The Pioneer, Student's Magazine: Vol. 53, Issue 1

thepioneer

Pierce College's student magazine.

Sept. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s student news publication, Est. 1974

1

Welcome

Back!

Lost?

Flip to the

campus map

pages 10-11

Read about

our new

President

pages 14-15

New

Art Installation

page 9


THE

Web: piercepioneernews.com

Email: pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu

Facebook: piercepioneernews

Twitter: @piercepioneer

Phone:253-964-6604

Room: CAS 323

2

Editorial

You Made It!

Everyday presents a new challenge. There are

times where bills might feel like a lot, while other

times it might be a battle just to get out of bed.

The pressure can feel like it’s too much and that’s a

normal feeling to have, especially as a student. But

everyday a student continues to move forward is

another day that challenge is conquered.

Not everyone has the opportunity to attend

college. Sometimes life gets in the way and forces

people to step back from school. It’s also no secret

that college is a big financial step that some simply

cannot make. There are many obstacles in life that

prevent people from this life. So to the students who

are here, never forget that you got here, and that it’s

worth celebrating everyday.

A plethora of students attend Pierce College, all

from different backgrounds and for different reasons.

There are running start students, and students

who haven’t been to school since graduating years

ago. Some students are here after having found a

sudden new passion they can finally pursue, while

others have recently graduated and are just getting

started. What brought them to Pierce will always

be an important step in their life. And over the

summer, Pierce has made many changes to try and

make that mean something.

Artist have gone out of their way to create a

sculpture meant to inspire those on campus, while

Campus Safety has made improvements to their

office for the benefit of the students. Those interested

in studying abroad now have unique opportunities

to do so, and new additions to the campus are

being discussed for the future. A lot has happened

on campus with more to come, but none of that

matters if the students aren’t here to experience it.

Students should feel happy to be where they are

now. Never forget the steps taken to get here, and

know that there’s always new opportunities for

students looking to make the most of the year as

they attend. A new chapter begins now, so make it

a great one.

Welcome to Pierce College, and for those who’ve

been here before, welcome back. You made it!

/ piercepioneernews.com

Editorial Manager

Taylor Riley

triley@pierce.ctc.edu

Production Manager

Ciara Williams

cwilliams@pierce.ctc.edu

Web Manager

Myra Fehling

mfehling@pierce.ctc.edu

Social Media Manager

Kotone Ochiai

kochiai@pierce.ctc.edu

Office Manager

Currently Hiring

Staff

ABOUT THE COVER:

Students new to Pierce could

laugh, interact, and learn

about campus activities at the

new Raider welcome held on

Sept. 11

Letters to The Editor

Have an opinion on our articles or about campus events, policy?

Write a letter to the editor and send to:

pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu.

We cannot publish letters that are anonymous.

THE PIONEER MISSION STATEMENT

Writers

James Zaldivar

Anne Hammond

Lizzy Rowe

Katie Kittlitz

Designers

Abri Wilson

Candee Bell

Darell Kuntz

Jezreel Proo

Photographers

Jordan Hong

Veronica Lu

Lily Binderiya

The Pioneer is an official publication of the Associated Students of Pierce College and is

sanctioned as such by the college’s Board of Trustees and funded primarily by student fees.

It is a public forum for student expression since 1974.

The Pioneer’s mission is:

(1) to inform the student body of issues and events of interest, relevance and importance;

(2) to provide students with a forum for discussion, opinion and expression; and

(3) to provide the student body with editorial leadership.

In carrying out this mission, The Pioneer will use as its ethical guide the Statement of

Principles adopted by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Although it will strive

to represent the diverse views and interests of the student body, The Pioneer is not responsible

for representing, endorsing or promoting any person, group, organization or activity.

September 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


June 3, 2019 / Vol. 52, Issue 8

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s student news publication, Est. 1974

PIONEER PAST ISSUE

Miss a past issue? Come into

our office and get a copy. It’s not

too late! Room: CAS 323

Contents

Campus

Campus

Feature

5&8/ NEW CAMPUS

SAFETY OFFICE

Campus Safty office summer

remodel is underway

10-11/ CAMPUS MAP

A campus map to help you

find your way

14-15/ PRESIDENT

JULIA A. WHITE

Julie A. White discusses

what it means to be involved

Campus

6-7/ KENYA

Pierce students form new

cultural connections

Feature

12-13/ EMS, DENTAL

AND VETERINARY

BUILDING EXPANSION

A proposed completion date

has been set for Fall of 2021

09

Sports

16/ MASCOTS

Not everyone gets to view

the world from inside a

large, fake bird, but Pierce

College mascots do just that

Campus

9/ PIERCE COLLEGE CONNECTING WITH

STUDENTS THROUGH ART

Pierce College Connecting with Students Through Art

Sports

18/ GOLF SCRAMBLE

The annual Pierce College

Golf Scramble scholarship

has come and gone for

another successful turnout

Coffee Break

19/ CARTOON CORNER

Take a break from studying

and have some fun

September 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 3


EVENT

September & October / 2019

CALENDAR

23 24 September 30 September 01 15 15

29 04

WELCOME DAZE RAIDER RESOURCE STUDENT GOVERN-

FAIR

MENT MEETING

MOVIE PASSES

AVALIABLE

Student Life Lobby Cascade 3rd floor Student life lobby

OLY205

4

From noon - 1 p.m. From 11 a.m. - 2 p.m From noon - 1 p.m From noon - 1 p.m.

10 11 15 31

ELA WORKSHOP

HAUNTED WOODS EXCURSION

PASSES AVAILABLE IN STUDENT LIFE

DESTRESS FOR

MENTAL HEALTH

DAY

FAMILY MOVIE

NIGHT

DISNEYS LIVE ACTION ALADDIN

STUDENT GOVERN-

MENT MEETING

SPOOKTACULAR

EVENT

Student life lobby

Doors open 5:30

Student life lobby

Community event

Showtime 6:00

From 11 a.m - 1 p.m. From noon - 1 p.m From 6 p.m - 8

04 / piercepioneernews.com September 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


NEW CHANGES TO THE

CAMPUS SAFETY OFFICE

Campus

The Campus Safety Office went through remodeling over the

summer with the hopes of improving student experiences

BY TAYLOR RILEY

Staff Writer

5

CIARA WILLIAMS/

Staff Photo

I need help.

It’s not unusual for college students to

say this on campus. Whether that help

be navigating the campus, or needing

personal assistance and not knowing

where to get it. It’s a normal part of being

a college student, and it is important to

know where students can receive that

support.

Pierce College’s Campus Safety Office,

located on the third floor of the Cascade

Building, is here to assist both new and

returning students with any burning

questions. Jeffrey Schneider, the Director

of Campus Safety, wants all students to

know that they can come to them for

anything.

“We’re kind of the one stop shop,” said

Schneider. “If you don’t know the answer

to something or don’t know where something

is or who to talk to, you can come

to us. We can either answer your question

or put you in contact with someone

who can.”

Over the summer, the Campus Safety

Office went through remodeling, with

the hopes of providing students a better

environment. Pierce has added a glass

window in the office which now closes off

the area from the public. This provides

students and staff privacy to air out any

and all problems.

Originally, the office was a tall counter

where students went with their questions.

Schneider states that the old set up did

not comply with American Disability

Act guidelines, meaning the state would

have required the remodeling. However,

Schneider felt that making a few extra

changes to better the student’s experiences

would be a benefit for the future.

“In the past victims who needed a

space to talk felt not as comfortable to

do so, due to the original set up,” said

Schneider. By providing privacy, the staff

hopes students will feel more comfortable

to come to them for help.

Campus security has also done work

over the summer, including teaming with

local law enforcement to better prepare

in the event of an incident. On Sept. 5,

Campus Safety held an all-day training in

the Rainier Building with the Lakewood

Police Department. Schneider states that

this allows officers to better familiarize

themselves with the campus

The Campus Safety Office has made

itself an available source for a plethora

of situations. “We’ve done everything,”

said Schneider. “From call ambulances,

to providing first aid, and for the case

of running start students, connecting

students and family members.”

On a typical day, the usual questions

students bring to the office involves finding

where their classroom is located or

how to receive a parking permit. Though

at times, students will come to the office

with more serious concerns.

Schneider mentions how there are

times where students are experiencing

dating violence or may even be the

victim of other serious crimes. Schneider

makes it clear that students can bring

non-school related concerns to them if

needed; the office can refer students or

staff to counseling or law enforcement.

Ultimately, it starts with Campus Safety.

The office does what it can to alleviate

any concerns students might have while

on campus. Students uncomfortable with

walking to their car at night after class

can go to Campus Safety and receive an

escort.

If a student’s car is broken into, or a

stranger or classmate is making them

uncomfortable - Campus Safety is here

to help with these concerns. Students

seeking help only need to stay aware and

ask when needed; all it takes is that first

initial step from students. .

Schneider finds it important that students

are aware that they are responsible

for their own security as well. Campus

Safety is here to serve students and will

always be available, but it is up to the

CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

September 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 5


Campus

FORMING NEW CULTURAL

CONNECTIONS

How an extended invitation lead to an exciting addition to the

upcoming Kenya study tour

6

Kenyan senators Samson Cherargei (left) and Irungu Kangata (right) at the

conference during their visit at Pierce College.

By CIARA WILLIAMS/

Staff writer

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN PIERCE

COLLEGE’S HISTORY, students will be

studying science abroad for an up close

and personal biology study in Kenya.

This trip will provide students the opportunity

to learn in a new environment not

confined by a classroom setting.

On Aug. 8, Kenyan senators Irungu

Kangata and Samson Cheragei were

invited to Pierce College by Dr. Francis

Githuku, head of the Metro Safari and

Kenyan Community. Francis intended

for this meeting to bring more Kenyan

students and their culture into Pierce

College.

Originally, the senators came to Washington

for diplomatic purposes regarding

the Boeing 737 plane malfunctions and

its effects on their citizens.

6

/ piercepioneernews.com

“THE COMMUNITY

COLLEGE MISSION

STATEMENT FIT THEIR

GOALS,” HE SAID.

“THEY SAW IT AS AN

AFFORDABLE AND

GREAT PATHWAY FOR

STUDENTS.”

— BRENT LEAVELL MAN-

AGER OF INTERNATIONAL

MARKETING

However, the Senators were also looking

for an affordable education for their

students.

As they toured, the senators brought

forth the idea of adding to the Kenya trip,

MARCOM

/courtesy photos

bridging the connection of the Kenyan

community and Pierce college.

The senators invited the students going

abroad to the National Parliament, and in

addition the possibility to have more students

from Kenya attend Pierce College.

The National Parliament, like the United

States senate, is a body of government

that votes and approves on different laws.

The Parliament itself, where the students

are invited to, is the building where the

voting takes place. This unique opportunity

was not originally on the roster for

the Kenya trip.

Brent Leavell, manager of International

Marketing and recruitment of the

International Education department,

facilitated this meeting. Leavell’s greatest

takeaway was watching the relationship

form organically

between the senators and the college.

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1

Iru

stud


“WE HAVE A LOT OF

SINGLE PARENTS

AND STUDENTS ON

FULL FINANCIAL AID

PACKAGES WHO ARE

WORKING THEIR

HARDEST OVER THE

SUMMER,”

— ASHLEY CHAMBERS

HOMESTAY COORDINATOR

The community college mission statement

fit their goals,” he said.

They saw it as an affordable and great

pathway for students.”

Ashley Chambers, the Homestay coordinator

for the International Education

department, will be attending the Kenya

trip as the administrator. “These trips

abroad are a once and a lifetime opportunity

for some students at Pierce,” Chambers

said. “It’s a way for students not only

to learn different subjects hands-on in a

non classroom setting, but to see a different

country as well.”

The game plan for the trip abroad,

Chambers explains, is to start in Nairobi

which is the capital of Kenya. From there

they will go further inland, each destination

bringing students closer to the wildlife.

At the end of the trip, they will be by

the Maassai tribe, a group inhabiting the

African Great Lakes region.

The trip itself is cheaper than most

flights to Kenya, but the financial costs

are still high. The entire trip will cost

around $3000 per student. Although

it is a daunting number, the school is

doing everything in its power to help,

one method being with the Kenya Shoe

Drive.

Collectors of Funds2Orgs pay nonprofits

to collect on the company's behalf, the

funds being given to the International

Department. The shoes donated are then

given to small business owners in different

countries.

“We have a lot of single parents and

students on full financial aid packages

who are working their hardest over the

summer,” said Chambers. “Students are

working two or three jobs, seven days a

week to make this 7trip happen and we

would love to ease a lot of the financial

burden for them.”

Boxes can be found for the drive in

front of the Welcome Desk, while shoes

can be dropped off at the International

office room C509. When the goal is met,

the Pierce College Foundation will get

the additional funds to help the students

going on this once in a lifetime trip.

With the visit from the senators, the

students going on the trip

abroad have even more to look

forward too. With the deadline

for the shoe drive being Oct. 15,

students can help the International

Department reach their

goals of 300 bags. So let's come

together as a student body and

achieve this goal.

Campus

Ciara Williams/ Staff Photo

WHERE BOXES ARE LOCATED

Cascade 3 infront of welcome desk

Cascade 4 infront of the Library

You can request for the International

office to arrange pick ups as well.

Irungu Kangata and Samson Cherargei meet with Pierce

students.

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 7


Campus

CAMPUS SAFFTY OFFICE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

students to take that extra step in

keeping themselves safe. “If you hear

something, you have to react. Make sure

that you are visible,” said Schneider,

whether it be about a problem, vehicle, or

a student in general.

With new students preparing to attend

Pierce College this fall, many may be

curious as to how Pierce intends to assure

them that they are safe here. America as

of recent has been going through hard

times regarding gun violence and public

safety, and Schneider wishes to say this to

any students in need of assurance.

There has been no particular safety

issues on either campus and that is outstanding.

There are very few crimes that

go on here, and that’s the way we like it.

We have built in systems, and more safety

mechanisms; so should an unfortunate

event here happen, more people will be

safe.”

What Campus safety can do for you

Campus Safety is located in CAS311

You can receive a parking pass from the Campus Safety Office

You can receive a security escort to your car, or even to the

bus stop

8Campus Safety can refer you to counseling

Campus Safety can provide First Aid, CPR, and other

medical assistance

Campus Safety can help you locate a class or room

Any thefts or crimes on campus can be reported to them

Campus Safety can assist students going through dating/

relationship violence

Campus Safety can notify students of any serious incidents

happening on campus

Campus Safety regularly holds training to better improve

security during any incident

Incidents on the Fort Steilacoom campus can be reported

via their office number : (253) 964 - 6751

PIXABAY/

Courtesy photo

8

/ piercepioneernews.com

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


PIERCE COLLEGE CONNECTING WITH

STUDENTS THROUGH ART

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s new art installation is meant to connect and

inspire students attending the campus.

Campus

WOWHAUS Art Studio/Courtesy

Photos

Scott Constablemaking the

measurements for the Ascent art

piece.

By LIZZY ROWE

Staff Writer

HOW DO YOU DEFINE ART?

Scott Constable of WOWHAUS Art

Studio says it is a way of interpreting

and understanding the world. “Art is the

cousin to science and a mode of inquiry,”

says Constable. He is the creator of the

ASCENT sculpture located in the stairwell

of the Cascade Building, which is a

central hub for students. “I believe it’s a

good metaphor for education by climbing

the stairs,” he says. “And I was inspired by

the students.”

Suspending from the four-story stairwell,

the piece appears like a large fan

with several smaller shaped fans on top.

Every shape and angle capture a student's

growth and success in school. “When you

are in school, you are exposed to many

different viewpoints, and with those you

create your own narrative,” says Constable.

The sculpture is meant to be viewed

from different angles while each view

gives you a different perspective. “It’s

always dynamic- just like the students,”

he added.

The process of creating this art piece

began around 6 years ago when the committee

wanted to incorporate an artistic

element to the school. David Roholt,

an art professor at Pierce, said it was a

collaborative project with the artist and

the Washington Art Commission. “Being

able to work with various colleagues on

campus was rewarding, and the artists

were easy to work with,” says Roholt.

The ASCENT sculpture is made of

wood and took four months to craft, both

by hand and computer. There were some

challenges to making this piece work

in the stairwell so that it wasn’t easy to

touch. Constable stated he made a model

and took measurements. Afterwards he

had a structural engineer make it earthquake

proof.

WOWHAUS is based out of Oakland,

California and consists of Scott Constable,

his wife Ene, and his daughter Aili.

“When my daughter was about one and

a half, I was building a tiny studio in the

backyard that was seven feet by nine feet.

She would always say I was in the wow

house,” says Constable. “It’s also a take on

BOWHAUS in Germany who were the

inventors of modernism.”

“WHEN IT’S INSTALLED,

IT BELONGS THERE,

AND IT BELONGS TO THE

STUDENTS THROUGH

GENERATIONS.”

— SCOTT CONSTABLE

WOWHAUS ART STUDIO

Nature is Constable’s main source of

inspiration. He became interested in art

at a young age and began by just drawing

trees. “Drawing taught me to see in color,

form, compositions, line and shade,” says

Constable. He loves to experiment with

3D, abstract and moire patterns. Growing

food and raising chickens with his family

in the California Redwood Forest would

constantly spark his imagination and

creativity.

The sculpture has many meanings to

everyone. Roholt says it’s pivotal to the

environment, being that Pierce is an

academic institution. The intent is to

add color and something unexpected for

students. “It will add an artistic element

to make the campus even more beautiful,”

he says.

Constable says the most rewarding

part of the process is when the sculpture

is displayed. “When it’s installed, it belongs

there, and it belongs to the students

through generations.”

There are many students pursuing a

career in the arts, and Constable knows

firsthand what it is like... “Making a

living as a professional artist is notoriously

difficult and is often frowned

upon as a career path,” he states. “My

advice to any young person interested in

pursuing a career as an artist is to be an

excellent communicator. The sweet spot

is in understanding your strengths and

limitations, finding the best medium to

express your ideas, and understanding

how the marketplace relates to your artistic

endeavors.”

A large replica ctreated to showcase

how the Ascent art piece will

look once completed.

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 9


Campus

GET TO KNOW Y

Important places at

Welcome

Center

Computer

Lab

The Welcome Center is where

you can get help to find specific

resources and connect with your

advisor.

The Computer Lab is a good

place to work on homework and

print out papers. The lab is regularly

open to students, and is also

open on weekends.

Cafeteria

Science

Dome

Fuel your stomach and your

brain. The cafeteria has four

choices of menus every day with

delicious food fresh off the grill.

Come feed your curiosity of

the universe. The Science Dome

is the South Sound’s digital

planetarium and is located on

the second floor of the Rainier

Building.

10 / piercepioneernews.com

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


YOUR CAMPUS

Campus

s at Fort Steilacoom

Health

Education

Center

Bookstore

The Health Education Center,

also known as HEC, features a

14,000 square foot gymnasium

with equipment, trainers, and a

range of classes. The gym is also

open to all.

The Bookstore is where you

can find your required textbooks,

as well as snacks and Pierce

merchandise to feed your school

pride.

Library

Int’l

House

The library is located on the

fourth floor of the Cascade Building.

Here you can find lots of

research tools, including a Design

room and lots of quiet places to

study.

The Homeland Security/Emergency

Management office and one

of the international coordination

offices.

Abri Wilson/ Staff Illustations

Abri Wilson/ Staff Photos

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 11


Features

CONSTRUCTION UNDERWAY FOR

STUDENTS IN THE MEDICAL FIELD

Space for students will be expanded and be completed by

Fall of 2021

By KATIE KITTLITZ

Staff writer

12 / piercepioneernews.com

UNDER

CONSTRUCTION

Jezreel Proo’/ Staff Illustration

MANY STUDENTS MAY KNOW

OF PIERCE College’s ever-growing

dental hygiene, veterinary technology,

and EMS programs. Students who are

part of these departments are often seen

walking around campus in their scrubs

after a long day of class. These are three

important departments that require lots

of space and updated technology for

students to be successful in their studies

and workplace.

To combat the growing population of

people joining these programs, a new

building on Pierce College’s Fort Steilacoom

campus is in the early stages of

planning. With a proposed completion

date of Fall of 2021, this building will

provide much more room for opportunities

with the advanced technology it will

provide.

Choi Halladay, vice president of administrative

services at Pierce College,

emphasizes the needs of students who

are part of these programs, and how this

construction will benefit them. “This will

expand the amount of space that they

have by a lot,” says Halladay. “It will make

it all state of the art, and a space that represents

the kinds of work environments

that most of the students would actually

go to work in.”

In fact, for the veterinarian department,

it’s not only the students who need

the extra space. According to Salvador

Hurtado, the Veterinary Technology

Program Director, this expansion will

provide an opportunity for different

animals’ environment to be taken care of

as well.

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue1


Features

Kotone Ochiai/ Staff Photos

The first floor of the Cascade building currently houses the EMS, Veterinarian (on

the right), and Dental hygiene (on the left) programs.

“THIS BUILDING WILL

HAVE MORE STUDENT-

DEDICATED SPACE.”

— SALVADOR HURTADO,

THE VETERINARY

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

DIRECTOR

As veterinary students, Hurtado states

that it’s important to have access to animals

that can be worked with. This need

is something that this development will

focus on. In addition to larger areas for

animals to roam and exercise, there will

also be external windows for them to see

outside.

Anyone part of an intensive educational

program is likely to understand the importance

of this simulated experience; it

is necessary to be successful in whatever

field one is going into. It’s also important

to have enough room to work comfortably

in, in contrast to a smaller space that

restricts a student’s productivity.

“This building will have more student-dedicated

space,” adds Hurtado.

There will be more study areas, and

places for students to hang out in. This

way, there won’t be as much time spent

walking from building to building to eat

lunch or find a quiet place to work.”

As the construction of this building is

still in the beginning stages, it’s too soon

to determine any specific unique features.

However, Halladay has a main idea of

what staff are looking for in this new

building. “We are trying to create layouts

where it’s really efficient. Where an

instructor can move from place to place

and help a lot of different students doing

different things simultaneously.”

Halladay continues in saying that this

way, students are able to multitask with

working on a project, while getting the

help they need from professors. Forming

a space where students have this access is

valuable as it gives everyone a chance to

learn the most that they can, even while

working outside the classroom.

Upon hearing about these new renovations,

some students may be worried

about how this may affect their time at

Pierce in ways such as tuition and parking.

However, Halladay assures that there

will be no increases in tuition or fees as

a result of the new building. Parking will

not pose an issue once construction is

complete. Halladay confirms that a few

additional spots are likely to be added,

but there should be an appropriate

amount of spaces now for more students

to park in.

This expansion of dental hygiene, EMS,

and veterinary technology is something

that students can look forward to in the

future. With these new facilities, it will

provide help with getting closer to their

goals while at Pierce College.

Located on the first floor in the

Cascade building, room C111.

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue1 piercepioneernews.com / 13


Features

President White getting interviewed by Lizzy Rowe

KOTONE OCHIAI/

staff photos

JULIE A. WHITE AND WHAT

IT MEANS TO BE INVOLVED

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom president Julia A. White goes in depth on

her life and what her goals and intents are for the students under her.

BY LIZZY ROWE

Staff Writer

Pierce College centers its focus on providing

educational opportunities through

equity, inclusion and accessibility to all

communities. Julie A. White, Ph.D and

current Fort Steilacoom Pierce College

president keeps those key components at

the core of her work.

White was looking for the next step

in her career and had her eye on Pierce

for some years now. “Pierce is a national

leader and trendsetter in the community

college sector,” she adds. “When I saw

this job opening was available, I was

excited, and I got right on it.”

Growing up in a rural community in

Indiana, White’s family had never been to

college. Her father dropped out of high

14 / piercepioneernews.com

school in the 10th grade, and her grandfather

couldn’t read or write. “Academics

came easily to me, but I did feel adrift. It

wasn’t something my family had experienced,”

White disclosed. “They definitely

supported me but didn’t know how to.”

In high school, White was encouraged

by her English teacher and music instructors.

They brought out her potential and

helped her through tough times in life. “I

experienced the power of literature and

music to help me understand the human

experience and connect my own emotions

to the broader world. I wanted to

bring that to others,” she states.

As a first-generation college student,

White says not to let anyone limit you or

define what you can accomplish. “There

are so many people with stories like mine

who have accomplished amazing things.

Get to know those people because those

are the people that can help bolster you.”

Equity is the accessibility of student

opportunity and success with the individual

needs of students at the heart. White

says people with less opportunities or

lack of resources create a separation and

a less vibrant culture for all. “We have a

lot of work to do in this country around

historical racism, sexism and the conditions

we see today are rooted in those

histories. We can’t go back and change

that, but we can address the current

conditions.”

With the national presidential election

underway, many candidates ran on

a platform of reducing or eliminating

student debt, particularly for community

colleges. White states that college should

be free to everyone because financially it’s

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


a huge barrier that if removed gives

more opportunities to students.

There would be funds for daily living expenses

for students who work full time and

part time.” She proposes this innovation so

students can work less and focus more on

their academics.

The Washington State Legislator has

increased funding so more students can

receive grants. There is no effective plan

for the grants between federal and state

financial aid regulations, but White is continually

working with community college

presidents on innovative projects. “We

are creating a virtual hub of community

resources that will help students identify

YOU CAN EXPECT TO

SEE HER ON CAMPUS

ATTENDING STUDENT

EVENTS, AND SHE

WELCOMES ANY NEW

IDEAS STUDENTS BRING

FORTH. “

JULIE WHITE,

PRESIDENT

their financial needs and services in the

community,” White says.

White’s first steps in her new role is to listen

and to learn. Having conversations with

students, faculty and examining student

success data will help her understand where

the barriers lie and how they can improve

them.

When she is not in the office or at a community

event, White enjoys yoga, hiking,

biking and being outdoors. She is excited to

experience the culture and beauty Washington

has to offer. White also has a son

and a daughter who are musicians and are

enrolled in graduate school. “I think there

are some helpful genes there, but they have

worked really hard. I am very proud of

them,” she states.

White says you can expect to see her on

campus attending student events, and she

welcomes any new ideas students bring

forth. “They should know I am out in the

community talking about how great they

are and trying to spread the word about

Pierce so more students can take advantage

of the opportunities that we have.”

Features

JULIE WHITE

courtesy photo

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 15


Features

THIS IS NO ORDINARY BIRD

STUDENTS LOOKING FOR A CHANCE TO EXPRESS THEIR SCHOOL SPIRIT

CAN DO SO BY APPLYING TO BE PIERCE COLLEGE’S MASCOT, THE RAIDER.

BY ANNE HAMMOND

Staff Writer

NOT EVERYONE GETS TO VIEW

the world from inside a large, fake bird,

but Pierce College mascots do just that.

Raider mascot Khuong “Finn” Ho,

a recent Theatre and Performance Art

graduate at Fort Steilacoom, flapped his

wings and cheered on Pierce students for

the past two years.

“I just love the whole idea of it,” says

Ho. “It is an odd job, but it requires so

much more than you’d think. It’s like

being a superhero. No one knows who

you are, yet people still know who you

are. Also, I get the best spots to watch the

games.”

The Athletic Department and Student

Life Office are always looking for

students to serve as the mascot, according

to Duncan Stevenson, Pierce College

Athletic Director.

“We’ll take anybody of any age and

size,” says Stevenson. “What we’re looking

for is the energy and the interest and

enthusiasm to do it.”

Mascots often start as first-year

students then stay for their second year,

states Doug Carlson, Operations Manager

of the Health Education Center on

campus, who hires the mascots.

“We’ve actually had more short people

“DURING GAMES, THE

RAIDER BIRD DANCES

AND HANGS OUT WITH

THE CHEERLEADERS

AND TRIES TO GET THE

CROWD GOING… PEP UP

THE CROWD,”

— DOUG CARLSON

than tall people in the costume,” says

Carlson. “Almost everybody has been

under 6 feet.”

This is a job with big shoes to fill. Mascot

Ho was up to the challenge.

“Moving is easy, though with the big

bird feet, stairs are challenging,” says Ho.

“Sound wise, everything is quieter. Vision

is surprisingly better than one would

think.”

The mascots boost school spirit at

indoor sports games – volleyball and basketball

– and at Student Life events such

as “Welcome Days”. In the past two years

“the bird” has marched in the Daffodil

Parade in Puyallup, according to Carlson.

“During games, the Raider bird dances

and hangs out with the cheerleaders and

tries to get the crowd going… pep up the

crowd,” says Carlson.

Mascot Ho says he tries to embody the

Raider by giving hugs and high fives. He

also “flexes his muscle” to flesh out the

mascot and add character.

“I love it when people are willing to

suspend their disbelief and sort of ‘play

along’ with the idea of the Raider bird,”

says Ho. “It keeps the magic alive.”

Athletic Director Stevenson observes

the mascot in action more than anyone.

“I’ve really enjoyed seeing the mascot

interacting with little kids,” says Stevenson.

“It can be a scary thing, but I think

for the most part, they’re really enamored

with being next to ‘the bird.’”

That’s what Stevenson calls the Raider

mascot; he and “the bird” go way back.

The college mascot, since its inception,

has been ‘the Raider,’” explains

Stevenson. “And this goes back to the late

1960s. But for 35 years, we really didn’t

have an official mascot character, not

even an emblem.”

When Stevenson started working at

Pierce in 1987 one of his goals was to get

something to be identified as “the Raider.”

Students made several efforts through

the 1990s to try to get something going,

but the review process was so involved.

“Finally, in 2003 to 2004, I was able to

get students to initiate a mascot challenge,”

says Stevenson. “It was a design

contest open to all students.”

They had around 15 submissions;

everything from the bird we have now

to a mustang, a raccoon, a variation on

the Oakland Raiders, and other options,

according to Stevenson.

Business student and baseball player

Jason Stark won, says Stevenson. Stark

had written a backstory on the Raider as

a bird who preys on smaller animals and

birds for its survival. It was like a falcon.

“’The bird’ was the one!” laughs Stevenson.

Marcom/ courtesy photo

Abri Wilson/ staff Illustation

16 / piercepioneernews.com

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


The

Pioneer is hiring

Come expand on your skills

We offer paid hours and paid training!

We need writers!

We need designers and

illustrators!

Photographers and

videographers!

Applications in office

C323 and

https://piercepioneernews.com


Sports

GOLF-SCRAMBLE SCHOLARSHIP

Pierce College held their 26th annual Golf Scramble

this year at the Home Course in DuPont.

BY JAMES ZANLDIVAR

Staff Writer

The annual Pierce College Golf Scramble

scholarship has come and gone for

another successful turnout. The Pierce

College Foundation has put on this

annual event for the 26th time, with the

purpose of raising money for students to

help aid them while attending. Among

the beneficiaries include those exploring

fields that venture through math, science,

engineering, plus many more.

Aug. 15 met the fundraiser with clear

skies and warm weather, setting the

perfect stage to golf. This was the first

year the fundraiser was held at the Home

Course in DuPont. Nicole Ferris from the

Pierce Foundation was nothing short of

great in putting this fundraiser together,

helping raise over forty thousand for the

students of Pierce College.

With that, credit is also owed to the

sponsors who played a major role in this

event. Not just for donating their time to

Pierce College, but for being more than

excited to be a part of the event. Casey

Debow of Right!Systems mentioned

that it was a great environment, Debow

having never an event to this day. The

strong encouragement of sponsors is just

another reminder that this brings the

community together.

One of the biggest supporters of the

annual Golf Scramble scholarship is

chancellor Michele Johnson. Johnson

showed much enthusiasm when mentioning

how she is the only one to play in

all 26 events over the years. She did not

hesitate in saying that the students are

what keeps her participating year after

year.

There were many key positions played

by participants to help make this a great

first year at the Home Course. One

key role included the staff of the Home

Course such as Ashley Sihachack, an

alumni of Pierce. Sihachack helped with

the flow of the event, helping participants

and Pierce volunteers by answering questions

and providing directions.

Amongst that, Sihachack went on to

mention that she saw an increase in the

number of participants for the event.

The fundraiser was clearly well planned

and provides a welcoming environment,”

she added. “Not only that, but Pierce

showed real initiative.”

Students of Pierce College are amongst

the volunteers that participated in this

fundraiser, including students Han

Duong and William Wasson. Duong

felt that the most important thing to tell

those unaware of the fundraiser is that it’s

a benefit for the students. For those interested

in participating next year, Wasson

adds that Student Life is the best way to

get involved.

The 26th annual Pierce College Golf

Scramble scholarship fundraiser was

definitely one for the books. From the

sponsors, Pierce volunteers, and the

workers of the Home Course, everyone

definitely contributed to the success. A

big thank you to everyone who played

their part in helping raise money for the

students at Pierce College. It has already

fueled the excitement for next year's

fundraiser.

ABRI WILSON/Staff illustations

18 / piercepioneernews.com

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1


REMEMBER TO TAKE BRAKE THIS YEAR

Maybe with a comic......

Coffee Break

a walk around the lake,

19

Ciara Williams/staff photos

Or look for some cool art on campus.

Remember this year to always take time for yourself and

not to burn out!

September. 20, 2019 / Vol. 53, Issue 1 piercepioneernews.com / 19

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines