NZPhotographer Issue 24, October 2019

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ISSUE 24, October 2019

INTERVIEW WITH

PETER LAURENSON

PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE

BY DON MCLEOD

HOW LONG IS “LONG

ENOUGH”?

BY KEN WRIGHT

October 2019 1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 24 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

Did you realise that this edition

marks the 2nd year of New Zealand

Photographer magazine under

the hands of Excio? Time certainly

flies when you're having fun! As we

finalise plans for next year we want

to hear your thoughts on what you

enjoy and which pages you skip (if

any!) so please do take part in our

survey if you haven't already.

This issue is all about photographing

people, with a healthy dose of travel

inspiration and a dash of nature

thrown in too so as to keep the

outdoor-loving introverts happy as

well.

We get to know Peter Laurenson

in our cover interview, finding out

about his love of Khumbu in Nepal

and his passion for climbing and

photographing the people and

places he visits. We welcome Susan

Blick back to the magazine as she

shares her story of photographing

one of the world's last remaining

homogeneous tribes.

Don McLeod shares his experiences as a press photographer and family

photographer to give us some tips on photographing people – The magic

happens when you build a relationship with the person you are photographing,

before pressing the shutter. This is similar to that Parmeet Sahni tells us in her articles,

as she explains how to get people to relax so that you can capture that candid

moment that makes a memory.

Don't worry if photographing people is not your thing, Brendon takes us on a trip

to Milford Sound whilst Ken Wright answers the question 'How long is long enough?'

in regards to long exposure photography. If you're not bursting to try your hand

at portrait shots, you'll be bursting to get down to the nearest beach or waterfall

– Show us what you were inspired to capture by tagging us on social media or

sending us an email.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 24

September 2019

Cover Photo

Final pitch

by Peter Laurenson

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email hello@excio.io

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NZPhotographer


REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He is an avid tramper

who treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio, Ana's

photography journey

started many years ago

with one of the first Kodak

film cameras. She loves

exploring the unseen

macro world and capturing

genuine people's emotions.

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer who

teaches photography

workshops and runs

photography tours. He

is the founder of New

Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2019 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

October 2019

3


CONTENTS

PHOTOGRAPHING ONE OF THE WORLD’S

LAST REMAINING HOMOGENEOUS TRIBES

by Susan Blick

12

PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE

BY DON MCLEOD

6

12

22

26

28

36

52

58

66

72

75

PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE

by Don McLeod

PHOTOGRAPHING ONE OF THE WORLD’S

LAST REMAINING HOMOGENEOUS TRIBES

by Susan Blick

BEHIND THE SHOT WITH GREG ARNOLD

FRESH SHOOTS AUTUMN PEOPLE’S

CHOICE AWARD WINNER: PATRICK SCHNEIDER

#WOMENINPHOTOGRAPHY GETTING TO KNOW

LEANNE SILVER OF ARGENT PHOTOGRAPHY

INTERVIEW WITH PETER LAURENSON

SOAKING UP MILFORD SOUND

by Brendon Gilchrist

MAKING MEMORIES IN THE STUDIO

with Parmeet Sahni

HOW LONG IS “LONG ENOUGH”?

By Ken Wright

“LURKING SYNDROME” IN PHOTOGRAPHY

by Ana Lyubich

BEST READERS SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

6

FRESH SHOOTS AUTUMN

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD

WINNER: PATRICK SCHNEIDER

66

HOW LONG IS “LONG ENOUGH”?

BY KEN WRIGHT

26


1 Day Workshops

Learn how to take full creative control

and capture your own unique images.

Different one day options:

Creative Photography

Long Exposure

Fine Art Printing

2 Day Workshops

Small Group Photography Weekends

Lightroom Processing

Tongariro Landscapes

Kaimai Waterfalls

Cape Palliser

Bay of Plenty Seascapes

and waterfalls

4 Day Masterclass

Be inspired with our master class

workshops, which are designed to be

educational vacations, where you are

immersed in a specific area

of photography.

Long Exposure - Coromandel.

Landscapes - Aoraki, Mt Cook.

Astro - Aoraki, Mt Cook.

Autumn Colours - Wanaka.

Wildlife - Otago Peninsular

Photography Tours

Taking you to the best locations

the country has to offer.

Draw inspiration from capturing

New Zealand’s most iconic

landscapes alongside some of

our more hidden gems.

20 Day: South Island Highlights

20 Day: North Island Highlights

17 Day: Ultimate New Zealand

12 Day: New Zealand Icons

15 Day: New Zealand

Coastal Landscapes

15 Day: North Island Landscapes

7 Day: Wild South Island

7 Day: West Coast Wilderness

7 Day: South Island Beaches

& Bays

7 Day: Volcanic North Island

7 Day: Northland & Bay of Islands

4 Day: Fiordland

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

021 0845 7322


PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE

by Don McLeod

“When you take a photograph of someone, you take a photograph of

their soul” Winna Efendi

Photographing people is exciting and

challenging, as you set out to tell a special story.

Of all forms of photography, photographing

people has been, for me, the most rewarding as well

as at times the most demanding. It has challenged

me to be very mindful of each person’s situation and

to work to develop an understanding relationship

with the person so that I am able to identify

something special about them.

It is that special moment, whether it be love,

concern, power, talent or some other emotion, that

I have strived to capture with my camera.

For many years I had the privilege of photographing

individuals, weddings, children, family activities, press

work and even developed basic x-rays for the local

Medical Centre putting my darkroom skills to use!

With my work as a press photographer I had to

portray events and stories of people within a

community, telling the story through photography

whether that be the horse event, the road accident,

or the production put on by the local drama club.

My community at the time was a medium size town

but as the saying goes “A photograph is worth a

thousand words.” It reiterated the importance of

connecting with people, helping them become

confident in relating their story, controversial or not.

THE CHALLENGE TO CONNECT

The term People/Portraits denotes a challenge, to

share something about a person in a visual format.

The pleasure is threefold for “The photographer”,

“The person”, and “The viewer”.

There may be joy, happiness, sadness but it is a story

you are making and telling.

It matters not what we use to make that visual result,

but rather that we follow a few simple steps:

1. Build a relationship wherever the photograph is

being taken.

2. Take time to visualise what you see or hear before

pressing the button.

CHILD AT BEACH

F6.3 1/1000s, ISO400

3. Seize the split second opportunity. Capture and

make that special shot.

4. Print the special photographs.

PHOTOGRAPHING CHILDREN

People and Portraits is broad in the sense that

we encounter people of all ages, in a variety of

situations. Photographing children is very rewarding

and a good place to start.

Photographs of children do not always need to be

posed, as often they pose naturally for you. Take for

example, this photo of a child at the beach. What

do you see on her face? Can you see that she is

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CHILD ONE

CHILD TWO

CHILD THREE

F5.6 1/30s, FP3 film 125 F4 1/30 FP3 film 125

F5.6 1/60s, FP3 film 125

relaxed and happy, being patient but also telling the

photographer to ‘Get on with it’?!

The above three photographs are typical of

children early evening prior to bedtime. During this

time families take time out to connect with their

children, with a story, or other quiet activity. As a

photographer, it is time to seize an opportunity to

portray another aspect about a child. It may seem

like making a record, but in reality it can be very

special.

When I photographed these children they were

relaxed, quiet and, posed naturally. Any attempt to

pose them could have distracted them from being

themselves. As photographers, we are setting out to

capture that something special about the person,

and while the use of unusual items to adorn the child

happens, it could be seen as missing out on the real

person.

The ‘child one’ photograph was captured using

natural light from a window. Look at the eyes and

the white dot in each eye. This adds a sparkle and

helps lighten up the face when set against a darker

background. Eyes of people often show emotions

and feelings which is exciting to portray.

The ‘child two’ photograph was captured using

natural light as the child sat casually with her special

teddy. It was her moment of quiet before bed. In the

post darkroom chemical processing, a sepia stage

was added as well as a little softening. The darkroom

step doubled the time, but adding sepia in the

computer editing stage is much simpler these days!

The ‘child three’ photograph shows a spontaneous

split second action by big brother, as he decided

to check out the progress of his little sister’s teeth.

Nothing posed, just a spontaneous set of actions

caught on camera. Again it could be seen as a

record shot, but the family still laugh about the

natural action.

Children have that sense of un-predictability, but

also a sense of love and freedom. Many times have

I, as a photographer rather than a Father, had to

photograph an active child having fun around the

garden. What I always found was, as Yousuf Karsh

said, “That small fraction of a second” needed

to capture a special photograph of a child can

bring us back to reality, but we need patience and

understanding to achieve a photograph that brings

joy to the family, and often to the child later in life.

POSED PORTRAITS

It will be noted that my work endeavours to

use natural lighting as my belief is that it gives

authenticity to the photograph. That does not mean

that I don’t use other lighting though, because I do.

The examples I give on the next page are examples

of capturing folk as they are and attempting to find

something special as mentioned earlier.

October 2019 7


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CHINESE MAN

F5.6, 1/30s, ISO125


Chinese Man

This delightful Chinese man was a

rehabilitation hospital patient. I met him

often with my work as a health professional

and was thrilled when he allowed me to

take his photograph. His eyes and facial

expression are how I know him. They capture

my attention every time I look at this

photograph. It is an expression of his wisdom

and love which in reality it was. In a sense, it

is a portrait without anything other than who

and where he was sitting.

Father John

Father John was photographed inside

the Monastery of the Holy Trinity Meteora

in northern Greece on part of a 3 week

vacation with my wife.

We were met by Father John at the entrance

of the 400 metre high monastery (a 95 minute

climb from the town of Meteora along

forested and rocky paths). Even though we

had a language challenge, we understood

each other well. A lot was achieved over

our first Greek coffee with Father John, with

whom we built a special relationship, so

necessary to get the photograph shown.

FATHER JOHN

F5.6, 1/30s, ISO100

The natural lighting captured my attention

immediately. As he walked in, I asked him

to stop, his hands fell into a natural position,

and an expression of warmth came across his

face. One interesting aspect is the fact that

he had lost an eye from cancer, which the

lighting hides. The photograph was taken on

film in natural light. A few months later I was

able to get a print back to him via a fellow

traveller.

Ballerina

This shot of the beautiful ballerina was taken

with my 6x6 Rollei camera on Ilford FP3.

She was visiting our small town in the Bay of

Plenty for a ballet performance and despite

spending the night with us, I only had 10

minutes to capture some photographs using

a single light the next morning.

I had seen during the ballet performance the

evening before that ballerinas have many

emotive poses when dancing. As we talked

that next morning she moved into a few

poses for me, and between us we liked the

one portrayed. The single light helped show

the personality we had got to know about

her. Getting to know a person is so vital and it

was proved again here.

BALLERINA

F5.6, 1/30s, ISO125

October 2019 9


STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

People on the street provide a set

of opportunities to portray people

candidly. This type of photography is

exciting and rewarding though a little

stealth is required at times because the

subject may be unaware of your actions.

The street photographer has to develop

skills in observation and technique. Some

of those techniques require careful

handling. It brings to the fore, the need

to be aware of cultural issues, as not

all situations will be accepting of their

photograph being taken. Saying this,

in all my street photography ventures

I have rarely been turned down if I have

first engaged with the person/people.

I refer back to my earlier comment that

it forces you to develop a relationship.

Panama Boy

Walking through the back streets in

Panama I noticed this young boy all

dressed up in soccer gear walking with

his father. The father indicated soccer

was his son’s dream career and after a

few minutes, the father and boy agreed

that I could take his photograph. The

young boy just naturally reacted so

proudly.

Monk & Child

This photo was taken in Laos. We had

been up early for the alms walk and

were exploring the temples, engaging in

a basic sign language conversation with

a small family. The young monk obviously

belonged to the family. After a short

sign talk asking their permission to take

a photograph, the young Monk sat and

casually put his arm around the young

child, which enabled me to photograph

them both as attached. I love how the

warmth of their relationship came so

naturally.

All of these situations were spotted so to

speak, and with thoughtful engagement

a photographic opportunity was seized.

CONCLUSION

Time immemorial has seen artists /

photographers making “Portraits of

People” I challenge you to leap into

a new way of portraying people by

building relationships before pressing the

shutter.

PANAMA BOY

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F9, 1/80s, ISO500


MONK & CHILD

F4.5, 1/80s, ISO400

October 2019 11


Photographing On

Last Remaining Ho

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e of the World’s

mogeneous Tribes

by Susan Blick

October 2019 13


TSERING

F2.5, 1/640s, ISO100,80mm

+ lume cube & reflector

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Iwas recently in the very North-Western tip

of India, about 7 hours north of Srinagar on

the Kashmir Line of Control in Ladakh, India.

Ladakh sits right in the middle of the World’s

highest mountain range, the Himalayas. It’s

completely inaccessible overland for eight

months of the year, totally cut off from the world

bar infrequent flights.

This isolation has allowed the preservation of

people known as Dropkas in Ladakhi which

means nomad or Turk, not from the modern day

Turkey, but a Kingdom of Turkic or Dardic people

who once ruled the Karakoram in the time of

the Greeks.

The Dropkas (Aryans as we know them in

English) are ethnically, socially, linguistically and

culturally completely different from all of the

other inhabitants surrounding them. They are

the decedents of the men from Alexander the

Great’s army who could travel no more and

were tired, sick or injured. These decedents live

mainly in three small villages in the only fertile

valley in all of Ladakh. They originally migrated

from the Gilgit area of Pakistan, wandering

Westward looking for better hunting grounds

and pastures and eventually stumbled upon

and settled in this valley squashed between the

Indian and Pakistani Line of Control.

I had read a lot about the Aryans before

traveling to the region and I was keen to

document one of the World’s last remaining

homogeneous tribes.

Just getting there is a story in itself, but

photographing them wasn’t as straightforward

as one might expect either. First of all, the

people are hard to find. Their village lies on a

steep cliff face and at an altitude of around

3,500m, it makes it very hard to sniff them out.

Secondly, they seem to slip in and out of their

houses without being seen, camouflaged-well

in their traditional dress and blending with the

forest surrounds and giant granite boulders that

nestle their village. The lane ways are devoid of

people and in the night they tell me Himalayan

wolves and shanko (high-altitude feral dogs)

as big as lions roam the mountains in search of

wildlife and domestic animals.

Add to this, the fact that in the past, Dropkas

believed that cameras could steal your soul, so

most people still aren’t all that keen on being

photographed! Nevertheless, I needed these

photos as I had come so far.

I had hired a fixer to help me organise for the

shoot, a fellow photographer born and bred in

Ladakh who took on the role of translator and

photography assistant. Together we hunted

around for some local women willing to pose

for some photography. These women would

be our main models, but they weren’t models

at all. We needed to spend a lot of time with

them, drinking butter tea, chatting, getting to

know each other before they finally start to

relax enough to be willingly photographed.

Their stories are interesting and added to the

experience, an investment in time and effort.

Tsering was the first lady I found to photograph.

She told me she had lived all her life in this

village and had rarely left it, visiting Leh just

once when she was young. She had no real

interest in the modern world and didn’t want

to join the rest of us on our march into the

complicated realm of modernity. For a moment

I felt envious of her simple life; a sustainable

existence growing barley, apricots, nuts and

cherries sufficed. She had had numerous

children, the actual number lost in translation

as she had also mothered others in those

early years, and a few had died shortly after

childbirth. Nonetheless, she liked her life as it

was. I thoroughly enjoy encounters like this and

I wanted to photograph her with dignity, and

showcase the beauty of the dress she proudly

wore.

At altitude, the light outside is mostly too harsh

for portraiture and inside the houses, it’s pitch

black bar for some small windows so lighting

is a huge issue! I’d traveled here with a Lume

Cube and an improvised reflector, a sheet of tin

foil found en route. Lume Cubes are fantastic

for on the road, but I do recommend having

two. Regardless, I needed to shoot most of the

interior portraits at a very wide aperture, and

needed to crank my iso up to 1250 on occasion

in order to get enough light onto the sensor – a

battle between too much noise and not enough

depth of field!

After running off quite a few shots inside, we

took a break to find a new location as I wanted

some environmental portraits. I didn’t just

want to shoot these people with just a ‘clean

background’ indoors as I think photographing

culturally requires or dictates the necessity to

show something of where the people live, where

they are from, the environment in which they

inhabit.

October 2019 15


A MOMENT TO RELAX

F1.8, 1/640, ISO100, 50mm

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We headed outside and wandered about. The

sun had gone behind some clouds so I was

feeling better about the outside shots now. We

found a nice cliff edge and while we discussed

compositions and posing one of the ladies sat

down and looked incredibly beautiful with soft

light around her. She’d finally relaxed and I turned

to take my shot. Sometimes it’s the moments

between the moments that provide the best

images and I think the photo 'A Moment To Relax'

is still my favourite shot from the few days I spent

in the village.

Next up, I wanted an environmental portrait

of a Dropka man and two women so as to

showcase their traditional dress. Dropkas wear

such elaborate costumes with each piece having

significance beyond aesthetics or practicalities.

Silver and turquoise amulet boxes are worn

around their necks, sometimes filled with the

ashes or fragments of ancestors. The silver reflects

evil away from the body not letting it enter and

turquoise protects from demons and is a poison

detector that was traditionally used to line the rim

of tea cups.

The headdress worn by both men and women

that you see in ‘Telling the Story’(next page) is

called a Ko. The Ko is adorned with flowers both

artificial and real, coins and silver, again for

purposes of protection. Men wear a crimson tunic

called a goucha and women wear a tunic called

a kuntop, loaded with beads, coral, shells, and

silver over which sits a goatskin cape.

I feel that placing your subjects in their ‘natural

environment’ can really help form a story to

support your photography.

The following day we visited a 400-year-old house

with a mud-packed floor and I felt like I had gone

back in time. The woman of the house, Dolma

had never had her photo taken before so I had

to sit with her for some time chatting via my

translator asking all sorts of questions getting to

know her, and even then it was hard to get her to

relax in front of the camera. All she wanted was

for me to photograph her most prized possession,

a copper ladle.

Kitchens are the most important rooms in Ladakhi

houses, some can fit up to 50 people and are

where the family lives, eats and sleeps during

the bitter winter months as they’re the only

rooms with a fire. I sat with her on a filthy, matted

goatskin, and admired her ability to prepare

any sort of meal at all in this rudimentary space.

Photographing here was perhaps the most

difficult of all as it was very dark indeed. Even with

my Lume Cube, a reflector, and some light rays

from a side window I had to up my ISO and to be

honest it still wasn’t sufficient. I hate high ISO so

didn’t want to go any higher than 800. Yes, ideally

a speedlight and a softbox would have worked

well, and in the future I may well travel with one

for my groups, but on the flip side, you do lose

some ambiance when using too much artificial

light.

While I had been photographing Dolma, her

husband had started spinning a prayer wheel

in the back corner of the kitchen. The adjacent

window was now letting in some brighter light and

I noticed the highlights on part of his face. He

looked very photogenic. I chatted to him about

the conversion from animism to Buddhism that

some of the Aryans are going through and this

helped to focus his attention and for him to relax.

Getting to know your subject, spending some time

talking with them, is integral and a nice way to

build rapport before you start pointing a camera

in their direction. Dolma’s husband continued

to spin the prayer wheel and I took a number of

shots attempting to get just enough blur on the

wheel as it spun in order to show movement. The

lighting was beautiful, but still quite contrasty

against the darker side of the room.

Three days later we left the village and headed

back to Leh and I thought to myself how

privileged I had been. I captured a moment in

time that may never be seen again. As remote

tribes like these have more contact with the

outside world it will undoubtedly impact their

culture. It’s quite a dilemma in fact, as the act of

recording culture also aids in its demise.

While there I looked hard at them and thought

how unconnected and unchanged they were,

but in actual fact, change has come, is coming

and will continue to come. When you have the

opportunity to do something like this you feel

humbled but also curious for more. In order to

complete this chapter in my own photographic

exploration I plan to visit their original home in

Gilgit, Pakistan in the not too distant future.

www.instagram.com/phomadic

www.susanblick.com

www.facebook.com/susanblickphoto

albums.excio.io/profile/Susan Blick Photography

October 2019 17


TELLING THE STORY

F2.5, 1/640, ISO100, 50mm + reflector

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October 2019 19


DOLMA’S LADLE

Dolma proudly holds her ladle for me to

photograph.

F2.0, 1/100s, ISO640, 50mm

THE LADAKHI KITCHEN

Dolma shows me where she spends most of her

day, in front of the stove

F2.0, 1/125s, ISO800, 50mm + lume cube & reflector

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A CANDID MOMENT

Dolma’s husband having a good

laugh as he makes a humorous

comment at my expense.

F2.8, 1/160s, ISO1250, 70mm

October 2019 21


Behind The Shot with Greg Arnold

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THE BEAUTIFUL TRAVELLERS

F5.6, 1/1000s, ISO640


GREG, TELL US THE BACKGROUND OF HOW

THIS PHOTO CAME TO BE!

A group of us were travelling as the guests of Prof.

Guan Kaiyun (deputy director of the Xinjiang Institute

of Ecology and Geography, part of the Chinese

Academy of Sciences) through the North West of

Xinjiang Provence, generally in the area of the historic

Silk Road.

We were being shown a number of the outreach

projects of the Institute, including the planting and

irrigation of sand retention shelter that measured 100m

wide (both sides) on a 450km motorway running right

through the Taklamakan desert.

Plants had to be chosen that could handle the

extreme conditions plus irrigation with subterranean

salt water and pumping stations needed to

established every 5–10km. Getting all this done within

an almost impossible time frame, was an extraordinary

feat!

SO HOW DID YOU COME TO BE PART OF THIS

GROUP AND TRIP IN THE FIRST PLACE?

Many years ago, the Pukeiti Rhododendron Trust

(through the efforts of Lynn and Robyn Bublitz)

established a friendship with a young Chinese Botanist

(now Professor Guan). There have been a number

of exchange tours based on this friendship over the

years. I missed a previous trip because of a M/C

accident, but was fortunate enough to be invited

onto this trip, 2 years later.

WHAT GEAR DID YOU TAKE WITH YOU?

I was planning to take almost exclusively street/

portrait shots on this trip so I had chosen kit that gave

me the best portability and quality (while still being

reasonably inconspicuous).

I had my RX1Rii (35mm/2, FF and capable of good

close work if I needed it) and A6500 with 55/1.8

(a wicked lens with fast focusing, image stabilisation

and with a useful aps-c, portrait angle of view). These

were cameras I was familiar with and both cameras

could use the same filters (ND+ CP), hoods and flash.

All of this fitted together in a tiny ONA canvas bag and

could be remotely controlled by my phone if needed.

WHAT WAS GOING ON BEHIND THE CAMERA

WHEN YOU TOOK THIS PHOTO?

Our bus had stopped in a small town near the borders

of Mongolia and Kazakhstan. Alongside us was a rather

Heath Robinson (house/sleeper) bus with a young boy

staring out the rear-side window at our strange looking

group. I wanted the photo of the boy and got myself

close enough before I pulled my camera into view.

From his expression, we seemed to look like a travelling

foreign circus, he didn’t appear aware of his photo

being taken. That was all I could see to photograph at

that time, as his bus had the curtains drawn and was

between me and the late afternoon sun.

Feeling pleased with getting that shot, I got on our bus

which was about to move on. As soon as our motor

started the curtains in the ‘house bus’ opened and

the occupants of both buses were looking at each

other like two passing trains.

I had been shooting with Manual exposure, but

there was no time to consider changing any camera

settings and so ‘The Beautiful Traveller’s’ photo was

taken through two sets of bus windows and looking

straight into the sun.

I have no idea who these people were, what their

ethnicity was, or where they were going though at a

guess they seemed to be heading toward Mongolia.

From the friendliness that radiated from their faces,

I’d have changed buses and travelled with them in a

heartbeat!

WERE YOU HAPPY WITH THE SHOT? WHAT, IF

ANYTHING, WOULD YOU CHANGE IF YOU

COULD HAVE CONTROLLED THE SITUATION?

Considering the unexpectedness of this scene

unfolding before my eyes I was happy with the

capture, but the quality reflects my haste and the

difficult conditions.

If I’d had time, I would have liked to have gotten out

of our bus, changed cameras and used a polariser

and a deeper lens hood. Even better, I’d have loved

to have changed buses for some portrait shots…

I mean who wouldn’t; they were beautiful people!

DID YOU TAKE THIS PHOTO IN BLACK AND

WHITE OR CONVERT IT LATER? HOW MUCH

EDITING DID YOU DO?

The sun on the windows turned the image milky, so

to salvage it I tried to make the shot look ‘film like’ to

hide its obvious flaws. I pulled as much contrast out of

the ‘washed out’ shot as I could and added a touch

of ‘dehaze’, but I was fighting noise as well as poor

definition.

It was going to be an awful colour shot, so I edited

it in Silver Effex Pro to get any extra contrast I could,

without losing all my mid tones. From memory, I played

with selective colour filters and used a ‘film effect’

preset.

TELL US WHAT IT WAS LIKE PHOTOGRAPHING

OVER THERE, ANY PROBLEMS?

In the Xinjiang Provence, we were pre-warned “under

no circumstances photograph the Police of Army”.

One of our group didn’t see a SWAT dressed security

Policeman (with automatic weapon) get on our bus

at a road check point while he was photographing a

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cotton seed-head in his hand. The Policeman’s reaction

was severe and only after our hosts intervened and the

photo was shown to not be a security threat, did he

leave and the camera was returned to its owner.

In the city of Kashgar we were told not to go into town

(except in groups) with words to the effect: “because

there are people here who would like to embarrass the

Chinese Government, and Western tourists could be

made targets to that end”.

Having said that and having seen the incredible level

of security everywhere, I never felt in danger at any

time. In Kashgar, Police sirens wailed all night, just to

let everyone know that they were there. There was a

Kindergarten next to our mid city hotel and at school

closing time (8pm) there were Army Personnel Carriers

and Police SWAT teams to guard the children’s pick up.

WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE WITH US

ABOUT YOUR TRIP?

The population in this area of China is a historic meld

of genes from all the countries that are in proximity.

Traders have been travelling this route for centuries and

borders have changed with political power changes.

The majority of the population is Turkic speaking

Muslims know as Uyghurs. The Uyghur independence

movement calls the area “East Turkistan”.

The Uyghurs were not only photogenic but very friendly

and this was one of a number of photo moments in

China, that for me was heartwarming.

The Institute (Prof. Guan, Dr Li, and Dr Liu especially) were

generous and wonderful hosts. The people we met were

fantastic and the scenery and the food were amazing.

It was such a privilege to visit China. I’d go back (even

to do the same trip again) in a heartbeat, but I doubt it

would be possible without such influential hosts.

albums.excio.io/profile/GregA

BEHIND THE SHOT IS PROUDLY

SUPPORTED BY

October 2019 25


LADY NORWOOD’S

BEAUTIFUL PATTERN


Fresh Shoots Autumn People’s

Choice Award Winner:

Patrick Schneider

HI PATRICK, TELL US ABOUT YOU AND HOW

YOU GET INTERESTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY…

I grew up on the lakes of Switzerland where I got a

taste for windsurfing, nature, and adventure. I first

visited New Zealand in 2015 and fell in love with the

place, moving here a year later in 2016. I’m 41, a

sparky and have worked in the trade for over 20 years.

I have a lovely partner who is from the Cook Island

which is where we are soon going to live and work.

As a keen windsurfer, my friends and I have always

been interested in getting good action shots of

ourselves but I also like to take pictures of other

people surfing, windsurfing, or kitesurfing – I enjoy trying

to capture people’s expressions of joy and happiness

while they are out playing with the elements.

25 years ago we didn’t have the technology of today

so we had to be creative. We started out by wrapping

plastic bags around the camera to protect it from the

flying sand on the beach. But the noise coming from the

flapping bags in the wind was very annoying so our next

move was to cut and glue some thicker plastic bags

together to protect the camera. In the end, we had

some solid weather-resistant camera housing made out

of mono-film, which we had plenty of thanks to all the

broken windsurf sails! This wasn’t our most deluxe model

though, we also got creative with an old outdoor light

which had an attached round food container for the lens

(like they have from Sistema) and on the end, I attached

a round glass with silicon to seal it against splashing water!

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH NOW?

I recently sold my Canon 70d so am currently taking

all images with my DJI Mavic Air drone which is

something totally different to regular photography.

Imagine seeing the world from the perspective of

a bird or sitting in a helicopter and taking pictures.

It opens a totally new dimension of taking pictures.

I enjoy flying the drone but on the other hand, I find

original photography more relaxing as I’m constantly

aware (scared) of the possibility of crashing the drone

or of it losing signal.

TELL US ABOUT THE DAY YOU TOOK THIS SHOT

AT WELLINGTON BOTANICAL GARDENS…

When I was visiting the garden a few weeks before

taking this picture, I was walking through the rose garden

and was wondering how it would look from a birds

perspective. What pattern would a bird see… I decided

to find out and went back on a sunny, part cloudy, not

too windy day with my drone.

I did some research on Google Maps prior to my

return trip to look for a remote elevated spot where

I could launch the drone. I thought around midday

would be a good time to avoid big patches of

shadows on the ground.

On the day, after I launched the drone, I was constantly

checking the view on the screen of my mobile phone to

see what the picture would look like. I was pretty happy

when I saw the pattern of the rose garden and was

surprised how equally accurate all those little rose beds

are! I took some shots and had a quick look at them,

I realized that I needed to fly a little higher to see more of

the garden. I changed aperture and shutter speed and

took some more shots. I could see that I had now found

the composition that I was looking for and thought that

with a little bit of editing and cropping I could end up

with a nice picture for the competition.

In all honesty, I hardly know anything about

photography and am not really interested in the

technicalities, I just like to take some cool pictures

sometimes!

HOW DID IT FEEL FINDING OUT THAT YOUR

PHOTO HAD WON THE PEOPLE’S CHOICE

AWARD FOR THE AUTUMN COMPETITION?

Winning something is always an exiting feeling. I like

the thought that other people enjoyed my picture,

it gives an inner satisfaction that others were moved

by what I captured as I too had been inspired seeing

pictures from the other photographers.

HOW DID YOU FIND OUT ABOUT THE

COMPETITION IN THE FIRST PLACE?

My partner loves flowers and herbs so I wanted to

surprise her with a tour of the Botanic Gardens. When I

was Googling the location I saw the Fresh Shoots

competition and thought I should give it a go.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU?

I would like to buy a Sony 6000 with water housing and

am soon heading to Rarotonga, Cook Islands so you

can expect to see photos from above and below the

water on my social media accounts in the future.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/pat_photo_grapy

www.facebook.com/

PATPhotography‐594430407410240


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#WomenInPhotography

Getting To Know Leanne Silver

of Argent Photography

ABANDONED LIGHTHOUSE

Burnham on Sea, UK

F11, 20s, ISO100

October 2019 29


At the moment, I am slowly making the transition

from hobbyist to calling myself a ‘real’ photographer.

I provide images for a monthly feature in a local

community newspaper called the Westerly which

has a print run of around 12,000. Taking photos (and

getting paid) for the Westerly images was a bit of a

turning point for me, as it is a regular commitment

that requires care and effort, and was what initially

encouraged me to think more about taking my

photography further.

It is still very part-time, but an important step

I am taking is to to learn about the business of

photography – I did a workshop with Canon which

was very helpful. Someone recommended that

I join NZIPP as an affiliate member as they have a

lot of helpful resources, and I went to the national

conference in June which was very inspirational.

LEANNE, TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOU…

I am an Aucklander, currently living in Hobsonville

Point with my husband, one adult son and

a diabetic dog. We have five adult children

altogether, and also are doting grandparents to

six mokupuna. I have spent most of my adult life

juggling raising a large family with various jobs –

mainly working as a guitar teacher, and then some

time as an executive assistant and then an office

manager. A couple of years age when our dog

became diabetic I decided that it was a good time

to re-evaluate how much time I wanted to spend in

traffic every day!

TELL US ABOUT YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

JOURNEY…

I have had a passing interest since the children were

young, but it wasn’t until my husband bought me a

Canon 80D on our first trip to Europe a few years ago

that I fell in love with photography. I did a couple of day

courses and discovered that you could combine travel

with photography, that was when I became totally

hooked!

My photography is evolving on an almost daily basis

as I learn new skills and try new creative ideas. I work

under the name Argent Photography, and I finally

have a website to display some of my work, which is

a big step for me.

TELL US MORE ABOUT TAKING THE PHOTOS

FOR THE NEWSPAPER AND WHERE THAT HAS

LED YOU…

My friend Sue writes the monthly feature for the

Hobsonville Point page and last year she asked me if

I would come on board and provide the photos. Sue

writes on a wide range of things with a local focus

– events, local restaurants and businesses, human

interest stories etc. It’s been a great discipline as

I don’t always have input into the topic, so have to

find creative ways to represent some of the topics –

we did one on local street names which was quite a

challenge! It’s gone from a single to a double page

spread this year, and I usually provide 6–8 images for

each article.

I have also done a couple of interior and product

shoots… The product shoot came out of an article

in the Westerly. We had featured a local business

called Healthy Dog & Co which makes healthy

and natural dog biscuits. Helen was in the process

of re-doing her packaging and contacted me for

product images for her new website.

The interior shots were for The Hangar, a fantastic new

co-sharing space on the waterfront at Catalina Bay

(which is part of the Hobsonville Point development),

I have a family member involved with the project,

and the team knew I was a local photographer, so

they asked me to take some shots for an upcoming

website.

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH NOW?

I still have my 80D (a lot of the images on these

pages were taken with that) but a few months ago

I bought a second-hand Canon 5D MKIV. I am

slowly adding to my lenses; my current favourites are

at opposite ends of the spectrum – a 150–600mm

Tamron, and a second-hand 90mm Tamron macro

lens.

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October 2019 31


AFTERNOON NAP

F3.2, 1/100s, ISO200

DO YOU HAVE A YOUR PREFERRED GENRE?

You’ll see from my range of images that I don’t have

a preferred genre as yet! I started with landscape

photography which I still love, but I am currently

enjoying exploring macro, wildlife and documentary

style family photography (e. g. baking session, last day

of kindy, walks on the beach).

TELL US ABOUT YOUR FAVOURITE PHOTO…

My favourite image (currently) is the photo of our latest

Grandchild who you see above. The photo was taken

when he was just a week old. He was asleep in his

bouncer in the afternoon sun and I realised that the light

coming in was pretty much perfect. I had my camera

and a 50mm lens, which was perfect. I love how totally

asleep he is and the details like the down on his cheeks.

WHAT CHALLENGES HAVE YOU HAD TO

OVERCOME IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND HOW

HAVE YOU DONE THAT?

I guess starting later in life (I’m in my fifties) has been

quite a challenge, as everyone else seems to have

been taking photos since they were teenagers! Not

knowing a lot about the craft initially has meant that

I have had to be disciplined and push myself hard to

learn as much as I can in the shortest time.

I did the Photography Institute Diploma initially which

really helped me set my foundations. But one of the

best things I have done this year is to join my local

camera club. I have also attended several workshops,

reached out to photographers who are further along

in their journey; and, like many photographers, I spend

way too much time watching YouTube tutorials.

ANY TIPS FOR KEEPING YOUR MOTIVATION

LEVELS UP?

I don’t often have a creative slump as there’s always

something new to discover and learn, but if I am

feeling a bit unmotivated, I will take my camera out

and try something different – maybe only taking one

lens, or going somewhere I haven’t been before. I find

that once I am out and about, something usually gets

me interested in exploring further. I have also joined

several FB groups which have thematic or weekly

challenges which has been a great way to help me

think about subjects in different ways and I also get

inspired by other people’s images.

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TRANQUILLITY

F11, 15s, ISO100

ON THE ROCKS

F11, 4s, ISO100

October 2019 33


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CHRYSANTHEMUM

F10, 1/30s, ISO800


HOW HAVE YOU BENEFITED FROM BEING PART

OF LESLEY WHYTE’S WOMEN IN PHOTOGRAPHY

GROUP?

I first went along to one of Lesley’s coffee catchups

last year and loved meeting other female

photographers. Lesley has a passion for connecting

women and helping them find their photography

confidence and strengths. Being able to share ideas,

ask questions, and hear other people’s stories in a

relaxed environment has been invaluable.

Recently, Lesley organised an evening with Rhonda

Cockerton, a police forensic photographer. I think

it’s safe to say all of us who attended were both

challenged and inspired to learn about an unheralded

but vital role photographers play behind the scenes.

WHAT DO YOU THINK THE ADVANTAGES ARE

OF BEING A FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER?

Over my many years as a mum I have learnt how to juggle

competing priorities, this skill is very helpful when you are

trying to fit photography deadlines in with a busy life!

But also, as both a mother and a grandmother,

I am comfortable around babies and children and

I think that helps both them and their mums to relax.

I also think that sometimes a female photographer

(particularly a slightly older one) can be less daunting

– I am reluctant to have my own photo taken so I can

empathise with women who feel the same way.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU?

I have a couple of potential projects/collaborations

in the pipeline, and have started working with Lesley

Whyte as her business expands – so I’m very excited

about what the future holds!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram/argent_photography

www.facebook.com/argentphotographynz

www.argentphotography.me

albums.excio.io/profile/argentphotography

PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

DOING THE ROUNDS

F5.6, 1/1600s, ISO320

October 2019 35


Interview with Peter Laurenson

2 year posting as Regional Manager South East Asia in

Singapore. After 6 years with NZTB I decided that I’d had

enough corporate politics and set up a small marketing

consultancy – MPWR. That went well for quite a while,

but after 12 years and the advent of the GFC (global

financial crisis) I joined Zealandia on a 3 year stint as the

marketing, sales and fundraising manager.

After Zealandia I went back into part time marketing

consultancy with Aspire, plus started to devote more

time to tramping, climbing, photography, writing and

volunteer work. In regards to climbing, I was a late starter,

only joining a NZ Alpine Club alpine instruction course

when I was 40 but since then, I’ve made up for lost time.

In recent years I’ve been editor of NZ Alpine Club

Wellington’s monthly Vertigo bulletin and I have

written over 30 articles for Wilderness Magazine. At

the beginning of 2019, I took on the role of editor for

Federated Mountain Club’s Backcountry. This has drawn

all my skills, experience and interests together in one

really stimulating role.

PETER, WHAT’S YOUR BACKGROUND?

I grew up in New Plymouth, in the shadow of Mount

Taranaki/Egmont until, in 1980, I went to Massey University

in Palmerston North to study marketing for 4 years. After

graduating I went to Wellington and worked at Unilever

for 3 years before heading off on 5 years of O.E. in 1988.

It took 9 months backpacking up through SE Asia, India,

Nepal, a bit of Europe en-route to Turkey, Israel and

Egypt, before reaching London in time to qualify for a 2

year working permit.

I scored a really good marketing role there and ended

up working in London for 3 years, with a lot of travel in the

UK and around Europe while there. Then in 1992 my wife

at the time and I decided that England wasn’t the place

to have kids, so we set off on a 10 month return leg – first

3 months in east Africa, then 2 months covering places

in Europe we hadn’t visited yet, then overland from

Karachi, up the Karakoram Highway and in to China.

3 months backpacking in China rounded off the return

journey.

Back in Wellington, I gained a spot on the senior

management team at the New Zealand Tourism

Board. This resulted in a lot more international travel

(but no longer overland with a backpack), including a

WHERE DOES PHOTOGRAPHY FIT INTO YOUR

STORY?

Apart from terrible snaps on a horrible cheap instamatic

as a teenager, I began what has become a never

waning and constantly enriching interest in still

photography in 1987, in the year before I headed off on

my O.E.

I figured I should get some skills to be able to capture

my adventures on film. So I bought a Chinon CP 7m

SLR (couldn’t afford anything better) and attended

a basic photography night course at Wellington High

School. That was the single best thing I could have done

because it introduced me to manual shooting – F stop,

shutter speed and exposure setting long before digital

came on the scene.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE OF

PHOTOGRAPHY?

The genre I identify most closely with is National

Geographic – vivid, candid, lifelike, enquiring, dynamic.

I don’t just take photos, I create images.

The purpose behind my ‘creations’ is to convey visually

what it was that made me FEEL impressed, amazed,

happy, shocked. I’m not hung up on simply representing

faithfully what the eye could see. Sure, over manipulation

can turn an image into a freak show and I certainly don’t

seek to do that. But if it was the colours on an ice face

at dawn that drew me in, then I’m not ashamed to use

considered post-processing to bring that to the fore. It’s

about capturing what my heart FELT.

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OUR MOUNTAIN

A lot of my photography occurs on mountain slopes

in places where a big heavy DSLR tends to stay in the

pack. While I love using my Nikon D750, I frequently use

a mirrorless compact camera (currently a Lumix TZ220)

in the hills. I still shoot Camera RAW files using spot meter

and manual settings, but some still may deem my gear

as amateurish. I also use a tripod much less than many

‘respected’ photographers but as a consequence, I am

able to capture a lot more action than some do.

I take a lot of panoramic series that I stitch in Photoshop

later – I’ve often found that a standard landscape or

portrait format is too limiting when trying to capture the

vast magnificence of our natural world. There is certainly

an art to getting the most from a stitch series, I love it!

DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE PHOTO?

A favourite photo? That’s tough – I’ve probably taken

over 250,000; and how do you define ‘favourite’ –

technically, artistically, emotionally, circumstantially,

symbolically? Here are 2 candidates.

‘Our Mountain’ is a favourite because it symbolises my

ideal situation. Although I grew up in the shadow of

Mount Taranaki, it wasn’t until age 33 that I eventually

climbed it. So to share the summit with all three of my

sons – at the time aged 7, 9 and 15 – was a moment I’ll

always treasure. The photo is not technically or artistically

great and its symbolism and circumstance are really only

significant to those in the picture, but it makes me smile

every time I walk past it on our living room wall to see us

at 2,450m on the crater rim of Mount Taranaki, taking

a breather before going up another 100 metres to the

summit.

‘Red Divide’ (next page) is my second favourite because

it is my most peer-recognised image – it was the winner

of the alpine landscape category and overall winner

(John Harrison Memorial Trophy) in the national photo

competition of the NZ Alpine Club in 2014.

HOW ABOUT PICKING A FAVOURITE

DESTINATION?

That one’s easy, it’s Khumbu in Nepal which is one of

the most beautiful places on earth. Its mountains are

the tallest, its people as fascinating as they are friendly,

and it’s surprisingly accessible whilst photographically

it’s unsurpassed. But mass tourism, and in the case of

Khumbu, guided climbs on Mount Everest, are changing

the Khumbu experience for the worse.

I’ve been going there since 1988 and my seventh visit will

happen this December. It’s the place where I’ve taken

each of my three boys when they turned 15. I still need to

take Cathy and will do so in 2020 or 2021.

October 2019 37


RED DIVIDE

3 Stitched Landscape Shots

The main divide of New Zealand's Southern Alps, viewed from near Pioneer Hut (2,200m) on the west, most

weather exposed side, at dawn. Mount Tasman, New Zealand's second highest peak, is far right. Both weather

and snow conditions weren't much good for climbing on this trip, but this sunrise was a nice consolation - a

bluebird morning would not have been as spectacular.

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October 2019 39


GOKYO

A stitch of 2 landscape shots

A dusk view from Gokyo Ri (5,357m) back down to Gokyo and the third lake 600 metres below, Khumbu, Nepal.

On this evening Mt Everest was obscured by clouds, but other closer giants such as Cholatse and Tawoche still

loomed large. The sunset coloured clouds also balanced the prayer flags nicely.

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October 2019 41


MIRROR ON THE MASSIVE

A stitch of 5 portrait shots

The view across Kongde Lake (4,600m) to the Everest Group and other peaks of Khumbu, Nepal. This view is

not seen by many visitors to Khumbu. It’s off the beaten track and really can only be visited on the way out

when you’re properly acclimatised. But if you’re after a round trip rather than entry/exit via Namche Bazaar,

then this is a good option. And you really do get a ‘big view’ of the heart of Khumbu from this point.

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October 2019 43


DEVOTION

TELL US ABOUT CAPTURING CULTURES AND

PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD…

In the pursuit of great landscapes, I’ve often

encountered fascinating cultures and people.

As you’ll see on the following pages, sometimes

people are the ‘main event’, such as at a Buddhist

reincarnation festival at Tsurphu Gompa in Tibet.

Other times people make up part of a bigger

picture, such as in Hushe village at 3,050m in

Northern Pakistan where I took the 'Top Gun' photo.

In places like the Himalaya it’s sometimes hard to

separate people from the landscapes they inhabit

and, actually, combining the two can produce the

most memorable images of all. Each person has

their own character. But people can also embody

the character of the places where they live.

My photos ‘Devotion’ and ‘Intrigued’ show Tibetan

pilgrims, many in their ‘Sunday best’, gathering

at Tsurphu Gompa to witness the ordination of

their young reincarnate. Traditions run deep in the

hearts, minds and everyday behaviours of Tibetans.

You can see the veneration in the eyes of this

crowd.

When I stop to think about travel portrait

photography I like to think that my purpose is to

capture the character of the person or people and

their environmental and/or cultural context. Take

images that are story openers. In truth though, quite

often portraiture in a travel setting is more about

being lucky enough to be in the right place at the

right time. I usually know generally what I’m after,

but sometimes when a specific image appears in

my viewfinder it is simply opportunistic.

If you have time, it’s possible to make personal

contact with a subject and build rapport before

taking any photos. This is ideal and often essential if

you want really candid, ‘look into the lens’ images.

But if you want ‘spur of the moment’ shots, it is often

more authentic to be a silent observer – a big zoom

can be very useful. In any given situation sensitivity,

ethics and culture should be considered when

deciding if it’s appropriate or not to take people

shots without their express permission.

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INTRIGUED

October 2019 45


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TOP GUN

‘What’s going on… let me see!’ This inquisitive, bright-eyed, little

Muslim ‘Top-gun’ symbolises the future of his mountain people.

Although he lives in an almost medieval village, he wears a cap

advertising a high-tech jet fighter movie! As such, he is being

exposed to two entirely different worlds.

October 2019 47


OF THE LAND

Travelling as an independent backpacker in 1992, leaving the Friendship Highway that carries on to

Nepal at Xegar, I visited Everest Base camp on foot, passing through and staying at extremely basic

villages along the route. Here is an old Tibetan lady that I stayed with one night. Behind her is a

view back across the Tingri plains towards the trail leading to Khumbu La and Khumbu in Nepal. Her

weathered features manifest the harsh environment she and her people live in.

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October 2019 49


GLANCE

A young Nepali girl at the Saturday market,

Namche Bazaar, Khumbu, Nepal.


FURTIVE?

At the Saturday morning market, Namche

Bazaar, Khumbu, Nepal.

HOW DID YOU DISCOVER EXCIO & NZP?

I actually fell in to Excio by accident, by mistaken

identity, when I thought Excio’s NZ Photographer

magazine and associated competitions were part

of NZ Photography Workshops, a company I had

become involved with.

At this point I wasn’t aware of Excio but when the

penny did drop, I was attracted by Excio’s ‘mission

statement’ that identified the importance of the stories

behind images and the need to go beyond superficial

social media popularity to do real good. When I made

contact with Excio my questions were quickly and

comprehensively answered by not just a real person,

but the CEO and Co-founder of Excio, Ana.

Compare this to my experience with ViewBug and you’ll

understand why I’m excited to join the community!

I signed up as a ‘free member’ to ViewBug over 3 years

ago – I was intrigued to see what an online photographic

community might lead to. ViewBug has been good for

me in that it’s encouraged me to rekindle my interest

in photography beyond the mountains and I’ve also

picked up some very helpful post processing ideas.

But I’ve always resisted becoming a ‘paid up member’

on ViewBug because it’s become obvious that this is

how you buy profile and (perceived) popularity, which is

mostly superficial or even plain delusionary.

I’m looking forward to exploring how Excio can

work for me and how I can return the favour. I enjoy

entering photo competitions, sharing my images

and receiving constructive feedback about them,

especially if those people know about photography.

I enjoy seeing other photographers’ work too, as a

source of technical and creative inspiration.

WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR THE REST OF

THE YEAR?

I’ll be writing for the Excio blog as well as here on NZ

Photographer in the coming months. Beyond Excio I

have a book to complete. It will be my second,

this time hopefully supported by a strong publisher.

My first book – Occasional Climber: A journey to

Mount Clarity, was a self published effort (2014) that

achieved very minor success but gave me many

insights and much satisfaction. Of the 150 copies

printed, I have 22 copies remaining (you can find out

more on my website, but no pressure).

And of course, I will continue to get into the hills

and climb as long as my body lets me. Each trip will

be added to my website, OccasionalClimber as a

resource for others.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.occasionalclimber.co.nz

albums.excio.io/profile/Occasionalclimber


Soaking Up Milford Sound

by Brendon Gilchrist

Let me tell you about the lessons I learned and

the sights I saw at one of the wettest places in

the world, happily soaking up (quite literally!)

all the moods and features of this characterful

place where nature rules and humans only visit to

admire the glory and power of this mystical place.

In a place so isolated and with no reception to

the outside world, Milford Sound sees almost 1

million visitors per year but it is not a true Sound,

it is a Fiord. Discovered by John Grono in 1812,

Milford Sound was originally named Milford Haven

as when John and crew entered the Fiord they

felt safe and sound from the weather that is out

in the Pacific Ocean – That is how it became a

Sound and not a Fiord even though both are

correct terms.

Wet weather for a cruise at Milford Sound would

typically be a tourist’s worst nightmare but not

for me, far from perfect weather was exactly

what I wanted and had planned for, purposefully

taking the 2pm sailing with Southern Discovers

when the weather forecast said the rain would

be at its worst! Why? Because I have seen and

photographed Milford in all conditions except in

the rain and was keen to see the Fiord in rough

waters and to capture the raw beauty that only

bad weather provides.

Usually, there are only a couple of permanent

waterfalls in the Fiord but on this day there were

many, making it one of the most spectacular

sights I have ever seen; the water tumbling out

of the sky, down the cliffs, and into the ocean –

You could almost see the life cycle of a rain drop!

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MILFORD MYSTERY

F10, 1/320s, ISO400

Some of the waterfalls only start when the rain

starts and stop when the rain stops, there is

nothing above them to form a lake of water to

create a permanent waterfall so I was privileged

to see something quite unique.

The journey out to the Pacific Ocean was the

most spectacular, seeing the waterfalls with the 4

sisters each flowing, each with its own personality

but sadly I missed the shot of the 4 Sisters

capturing only 3 Sisters instead.

Once we hit the Pacific Ocean the waves started

to get bigger, the boat bouncing through the

waves. I was a little disappointed that we didn’t

see any dolphins as they are amazing to watch

when they are in front of the boat, jumping

around and having fun.

As the boat turned and powered through the

waves to the other side of the Fiord, it marked the

halfway point of our trip. By this time I was soaked,

and so was everyone else! It was the greatest of

all challenges to capture this majestic place whilst

keeping the camera dry and the rain droplets off

the lens – my two cleaning cloths were soaked

through by the end.

On the return trip down the right side of the Fiord

we encountered Stirling Falls which is a 151 metre

drop, the water falling straight off the high cliffs

and into the ocean – A very impressive sight.

2 hours later and our cruise was coming to an

end. I wanted to shout ‘nooo, that was too fast’

however, the memories of what we saw will last a

lifetime.

October 2019 53


3 SISTERS, 1 MISSING!

F9, 1/320s, ISO400

My meeting with Milford Sound, or Piopiotahi as

it’s called in Maori (which means ‘a single Piopio’

which is a long extinct native bird) was meant to

continue but alas, fate had other ideas. You see,

I had wanted to shoot sunset in Milford but there

was no dorm accommodation left, the closest

accommodation being an hour away. The road out

shuts at 5pm and only reopens when the roading

crew have flown over the avalanche paths to make

sure it is safe to reopen so there was no way I could

get my shots. Rather than be negative about it, I’ll

have to take it as an opportunity to come back

again!

3 TIPS FOR TAKING PHOTOS ON A WET

MILFORD SOUND CRUISE

• Take several lens cloths else you might end up using

your t-shirt to wipe your lens dry! A rain jacket for your

camera is also a good idea.

• Have your camera settings setup to capture the

beauty as (even on a clear day) the boat only

slows down for the important parts and you don’t

want to miss the shot – Use autofocus and a higher

shutterspeed to compensate for the boat speed so

you don’t get blurry shots.

• For the best position, stand at the back of the boat away

from the wake that the boat generates from its blades.

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MILFORD SOUND WATERWALL

F6.3, 1/250s, ISO400

1 Day Auckland Workshop

20th October 2019

8th March 2020

1 Day Wellington Workshop

27th October 2019

5th April 2020

Fine-Art Printing Workshop

Join us for a one day fine-art printing workshop and learn how set

up print files, using a colour managed workflow to turn them into

professional grade prints. Our workshop has been designed to simplify

the printing process, you will come away with the knowledge to print your

own prints at home or to be sent to a lab.

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

021 0845 7322

October 2019 55


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October 2019 57


Making Memories In The Studio

Something I have learned over the years is that

nothing is impossible when you’re passionate

and driven.

Having a collection of photographic memories was

always very important and precious to me. Before

migrating to New Zealand, I had tens of thousands

of printed photographs. Memories of my childhood,

my marriage, my family, all our milestones. Their

value in my life was irreplaceable. When we

decided to pack up everything in India and move,

I had to leave a majority of those images behind. It

gave me an understanding of how much memories

can mean to a person, I soon purchased a DSLR

camera to restart my collection once again.

My journey into professional photography began

when I posted some photos on Facebook of my

youngest daughter. A family friend asked me

if I would be able to take some photos of her

children and I accepted. She recommended me

to a few friends for photos and as my photography

started to take off I began to learn new things.

The rest is history. When I look back at where I’ve

come from, its always quite overwhelming. You

see, upon my migration, I had spent a few months

without a job and was battling depression. I kept

persevering and setting goals though and now I’m

a happy working mother with my own professional

photography business with a focus on newborns,

family, children, pre-wed, maternity, and event

photography though I also have a passion for

street photography.

CAPTURING MEMORIES

I feel that photography is an art in which there is an

endless amount of inspiration. Every photographer

has a distinct and unique style therefore, there is

something to learn from everyone and there is a

photographer in us all. Every time we think of a

memory that makes us smile, we are visualizing a

snapshot we took with our minds. If one is keen to

pursue photography as a passion or a profession,

there are no rules that they must follow to start. You

should just follow your instincts and listen to your

gut feelings.

For me, informal shots are the most special ones

to look back on. They capture the love and

bond between the subjects better than formal

shots. I also have a massive inclination to black

and white. It just makes the image look so much

more powerful. I especially love this quote by

by Parmeet Sahni

Ted Grant – “When you photograph people in

color, you photograph their clothes. But when

you photograph people in Black and white, you

photograph their souls”.

When I do photoshoots in my studio, I love

using natural light. It’s slightly harder to control

compared to studio lights but there’s a major

difference in the end result – I feel that artificial

lights give the photos a staged look, however, if

that’s the aura you’re trying to achieve, studio

lights make it very easy to illuminate the subject

exactly how you want to.

To achieve the candid style of my photos, I keep

talking to my clients, making them laugh and

giggle then, while they’re calm and almost

unaware of the camera, the shot is taken without

them even realizing. I’ll get them talking amongst

themselves about a memory, or have them crack

cheeky jokes. Sometimes, making your clients do a

fake laugh cracks them up and they end up really

laughing when you take the shot. This is especially

helpful when photographing children as well as

people who are camera-shy.

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I make it a point to do professional photoshoots

of my family at least once a year. My daughters

are 7 years apart, 10 and 17 years old. Therefore,

it’s rare for them to play nice for long durations.

I ensure they don’t feel or look awkward in photos;

instead of making them pose, I sit them down and

tell them to talk to each other, and make jokes.

Both my daughters are quite witty naturally, so

they end up making comments about the other

and cracking up. These are the moments I want

to remember. I love seeing their bond, their smiles,

and their memorable years in photographs. I’m

sure these memories will be precious to them when

they are older too. Their innocent bickering, them

teasing each other, laughing with each other. That

loving, sisterly bond.

In photography, every client you work with is

completely different and no two photoshoots are

ever the same. I’ve had experiences capturing all

kinds of people from babies who are only a few

hours old and still in the hospital to seniors over

the age of ninety who want their photo taken with

their family before it is too late.

October 2019 59


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October 2019 61


I also give back to the community by giving

complementary photoshoots to people who

I think will value them most. In my mind, I’m not

gifting a photoshoot, I am gifting memories.

At Soulful Memories Photography, there is

no charge for Rainbow Baby photoshoots.

A rainbow baby is “a baby born after a

miscarriage, stillborn, or neonatal death”. It

is called a rainbow baby because it is like a

rainbow after a storm: something beautiful after

something scary and dark. I also don’t charge

for family photoshoots when a family member

is battling a terminal illness. I feel as though it

is my duty to use my skill and my profession to

do some good around me. If I have the gift of

giving memories, it makes me happy to use it for

people who need it most.

Despite what most people believe, newborn

and kids photoshoots are the toughest of them

all. With models, shoots are a breeze because

you can tell them exactly what you want and

they will pose and cooperate accordingly. With

newborns, you don’t have that privilege, as

these little angels always do as they wish. The

feeling when you get a photo of a baby smiling

is just unbeatable though and there’s so much

triumph in making toddlers and kids comfortable

in front of the camera.

I have a few tricks up my sleeve which I have

gathered over the years – I usually find myself

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having to act like a clown behind my camera

to coax a smile! To make distracted and bored

toddlers look into the camera, I sometimes tie a

small rattle or toy near the lense. Or sometimes

I will ask them if they can see a birdie inside the

camera. Other times, the parents will simply have

to stand behind me dancing and jumping around

to excite their little one!

There have been many incidents when a baby

has wet themselves or done a poo when they

are posing nude, especially when they’re in their

parent’s hands – It’s like they know exactly when

the perfect time to go to the toilet is!

A funny experience I had was during a cakesmash

photo session. A boy was about to turn one

and his parents were immensely excited for the

shoot. They were so enthusiastic when it came to

decorating the setup and were confident that

their son would do a great job making a mess for

the photos. However, when the time came, the

poor chap got upset and just would not touch his

gorgeous cake! We waited an hour for him to do

something but he was just not having it. He played

with everything that was around him but refused

to do anything to the tempting cake right in front

of him. At least his parents got a hearty dessert

that night!

STUDIO SETUP

In my experience, photography is more about

perspective and skill than fancy equipment

making it possible for anyone to set up a home

studio – A studio doesn’t have to be huge and

filled with all the latest high-tech equipment.

I myself did photoshoots in a home studio for a

couple of years. As long as you have a source of

natural light and a clear background, nothing is

stopping you from taking amazing shots.

You really don’t need a massive studio to do

portraits. It is certainly possible to convert your

spare room or basement into one. However, you

must take measures to ensure your space is safe,

especially if you plan to have newborns or small

children inside. For example, check exposed

sockets and wires, ensure there are no nails

or screws in the walls, etc. Think about having

access to your washroom where clients can get

changed, or even a small changing room or a

room partition for their privacy.

I enrolled myself in many workshops and watched

an endless amount of tutorials to prepare myself

for setting up my home studio. I also asked

many fellow photographer friends, checked

on photography groups, as well as spoke to

salespersons at stores to get multiple opinions,

this helped me make an informed decision when

it came to making the initial purchases. It’s

definitely a big investment, but keep in mind that

you don’t need to purchase everything tomorrow.

Get the basics, and slowly build your way up.

MY FIRST PURCHASES FOR THE STUDIO

INCLUDED:

• Backdrop Rolls (Black and White)

• Backdrop Stand

• Bigger Light Reflectors

• A pair of Strobe Lights with Softboxes

• Props for Newborn Photoshoots

I already owned a good quality Canon camera

but I added 3 lenses to my collection which are

now my favourites:

• Sigma 35mm 1:1.4 ((perfect for newborn

photography)

• Tamron 85mm F/1.8 (really good for portraits)

• Canon 24–70mm F/2.8 for wide angle.

October 2019 63


There are many inexpensive and creative

substitutes for major parts of the setup if your

budget won’t stretch that far. For example,

instead of purchasing huge backdrop rolls and

stands which take up ample space, invest in

plain king-sized throws and pin them up on the

wall using clips or pins. If you cannot place studio

lights in your home studio because of monetary or

space restrictions, photograph your subject near

a window and use a portable reflector to balance

and control the lighting. You can also get cheap

storage / furniture / props from op shops until you

are ready to buy more expensive items.

Photography can indeed be a pricey profession

at times but in the end, you get a good return on

all the investments that you make.

GROWING THE BUSINESS

After getting my home studio set up, the next step

was getting clients. Most of my previous shoots

had been outdoors or at a client’s residence so

this was the first time I was offering indoor shoots

at my own place.

Initially, to build my portfolio and to have sample

photos on social media platforms, I did a few

complimentary photoshoots which gave me the

opportunity to experiment and get comfortable

in the new space, and to find my style. Even

today, if I wish to try something new or creative

for the first time, I put out a model call for a free

photoshoot on my Facebook page. The model will

get free photos and I get to play around without

being anxious about the end result.

I uploaded regularly to Facebook and Instagram,

sometimes twice a day to get traction, and

eventually, inquiries started filling my inbox. In the

midst of working a full time office job and taking

care of my family, I purposefully didn’t opt for too

many platforms, I wanted to provide quality over

quantity.

When I was deciding the pricing of my services,

I decided to keep the costs as low as possible.

My goal was not to make money but to provide

as many memories as I could to as many families

and lovely clients as possible. Therefore, I created

different packages at different price points to

suit the needs of every query that comes my

way. Each package offers a different number

of photos. In my family or newborn shoots, some

packages are just for photos of the child, others

include shots with immediate family and some

with extended family members and so on. They

are priced taking into account how many photos

are taken, how many models there are, how long

the session will take, etc.

Today my Facebook page is my primary source

of promoting and sharing my work and has more

than 2k members and over 150 positive reviews

and recommendations, that’s my treasure! On

the days I feel low, I go through the reviews and

they instantly fill me with encouragement and

motivation.

I must say, having a home studio can have its

own challenges, especially when you have kids.

I started out doing sessions over the weekend

and before each session, I made sure my family

knew about my schedule. They were always very

respectful of mine and the client’s privacy. It’s not

easy to make your kids sit still on sunny weekends

though so we made sure I had time for my family

and outings accordingly. Today I keep a calendar

on my wall where my photoshoot session times

are written down and everyone writes down

which days they may be busy so we make sure we

find a time when we can all go out somewhere

nice together. It really helps to have the support

of your family and to involve them in your work

patterns.

FINAL TIPS FOR NAILING THE SHOOT

Before photoshoots, it is good to be organized and

prepared. It’s important to have extra batteries and

SD Cards at hand as you may not get time to look

for these in the middle of a session. It’s also a great

idea to prepare and layout any props that you will

be using so that you know you have everything

you need to get through. You should also look for

ideas and plan poses beforehand to save time and

be sure to take some test shots before you finally

start rolling the session – this gives an idea to check

your settings and if anything is ‘off’ (wrong settings

left over from a previous session) you won’t lose

anything.

When you’re looking through the viewfinder, if

you like what you see, just press the shutter. Don’t

delete photos straight away because you don’t

instantly like them. Instead, load them up onto your

computer and look at them on a bigger screen.

Play around with the image, find a story – Images

don’t have meaning on their own, the viewer of the

photo finds meaning in them – “Beauty is in the eye

of the beholder”!

Professional photography can seem a little

daunting to outsiders, but we all start somewhere.

The most important part is to make a start and then

build along the way. Just take the leap, believe in

yourself, and things will start falling into place. As

they say, hard work pays off. If you are dedicated

and open to learning – everything becomes

possible. There may be obstacles along the way,

but overcoming them is what makes one even

more motivated.

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October 2019 65


HOW LONG IS “LONG ENOUGH”?

USING ND FILTERS FOR LONG EXPOSURE IN LANDSCAPE

PHOTOGRAPHY.

By Ken Wright

KAIMAI WATERFALL

F20, 1/2s, ISO100

All too often on social media, I see the wrong

exposure used in the wrong location, the rush

to use a ten stop to create an effect at the

expense of the beauty and dynamics of the location.

For me, a really long exposure is best used for

landscapes that do not have a dynamic element,

ie. calm seas, lakes, jetty and a slow moving sky with

plenty of definition. Here we want to smooth out the

sea, lake, remove the wind chopped ripples and get

that lovely silky effect and movement in the sky.

My colleague and fellow tutor at New Zealand

Photography Workshops, Richard Young is very adept

at “Long Exposures” anything 2-8 minutes and he

is in his element where as I tend to operate at the

other end of the scale, still classed as long exposures

because you can’t handhold the camera.

That’s not to say that I don’t do longer exposures like

Richard, it’s about having enough knowledge to deal

with what nature throws at you - Presented with a sea

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with little or no water movement and I will be into a

ten stop in a flash.

However, most of my favourite locations that I visit

for seascape photography in the Bay of Plenty have

dynamic water movement over rock ledges and small

offshore islands etc. These environments suit the shorter

more explosive exposure. Repeatedly we find this falls

into the 1/8, 1/4 or 1/2 second to precisely capture the

wave movement as it hits a rock or spills over the edge

and drains away to reveal a white water pattern, as

you can see in my ‘Otarawairere Sunstrike’ image.

Something that I have used to great effect is a

composite of multiple waves based loosely on a

timelapse. This allows me to capture the visual story

over about 5 seconds made up of multiple shots of a

1/4 second each.

Presented with a sea with very little action, one small

wave would look lame, so I figured that if I shot each

wave that came in and then re assembled the image

in PSD to create the visual story, then I could walk

away with a credible image from that morning.

October 2019 67


OTARAWAIRERE SUNSTRIKE

F22, 1/3s, ISO125, 16mm

KAIKOURA LIMESTONE DRIFT

F16, 1/8s, ISO100

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CATHEDRAL COVE

F4, 15s, ISO500, 25mm

SO, HOW LONG IS “LONG ENOUGH”?

This is a phrase I use all the time and simply means

that the exposure only needs to be slower than the

speed of water to capture an effect, anything longer

is personal preference.

With an explosive sea that’s moving fast the 1/4

second seems to be the magic length, in the image

‘Kaikoura Limestone Blast’ the sea is surging in at quite

a pace, any longer on the exposure and we would

not capture the blast against the rock.

However, waves that are “drawing back”, need a

longer exposure to capture the white water run trail,

this tends to lean towards 1-2 second.

A contradiction to this “rule” happened one morning

while shooting a seascape at Cathedral Cove looking

towards “Sail Rock”. It was about 5.30am, the natural

light at that time was giving me a 15 second exposure,

which was all good until the sea picked up pace and

started surging into the cave. 15 seconds was turning

it to mist and not conveying the wave exploding on

the one lone rock. A wild guess at creating a precise

exposure during a long exposure paid off - I lit the

front edge of the wave with a high powered torch

and followed the front edge of the wave as it moved

across the mouth of the cave.

One of the things that I have learned with dynamic

seascapes is to read the waves - waves build in a

cycle of seven of which 1 and 2 tend to be flat, 3

starts to build, 4,5 and 6 are where the action is and

seven could give you a bath! So always be aware

of the size of the sea!

As the sun comes over the horizon there is a natural

increase in the wave pattern which intensifies

through sunrise, when you think you have the wave

patterns don’t become complacent, the seventh

set of seven can be bigger than the rest and give a

rogue wave so stay safe.

WATERFALLS

Waterfalls are one area where I often see

photographers shooting too long an exposure. The

longer the water runs the more it overwrites itself thus

losing secondary detail.

October 2019 69


HOTWATER WATERFALL

F14, 2.5s, ISO50, 16mm

You have to get used to reading the speed of water

movement in waterfalls, I tend to refer to this as a

running tap or a lineal movement that repeats and is

constant unlike the sea which is variable. An example

that I show students is to scribble on a piece of paper

with a pen, here is a light scribble (1/4sec) and you

will see all the gaps in the water flow, a longer scribble

for a second and we have nice flowing water and

secondary detail, a longer scribble for 5 seconds and

now we have completely overwritten the fall and

have a black mess, so think of it in reverse as white

water, 1/4 second is not long enough to give smooth

water, 1-2 seconds are perfect for smooth white

water and secondary detail and to reveal a vortex,

5 seconds and you have lost all the secondary detail

and ended up with shaving foam. The answer always

lies in the 1-2 second area and is relevant to the

volume and speed of water.

I shoot at Tarawera Falls a lot, it’s 65m high and has

a huge volume of water, a hydro engineer once told

me that it was moving at ten tonnes a second which

means a one second exposure is long enough. When

photographing big waterfalls you also have to be

mindful of wind movement generated by the fall, this

can mean that there is a lot of foliage moving in the

shot and we don’t want the viewer to think that the

whole image is soft.

SO, “HOW LONG IS LONG ENOUGH”?

That’s up to you to decide based on the image

you want to convey, but don’t let the story be

overwritten by adding an effect, a ten stop is not

always the answer. From Serene to Dynamic, your

job is to visually tell the story of that location.

JOIN KEN WRIGHT, A SENIOR TUTOR AT NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS, ON A

BAY OF PLENTY WATERFALL & SEASCAPE WORKSHOP AND IMPROVE YOUR LANDSCAPE AND

LONG EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHY AS YOU GET TO GRIPS WITH DYNAMIC SEASCAPES AND

CASCADING WATERFALLS.

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TARAWERA RAINBOW

F22, 1.3s, ISO50

October 2019 71


“Lurking Syndrome” in

Photography

by Ana Lyubich

“We are not here to fit in, be well balanced, or provide example for others. We

are here to be eccentric, different, perhaps strange, perhaps merely to add our

small piece, our little clunky, chunky selves to the great mosaic of being”

– Jim Hollis

Have you ever sat next to someone on a train

or bus who was going through their social

media news feed without commenting or liking

anything? That person was very likely a “lurker”.

Wikipedia defines a “lurker” in the Internet world as

someone who “observes, but doesn’t participate”.

You may even be one yourself. Don’t worry, I’m guilty

of it too which helps me speak on this topic from my

own personal experience. It’s not uncommon, in fact,

only 1% of followers of any social media platform

or community are actively engaged members, 9%

occasionally participate, while the rest… lurk.

Since this month’s NZP topic is about people, and

people are always at the heart of any community,

it’s no surprise that I got thinking about photography

communities. I’ve seen many, and am an official

member of quite a few online communities (not

including the creation and running of one myself!),

but when it comes to participation – in most cases I

like to see what other members are sharing, first of all

for inspiration, and then I try to always “like” or “love”

photographs that I really like – to show the sign of

appreciation and to encourage photographers to

create and share more.

So why don’t 90% of followers participate? What are

the barriers for engagement? As Brooke Ballard said,

“Social media is about sociology not technology.”

FEELING LIKE YOU’RE NOT GOOD ENOUGH...

Imagine going to a party where you pretty much

don’t know anyone... Not everyone is an outgoing

extrovert and keen to engage with a perfect stranger.

The same applies in online communities. The moment

you join a Facebook photo group, for example, you

see what other members are sharing. Doesn’t matter if

you know them in real life or not, you start comparing

yourself to others wondering “Are my images good

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enough to be shared? Probably not… Let me try a

few more times and then I’ll share…”.

Personally, I haven’t ever seen a single portfolio (and

believe me I look at many portfolios, daily) where

there hasn’t been at least one good photo.

So remember, when you’re hesitating about hitting

that upload button; it doesn’t matter if you are just

starting out or if you think you didn’t nail the shot, a

photo doesn’t need to be perfect to be seen, it just

needs to be your favourite at that moment in time.

Share it and say why it is your favourite – words add so

much to a photo that they can quite easily change

the whole perspective, taking it to a whole other level.

CONFESSION TIME

Here are the confessions of some online lurkers from

Reddit forums:

“I think I’m super hilarious until I write out my reply

and realise it’s really not funny at all. Backspace,

backspace, backspace. Hang my head in shame

and continue reading.” Dangerkittin

“Honestly, I’ve never felt the urge to respond to

something I feel strongly about because I know that

thousands of other commenter’s share the same

opinion and posted it.” Bruceagema

The last confession is especially dangerous in the

photography world. Our world is built on images and

photographs. Who takes those images? Who shares

the images of mundane surroundings, the most

remote corners of the world or something deeply

important? We do, us photographers. Well, the 10% of

us who aren’t lurking!!

If you take a photo of the Wanaka tree and don’t

upload it because you think there are already

thousands of others who took the same photo of


the same tree – you are absolutely 100% right. BUT it

doesn’t mean you don’t need to share your photo.

Just like fingerprints, no two photos of the same

subject are ever the same so please do share your

shot whilst telling your personal story that goes along

with the photo – your why.

GETTING THE COURAGE TO LEAVE THE

SHADOWLAND

The Shadowland is the same place as our comfort

zone. We all know that it is comfy and cozy but

doesn’t help our progress. Communities whether

online or offline are there to help us grow, meet others

and share common interests.

The problem is that as time passes and you are

no longer a “new member” of a community,

psychologically it becomes harder and harder to

engage. Do you just post something and say “Hi”?

Do you say you just joined when it’s been six months

already…? How do you start the conversation? What

happens if the active members of the community

don’t like what you say?

Forget the ‘what ifs’, and know that you must start

engaging in any community as soon as possible

after you join. Get your foot in the door, no matter

how uncomfortable it may feel. The risk at this stage

is minimal, but the reward from participating in a

community of like-minded people is enormous. Of

course, there are some cases when you join a group

and then find it doesn’t feel quite right. There’s no

need to stay or force yourself into something you

don’t like. Maybe you don’t share the same values as

other members? Maybe the age of the participants

is not right for you? Maybe you don’t get any new or

useful information? That’s ok, with one click you can

leave, unsubscribe and find a community that feels

like home.

I could easily spend hours talking about “lurking

syndrome”, giving different examples and

consequences, but I’d like to say to everyone

reading this who recognized themselves as a lurker

or even half-lurker – as soon as you acknowledge the

reason why you are not actively participating in any

community you belong to (and those reasons may

not be from the list above), try to remember why you

joined it in the first place and then be a bit braver

and take the first step of saying “Hi!” and introducing

yourself, even if you are not ready to (or don’t need

to) share any of your photographs.

I’m still on this path myself. If you want to share your

experience – you are most welcome to send me an

email, let’s bring more lurkers out of the Shadowland

and more talented photographers to light.


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Photo© Darran Leal www.worldphotoadventures.com.au

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NZPhotographer


THE GALLERY IS PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY

PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

October 2019 75


76

NZPhotographer


CHEERS

F8, 1/320s, ISO3200, 220mm

At the Martinborough Meandering Vineyards Day

this stranger had eyes on me (my camera) from

across the room, I had to take the shot!

Ann Kilpatrick

October 2019 77


BOHO

F4, 1/1600s, ISO320, 50mm

A fun Mama Mia inspired photo

shoot for this young lady's 18th

Birthday.

Anne Zablan-Balila

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NZPhotographer


PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST

I spotted this artist out doing a painting on the rocks at Island Bay. I chatted to him for a while and took a few

close up shots but when looking back at him when I was further down the beach I thought a long shot would

look rather cool. It seems to have more atmosphere when framed by the trees and breaking waves in the

background. Apologies to the artist for forgetting his name!

Peter Maiden

October 2019 79


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A SILENT MELODY

1/50s, ISO400, 44mm

Model: Georgia

Makeup Artist: Serenity Hair & Beauty

Hair: Michelle Paulin

Anupama Wijesundara

October 2019 81


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NZPhotographer


STEAMPUNK PASTELS

F11, 1/200s, ISO200, 80mm

This is the second year I have attended the

Glenbrook Steampunk Express. The day is full

of wonderful people dressed up in their best

steampunk outfits and includes a ride on a

steam train with a stop over at the engine

workshops. I was standing on the railway line,

looking up at these two ladies on the platform.

Carole Garside

October 2019 83


BACK TO ME

F1.4, 1/1250s

After having a child your body changes and this sometimes

affects the confidence of a woman. I took this photo to show

how beautiful and mysterious you can still be.

Linda Cutche

84 NZPhotographer


WAITING

F3.5, ISO400

This shot was taken at a small gathering

before my daughters formal. She was

waiting for her boyfriend to come so she

could pin his buttonhole flower on.

Di Lewis

October 2019 85


TALKING WITH FIRE

F5.6, 1/500s, ISO6400

The Smithy at Howick Historical Village.

Hender Park

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October 2019 87


INVERSION

F4, 1/1600s, ISO320, 50mm

This is a portrait which was part of a series

I did on how we manipulate our bodies to

become like Barbie dolls. This is the final

image in the series, I wanted it to look like

she was more machine, or artificial than

real, thus the inverted effect.

Janisha Patel

88

NZPhotographer


SUBJECTIVE SUCCESS

F4, 1/1600s, ISO320, 50mm

This photo is an extract from a photo zine that I created earlier on this year called

Subjective Success. It questions the relationship that is created by the media and

pop culture between fame, money, and success. It shows the ideas of identity with

success, and the concept of 'being someone', and uses the bright neon lights as

symbolism for the scene of the fast life.

Iolo Adams

October 2019 89


EDGE OF ADULTHOOD

F4.8, 1/8000s, ISO6400

17yr old Sebastian exudes the innocence and energy

of a young man burgeoning on adulthood.

Kelly Vivian

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October 2019 91


SOUL CONNECTION (SISTERS)

F7.1, 1/200s, ISO200, 34mm

This image is of two lovely sisters who found a special connection that they

forgot already existed. In our fast moving life we forget to connect with our own

folks. My sessions are designed to ignite that spark between two souls again

and again and again. I love the innocent expressions I caught on the camera

once they got really comfortable with each other.

Mandy Sidhu

92 NZPhotographer


BUILDING UP COURAGE

F5.6, 1/160s, ISO200

This image was taken at a Camera Club set up

shoot with models.

Murray Lowe

October 2019 93


TIES TO

FEMININITY

This is an image looking at our

duality and how femininity, or the

pubic notion of it, can sometimes

bind our self image.

Marianna Johnson

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October 2019 95


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MORE LONDON

F8, 1/400s, ISO200

Taken in the More London Precinct on the South

Bank, I was taken by the vivid red colour of the

building and the shadow cast on it, as well as the

people walking across the frame.

Michael Bouchier

October 2019 97


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NZPhotographer


THE ART OF BEING DIFFERENT

F3, 1/160s, ISO800

Peter Kurdulija

October 2019 99


HAPPY FATHERS DAY

It's about the good memory of father and daughter time.

Twingle Mathali

100

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October 2019 101


"PHOTOGRAPHY IS ABOUT

CAPTURING SOULS NOT

SMILES"

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NZPhotographer

DRAGAN TAPSHANOV

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