, which are often

more challenging to develop than through

traditional learning modes. We’ve seen many

of our employees’ careers launched following

their participation in mentoring programs.”

For foodservice operators that want to start

a mentoring program or improve their existing

one, Montcalm offers a few tips. First, be

clear on your goals and the constraints you

have to work within. Then find the right balance

of structure and flexibility. That way, the

experience can be customized to each learner,

while still achieving desired business goals.

Finally, secure resources and leadership support

to ensure the program is successfully

managed. “A lot of work happens behind the

scenes of a successful mentoring program,”

says Montcalm. FH

iSTOCK.COM/WILDPIXEL

14 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


TOP 30 PROFILE

DANIELA

ALHANOVA

Assistant Food & Beverage Manager,

Club Lounge, Sheraton Centre Toronto

Story by Shelby O’Connor

“Along with her undeniable

talent, Daniela is always

an absolute joy to work

with. She’s a true team

player and always

manages to foster positive

discussions and bring

the best out of other

associates and leaders”

— MARCOS YU, DIRECTOR OF ROOMS,

THE SHERATON CENTRE TORONTO

Daniela Alhanova’s

passion for hospitality

began on her family

trips to Marmaris,

Turkey when she was

a child. As a regular

at the Marmaris Park

hotel, she came to

admire the property’s

general manager and

aspired to become a

GM herself one day.

When Alhanova

was 14 years old, she moved with her family from

the Kyrgyzstan Republic (Kyrgyzstan) to Canada

to escape the aftermath of the Tulip Revolution.

Uncertain about her future, she attended a university

fair and discovered Ryerson University’s

Hospitality and Tourism Management program.

Remembering her hospitality aspirations as a

child, she joined the program in 2010.

While at Ryerson, Alhanova thrived, winning

many awards and certificates for her efforts,

including first and third place with her teams

at two separate HTMSA Tourism Case Study

Competitions. She also applied to Ryerson’s

exchange program and was accepted for a semester

at Helsinki, Finland’s Haaga Helia University

of Applied Science to study hospitality and tourism.

There, she got to work and cook alongside

several of Finland’s Top Chef finalists.

After returning to Canada, Alhanova graduated

from Ryerson with a Bachelor of Commerce in

Hospitality and Tourism Management and was

offered a job as a front-desk agent at Sheraton

Centre Toronto.

Wanderlust struck Alhanova again, however,

and she soon moved to Hong Kong to work as a

management trainee at the Kempinski Hotel. In

just two years, she helped implement several new

programs and events and was promoted to assistant

Guest-Relations manager and then Guest-

Relations manager.

Utilizing everything she learned from her experiences

abroad and in Canada, Alhanova returned

to the Sheraton Centre Toronto to take the reins

as the assistant Food-and-Beverage manager for

the hotel’s club lounge. There, she works closely

with her team to improve the food-and-beverage

menu while looking for future opportunities to

showcase her passion for the industry. FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 15


FOOD FILE

GLOBALLY INSPIRED MENUS MEET DEMANDS OF WELL-TRAVELLED DINERS

Story by Janine Kennedy

Unique, bold, authentic

— these words surface

repeatedly when discussing

globally inspired

cuisine in Canada.

Changes to how chefs

present global cuisines

are underway, due

largely to the demand

for unique menu items

that tell a story. While

Canadian consumers are

generally well travelled

and educated on global

flavours, each individual

has their own idea of

what makes an international

dish authentic. It’s

up to foodservice operators

to provide a multifaceted

guest experience

to meet these

growing expectations.

16 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


Recent research from Chicago-based Technomic shows 62 per

cent of diners are eating globally inspired cuisine at least once

a month and demand is largely driven by younger diners.

“Younger generations are generally driving demand for innovation,

including global cuisines,” Anne Mills, senior manager of

Consumer Insights at Technomic explains. “They’re more diverse

and have had greater exposure to different cuisines from a younger

age — thanks to the Internet — so they’re more open to trying

new foods and flavours.”

Ethics have become an important consideration when discussing

globally inspired cuisine and many industry experts say

we need to refer to it differently in a country as multicultural as

Canada. Many within the industry are also concerned with issues

surrounding cultural appropriation. Jo-Ann McArthur, president

of Nourish Food Marketing in Toronto, says an entire generation

of Canadians now exist who have never known anything other

than multicultural restaurant offerings.

“We aren’t using the term “ethnic” anymore — especially not

in Toronto, where Generation Z has grown up with these types

of international cuisines as staples in their lives,” she explains.

“They’re just multi-cultural food offerings — a true reflection of

Toronto as a city.”

For those living outside Toronto, ethnic backgrounds vary

considerably throughout Canada (First-Nations groups being

considered the only true ethnic Canadians). Each ethnicity represented

within Canada, as well as the distinct geography of each

area, influences the food culture of that region.

“What we’re seeing now [in globally inspired food trends] is

more regional cuisine,” McArthur continues. “People don’t want

‘Asian’ food anymore; they want to know what they eat in Taiwan.

They’re going out for Vietnamese or Filipino food. There’s no

blanket terminology anymore.”

Arlene Stein, founder and executive director of Toronto’s

Terroir Symposium, agrees the terminology needs to change

around this cuisine.

“Language is powerful and important in the way we

frame things,” she says. “People are questioning why the differentiation

of ‘ethnic’ to equate non-Western cuisines? By what

we have learned and researched over the years, ‘ethnic’ is a racist

term. By clinging to these [differentiations] we’re ignoring the

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 17


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FOOD FILE

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KEEPING THINGS SPICY

Choosing the right spices for your global-inspired menus is

essential. Spices are the make-up for any global cuisine; the

right combination of aromatic anise with black pepper, for

instance, will deepen the flavour of a Chinese-inspired pork belly

while a bright combination of chili, cumin and oregano adds that

unique, smoky touch to authentic Mexican-inspired fare.

Juriaan Snellen, executive corporate chef for McCormick

Canada, says globally inspired flavours are on the rise, largely in

part to adventurous Canadians exploring the globe. But instead

of enjoying foods from generalized areas of the world, Canadian

diners are now looking for more regional, unique food experiences.

For example, a Szechuan-inspired hot pot meal, or Dim Sum

from Hong Kong, are replacing the all-encompassing Chinese

restaurant of yesteryear. Snellen says diners are ready for more

adventurous meals across all foodservice segments.

“Consumers are more open to experience authentic globallyinspired

food,” he explains. “There is a focus on Japanese cuisine

[right now] — beyond sushi, like traditional Izakaya-style restaurants

where diners can have a variety of small plates all with

distinct tastes, textures and flavours.”

Here are some spice blends that add plenty of unique flavour

without adding extra prep to menu items.

Club House Tandoori Masala The best blend for

making Indian-inspired meat or fish rubs, or mix with

melted ghee (clarified butter) and garlic to brush

on freshly-made naan.

Lawry’s Asian Ginger, Garlic and Chile Rub

Think the perfect Chinese-inspired pulled-pork steam

bun, wok-fried prawns or dry-rubbed, grilled squid.

This spice blend transcends regions and food types.

Grill Mates Mojito Lime Seasoning Blend

Make the perfect grilled-fish taco or pork carnitas

with this zesty seasoning blend.

beautiful multiculturalism we enjoy in Canada.”

With Technomic research indicating 36 per cent of Americans

would like to explore regional varieties of mainstream global cuisines

to try new foods and flavours, going hyper-regional with menu items

is a safe bet — if you can do it authentically.

“It’s not just dinner Canadian diners are interested in now, either,”

McArthur adds. “People want to know ‘what do they eat for breakfast,

or dessert, in other countries?’ As a result, meal offerings are

changing with this idea of regionality.”

Restaurants such as Toronto’s Maha’s Egyptian Brunch are driving

innovation in this area. At Maha’s, you can dine on Egyptian breakfast

staples, such as the Cairo Classic (fava bean foole with sliced

boiled egg, falafel, tomato, feta, charred balady bread and salata balady,

$16) or Egga, a savoury omelette, packed with fresh herbs ($15).

In Montreal, at Kaza Maza Restaurant, Fadi Sakr has been serving

up authentic and regionally influenced Lebanese and Syrian foods

for the past decade.

“We’re now celebrating our 10th anniversary,” Sakr says. “When

we first opened, it didn’t take us long to start getting busy. About a

month after we opened, we received a good review in the [Montreal]

GLOBAL FLAVOURS Roast rabbit (above left) and paneer cakes

from Vikram Vij; a selection of Middle-Eastern dips from

Kaza Maza (below)

Gazette. About two weeks later, we were in another paper. It started

picking up from there.”

Sakr credits the regional approach as one of the reasons it’s

become one of Montreal’s most-popular Middle-Eastern restaurants

with its Aleppo-specific menu options, such as Kefta Karaz ($20),

which combines minced lamb with spices, walnuts and pistachios

before cooking. The dish is then garnished with a sour-cherry sauce.

“This [type of kefta] is not typical of the general Syrian and

Lebanese region,” he explains. “This is more of an Armenian specialty;

it shows the Armenian influence on the region of Aleppo. Our

idea was to bring something new [to the city]. Montrealers are familiar

with Lebanese cuisine — there are a lot of fast-food restaurants

here, but that’s not our style of cooking.”

In recent years, Syrian food offerings have been on the rise

throughout Canada with the influx of refugees being welcomed to

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 19


FOOD FILE

TASTES OF THE WORLD Middle-Eastern dishes, such as Kefta Karaz

(above right) have put Montreal’s Kaza Maza on the culinary map

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both rural and urban areas. Newcomers to Canada have started food

businesses that have further enriched their regions’ food culture and

contributed to the nation-wide demand for authentic menu items.

Plant-based and flexitarian lifestyles are becoming increasingly

popular among Canadian consumers and globally inspired foodservice

offerings are a natural way to help meet this demand. Spiceheavy,

texturally diverse menu items inspired by the Middle East,

India, Latin America or Southeast Asia pack vegan and vegetarian

dishes with flavour and protein.

“We do get a lot of vegetarian guests and have a lot of vegetarian

options on our menu,” Sakr continues. “Half of our menu is vegetarian.

We didn’t

have to invent

any new dishes;

this is what

we’re eating back

home — classic

recipes.”

Traditionally,

globally inspired

foodservice

options such as

Thai, Chinese or

Indian cuisines

have been limited

to QSR’s,

takeout and

casual eateries,

but 25 years ago,

Indian-born

and Europeantrained

chef

Vikram Vij —

together with

his partner

Meeru Dhalwala

INSPIRED TASTES Indian-inspired pork

tenderloin dish from Vikram Vij

— challenged that idea by opening Vij’s Restaurant in Vancouver.

They started a trend that combines high-end, classical technique

with authentic food traditions; serving dishes such as classic Lamb

Popsicles (marinated in wine and served with fenugreek-cream

curry; $11 each) and sablefish in tomato, yogurt and garam-masala

broth ($32.50).

“I studied in Austria, so you have to look at it from a different

approach: a young boy who’s a French-trained chef, who felt

his cuisine was not being represented properly,” he explains. “Even

though Indian food is as complex as any cuisine in the world — it

was always represented as cheap, all-you-can-eat buffets. I wanted my

cuisine to receive the same love and respect as any other [high-end]

cuisine in Canada.”

According to Vij, a shift has occurred in the way people want to

enjoy globally inspired foods in Canada. Technological advancements

within foodservice have made ordering a meal for delivery an easy

task and has ultimately affected the way Canadians are dining out.

“If you have a 110-seat Indian restaurant [in Canada], you’ll

struggle,” he says. “More diners are choosing larger, mid-range chains

that offer a variety of globally inspired dishes than smaller, independent

restaurants serving a specific type of cuisine. You’re better off

opening a 45-seat restaurant and having to turn people away.”

In addition to Vij’s Restaurant, Vij and Dhalwala own and operate

Vij’s Rangoli and My Shanti (both in Vancouver) and Vij’s Sutra,

located in Victoria. Vij has recently expanded his business to

supply other segments of foodservice. These offerings include a

variety of quality Indian-inspired flash-frozen meals suitable for

large-scale catering, which are sold in bulk (including several

vegetarian options).

Kendale_QV.indd 1

2018-05-15 3:37 PM

20 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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FOOD FILE

TRENDING TASTES

Green curry

congee made

with McCormick

spice blends

At McCormick Canada, adaptable variations of globally inspired

dishes are the name of the game when it comes to modern menu

design. Curries are found all over the world, but going with lesserknown

recipes, such as its Mozambique Chicken and Shrimp Curry

(made with coconut milk, tomatoes, cinnamon and a range of Club

House spice blends) will pique the curiosity of diners and add a

fresh punch of flavour to an otherwise common restaurant dish.

Executive corporate chef Juriaan Snellen says using the right

spice blend in menu items can balance out the amount of salt or

sugar that might otherwise be added to boost the flavour of a dish.

“Spice blends are a great and easy way to infuse global flavours

into any recipe,” he says. “Today’s consumers are demanding more

flavour, but still expect salt and sugar levels [in menu items] to

be low.”

Snellen suggests bulking up the flavour of soup broths with deep

spices or adding a dash of garam masala to shortbread-cookie

dough to transform a classic comfort snack into a South Asianinspired

treat.

According to Toronto-based chef, food writer, educator and

activist Joshna Maharaj, we shouldn’t be afraid to let our Canadian

multiculturalism shine. While authenticity and avoiding cultural

appropriation is important, these things shouldn’t discourage

operators from incorporating more global flavour into their menu

items.

“A great way to understand this [globally inspired food] trend is

menus are starting to reflect the cultural diversity that exists among

Canadians,” she says. “There’s an opportunity for chefs and restaurateurs

to open up and connect to their communities by investing

in diversifying their menus. This is less about chasing one specific

cultural dish and more about embracing a more accurate idea of

who Canadians are.”

Stein agrees. “How do we define ourselves in Canada? The reality

is, we’re the second-largest country in the world, with many

different people who have brought culinary traditions to our landscape.

Sticking with one national food identity is a detriment — it

holds us back from respecting and valuing all of the things that go

into regional food systems.” FH


ADVERTORIAL

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SERIES

A Year in Niagara:

SUMMER

STORY BY BRUCE MCADAMS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF KIRK

In the third instalment of our fourpart

series on The Restaurant at

Pearl Morissette, we examine how

the culinary team addresses the

challenge of accommodating guests’

dietary restrictions without compromising

the quality of the menu

Chef Daniel Hadida leads the

kitchen at The Restaurant at Pearl

Morissette; (inset) Bruce McAdams

in conversation with chef Hadida

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 25


When I arrive at The Restaurant

at Pearl Morissette, it’s midafternoon

and the staff are

as welcoming as ever, but it’s

been a long and busy summer

and it shows. I spend time catching up with

chef Eric Robertson, who informs me they’re short

a few bodies in the kitchen. A turned ankle during

a lunchtime soccer game, knee surgery for another

staff member and they’re down two cooks. “The

guests don’t notice any difference, but we work a

little harder to get a 10-course tasting menu out.”

Maitre d’ Roisin Fagin comes over to say hello

as I wait to speak to chef Daniel Hadida. I ask

Fagin if she saw the last story I’d written about

the restaurant. I’m pleased to hear she’d seen

and enjoyed it but, she points out that I referred

to their patrons as customers — something they

never do. Fagin says they refer to people who dine

with them as guests. This exchange cements what

I’ve come to know about this restaurant — leadership’s

commitment to the guest experience is

not just rhetoric, it’s something that starts at the

top. If it didn’t, the kind of ‘escapism’ the team is

trying to provide would not be possible.

ONE WITH NATURE The idyllic view from the restaurant’s dining room

26 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


SERIES

There are several items I want to cover for this

instalment of this series, including the increasing

challenge of dealing with dietary restrictions and

Hadida’s thoughts on the state of the restaurant

industry. Although he’s trying to change the current

restaurant model, Hadida recently said he

feels the industry is making progress and I ask

him to explain his thinking.

When it comes to dietary-restriction requests

from guests, Hadida and Robertson admit they

gave the issue huge consideration when they were

opening the restaurant. They considered saying

no and even charging more. In the end, they

committed to accommodating any requests, as

it aligned with their goal of providing a luxury

experience. “Our decision is validated by the great feedback

from guests who are touched by the effort,” says Robertson.

Hadida adds he hasn’t wasted a moment second-guessing the

decision; it doesn’t make him happy, but he’s grateful.

When asked about the process they use to make this happen,

the chefs produce a reservation sheet for the upcoming week,

which shows approximately one-quarter of the 240 guests they

will serve have some form of dietary restrictions. There are

vegans, pescatarians, guests on gluten-free diets and those with

allergies to mangos and cinnamon.

In order to deliver the high level

of cuisine they’re committed to,

Robertson says the team looked

for ways to make handling these

requests less of a burden. Given it’s

a reservation-based restaurant that

books months in advance, it’s able

to receive information from guests

ahead of time. When I’ve made

online reservations at the restaurant,

I’ve been prompted by Tock

(the online reservation system) to provide any dietary restrictions

my party may have. Fagin or another member of the service

team follow up by phone a week in advance of a reservation

to ensure they have all necessary information.

The chefs recommend I attend the restaurant’s weekly

LEADING BY EXAMPLE

Chefs Eric Robertson

and Daniel Hadida

facilitate the team’s

weekly meeting

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 27


SLUG HERE

28 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


SERIES

menu meeting to get a better understanding of

the efforts required to deliver on this promise. I

arrive just as the meeting is getting under way.

All managers and employees are present, including

the farm team and forager, who have had a

particularly busy year as the restaurant has more

than doubled the size of its gardens as well as

adding a greenhouse on site. The first 20 minutes

are taken up with what Hadida refers to as a

weekly check-in. Everyone takes a turn sharing

what they’ve done on Monday and Tuesday, the

days the restaurant is closed and everyone has off.

There’s a comfortable feeling around the table, as

well as a sense of equity among all.

Once the catch up is complete, the team moves

on to the business of the menu. Robertson shares

the details of the 10-course tasting menu ($96)

they’ll be preparing for the week. One dish that

catches my attention features sweet corn with

sea urchin and black-bean miso finished with a

plant grown in the garden called ‘rabbit tobacco.’

When crushed, this plant gives off the scent of

maple syrup. Notes are taken by staff and questions

asked before moving on to how to handle

this weeks’ dietary restrictions. The team has prepared

an “allergy sheet” for the week that’s broken

down by each service.

Robertson starts his review with Thursday

dinner service, which includes 40 reservations.

The allergy sheet shows 12 of these guests have

some form of dietary restriction. The team goes

through every plate that will be affected by these

requests and, while some substitutions are obvious,

others take several

team members’ input to

come up with an appropriate

alternative.

The next part of the

meeting involves the

restaurant’s forager and

farm team, who provide

an update on what

they’ve been working on.

Summer is a slow time

for foraging, but there’s

been lots of work in the

gardens — including

harvesting a variety of

melons and squash and

planning and planting

beds for the upcoming

seasons. During the farm update, I’m shocked to hear the farm

team make the group aware they’ve planted some lettuce and

arugula specifically for staff meals and it will be ready in the

upcoming week. Though I’m aware of Hadida’s belief that staff

meals provide an opportunity for the front and back of houses

to get together in a transaction-free environment, I had no idea

they were growing specific foods for these meals.

SHAKE,

SAUCE

GEARING UP The team

meets to discuss

each week’s menu

and address any

dietary restrictions

that need to be

accommodated

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OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 29


SERIES

After the meeting, I sit down with Hadida for

a broader industry discussion. Despite his belief

that the current restaurant model is broken, he’s

positive about the progress made in the last 10

years. He believes the restaurant industry is in

a transitionary period. “I was fed that passion

bullshit for a long time; I was institutionalized,”

he says of a business model that was old, tired,

and hadn’t changed in years. When asked what’s

changed, he compares the industry to “a piece

of kitchen equipment you move and see that it’s

dirty underneath. In the past, the industry has not

addressed the dirt, we’ve just put the equipment

back — we’re now addressing that dirt.”

It’s a Friday night and time for me to enjoy The Restaurant at

Pearl Morissette as a guest. My companions — one of whom is

vegetarian — and I arrive and after a warm greeting, are shown

to our table. Wine orders are taken and we have the menu

explained by one of the servers. My friend comments that the

term ‘vegetarian’ was never used when it was explained she’ll be

enjoying a menu with a few different ingredients. In all, four

of the 10 courses come out prepared slightly differently for my

guest, including a dish prepared with wild mushrooms in place

of fish. At the end of the meal, each of us is presented a printed

copy of the menu we enjoyed to take home. We’re all left speechless

when we see that my vegetarian friend’s menu featured the

exact dishes she had enjoyed that evening. We expected her

menu would read like ours, but the team had taken the time to

personalize a version of the menu just for her.

A life-long vegetarian, my friend says she’s never had a

dining experience with a set menu where she’s not felt that she

was being ‘accommodated for’ or even made to feel a burden.

Upon leaving the restaurant, we thanked Hadida for a magical

experience. My friend told him how special she was made to feel

by the restaurant’s seamless accommodation of her vegetarianism.

A smile crosses the chef’s face as he receives the praise

for his team’s effort. At least for this moment, I’m certain he’s

pleased he decided to face the challenge of dietary restrictions

head-on. FH

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SUPPLIER PROFILE

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOCUS

STEEPED

IN HISTORY

Fresh off a rebranding, Garland/Welbilt still tops the

Canadian foodservice-equipment supplier landscape

By Laura Pratt

When it comes to the longstanding foodservice-equipment supplier

Garland/Welbilt, Brian Earle, manager of National Operations

for McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada, is emphatic in his recommendation.

“Garland/Welbilt is one of [our] best suppliers,”

he says. Full stop. You bet, agrees Paulo Ferreira, senior director,

Design and Construction, at Recipe Unlimited Corporation,

Canada’s oldest and largest full-service restaurant company, which

has completed several innovation projects and rollouts with

Garland/Welbilt — “a very strong organization and one of the best

companies in the foodservice business.”

iSTOCK.COM/FEELPIC

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 31


It’s a common refrain among

customers of this, the world’s

largest equipment supplier

to restaurant chains. Freshly

renamed but steeped in history,

Garland/Welbilt services

all aspects of foodservice. But

chains are the biggest piece, says

Jeff McMullen, vice-president of

Sales for Canada, because they

tend to be the most forwardthinking.

Garland’s history in Canada

is a complicated one that dates back to

1929, when brothers Henry and Alexander

Hirsch established the Welbilt Stove

Company. But Garland stoves have been

around since the late 1800s, when they

were the beloved output of the Michigan

Stove Company. Today, these wood- and

coal-burning cast-iron parlour and potbellied

antiques are the darlings of the

collector set.

Welbilt acquired the Detroit-based

company in 1955 and the next 60 years

were spent adding brands to the portfolio

and shifting ownership. Manitowoc took

over the company in 2008, but eight years

later spun off Manitowoc Foodservice.

NAME GAME Welbilt is commonly known

to most as Garland due to the popularity

and history of its flagship range brand

Keen to find a name representative of

all the brands in its collection (11 in all:

Kolpak, Merrychef, Manitowoc, Multiplex,

Cleveland, Convotherm, Delfield,

Frymaster, Garland, Lincoln and Merco),

the company approached the Hirsch family

to see if the rights to Welbilt were still

available. They were, and in 2017, the

company returned to its roots and once

again became Welbilt.

“There was confusion in the market,”

says McMullen, of the evolution. “People

couldn’t associate all our brands with the

Manitowoc name. We [wanted] a name

that would resonate as a top-quality brand

that can supply everything for

the kitchen.”

In another identity twist, Welbilt is

actually known to most as Garland, thanks

to the strength of its flagship range brand

and the history in its rear-view. In 1952,

Russell Prowe brought the range part of

the business to Toronto and started building

units in his garage. Getting to the

point where Canadians know Welbilt as

the umbrella brand, McMullen says, will

be a matter of time, education and effort.

A rose by any name, Garland/Welbilt

is an industry leader in technology and

innovation and the last 20 years has seen

great advancement on this landscape,

including a surge of digital and electronic

novelty. Welbilt was the first to build a

two-sided grill, for McDonald’s, and offers

equipment that can cook food 10-times

faster than anything else — without

compromising quality. Welbilt’s Garland

Xpress Grill’s touch-screen control means

all the operator has to do is drop a hamburger

patty onto the grill and push a button.

The robotic plate cooks both sides of

the burger at once and is more than twice

as fast as traditional grill methods.

The company, which also has a partsand-service

arm, KitchenCare, and a kitchen-design

arm, fitKitchen, prides itself on

understanding the customer’s operation,

challenges, capacities and needs. Its range

of brands means Garland/Welbilt can offer

solutions others can’t. “A customer might

say they need to buy a combi oven, but

we might assess their needs and say they

should have a convection oven and

a steamer instead and here’s why,”

says McMullen.

Labour challenges, including both its

industry paucity and skill shortages, have

spawned equipment that’s simple and

intuitive, with touchscreens and the ability

to standardize recipes. The younger

customer has also made its mark, inspiring

the emergence of foodservice that facilitates

the trend of eating on demand. “It’s

about instantaneous food — and equip-

SAM MISURACA [HISTORICAL GARLAND STOVE IMAGE], GRACE GROGAN [GIANT GARLAND STOVE IN MICHIGAN]

32 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Garland/

Welbit boasts a collection of 11 brands,

which offer products for all aspects of

a restaurant’s kitchen

ment that lets you cook and transport

it fast without conceding quality,” says

McMullen.

But the most robust part of Garland’s

current business is accelerated cooking

that employs multiple technologies, such

as its Merrychef oven, which uses convection,

microwave and air impingement.

Beverages are also on the climb, including

frozen drinks and specialty coffees.

Welbilt’s Multiplex brand offers a range of

cooling and beverage-dispensing systems

that feature technology aimed at reducing

waste and labour while maximizing productivity

and profits.

The call to hold food that stays yummy

has inspired another burst of innovation.

Clever Merco warming cabinets keep

food hot, fresh and ready to serve and

free up the broiler for lunchtime demand

by maintaining the quality of nosh prepared

earlier in the day. Such technology

is meaningful to kitchen logistics, too, for

the proximity of the cabinetry to its cooking

cohorts.

“When you make the chicken Caesar

salad, the chicken’s right there,” says

McMullen. “So often people cross paths

and bump into each other. We try to eliminate

those spaghetti drawings by looking

at everything, even the logistics of human

movement in the kitchen.”

McMullen counts an industry trend

toward consolidation — not only within

manufacturers, but customers and dealers,

too — as its most significant business

challenge. Multiple business practices

mean it’s hard to stay current on players

and acquisitions. An abundance of competition,

says McMullen, keeps everyone on

their toes. And it’s a challenge to get restaurateurs

to think about the future, and

to buy for not just today, but tomorrow.

“Making sure they understand how technology

can benefit them and save them

money is what we do. It’s our mission to

help people understand why they should

take that leap.”

Garland/Welbilt is just shy of a US$2-

billion company, globally, with 17 manufacturing

facilities — two in Ontario,

where Garland, Lincoln and Cleveland

products are manufactured. The Floridabased

organization employs approximately

5,400 worldwide, 500 in Canada. Most of

its sales — 73 per cent — are in North and

South America. But, while the U.S. is 10

times the market, it isn’t 10 times the sales.

“We have stronger market share in Canada

than in the U.S.,” says McMullen.

COMING IN

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Up next? Smart kitchens, whose equipment

is connected via Wi-Fi and is sophisticated

enough to monitor temperatures

and maintenance, conduct productioncapacity

overviews and send notifications

of potential operational issues to the service

company. These innovative options have

been around for a while, says McMullen,

but labour shortages and the need for

self-diagnostics have inspired operators to

embrace them more than ever.

For McDonald’s Canada, Garland/

Welbilt’s a “strong, customer-focused

organization,” says Earle, that furnishes a

competitive edge along with quality,

innovative products and impeccable

support that extends to menu development,

operations procedures and quality

improvements. Garland/Welbilt, says

Earle, is a powerful third leg in the threelegged

stool concept Ray Kroc introduced

to describe a well-running company.

“They’ve been strong, leading partners for

our system, our operators and our restaurants,”

raves Earle. FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

Coming Next Month_QV.indd 1

2019-09-17 2:29 PM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 33


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EQUIPMENT OVERVIEW

BEYOND THE STATUS QUO

iSTOCK.COM/DIGTIALSTORM

Consumer trends

are driving equipment

choices across

all segments

By Denise Deveau

Foodservice operators are dealing with a convoluted web of trends — from

technology advancements and labour shortages, to open kitchen designs and

skyrocketing real-estate prices — that are having a marked impact on their

kitchen design and equipment choices. While the basic drivers are consistent

throughout the industry (the need for speed, efficiency and cost savings), each

sector has its own spin on the dilemma.

With real estate at a premium, the push is on to reduce kitchen sizes and

make them more efficient. For larger formats, it can lead to major equipment

changes. QSR operations, on the other hand, have long been proficient at

working within the confines of a small footprint.

“QSRs have always done well fitting in small spaces and are getting even

smaller. Then there’s the growing popularity of ghost kitchens for food delivery,”

says Josh Wolfe, corporate chef and director of Sales with Food Service

Solutions Inc. in Mississauga, Ont. “Ghost kitchens have become a primary

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 35


method to take space in an industrial area that

doesn’t have to be retail driven. As a result,

restaurants can take more of a QSR approach

because you don’t have the burden of frontof-house

costs.”

And, as delivery, takeout and online ordering

gain popularity, Nanci Giovinazzo, principal

at Food Forward Consulting in Toronto,

says her clients are reconsidering how they

plan out their kitchens.

“I’ve got some clients with 30 per cent of

their revenue coming in from takeout,” she

says. “So, [many of them] are adding commissary

areas that are not downtown based and

are a less expensive to build. These commissaries

are able to service the smaller location,

their main kitchen, which then becomes the

finishing kitchen.”

MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK

With the higher cost per square foot, casual

and fine dining are motivated to shrink kitchens

in order to add more revenue-generating

seats, Wolfe says. “But you can’t just reduce

the footprint of the kitchen and generate the

same volume of output doing things the same

way as yesterday. It simply doesn’t work.”

Reducing kitchen size and labour requirements

in back of the house allows operators

to get out front where the revenue streams

are, explains Doug Feltmate, foodservice

and hospitality consultant with Planned

Foodservice Solutions Inc. in Ottawa. “If

you’re paying $35/sq. ft. gross rent for your

space, 15 sq. ft. will cost $525 a year in the

back of house. The same 15 sq. ft. could generate

$1,000 to $15,000 annually in the front

of house.”

The question remains, how do you take a

2,400-sq.-ft. space and achieve the same productivity

and revenue in 1,800-sq.-ft. of space

with fewer staff, he adds. “The equipment

used in your operation with be that determining

factor.”

Equipment basics that can play a key role

in reducing space and labour requirements

are a combi-oven, a blast chiller/freezer and

a vacuum-pack machine, Feltmate says. “The

proper combi can replicate several different

cooking environments and eliminate the need

for several other pieces without sacrificing

food and service quality and times.”

Technology also comes into play on a number

of fronts, Wolfe notes. “Many efficiencies

are technology driven. For example,

self-cleaning appliances, cloud-based connectivity

for remote programming and

maintenance, capacitive touch interfaces and

tablets allow operators to be more effective in

controlling operations. With cloud connectivity

for example, you can videoconference,

conduct training across the country, program

equipment, manage diagnostics and even do

maintenance remotely.”

Self-ordering/self-paying kiosks in QSRs

are proving valuable tools for optimizing

space and reducing the number of cashiers.

“McDonald’s has led the charge in selfordering

and payment kiosks,” Feltmate says.

“Three kiosks will replace two cashiers and

eliminate lineups. A $15,000 to $20,000 initial

investment could save $60,000 to $75,000

annually in labour.”

Switching to a cashless system for any

operation also saves considerable labour at

the end of the shift, allowing for instant server

and management reconciliations

with the POS system without

having to count, balance and do

cash deposits.

The QSR sector is also leaning

a bit more on speed-cooking

technology, Wolfe notes. “They’re

not having to predict how many

[items] they’re going to sell.

Rather, they can heat and crisp

items when they need to without

pre-heating.”

“Even in food-court kiosks,

they may not be cooking but finishing

it in front of customers in a

rapid-cook oven. It adds a level of

quality to the process. To that end,

we’re seeing more attractive rapid-cook

ovens coming into play,

with curved corners and matte

colours, not institutional hunks

of stainless steel,” says Andrew Waddington,

senior consultant with fsSTRATEGY Inc.

in Toronto.

With the growing trend to expanding

menus, multi-purpose equipment is gaining

ground at all levels and driving the need for

multi-purpose systems even more, he adds.

“Even Tim Hortons is doing fries and burgers

now. When menus expand, footprints can’t

match it, so equipment has to do more with

the same space.”

FROM THE

SUPPLY

SIDE

More operations are adding eco-friendly

functions to the equipment mix, Waddington

says. “Most major refrigeration companies are

using more environmentally friendly coolants,

for example. More operators are choosing

high-efficiency hoods and demand-control

exhaust systems. We’re seeing a lot more

focus on ventless technology, rapid-cook

ovens and warewashers that recapture heat

and require less chemicals.”

EQUIPMENT SHOWCASE

Fine dining stands apart in situations where

equipment is often more about branding and

innovation. “Because fine dining pushes innovation

in food, it’s also pushing equipment

innovation,” Wolfe says.

Open-display cooking is becoming an

increasingly popular option. “People always

want to see the kitchen; they want to see the

action,” says Ori Grad, broker at CHI Real

Estate Group in Toronto, which helps restaurateurs

find their ideal space.

“But this means operators need

to have better and cleaner-looking

equipment.”

In fact, for many fine-dining

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ishes and formats to reflect the

of flatware in napkins

at a rate of 500 sets branding and decor, Wolfe notes.

per hour. The Roll-O- “Once you lose the walls, you

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and chopsticks. Not you can take predetermined setups

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only does this piece

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sanitizes each set with [modular] elements like

with a built-in ultraviolet

light as it rolls. spaces or griddles.”

burners, French tops, warming

“When you become a morespecialized

restaurant, the equipment

reflects that,” Waddington says.

Whatever the equipment and technology

choices, operators will need to move outside

their traditional comfort zones, Feltmate says.

“They’re going to have to explore different

ways to do things and dump the traditional

thought process of, ‘well that’s the way we’ve

always done it.’ Good operational planning

and facilities design are needed more than

ever. The solutions are out there...they just

have to be put in place.” FH

36 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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EQUIPMENT TREND REPORT

THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

When the going gets tough, equipment investments get smarter

By Denise Deveau | Illustration by Margaret Moore

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 39


Ask an operator what

drives their equipment

choices and the answers

come as no surprise.

Shrinking margins,

labour shortages and rising costs have

long been underlying concerns for

industry players. To that end, they’re

seeking out equipment that’s easier,

more foolproof and more efficient

than ever.

There are other influencers at

work as well. Plant-based menu items,

the demand for sustainable practices

and the artisanal-cooking movement

play a part in equipment choices.

Then there’s the issue of space.

Many restaurant owners are optimizing

smaller-footprint kitchens

through a number of investments,

from multi-purpose hot and cold

appliances, to prep equipment

that can lighten the storage and

labour burden.

THE PRIORITIES

“Profitability is always the number-1

priority for equipment decisions,”

says Tim Cuff, executive chef at

The Fifteen Group in Vancouver.

“Operators want to make sure investment

delivers a return. At the same

time, the focus is on minimizing the

kitchen as much as possible to free up

square footage for customers.”

Smart choices include self-venting

combi ovens, he says. “RATIONAL

[ovens are] useful tools and can save

tens of thousands of dollars in ventilation.

It also allows you to put an

oven in areas you wouldn’t normally

be able to.”

Combis are more popular than

ever, reports Joel Sisson, president

and founder of Crush Strategy Inc. in

Burlington. “When skilled labour is

difficult to find, everything is focused

on how to deliver consistently good

quality food without as much work

in the kitchen. Combi ovens allow

for a lot of different kinds of cooking

and holding. The best part is, you just

have to set the time and you’re done.”

Longevity also matters and restaurateurs

are spending more on better,

more robust pieces, Sisson adds. “We

had one client exchange their existing

ice machine for a Hoshizaki system

for their bar area that offered better

capacity and recovery.”

Self-cleaning features are also a

strong selling point, Sisson notes.

“People aren’t cleaning as much

or not as willing to do it. You need

equipment to do as much as it can.”

THE INCREDIBLE

SHRINKING KITCHEN

It’s not always about the big stuff.

“Restaurants are looking for ways to

create a lot of food in smaller footprints,

because kitchens are much

smaller than they used to be,” says

Plant-based

menu items,

the demand

for sustainable

practices and

the artisanalcooking

movement play

a part in

equipment

choices

iSTOCK.COM/MORRISON1977 [IDEA BULB SKETCH]

40 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


JAM PACKED The vacuum

packer from Italian manufacturer

Orved is perfect for small

restaurants that work with

single servings

you save on labour, production

and storage.”

Vacuum-packaging systems are also

an essential efficiency tool, Heaton

notes. “By shrinking foods in vacuum

packs, we can lay them on top of each

other in a smaller freezer unit than we

would normally use.”

Heaton says there’s also an evergrowing

range of compact appliances

that help clear floor space. “I’ve seen

some incredible dishwashing and

sanitizing machines that have been

shrunk down to fit smaller spaces.

Ventless combi ovens are another

way to save space. We use them

everywhere. [in the kitchen]”

Induction cooktops are not only

cleaner and more efficient, they don’t

take up nearly as much room as a sixburner

gas range and keep the kitchen

cooler, he adds. “The great thing is

they can be sunk into the counter or

moved when you want to. We also use

a lot of under-the-counter refrigeration

and freezer units so they don’t

take up workspace.”

“It’s all about more seats and

“I’ve seen

some

incredible

dishwashing

and

sanitizing

machines

that have

been

shrunk

down to

fit smaller

spaces”

— Ben Heaton,

corporate

executive chef,

ICONINK

Ben Heaton, corporate executive chef

at ICONINK in Toronto.

Rather than massive ovens and

refrigeration systems, a smallerformat

kitchen may be well stocked

with blenders, sous-vide equipment,

vacuum-sealing systems and shrunkdown

appliances.

One effective approach is to produce

as much as you can in batches

beforehand, Heaton explains. “In the

old days you might have had five or

six ranges. Now, with pre-cooked

techniques, you might only have one.

There’s also less guesswork in cooking

when you can get food ready ahead

of time. It helps simplify the size of

the space and the number of people

you need.”

High-powered blenders and food

processors are counted among his

kitchen mainstays. “Rather than using

large ice-cream-churning machines

for gelato, we use smaller Pacojet

blenders and freeze portions that can

be blended to order. Thermomix is

heavily used for sauce work because

it blends and heats up. You can throw

dry or wet food in and bring it to the

temperature you want. It’s a lot more

expensive than a bowl and whisk, but

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 41


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making kitchens as efficient as possible,”

says Andy Slinn, executive

chef, Joseph Richard Group (JRG) in

Surrey, B.C.

RATIONAL combi ovens play a

big role in JRG’s operations, he says.

“They’re great time and space savers

because they can do so many things

at once and you can program them

using a memory stick. We can use

the steaming feature for our Asianconcept

restaurants, for example, and

eliminate the need for rice cookers.”

For prep work, JRG uses Vitamix

blenders and Robot Coupe mixers.

“They’re super easy and don’t

break down.”

Rather than separate walk-in

coolers and fridges, he prefers spacesaving

combination refrigerator/freezers.

“We use True a lot because of the

service and warranties.”

And, rather than grills, Slinn has

transitioned to flat-top griddles from

Southbend. “They’re fantastic. You

can have a three-foot-long system

running three different temperatures

at the same time. I can cook eggs on

one at 200° and hamburgers on the

other at 400° — you can’t do that

with a grill.”

THE PACKAGING

REVOLUTION

With worldwide concern over waste

and single-use plastics, sustainable

packaging is becoming an increasingly

important focus.

“Sustainable packaging is huge

with the millennial market especially,”

Cuff says. “More people are looking

at that.”

Sisson says the focus on sustainable

packaging is becoming a major issue

for restaurants and consumers alike.

“There’s a big push on making guests

feel their operations are environmentally

friendly. There’s a number of

movements to eco-friendly packaging.

Yes, it comes at a premium but, for

many, it’s an investment they need

to make.”

Canadian restaurateurs are at an

advantage since the population is

on board, says Mark Marinozzi,

vice-president of Marketing for

World Centric in Rohnert Park,

Calif., a producer of compostable

tableware products.

“Canadians have a strong interest

in supporting and doing the

right thing from an environmental

>>> story continues on pg. 46

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Durability is an important consideration

when purchasing any type of foodservice

equipment. All too often, purchasers

focus on the “big picture” and overlook

seemingly unimportant details, such as

the durability and life-expectancy of

hardware and accessories. Like links in a

chain, each part of a kitchen’s equipment

needs to be strong so it can run smoothly.

Mike McGuire, managing partner at Zink

Foodservice in Columbus, Ohio, says

some buyers focus strictly on the cost of

equipment without pausing to “evaluate

how long the parts will last.” He points

to the example of a restaurant that’s

currently under construction. “It’s probably

going to be here for 25 years,” he says.

“The equipment that’s going in there needs

to last most of that time.”

Often, improving equipment durability

comes right down to the hardware. While

many operations professionals examine

every aspect of how a piece of equipment

will work in their restaurant, “the hardware

around the equipment is something they

spend very little time with,” he says,

adding they often forget “the incredible

pounding the equipment takes in a typical

foodservice operation.”

Strength and functionality aside, the

styling and design of the hardware

becomes even more important in an

open kitchen setting, says McGuire.

“People are intrigued by the kitchen. In

open layouts, customers can see how the

kitchen operates and using well-designed,

heavy-duty hardware adds to the overall

aesthetic of the space.”

Creating Long-lasting,

Dependable Hardware

McGuire’s experience in the industry

has taught him to value high-quality,

long-lasting parts: that’s why he trusts

Kason. It’s products are thoughtfully

designed and manufactured with care

and precision in the U.S.A. “Kason has

been a supplier across the entire industry

and is well known for its durability

and reliability,” he says.

This commitment to quality extends to

the OEM products Kason manufactures,

says McGuire. “It works closely with

its customers to develop products that

will help suppliers move to a new level,

to incorporate a new component that

manufacturers are looking for.” Kason

craftsmanship can improve those products,

he says. For example, “Kason developed

some specifi c handles and hinges for

a walk-in cooler that has made a big

difference in how the doors close… how

they’re adjustable,” McGuire says.

“It’s unique, and we use it as a big selling

advantage for our walk-in coolers.”

Of course, a good product is nothing

without good service to back it up, and

McGuire says Kason excels at service.

Its regional warehouses “make it very

handy to get product when customers need

it. Almost nobody I know in this industry

has the distribution network that it has.”

The fact that Kason is a family-owned

business is yet another reason McGuire

trusts it. “They treat us like family and value

us as a partner,” he says. It’s a partnership

that only improves with time, McGuire says,

noting “we rely on them because of the

incredible history that they’ve had and what

they’ve accomplished.”

Craftsmanship is an integral part

of Kason’s manufacturing process.

A Kason 1248 Hinge just after

robotic polishing.

Kason’s family-oriented culture

makes a positive difference in their

product’s quality.

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story continued from pg. 42

THE LAST STRAW Paper straws

from World Centric

and social standpoint. In addition,

restaurants have access to a more

widespread composting infrastructure

than in the U.S.”

A WORLD VIEW

For anyone wanting to keep tabs on

future equipment trends, it helps to

look outside of North America, says

Josh Wolfe, corporate chef with Food

Service Solutions Inc. in Mississauga,

Ont. “Europe has always been at the

forefront of blast chilling and combioven

technology, for example.”

One innovation of note from

Italy is vacuum-packing technology.

“Orved has a marvellous take

on food-processing tools based on

vacuum technology. They’ve figured

out how to use very specific programming

to modify the atmosphere in

the chamber to do way more than

just preserve products,” says Wolfe.

Systems can be used to clean mussels

and clams, marinate and infuse

oils and liquids

within minutes or

hours rather than

days or weeks.

“When combined

with blast chilling

and combi ovens,

it can potentially

touch huge pieces

of an entire operation,”

Wolfe says.

Switzerland’s

Brunner-Anliker is revolutionizing

prep functions with a unique

high-volume fruit-and-vegetable-cutting

machine. “It excels in combining

throughput and speed along with

precision,” Wolfe says. The system can

dice to the precision of a Japanese

knife and improve yield — particularly

for soft products such as strawberries,

tomatoes and bananas.

“It can do this in huge volumes,

which is key for operators,” Wolfe

says. He estimates ROI to be about 10

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years based on labour savings.

Heaton found his favourite kitchen

tool — a stand-up sheeter — when

visiting the Middle East. He uses the

countertop unit for making pita and

flatbread. “You just drop in the dough

and you’re ready to go. I love that piece

of equipment.”

A SCHOLARLY APPROACH

A culinary school is another focal point

for exploring the equipment needs of

today and the future. That’s because

its job is to prepare students for the

industry and where they’ll be working,

says Alison Iannarelli, executive

chef at Centennial College’s School of

Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts

in Toronto. “We show them, realistically,

what they may encounter in their

careers, from large equipment to small.”

When it comes to the hot side of

things, students are introduced to conventional

gas ovens, burners and stoves,

as well as induction cooktops, grills and

barbecues. “We also have RATIONAL

and Garland combi ovens in multiple

sizes for our event centre, labs and restaurant.

We have beautiful deck ovens

and a conveyor rotating oven as well.”

A new addition is a custom-built outdoor

wood-burning oven. “It’s a good

opportunity for us to show students

different ways of cooking without gas,”

Iannarelli explains. “We may also

incorporate a fire pit as more restaurants

are going back to artisanal and

rustic [method].”

Other recent acquisitions include an

industrial-grade spiral mixer and a grain

mill. “Along with the wood-burning

oven, we’ve created a whole new learning

opportunity for students,” she says.

On the cold front, blast chillers are

used in the large-quantity baking lab.

“We have different ice-cream machines

and new walk-in refrigeration systems.”

In recognition of the ever-expanding

plant-based movement, the college’s

appliance inventory includes Pacojets

and Vitamix blenders, spiralizers and a

Ruby Juicer 2000. “Utilizing fruit and

vegetables in different ways is becoming

more popular,” Iannarelli adds.

THE ART OF IT ALL

Beyond the size, space and cost savings,

a growing number of restaurants

are going the artisanal route. “That’s a

big thing,” Cuff says. “If it’s pizza, a lot

are going back to wood. Tandoor ovens

and rotisserie equipment are big as

well. Charcuterie has been growing in

popularity in the last 10 years. It’s really

exploded, so we’re seeing a lot of interest

in dry-aging and curing cabinets and

other specialty equipment.”

Another trend affecting choice is

the move to open-kitchen and cheftable

venues, he adds. “They provide

that Instagrammable moment for restaurants.

Equipment elements are being

incorporated into the aesthetic of

the restaurant in ways we’ve never

seen before.” FH

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EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY

TABLETOP TECH

Improving efficiency

with tableside and

tabletop tablets

By Shelby O’Connor

iSTOCK.COM/DJILEDESIGN

Tablets are making the move from a

source of portable entertainment to

an invaluable tech tool for operators.

“Tableside ordering is where

tablets really shine,” says Scott

Waldrum, vice-president of Marketing at

B.C.-based Squirrel Systems, which specializes

in restaurant point-of-sale systems. “Having

your server come over and be able to order

directly from the tablet at the table has a

ton of benefits for guests, as well as the

restaurant.”

The goal of Squirrel Systems’ tablets is

to help elevate guest experiences by making

service more efficient. “When you have

tableside ordering and then runners to bring

the food out, you get more attentive service,”

says Waldrum. “Servers aren’t running back

and forth to put orders in and get food. [It]

changes the operational model of the floor.

Servers are with customers more often and

can handle more tables.”

Servers can also be armed with a wealth

of information to help customers make dining

choices. Tablets can be programmed to

include the ingredients in each dish, wine

pairings, calorie counts, specials and inventory

counts for specific dishes so servers know

exactly what’s available.

Restaurant-management teams also use

tablets to access real-time data and reports to

organize day-to-day operations. “The older

model would have managers in the back

looking at reports, data and managing the

restaurant,” says Waldrum. “If the managers

have tablets, that’s all available to them while

they’re on the floor. [They can look at] average

check sizes, table turns — those are the

metrics they measure for shifts.”

Kitchen automation helps tablets connect

the front and back of house. “When an order

comes through from the server on the tablet

or regular terminal, the automation system

sends different parts of that order to different

stations,” explains Waldrum. “The order

is separated appropriately, depending on how

long it takes to deliver those items, so it all

comes out together.”

For those who want technology to play a

larger part in giving customers control, Presto

offers several tablet solutions, including a

tabletop system called PrestoPrime and Presto

Wearables — a watch-like platform worn on

staffs’ wrists. The wearables can immediately

notify servers when an order is placed by the

customer through the tabletop tablets and

when the kitchen has finished making that

table’s food, leading to quicker and more

attentive service.

The PrestoPrime tabletop device allows

guests to place their own orders. Restaurants

can customize their tablets and choose how

much control their diners have over menu

options. “Our customers can pick how much

[information] is exposed to the customer —

some want the entire menu and some want

a partial menu,” says Rajat Suri, CEO and

founder of Presto.

If customers have dietary restrictions, Suri

says “[the tablets] can be programmed with

dietary information, nutritional information,

calorie counts and can allow [guests] to filter

[menu options] by different diets.”

As guests wait for their orders to be

brought out, they can engage in one of the

many games offered by the tabletop platform.

“We have multi-player trivia so people can

play against real people, in real time, in the

restaurant or across the country,” says Suri.

“We [also] have kids’ games and digital

board games.”

Partnered with the newer Presto Wearables,

the tabletop tablets also immediately notify

managers when a guest is unhappy so they

can quickly resolve issues and generate positive

experiences.

Suri believes guests are happier when they

can control their own experience. “We capture

around 20 times more guest feedback on our

system than any other system out there,” he

says. “The restaurants can use [the information

from the surveys] to drive better performance.

With immediate feedback, if a guest

is unhappy, they can be talked to and rescued

before they leave the restaurant.” FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 49


*Reg. TM McCormick Canada | ®Reg. TM The French’s Food Company LLC. Used under licence.


POURING FOR PROFITS

MIXING

THINGS UP

Sustainability is driving innovation

in Canada’s cocktail category

BY JESSICA HURAS

iSTOCK.COM/MARIANVEJCIK

Cocktail culture in

Canada is on the

rise, with Restaurants

Canada reporting

spirit servings at

casual-dining restaurants

increased from 16 per cent in

2013 to 20 per cent in 2018.

Spirits are in higher demand at

fine-dining restaurants as well,

with additional research showing

spirits now account for 23 per

cent of alcohol servings.

“Cocktails, like the Old

Fashioned, are commonplace

and slide off the tongue for the

average guest now,” says Amber

Bruce, bar manager at the Keefer

Bar in Vancouver. “A restaurant

that used to only have a selection

of imported beers and bigbox

wine brands now needs to

make at least classic cocktails. It’s

become an expectation.”

Health, sustainability and

the locavore movement are driving

forces in many areas of foodservice

and the cocktail world is

no exception. “There’s more focus

on local products,” says Bruce. “A

couple of years ago, we only had

two or three different Canadian

gins and vodkas, but now the

craft-distillery movement is

blowing up.”

In addition to using more

Canadian-made craft spirits,

mixologists are incorporating

local produce. Andrew Keyes,

head bartender at Halifax’s Lot

Six Bar & Restaurant, says his

team sources herbs such as mint

and basil — and unconventional

ingredients such as parsnips —

from local farmer’s markets to

use in cocktails.

Evelyn Chick, bar manager

at Toronto’s PrettyUgly bar, says

bartenders are increasingly

approaching local ingredients

with the mindset of a chef; thinking

about the flavours of a cocktail

the same way a chef might

think about the flavours of a dish.

“In Canada, we have an abundance

of things like cedar, balsam

fir and mushrooms,” says Chick.

“And we can get [items] like

rockweed or sea asparagus from

the east coast — that’s a great

thing that sets Canadian cocktails

apart.”

Bartenders are also becoming

more mindful about waste and

the sustainability of their ingredients.

“It’s being creative with

the use of everything,” says Chick.

“It’s thinking about your ingredients

and allowing for a second or

third use instead of just tossing

it away.”

For example, leftover limes

and lemons are used to make new

ingredients, such as liqueurs and

citrus stocks for other drinks. “I

always like to talk about the life

of a pineapple,” says Chick. “If we

juice the pineapple for service,

we’ll use that pineapple juice to

make a syrup and we ferment the

pineapple husk to make tepache

(a fermented beverage made from

the peel and rind of pineapples).”

The wider availability of

non-alcoholic distillates such as

Seedlip, a popular alcohol-free

spirit developed in the U.K.,

is driving a continued trend

towards low ABV cocktails and

mocktails. “It allows people to go

out and have a few drinks and

not be intoxicated,” says Chick.

“You can also experience more

flavours that way.”

Bruce adds the trend towards

high-end mocktails is more

inclusive for customers who want

to have a drink with their friends

but prefer not to consume

alcohol. “It makes them feel

more at home because they can

blend into the social fabric and

not be called out by their friends,”

says Bruce. FH

MADE

WITH

LOVE

Founded in Montreal in 2009, Made with Love is one of Canada’s biggest mixology competitions. Every year, some of the

country’s best bartenders compete locally, with the winners from each region then going head-to-head to compete for

the national title. “The competitions are always extravagant,” says Florence Doyon-Simon, national event planner for

Made with Love. “We ask bartenders to push their limits in terms of creativity.”

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM

OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 51


CHEF’S CORNER

A CULINARY JOURNEY

Chef Angus An opened his mind to Thai cuisine

and his culinary inspiration changed

STORY BY SHELBY O’CONNOR

After being classically trained at the French Culinary Institute in New

York, Angus An — owner of five popular restaurants in Vancouver —

was skeptical about the opportunity to join chef David Thompson’s

team at his Michelin-star Thai restaurant Nahm, in London.

“I had a very closed-minded notion that Asian food was a more

lacklustre, less formal and spectacular cuisine than French or European cuisine,”

An says. “When I first had the opportunity to work with David, I didn’t know if

I wanted to learn [to cook] Thai food because my experiences with [it] in North

America [weren’t good.]”

But all this changed when An first experienced Thompson’s food. “I realized

how closed-minded and naïve I was, because the food was amazing — full of balance

and layers of robust and sharp flavours.”

Realizing joining Nahm would broaden his culinary horizons, An took advantage

of the opportunity. Ultimately, An believes, his decision saved his career.

When he returned to Canada in 2006, he opened his first restaurant,

Gastropod, in Vancouver. The restaurant specialized in

European food prepared with modern cooking techniques.

“It was very well received when it opened, but

within a couple of years — when the economy was bad

in 2009 — we were forced to either close or rebrand.”

The choice to rebrand was successful, as Maenam —

An’s flagship restaurant — is “still going strong ” 10 years

later. The dishes at Maenam are based on traditional

Thai recipes, which incorporate local, sustainably harvested

ingredients when possible, with a balance of hot,

sour, sweet and salty flavours.

“My [cooking] philosophy is keeping things simple

and doing it well and with integrity,” says the 38-yearold

native of Taiwan. “When I was younger, I was more

interested in techie, modern food, but now understand

food just has to taste good.”

An has opened several other restaurants including

Longtail Kitchen, Fat Mao Noodles, Freebird Chicken

Shack, Sen Pad Thai and, his latest venture, Popina

Canteen — a collaboration with three other local chefs

that opened in summer 2018.

Located on Granville Island

BITS & BITES

FAVOURITE FOOD

MEMORY

Picking lemons in

his grandmother’s

backyard

in California

FAVOURITE

INGREDIENTS

Olive oil, lemons

and anchovies

FAVOURITE

CULINARY

DESTINATION

Thailand, Japan

or Europe

ALTERNATE

CAREER

Architect

and built out of shipping containers,

Popina Canteen is An’s

only project not focused on

southeast-Asian cuisine.

Popina’s menu offerings

include a grass-fed, B.C.-beef

cheeseburger ($12), an organic

white quinoa and kale salad

topped with a Japanese-curry

dressing ($10) and a seafood

tray featuring half a Dungeness

crab or half a lobster, nahmjim-marinated

swimming scallops,

peel-and-eat side-stripe

shrimp, albacore tuna crudo

and mussles escabeche ($45).

“Having a restaurant right

on the water, in shipping containers,

[with] a bit of a patio

[is] quite an amazing concept,”

says An. “We’re very proud and

happy with the result.” FH

52 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY OCTOBER 2019 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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