Nomad issue #22

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ISSUE 22| SEPTEMBER | FREE COPY

BY THE SEASHORE

BEAUTIFUL, SWEET, UNADULTERATED MALINDI

FROM PRAGUE

WITH LOVE

HOME OF

AFRICAN ART

DISCOVER LUANDA,

ANGOLA


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2 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


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NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 1


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EDITOR’S NOTE

NAIROBI’S REVENGE

I

like to joke that my favourite thing to do in Nairobi is to get out of Nairobi. This

should however not be mistaken for a dislike for the capital, though, because I’ve

come to realize that the best thing about going to our beautiful coastal beaches

or heading north to the mountains is that I get to come back to Nairobi. Oh my

life is a paradox.

Recently, I’ve been particularly vocal about my disdain for Nairobi. I’ve mentioned how,

after living here for 10 years, I’ve simply exhausted the list of things that I could possibly

do in this city. Besides going out to restaurants, of which there are some excellent ones

continuously cropping up, what else is left to do for a restless soul that has ticked everything

off her list tenfold?

In a bout of karma…wait, does it come in bouts? And when do you know when it is in

fact karma instead of just a series of unfortunate coincidences? Being a Christian, I don’t

exactly prescribe to that brand of spirituality, but the writer in me does quite like how that

word rolls off the tongue. Anyway, in a series of unfortunate events, Nairobi decided that it

had had enough and decided to exert its revenge. It struck at the right time too, when I had

booked a flight out of the country and was excited about that for weeks.

On the said day, I missed my flight because the road we decided to take had been

blocked off for the day, and when we finally got out of that situation, it sent its agents, the

police, to derail my driver for a further 30 minutes due to a minor traffic violation. By the

time I got to the airport, the check-in counter had been shut off despite there still being some

30 minutes to flight time; I was simply too late. Determined not to spend another night in

Nairobi, I booked the evening flight, and after hanging around the airport all day, got to

the immigration desk only to be turned back due to an issue with my passport which I had

used only one week prior.

I then had to go back to my apartment and spend another night in Nairobi. It had won

the fight, and just for the record, just so we’re back on good terms going forward, my dear

Nairobi, I’m sorry for all the bad things I’ve said about you. Most of them, at least.

wattaonthego

Wendy Watta

NOMAD ISSUE 21 · SEP/OCT 2019 · PUBLISHED BY WEBSIMBA LIMITED, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

MANAGING DIRECTOR MIKUL SHAH EDITOR WENDY WATTA DESIGN BRIAN SIAMBI SALES VANESSA WANJIKU DIGITAL FAITH KANJA

CONTRIBUTORS SAMANTHA DU TOIT, KARI MUTU, DIANE MCLEISH, SABINA VIVALDI, FAITH KANJA, MAURICE SCHUTGENS, ERIKA KOSS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS BRIAN SIAMBI, JAMILA HASSAN EL-JABRY, TREVOR MAINGI, RAHIM MANDVIWALLA

MARKETING & OPERATIONS DANIEL MUTHIANI, JANE NAITORE

SALES ENQUIRIES CALL NOMAD 0711 22 22 22 EMAIL EDITOR@NOMADMAGAZINE.CO

NomadMagazineAfrica @NomadMagAfrica @NomadMagazineAfrica

4 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


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ON THE COVER

MALINDI PIER

PHOTOGRAPHED BY TREVOR MAINGI

CONTENTS

26

MALINDI, MAMMA MIA!

Having spent a glorious

week exploring its beaches,

sampling local and Italian

food, following strangers on

impromptu adventures and

diving head-first into an array

of excursions, Wendy Watta

makes a case for why you

should visit Malindi.

6 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


48

24

In this issue

10. TOP SHOTS

This month’s featured photographers

capture a boy swimming against the tide

near Fort Jesus, Mombasa, and more.

14. NEWS

New ground broken in an effort to save

the northern white rhinos while Rwanda's

most luxurious hotel launches in mountain

gorilla territory.

16. WHATS ON

From Afri-love Fest to the Zanzibar Beach

& Watersports Festival, find a roundup of

must-attend events this season.

24. GLOBETROTTERS

Muthoni Maingi talks about her trips

across the globe, talking to strangers in

pubs and accepting invitations that no

sensible person would.

52. WHAT I PACK FOR MY TRAVELS

Our Head of Sales, Vanessa Wanjiku,

gives us a peek inside her travel bag.

FEATURES

46. ON THE RADAR: EBURU FOREST

Eburu Forest is a treasure of the Great Rift

Valley and that is why the Rhino Ark

Charitable Trust stepped in and

is engaged in a major long-term

conservation exercise to preserve and

sustainably manage it, writes Diane

McLeish

44

36. MALINDI DREAM

From Malindi Dream Garden and Sandies

Tropical Village to Diamonds Dream of

Africa, discover some of the places where

we stayed during our one week trip to

Malindi.

38. WHERE TO STAY

Suggestions of beautiful properties in

Malindi to book on your next trip.

40. COZY POINT HOMES

Immerse yourself in the local vibe in

Malindi in a charming home setting where

you never have to worry about what’s for

dinner!

REGULARS

20. BIRTHDAYS ARE FOR WILD CAMPING

It seemed a slightly strange request from

their soon-to-be eight-year-old; to take

her ‘proper’ camping for her birthday

when she had spent most of her life

growing up in a tent, writes Samantha du

Toit. However, missing ‘proper’ camping

themselves, the family happily obliged.

22. FROM PRAGUE WITH LOVE

Kari Mutu spends time in the capital city

of the Czech Republic, walking around

Prague’s old town which is an immersion

into history, varied architecture, cultural

attractions, beer and food...lots of food.

44. LUANDA: A CITY ON THE MOVE

Maurice Schutgens heads to Angola and

with only a day to spare, explores what

he describes as ‘one of Africa’s greatest

mysteries’.

48. HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS

With an array of African art collected

from over 20 African countries, coupled

with its unique architecture inspired by

the traditional mud houses across the

continent, African Heritage House is

indeed an art lover’s paradise.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 7


8 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


WHICH PLACE IN THE WORLD FEELS MOST LIKE HOME RIGHT NOW?

KARI MUTU

Kenyan Traveler, Page - 22

Although I live in Nairobi, the place that feels

most like home right now is Nanyuki town.

There are still wide open spaces and natural

landscapes not far away so you can easily

escape from urban noise, traffic and general

stress. Beautiful Mt Kenya is always hovering

in the background. I love the peaceful

countryside views of farms, livestock grazing

in the fields and people working the land,

and yet knowing that modern conveniences

are nearby. Plus, it’s just a few hours away

from Nairobi.

DIANE MCLEISH

Conservation, page - 46

Living on a farm on the shores of Lake

Naivasha definitely feels like home. Being

retired, we moved here three years ago

and the experience of raising chickens,

cultivating and eating from the vegetable

garden, harvesting rainwater, heating water

only by solar power and supporting local

businesses has been invigorating. We also

have the pleasure of walking the dogs to

the lakeshore daily where we can enjoy

sundowners, watch glorious sunsets and the

abundant wildlife.

MAURICE SCHUTGENS

Dispatch, page - 44

Africa has always been my ‘home’, whether

it was the rural eastern Uganda village where

I grew up, the tea estates of Malawi where I

spent my transformative teenage years or the

metropolitan city of Cape Town where I did

my masters degree in Conservation Biology.

Now, having been based in Nanyuki for

the last 5 years I’d have to say nothing has

changed! I consider this whole continent my

home and I hope to see much more of it in

future.

SAROVA HOTELS & RESORTS REFURBISHES

THE LIDO LOUNGE & RESTAURANT

The largest indigenous collection of hotels in East Africa, Sarova

Hotels & Resorts, has officially opened the Lido Lounge and

Restaurant within the Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa.

The newly refurbished restaurant now exemplifies an elegant and

stylish seaside restaurant that will offer a unique dining experience

coupled with magnificent panoramic views of the Indian Ocean.

The renovation is part of the ongoing full refurbishment of Sarova

Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa that started three years ago.

There is a large iconic bar in cool white terrazzo with light slots

that goes from the deck into the water, allowing for a swim up bar

seating. Rustic and rugged tropical textures are at play at the openair

lounge.

Lido certainly lives up to its name. The world class cuisine

available combined with friendly service makes the experience in

food and beverage exceptional at every encounter. The lounge is

a chill out spot where guests can listen to contemporary music. It

will offer a vast array of seafood and feature the catch of the day

delivered by the local fishermen from the nearby reefs. The open

kitchen also provides guests the fun theatrics of watching their food

being prepared.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 9


10 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


TOP SHOTS

JAMILA HASSAN EL-JABRY

Instagram: @jammy.eljabry

This photo was taken near Fort Jesus. The

boy was swimming against the tide and

was really enjoying himself, so I decided

to capture the moment. I used a Canon 5D

Mark III with a 24 -105 mm lens, and my

settings were F/8, 1/400 and ISO 100.

TIPS: Always capture a moment that tells

a story. Framing and composition are also

very important to take into consideration.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 11


RAHIM MANDVIWALLA

Instagram: @r.m_wild

I used a Canon 5D Mark III with a

Sigma 150-600mm lens set to shutter

speed 1/320, F/6.3and ISO 200.

The image is titled Brotherly Love. These

brothers are part of the Kingfisher pride

at Nairobi National Park and may be

the future kings there. This shot was

captured as they rested under a tree in

the afternoon.


TOP SHOTS

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 13


WHAT’S ON

AFRICA HOTEL INVESTMENT

FORUM (AHIF) 2019

This annual event brings together the who’s

who of the hotel investment community

that drive investment into tourism projects,

infrastructure and hotel development across

Africa. AHIF has proven to be Africa’s annual

meeting place for the region’s most senior

hotel investors, developers, operators and

advisors. It is the conference that connects

business leaders from international and

local markets to do deals across the region.

Meet the investors panel who will share the

main hurdles and opportunities available

in the region. Themed Unlocking Tourism

Opportunities across the continent, this event

takes place from 23rd to 25th September

2019 at Sheraton Addis in Ethiopia.

www.AHIF.com

THE ZANZIBAR BEACH &

WATERSPORTS FESTIVAL

This annual event, now in its 9th edition, is a celebration of beach

life, culture and music, spanning three days. Taking place from 6th

to 9th December, the main location this year will be in Jambiani on

Mfumbwi beach, on the South-East Coast of Zanzibar. The festival

comprises different sports including goat racing, dhow racing ,

'nage' for women, a beach soccer tournament, beach run, kayak

racing, kite surfing, touch rugby, tug of war, a paintball fight, Maasai

high jump, beach volleyball tournament, music from famous local and

international musicians and more. For more information please visit

www.zanzibarfestival.com

AFRI-LOVE FEST

Fun, interactive and fresh, Afri-love Fest returns! Save the date

for another day of creative play on Sunday 3rd November, in

Nairobi. There will be plenty to enjoy for people of all ages.

Try your hand at something new with a variety of creative

workshops, talks and interactive experiences. Discover some of

East Africa's most innovative makers and designers spanning

home, fashion, beauty and more! Relax with friends, food and

drink in the beautiful Ikigai Westlands garden. Find out more at

www.afri-love.com/fest.

14 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 15


NEWS

NEW GROUND BROKEN IN EFFORT

TO SAVE THE NORTHERN WHITE

RHINOS

Great news as scientists carry out a successful egg

harvest from Ol Pejeta’s Najin and Fatu, the only two

female northern white rhinos left in the world. This

breaks new ground in the effort to save the species. On

22nd August 2019, a team of veterinarians successfully

harvested eggs from the two females — a procedure

that has never been attempted in northern white rhinos

before. The scientists artificially inseminated the eggs

with frozen sperm from a northern white rhino bull. By

September 11, two embryos from Fatu were successfully

matured and in the near future the embryo will be

transferred to a southern white rhino surrogate mother.

The successful procedure was a joint effort by the

Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-

IZW) Berlin, Avantea, Dvůr Králové Zoo, Ol Pejeta

Conservancy and the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS).

RWANDA’S MOST LUXURIOUS

HOTEL LAUNCHES IN MOUNTAIN

GORILLA TERRITORY

Rwanda launched one of its most luxurious hotels

in Kinigi sector, Musanze district in Northern

Province, right at the habitat of the rare mountain

gorillas. The facility, Singita Kwitonda Lodge

and Kataza House, is set within a landscape of

wetlands and lush meadows with magnificent

views of the Sabyinyo, Gahinga and Muhabura

volcanoes. Designed around local materials, the

buildings have been crafted using volcanic rock,

river stone, handmade ceramic tiles and oven-red

clay bricks made by surrounding communities. The

interiors have been carefully curated with a focus

on handcrafted details, including woven panels,

tiles and clay pots. Catering for the unique climate

and conditions in Rwanda’s northwest, all the suites

feature indoor and outdoor fireplaces and outdoor

heated plunge pools. The cost of a stay ranges

from $1750 per night to $8000.

KURIFTU RESORTS & SPA OPEN

THE BIGGEST WATER PARK IN EAST

AFRICA

Set in the lake town of Bishoftu in Ethiopia, the park

which has water playgrounds, swimming pools, about

123 shops and three banks is the first of its kind in East

Africa. Opened on 31st August, the park has 12 facilities

designated for different recreational activities such as two

water houses, a boomerang slide, a spiral slide, a wave

pool and a performance center. There is a designated

area that will host concerts and events complete with a

lit-up stage, and it has beach-like features including the

sand. Kuriftu currently has five operational resorts and

hotels in Bishoftu, Bahir Dar, Afar, Langano and Adama,

and in Moucha Island, Djibouti.

16 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


SILVERPALM SPA & RESORT

Bofa Road, Kilifi P.O. Box 41247-80100,

Mombasa | Tel: +254-780745837 /+254 707745837

Email: info@silverpalmkilifi.co.ke | www.silverpalmkilifi.com

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 17


SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL

WILL TRAVEL

FOR COFFEE

You may be an avid lover of coffee, but have you ever considered going on a coffee

tour to find out more about how it ends up in your cup at a cafe, or how farmers are

learning to sustain their business through coffee tourism? Text: Erika Koss

In 1994, during my first summerlong

visit to Kenya, I cannot

recall visiting a coffee shop in

Nairobi. Twenty-five years later,

it isn’t hard to find such cafes to

conduct business interviews or

meet with friends, complete with

a knowledgeable barista showcasing the

special quality of Kenyan coffee.

Among these coffee drinkers, however,

how many know that it takes more than

three dozen pairs of hands for a tiny coffee

seed to transform into a liquid beverage?

Sometimes even those who drink the most

coffee in the world – per capita consumption

is highest in Scandinavia and the United

States – may not know that coffee is a tree

and a cherry. And who can explain the

labour-intensive process that coffee takes

from farm to cup?

To help bridge this gap, some farms

have launched coffee tours to teach visitors

about the lengthy coffee chain, where it first

begins as a seed and grows into a tall tree

that produces flowers, green unripe cherries

and finally red cherries. Only when these

cherries are bright red are they ready to

be picked and sorted, a time-consuming

job often accomplished by women. These

cherries can be processed in different ways

depending on the machines or technical

capacity at various farms. After processing,

the “parchment” coffee is ready to be dried

in the sun, then taken to the mill where it

transforms again to “green coffee”—usually

the form in which it is then exported to North

America or Europe. Only after all these steps

will green coffee be roasted into a darkbrown

hue, then be ground, brewed and

prized as a beverage.

Coffee tours can offer a way for farmers

to diversify their income. From climate

change to coffee-berry diseases, many

challenges lead young people to migrate

to cities and older farmers to uproot their

coffee trees to plant other crops. For many

coffee farmers in the more than 70 coffeeproducing

countries in Latin America, Africa

and Asia, coffee has been an unprofitable

business for decades.

I always learn something new every time

I visit a new coffee plantation, estate or

farm. I’ve joined coffee tours on farms from

Nicaragua to Rwanda. Some family estates,

such as Greenwell Farms on Kona island,

Hawaii or Hacienda San Pedro in Puerto

Rico, have been giving public coffee tours

for many years, allowing survival despite

market fluctuations and climate disasters,

such as hurricanes.

Yet in East Africa as a whole, it is still

relatively harder to find a coffee estate,

plantation or cooperative that publicly

welcomes guests to learn about the whole

process of coffee from seed to cup. In Kenya,

however, there are several opportunities to

learn about coffee production. For those

near Nairobi, one of the best options is the

educational experience offered at Fairview

Estate in Kiambu, where day-time coffee

tours are possible most days except Sundays,

which is the weekly agricultural holiday.

When I visited in June, I was given an

enriching tour by Mary, an experienced

barista, coffee taster and tour guide. As we

walked through part of the estate’s 150 acres

of land, she talked about the importance of

coffee varietals, such as those now popular

in Kenya (Batian, Ruiru 11, SL28), and she

shared that in addition to several families

who live and work year-round on the

estate, during the harvest, more than 400

people are given work picking, sorting and

processing coffee. The tour ended with a

tasting of three different roasts of the same

coffee—emphasizing that coffee’s unique

flavor has as much to do with its production

on the farm, as it does when it is roasted and

brewed.

Last month, I flew from Nairobi to Kitale

to visit Sakami Coffee in Trans Nzoia county

on the slopes of Mt. Elgon. With 70 acres in

production—50,000 coffee trees—Sakami’s

husband/wife co-owners, Gloria and Jarmo

Gummerus, are focused on sustainability

and transparency at every step of their

coffee’s production. And while they are not

yet ready to host coffee tourists, it is part of

their overall vision for the future after they

complete their next phase of planting 30

more acres of coffee trees from the seedlings

growing in their coffee nursery.

From California to Cape Town, owners

of vineyards have offered wine tours and

wine tastings for decades. In the twenty-first

century, coffee may be the one of the world’s

most desired beverages, but its consumption

will only be possible if coffee farmers and

producers find it financially profitable. For

those who can, Coffee Tourism may be one

strategy to sustain a future with coffee for us

all.

Author bio:

Erika is a writer, teacher and researcher

living in Nairobi, Kenya. She is a Research

Associate at the University of Nairobi; a

PhD candidate in International Development

Studies at Saint Mary’s University in

Canada, and an Authorized Trainer of the

Specialty Coffee Association. Instagram: @

AWorldinYourCup.

18 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


NOTES FROM THE BUSH

BIRTHDAYS ARE FOR

WILD CAMPING

It seemed a slightly strange request from our soon-to-be eight-year-old;

to take her ‘proper’ camping for her birthday when she had spent most

of her life growing up in a tent, writes Samantha du Toit. However,

missing ‘proper’ camping themselves, the family happily obliged.

Preparation started with

digging out old tin trunks

full of slightly rusty pots and

pans, dusting out camping

tents, relocating the grill,

deciding on bedding

options and, of course,

creating campfire-friendly food menus. At

last, with the car heaving under the weight

of our outdoor equipment, we set off to our

new campsite; a short journey of a mere

kilometre or so from camp but, nonetheless,

a different world. Located right on the river,

and a few feet from a small sandy valley

which we knew from past experience was a

key drinking point for many wild animals, our

new campsite was just the right size. Nestled

in the bushes, we had enough space for our

cooking area and two tents; one for us and

one for Auntie and Uncle, who were joining

our birthday fun.

As the camp came to life with a washingup

station in place, tents and beds made

up and tables and chairs put around the

campfire, preparations for dinner started.

The children rose to the occasion, delighted

to help with all the chores and preparations

as it all seemed novel and fun. As the light

was fading, we almost could not believe our

eyes as, in the distance, a small family of

elephants made their way carefully down to

the river to drink. They could not see us, and

dinner preparations on hold, we watched

them until the light faded. Later, we sat

with a delicious meal on the plates on our

laps, tasting all the better for the time and

campfire smoke it had taken to get it there.

The night noises seemed closer than

usual. As we fell asleep we could hear the

distant bark of baboons, the closer whoop

of the hyenas and perhaps some more

elephants splashing in the cool river.

In the morning we started our day by

reading the ‘morning news’ or in other

words, looking for who had come to drink

in the night. A plethora of tracks greeted us

including leopard, hyena, various gazelles

and a porcupine. Seyia shrieked with

surprise when she noticed our washing up

sponge in the bushes with a few chunks

missing from it. A hungry genet had done

that, we all assumed. As we stood and

turned around from the river to walk back

to the campsite, we gasped to see a lioness

with her four small cubs looking at us, very

surprised to see us on their way to drink.

She stared at us for what seemed like a long

time, but in reality was probably a splitsecond,

before heading off at a fast trot in

the opposite direction. Her cubs followed,

and we could track their progress away

from us by the warning calls of the baboons

and vervet monkeys.

We spent the rest of the day by the

river, relaxing, swimming, cooking and

bird watching. We returned to main camp

the following day, tired and dirty but with

blissful memories of our ‘proper’ camping

trip and with a family pact not to leave it so

long until the next time.

Samantha du Toit is a wildlife

conservationist, working with SORALO, a

Maasai land trust. She lives with her

husband, Johann, and their two children at

Shompole Wilderness, a tented camp in the

Shompole Conservancy.

20 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


KOBE SUITE RESORT, WATAMU

Nested in the heart of Watamu Marine National Park, Kobe Suite Resort

offers a unique stay, endless opportunities to relax and reconnect with

nature and the special people in your life, this is a place you don’t want to

leave. The resort features a tropical garden, two outdoor pools & a private

beach area. Come & discover the beauty of the best beach in Kenya.

WELCOME

It is our pleasure to welcome you to Kobe Suite Resort, Watamu. Our

helpful, friendly personnel eagerly await your arrival and are committed

to ensuring that your stay is enjoyable and unique. As soon as you arrive

you’ll be greeted with the warm embrace of our perfect tropical climate

and feel instantly relaxed with the natural beauty of our spectacular

location.

Our team always ensures to go the extra mile to make sure your visit

is an extraordinary experience. The resort’s twenty three suites, two

swimming pools, luscious gardens, beach bar and beach restaurant make a

relaxing lounging area with direct access to the beach, where we provide

exclusive services for Kobe Suite Resort guests.

The pure and peaceful character of Kobe Suite Resort is ideal for just

relaxing and connecting with nature. The warm, turquoise blue waters

and the majestic sand bar are soothing and alluring offering themselves

as your own therapeutic spa while also providing a spectacular place for

snorkeling, scuba diving, fishing and kite surfing.

SUITES

The resort consists of 23 suites of which; 18 Garden View Suites and 5

Ocean View Suites. All suites have all the necessary amenities to make

your stay as enjoyable as possible.

WELLNESS & BEAUTY

Every facet of daily life is aligned with the purpose of nurturing health,

harmony, and spiritual growth and provides a complete

experiential education in holistic living. Hence we offer, three types of

massages as well as manicure and pedicure.

FOOD & DRINK

Dining at the beach with a gentle breeze is one of life’s great pleasures.

Whether it be breakfast, lunch or dinner, our signature menus focus on

fresh produce cooked simply and served expertly.

www.kobesuiteresort.com || info@kobesuiteresort.com +254 722 658951

KobeSuiteResort kobesuiteresortkenya

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 21


FROM PRAGUE

WITH LOVE

Kari Mutu spends time in the capital city of

the Czech Republic, walking around Prague’s

old town which is an immersion into history,

varied architecture, cultural attractions, beer

and food...lots of food.

Established in the 9th century, Prague

has become so popular that one resident

told us that she leaves the city during the

summertime. I travelled in the spring when

the weather was still chilly but the streets

were less crowded and therefore pleasant to

walk around. Communication is not difficult

because English is spoken by many locals,

although you might struggle with the names

of places. Each morning we strolled down

the celebrated Wenceslas Square, named

after an old king whose good deeds are

immortalised in a famous Christmas carol.

Here, many important events have taken

place like the founding of Czechoslovakia

and anti-communist protests.

Today this ancient city is a

mix of old and new, where

businesses and retail shops

sit next to monasteries and

palace gardens. At the

bottom of a cobble-stoned

street we found an outdoor

market that has apparently been running for

almost 800 years. There were stalls selling

mouth-watering fruits, sweets, souvenirs

and colourful figurines of the famous Infant

Jesus of Prague. Just beyond the market

was the St Gallen Church, and inside the

quiet softly light sanctuary, I marvelled at

the rich paintings, gilding, carved pews and

sculptures.

Much of the city's architecture is like

works of art and at every turn there is

something captivating to see: pink, blue and

green facades, sculptures at street corners,

fascinating sewer gratings, large doors

with amazing details, decorative wrought

iron grills, buildings with bas relief art and

more. Yet Prague wasn’t always beautiful.

Czechoslovakia rose from the ashes of the

Austro-Hungarian empire at the end of

World War I then split into two countries in

1993. Prague’s complicated story includes

bombings during World War II and

occupation by Germany and communist

Russia. A wall around a construction site

was covered with photographs of Prague

between the 19th and 20th centuries.

Near the town square we stopped to

view the Astronomical Clock, a 600-year

old medieval timepiece that is the oldest

operating clock in the world. Its two blueand-gold

clock faces are decorated with

Zodiac signs, carved figures and Roman

numerals, and it looks like something out of a

fairy tale. When the clock chimes at the top

of every hour the animated statuettes come

to life, much to the amazement of gathered

onlookers.

We passed street performers in gold

costumes and face paint. Somebody cruised

slowly along in a long red vintage vehicle.

Down a narrow street we were shocked

to see a man dangling by his hand from a

building. It is the renowned Man Hanging

Out sculpture of the celebrated physiologist

Sigmund Freud, created by Czech artist

David Cerny.

Czech Republic is renowned for beers

such as Budweiser, Pilsner Urquell and the

non-alcoholic Birell, so a visit to the Prague

Beer Museum was not to be missed. An

unusual attraction was the Museum of Senses

which had all kinds of optical illusions and

intriguing displays.

Food is quite affordable here with

a variety of cuisine available. We had

Vietnamese lunch at the Banh-mi-Ba, a

busy Vietnamese bistro where big portions

of soup, noodles, shrimp and vegetables

arrived at our table promptly. I was

surprised to learn that Prague has a sizeable

Vietnamese population, a legacy of the

communist era when students came to study in

the former Czechoslovakia.

Down a narrow street we discovered the

Choco Café that specialises in flavoured hot

chocolate made from real chocolate bars.

Mine had fresh raspberries and whipped

cream and was smooth, creamy and incredibly

rich.

We had planned to take an evening river

cruise but decided against it because there was

rain in the forecast. Instead, we dined at the

stylish Hergotova Cihelna Restaurant located

along the banks of the Vltava River. Near the

restaurant is another legendary David Cerny

statue called Piss. It depicts to two mechanical

brass men urinating into a water fountain!

Under the imposing vaulted ceilings of the

restaurant we enjoyed beautifully presented

plates of baked goat cheese, beef tartare and

venison accompanied by fine Czech wines.

The service was wonderful too.

On another day we strolled across the

beautiful historic Charles Bridge, the most

well-known of the 18 bridges across the

Vtlava River. From the middle you gaze at the

broad blue river flanked by historic buildings,

spires, church steeples and clock towers. In the

distance was the setting sun and forest-covered

hills.

That evening we happened upon the U

Tri Ruzi Resturant off the main town square.

Inside the busy, double-storey establishment,

the wood panelled walls and booth seating

give the ambience of an old tavern. The

menu offered home-style dishes like ribs,

beef goulash and pork knuckles with mashed

potatoes and gravy. Ruzi also operates a

popular micro-brewery and I found red ale

beer more to my taste than the dark lager.

With some extra time I would have liked to

visit the old Jewish Quarter and Prague Castle

that looks over the city.

22 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


KENYAN TRAVELER

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 23


GLOBETROTTERS

Faith Kanja talks to travel blogger

Muthoni Maingi about her trips across

the globe, talking to strangers in pubs

and accepting invitations that

no sensible person would.

Twitter @NonieMG

What inspires you to travel?

I have always loved to disappear and immerse myself in the novelty

of ‘undiscovered to me’ territories. This started when I was a small

child who would climb into cupboards and hide for hours, to the

present when I sometimes book spontaneous trips

and disappear into weekends of pure silence. I like to

walk in spaces that are familiar and comfortable to

others because it is their home, but that are unfamiliar

to me. In many ways, a penchant for discovery and

disappearing are not solely tied to the traveling

experience; these are inherent drives that come with

certain personality traits.

I also like to engage in the banal difference and

nuance of everyday existence in a different place,

because a morning commute in Kuala Lumpur

and one in Nairobi essentially holds the same tension; working hard to get

somewhere on time, in style and in one piece (the mundane) but the difference is

in the sounds, smells, transport options and directional signage languages.

What are some of your favourite destinations that you’ve been to?

Malaysia, Mexico, Scotland, Madagascar and Turkey

are my favourite travel destinations for their amazing

people, food, one-of-a-kind views and experiences

overall.

How have other cultures influenced you during your

travels?

I always come back with recipes and cultural practices that I love to

replicate at home. I do Ethiopian coffee ceremonies for friends and make

Malagasy iced tea. The latter is pretty simple: boil black tea, lavender,

vanilla, honey, cloves, cinnamon and cardamom, add lemon juice when

cool, add ice then serve. I also have a tradition with a close friend where

I bring the country’s alcohol back and we enjoy it in my garden as we

gossip and catch up.

What’s your favourite thing to do in a new town?

Walking into bars and cafes and striking up deep conversations with

strangers. I have friendships that have grown having started off from this,

as well as heaps of stories on adventures that this led to!

What’s one tip you’ve learned thanks to frequent travel?

Please buy travel insurance. So much can go wrong with your health, missing flights, theft or loss

of property.

Essential items to pack...

My packing list always has sweaters, scarves, sundresses, shorts, sunscreen, sunglasses, sneakers

and sandals. I call them ‘the big S’, and those are the essentials. Everything else is not as

important.

How do you prepare for a trip?

A lot of research goes into the tourist traps and how to discover the path less travelled. I make

sure I have insurance, extra money (make sure you have 1/3 more than you think you need)

then take care of cultural sensitivities to avoid offending anyone by reading up on the place. I’d

suggest following local bloggers and voices for insight on that.

Which three destinations are currently on your bucket list?

Jamaica, Japan and Colombia.

24 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


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NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 25


PHOTOGRAPHS BRIAN SIAMBI

MALINDI,

Having spent a glorious week exploring

its beaches, sampling local and Italian

food, following strangers on impromptu

adventures and diving head first into an

array of excursions, Wendy Watta makes a

case for why you should visit Malindi.

MAMMA MIA!

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 27


The plan is to join our photographers Brian and

Trevor on a sunrise-chasing mission, but when I

get a call from the former at about 5:15 am the

next morning saying that our tuk tuk is waiting at

the hotel gate, I seriously contemplate shutting

off my phone and sinking deeper into the warm

bosom of my comfortable double bed at Malindi

Dream Garden. I often find it easy to catch the sunset, because if

I’m at the coast, I am likely to be strategically placed at the best

seat in some beachside or cliff-top bar with two daiquiris singing

a catchy pop song in my head. A sunrise is often caught if it so

happens to wash through the large windows of a cozy room I’m

staying in, but actually having to rise up early for one is a concept

I’ve never understood. Yet, I’ve seen enough photographers nearfanatically

plan for one with the seriousness of Jack Bauer trying to

find a bomb hidden somewhere in the city in 24.

Walking down the Malindi pier barely 10 minutes after getting

up, I am instantly sucked into vibe here. A man holding the hands

of his two little daughters on either side strolls past me and the trio

position themselves at the end of the pier facing the water in wait of

the sun. Another rides his bicycle back and forth as though either

restless or exercising. Two tall guys, abs in full display, do their

burpees on the pavement, and let’s just say that I can see how a

tourist from a faraway land would be drawn to these ‘oh so exotic’

beach boys. At this point, the sky is yellow and orange and pink but

the sun is still playing peekaboo, so I decide to walk down to the

sand which, much like the rest of Malindi, has black deposits and is

speckled with micah, aka fools gold, which glitters in the sand.

A group of boys play football close to the water, and every

so often, the ball is kicked into the sea and someone has to dive

in and body-surf the waves to retrieve it. When the blazing ball

of orange does take to the skies with such boldness and aplomb,

we all come to a standstill as though watching the ultimate flag

being raised. Malindi sunrises are incredible, and as an apology

to photographers for everything I said before this mission, I get it.

Really, I do.

In some rather stark ways, this town has changed from what it

was three years ago when I spent quite a bit of time here on a family

holiday. If ever there was a place where the hotel industry took a

hit along the coast, it would be this. Once-popular spots like Coral

Key, one of the oldest hotels in the town and where I remember us

struggling to find space and thereafter stuffing our faces with heaps of

cheese-packed pasta, are no more. Others like Eden Roc, Beverly key

and more also closed down. Italians, who would come down in large

numbers, have also reduced from this town which was once deemed

as ‘Kenya’s little Italy’. Still, their influence is just as tangibly noticeable

in the food and even signage language

Things seem to be looking up, particularly this year, as Malindi

seeks to return to its former glory. Keen to rediscover the town, I hop

on a boda boda to the Vasco da Gama pillar which I first visited

during a history class field trip as a teenager. During a candid

conversation, a hotelier at one spot we passed by had confided that

they thought it was a run down place that they hadn’t taken their

guests to for years, a sentiment I heard echoed a few times. On

personal inspection, however, I thought it to be fine, and a tunnel

underneath it led us to a beach where we were lucky to spot some

starfish. Gede Ruins, the remnants of an ancient Swahili town, are

still a worthwhile visit for culture buffs. Keen to find out some history,

I head to the museum which proves to be a rather underwhelming

experience. It is 5:00 pm and there is no one to show me around as

all the guides have apparently gone home. I am instructed to ‘just

walk around and see’, and when I ask about the history, get the noncommittal

‘if you know about the popular history of Mombasa then

that’s pretty much it”.

Still, the charm of this quaint town is not lost on me, and for the

discerning traveler, Malindi has a lot to offer. As of this year, tourism

is looking up yet again and spots like Malindi Dream Garden where

we stayed are bustling with guests. Having spent one glorious week

exploring its beaches and tucking into its food (both at the nice

restaurants in town and that roadside kibanda where a lovely Swahili

woman sold me viazi karai with tangy tamarind sauce), what follows

are some things that we did during our trip and that are worth adding

to your itinerary.

28 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


A group of boys play

football close to the

water, and every

so often, the ball is

kicked into the sea

and someone has to

dive in to retrieve it

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 29


30 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


THE LOW-DOWN ON MALINDI

HIDDEN GEM

SABAKI RIVER ESTUARY

We had heard that the Sabaki River is a haven for flamingos, and

that the best spot to take in the view was at the bridge, and so we

ask our regular tuk tuk driver Mohamed to take us there. This place

turns out to be exactly as advertised, but as Trevor is setting up his

drone, a man runs up to us, introduces himself as a guide and tells us

that there is an even better secret spot, one where the river meets the

sea and where the view is tenfold. This man, Karisa, tells us that it is

about 10 minutes off the main road, and that our tuk tuk can make

it there, so without much convincing, we follow him. We turn into a

blink-and-you-will-miss-it-path and follow the meandering river whose

banks are so muddy that I think we will certainly tumble over in this

rickshaw, but we only ever get stuck.

Moments later we come to the base of a huge sand dune where

the tuk tuk can’t go any further, and as we follow Karisa up one sand

dune and the next, I can’t help but wonder if I’m a lamb walking

altogether too willingly into slaughter. Mohamed, too, says he has

never been to this place, and while I’m starting to panic inside whilst

wondering if he might be in on whatever this is, on the outside, I am

the definition of calm and collected.

Then our group walks up to the most beautiful enclave I’ve seen

in Malindi, where the river stretches a hand out to greet the sea

but ever so slightly misses - so near yet so far! The ocean forcefully

crashes into the land as if it has a personal vendetta that the wind

is egging on. There are ridges left in the sand by the tide, and I

quite enjoy sinking my feet into the little pools scattered all over. A

big flock of flamingos paint the shoreline white in their plumage,

and as we approach, they flap their wings as though part of a wellrehearsed

orchestra and fly off to the other shore. Karisa informs us

that this is an important birding area, and that hippos are also found

in this region. This estuary, which overlooks Malindi town, is certainly

worth the trip. Karisa Benjamin (Guide)- 0711849742

WHERE TO EAT

BEACHSIDE: Osteria Beach House - This English colonial-style house

is set right on Silversand beach, and when we stopped by for lunch,

we dined al fresco under the cool shade of a tree. If you dine at only

two places in town, stop by this spot or their other outlet in town

which has the best ice creams around.

There is a swimming pool but you can also dip in the sea then

lounge on the sunbeds. Service is fast and friendly and the food is

worth writing home about, especially the deep fried calamari, and

our group also tried tuna and a salad, pasta and pizza crowned

with ice cream. There’s a stand where a local man selling handmade

souvenirs. He is so convincing that weeks after my trip, I still don’t

remember how I bought four brass rings from him.

FOR DINNER: Bar Bar Restaurant & Bar - Bar Bar came

recommended several times by residents, so we made a reservation.

Set right next to the road, it is open to the front side ( imagine the

great people watching during the day!) and is also quite spacious.

There was a lively game of football showing on the screens. As soon

as we sat down, an elderly Italian guy, presumably the manager,

brought menus to our table, handing them to the ladies first - what a

gentleman! The menu is very Italian, so expect pasta, pizza, gelato,

tiramisu and the works. The ragu pizza is highly recommended.

FOR LOCAL FOOD: Taheri Fast Foods - This is a small but prominent

restaurant run by Tasneem Mohsin and her husband and sons. It is

always bustling, which speaks to its popularity. The food is good

and cheerfully affordable. Tasneem makes a mean baked mutton

leg, and the menu being Indian and Swahili, I like to pass by for their

mandazi, viazi, bhajia, kaimati and the works.

FOR SEAFOOD: Che Shale - 20 km North of Malindi, this spot might

be popular for kitesurfing, but foodies will know it for its organic

crab farm to plate experience. In an environment best described as

castaway-chic, this passion project by owner Justin offers massive

mangrove crab served in various ways blended with local flavours

and spices. If you’ve never had soft shell crab fried until golden

crispy with a dab of mango salsa, or the perfect crab cakes, this

place is it.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 31


THE OCEAN FORCEFULLY CRASHES INTO THE LAND AS IF IT HAS A PERSONAL

VENDETTA THAT THE WIND IS EGGING ON. A BIG FLOCK OF FLAMINGOS

PAINT THE SHORELINE WHITE IN THEIR PLUMAGE, AND AS WE APPROACH, THEY

FLAP THEIR WINGS AS THOUGH PART OF A WELL-REHEARSED ORCHESTRA

AND FLY OFF TO THE OTHER SHORE.

32 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


Aerial Photographs Trevor Maingi

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 33


FUN IN THE SUN

DHOW CRUISE

A sunset dhow cruise is my all-time

favourite thing to do at the coast, and

I therefore always seek it. Our crew of

two is waiting when we finally get to the

family-run Driftwood Beach Hotel, and

we quickly hop on a speedboat which

takes us to a traditional Mozambican-style

dhow. After we all climb the ladder and

get on board, we set sail. These cruises

can be as laid back or extravagant as

you want them to be. Desired drinks and

snacks are always advised, and I always

remember to pack some ciders or a bottle

of wine. We even carry a bluetooth

speaker so we can play our favourite

songs as we are lulled up and down the waves, in and out of the

winds. If you wish, you can even stop on a secluded beach for a

private beachside seafood barbeque.

Book a cruise with Driftwood Beach Club:

www.driftwoodclub.com

SCUBA DIVING

Plan Hotels overlook Malindi Marine Park which is located south of

the town extending to Mida Creek. It stands out for its fringing reefs,

coral gardens in the lagoons, diversity of fish, mudflats and more

making it ideal for scuba diving and snorkelling, both of which we

try. Brian, who goes diving, reports seeing octopus, lionfish, turtle,

stingray and more.

Dive with Blue-Fin Diving: www.bluefindiving.com

OUT OF TOWN EXCURSION

MARAFA HELL’S KITCHEN

About an hour from Malindi Dream Garden where we are staying,

we make a return trip to this intriguing sandstone canyon which,

according to science, formed through erosion over thousands of

years. The soil is so brittle that if you kick it it breaks apart so this

isn’t exactly a far fetched notion. Its daunting name comes from the

structure and colour which resembles flames jutting out of the bottom

of the earth, and if you visit in the daytime you might just pass out

from the heat. There are a variety of rather bizarre local folklore

surrounding its formation, including one which claims that it came to

be as a result of heavy rains which God sent down to punish a rich

family who had a lot of cattle and so much produce that they would

even bathe in milk, and yet would not mind their poor neighbours.

A friend, on the other hand, mentioned that he thought it may have

formed during the flood in Noah’s day...

Whatever the case, this canyon is indeed fascinating to see.

The white, yellow and red pigment

in the soil are so vibrant that

according to our guide, Maasai

and Giriama women collect and

use it cosmetically or as paint

during traditional ceremonies. Wear

comfortable walking shoes if you

intend to go down into the valley.

Evenings are the best time for a visit

as the sunsets here just photogenic.

This excursion was organised by

Intra Safaris Ltd.

www. intrasafaris.com.

RESIDENT KNOW-HOW

Sabina Vivaldi, Owner,

Cozy Point Homes

Malindi resident for the past 20 years.

What are your favourite places to eat in town?

I quite like Osteria Beach Bar for their good Italian food. In the

town center, I like to have breakfast with friends at Karen Blixen or

Bar Bar where I’m likely to have a cappuccino and brioche.

Favourite thing to do in town…

I like going around the fabric shops because I enjoy making my

own clothes and sometimes for friends and guests. I work with a

few tailors in town for that. I especially like the Indian shops and

once in a while they will bring something new and will let me know

beforehand so there is always that excitement of waiting for their

stock to arrive. I even take my guests to explore the shops. I also

really love the beaches, and Silversands beach is a nice spot for an

evening walk. Mayungu, which is 20 minutes out of town, is one of

the best and if you fly over it you will realize that it is a natural pool

because you can see the reef and the coast underneath its clear

waters.

Best kept secret...

In the dry season, I go to this secret spot near Arabuko Sokoke forest,

and it has a natural water pond where elephants come to drink.

ON YOGA...

Morris Kalama, yoga teacher

I’ve been teaching yoga for the past 10 years and currently spend

a lot of time between Watamu and Malindi. My favourite spot is a

beach which we call Obuntwane in Bajuni...it is close to Vasco da

Gama and sometimes I go there with friends. My favourite thing is

however to teach different types of yoga such as ashtanga, power

vinyasa, hatha, vinyasa flow and restorative yoga. I get all levels of

people, and we have some really beautiful homes which are perfect

for sessions in the mornings or evenings. Malindi is also ideal for

retreats so it would be a good spot for teachers to look into.

morriskalamayoga@gmail.com

34 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 35


MALINDI DREAM

GARDEN

Run by the Planhotel Hospitality Group which also owns Sandies Tropical Village

and Diamond Dream of Africa , this cozy gem is a real slice of paradise on the coast.

Text: Nomad Photography: Brian Siambi

USE THE CODE: PLAN NOMAD 10 % OFF

VALID UNTIL 30TH NOVEMBER 2019

36 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


O

wned by the Planhotel

Hospitality Group which

has stunning properties

around Africa and the

Maldives, there are

technically three unique

boutique hotels set along

the powder-white backdrop of one of

Malindi’s best beaches. First there is Sandies

Tropical Village, one of the key and longestrunning

successful hotels in town, with a

locally influenced Swahili architecture and

decor. There is also the Indo-Arab style

Diamonds Dream of Africa which is one of

the most luxurious offerings in this part of

the coast. Finally, there is Malindi Dream

Garden which is where our team stayed,

checking in through a reception which used

to be an old English house before being

extended and renovated, outfitted with

attractive art accented by whitewashed

wooden furniture which blends seamlessly

into the coastal atmosphere. Guests have

access to all spaces, and there is a different

ambiance throughout the property.

At Malindi Dream Garden, there are 44

deluxe suites and four stylish superior suites

spread across two floors and semi-circling

a lush green garden dotted with palm trees,

and in whose center sits a large swimming

pool. Much to my delight given our allinclusive

status, a pool bar is only a stone’s

throw away from my room, and those rumand-passion

cocktails aren’t going to drink

themselves. Walking in through the front

door of my room, there is an air-conditioner

and a fan, a large en-suite bathroom, double

bed, refrigerator, safe, working area and

the usual conveniences found in spaces

of a similar standards. Large glass doors

lead to an open terrace with sun loungers,

overlooking the garden and pool. For art

lovers, the exterior walls of each suite has a

vibrant tropical painting, a pleasant addition

to the decor.

For lunch we meet at the beach which

has daybeds facing the blue water where

guests take turns dipping in the sea or

basking in the sun. As far as set-ups go,

this is as special as it gets. Tucked in the

more secluded end of the beach, a rustic

white-washed wooden table with four chairs

sits in the shade of a white sailing canvas

which billows gently in the afternoon breeze.

The white backdrop is offset by a colourful

wreath made out of palm and accessorized

by bougainvillea flowers. There is a bottle of

white wine chilling in an ice bucket, and this

is served as soon as we settle in. Chef Ayaz

then comes to take us through his menu;

most of the dishes are either from the sea or

sourced from their organic farm, making for

the absolute farm-to-table dining. The amusebouche

is a bite-sized California roll with a

side of smoked sailfish and tomato-topped

bruschetta. This is followed by delicious

seafood paella which comes topped with

lobster and served in a wok. The star of

the show, however, is a miniature wooden

‘seafood boat’ laden with all sorts of grilled

seafood, and I don’t care where we’re

sailing to...I’m jumping aboard and jostling

for space! I spot lobster, octopus, prawns

and tuna, and after grabbing a few pieces

of lime, we tuck in!

After dessert, fresh fruit dipped in

chocolate fondue, I all but waddle to

Mvua African Rain Spa for a relaxing

30 minute massage in which I fall sound

asleep, followed by a soothing dip in the

thalassotherapy center which has pools lined

with water jets said to boost circulation. The

rest of the afternoon passes by in a glorious

blur of cocktails, sleep and a rented kayak

from the adjacent diving and watersports

center taken out to sea: it’s not a bad day to

be a travel writer.

For business travelers, this spot has just

opened the biggest hotel conferencing

facility in Malindi with a capacity of about

500 people. Two restaurants and three

bars complete the idyllic vacation setting,

and there is also a gym on site which I

actually don’t set foot in as I am altogether

too content to be a beach bum. We tuck

into themed gourmet dinners ranging from

African to Mongolian, and on our second of

five nights, an animation team provides the

evening entertainment.

The hotel helps set up most of our

excursions around Malindi, from diving

and snorkelling to out-of-town excursions

to Marafa Hell’s Kitchen. What stands out

the most is however the friendly staff with

whom I can tell that every interaction is truly

genuine. Whether they are whipping up a

cocktail at the pool bar, offering a bottle

of water at the lunch buffet or ensuring the

rooms remain fresh and polished, truly enjoy

what they are doing and just want to ensure

that we are having the best time. At these

three hotels set just off Malindi’s Casuarina

Road, we arrive as guests but leave as

friends, having had a good ol’ time by the

beach. www.planhotel.com

Email: reservations.kenya@planhotel.com

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 37


WHERE TO STAY

MALINDI

WHITE ELEPHANT SEA & ART LODGE

This lodge is a fusion of nature and

art having 19 rooms and four two-and

three-bedroom apartments. Each room is

personally adorned by the master artist

Armando Tanzini’s creations, and each

furniture piece handcrafted at the White

Elephant Creativity Centre. The outdoor areas

are intricately designed with nature and art in

mind. Three guest-accessible art galleries are

nestled in the beach forest which is not only

dotted by Armando Tanzini’s monumental

sculptures but is home to an array of small

animals and birds. The Lodge has two

restaurants, individual gazebos, lounging

areas and meeting rooms.

www.whiteelephantmalindi.com

DRIFTWOOD BEACH CLUB

These family-run cottages and villas can

accommodate just 70 guests. The dwellings

are constructed in the traditional coastal style

and brought up to date with air-conditioning

and other modern amenities. The rooms are

designed to be private while still being close

to the open-air bar and dining area. For

those who simply want to relax, they have

four miles of white beach perfect for long

walks, a treatment room as well as plenty

of lounging areas. Driftwood Beach Club's

experienced team are on hand to offer some

of the best food in Malindi.

www.driftwoodclub.com

OCEAN BEACH RESORT

Expect a five star resort that takes hospitality

back to its essence. Luxuriously appointed

rooms are spread around the beautiful

gardens creating a private and secluded

atmosphere. The hotel offers 20 rooms and

15 suites showcasing early 20th century

tropical style with wooden beamed roofs and

elegant wooden floors. Surrounded by green

lawns and palm trees, spend four nights in

a deluxe suite beachfront room and the fifth

night is on them. Relax at the beachfront

restaurant, Dunes, sample the chef’s menu at

Victoria Restaurant or simply enjoy the sunset

and an evening cocktail at Finch Hatton’s

Bar. www.oceanbeachkenya.com

38 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


Photography: Brian Siambi and Respective Properties

WHITE NYUMBA

This all-white house has four double rooms

spread across two flours. The ground

floor has the kitchen which comes with an

experienced chef and a small team who go

out of their way to make sure your stay is

comfortable. The main terrace has a large

dining table which can hold eight people,

a spacious lounge where your group can

hang out in the evenings, complete with a

swinging hammock. It overlooks a large

pool tucked in the garden, perfect for

cooling off on those hot Malindi afternoons.

From Ksh 20,000. Book via AirBnb.

BELLA AZZURA VILLA

This is a lovely family vacation house

set in the heart of Casuarina and which

comfortably sleeps up to 12 guests. Located

in a secure gated compound of four villas,

the property has two apartments with a

shared terrace. It can be booked as one

villa for a large group, or each villa booked

separately by up to six people. It has a

beautiful pool with a gazebo, lush mature

gardens and is only a five minute walk to

the beach. A chef is available at an extra

cost. Rates start from Ksh 3,400 per night.

Book via AirBnb.

KILILI BAHARINI

This resort has 29 comfortable airconditioned

rooms, three prestigious suites,

three junior suites, five pools, two bars, a

restaurant, spa and wellness center called

Medicallife, and is set along the beach.

The rooms – all furnished in Swahili style

with whitewashed walls, draped mosquito

nets and subtle lighting – overlook one of

the swimming pools, and each has its own

fully furnished private veranda. Deck chairs

and comfortable day beds can be arranged

at the beach for guests to use, as required.

Simply put, the team here goes above and

beyond to offer the very best.

www.kililibaharini.com

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 39


COZY POINT

HOMES

Immerse yourself in the local vibe in Malindi

in a charming home setting where you never

have to worry about what’s for dinner!

Text: Sabina Vivaldi

I would describe this spot as a charming, ownerrun

villa where we love to invite people to explore,

enjoy themselves, eat, drink, sing, dance, swim,

bask in the sun and simply BE TOGETHER.

Create lifetime memories in a comfortable

home where your curiosity, desires, needs and

passions can be explored. We offer a heartfelt and

personalized experience where:

• The Indian Ocean is at our front door

• We have an intimate local understanding

coupled with hands-on curating of

whatever you’re seeking during your stay

• Friendly service with a neighborhood

and community vibe that includes dining,

drinking and dancing

• Retreat and quiet reflection services

including a spa, massage, yoga and nature

gazing.

When I thought about how to decorate this

house, I took Malindi as a reference. Every piece

of furniture or art therefore draws inspiration

from something specific. There is a striking

painting by the artist Giampaolo Tomasi who

portrays the head of the Mijikenda tribe, seats

made from traditional dhows or fishing boats,

Armando Tanzini sculptures which portray

African subjects in the shapes and colours of the

surrounding landscape here, and more.

We also used Indian fabrics and objects to

respect the colourful traditions of its people,

the Italian taste of Lalla Spagnoll's decor is

unmissable, paintings full of life and passion

showcasing African expressions by the talented

Alexandra Spyratos adorn the walls, complete

with the paintings born of travels in the savannah

by the artist Mariangela Verriello. In short, there

is an air that unites Kenya, India and Italy in a

harmonious and elegant mix that appeals to the

eyes and truly speaks to the heart.

Six guests can occupy the main house

which has three spacious rooms. The spot is

ideal for those looking to rent an entire place

for themselves, couples or a family in search of

exclusivity, privacy and serenity. It is the ideal

place to use as a base from which to set off every

day to discover numerous experiences that I

organize to surprise the guests.

There are two spacious verandahs and a big

swimming pool which are ideal places to relax,

have a drink or enjoy a meal. Coupled with the

pool deck, these spots are great for practising

yoga, and the home would be perfect for a

wellness retreat. It is actually the excellent cuisine

and soothing music which make the evenings

a time to cherish, as guests and hosts come

together to trade beautiful stories which has been

known to lead to long-lasting friendships.

AS A GUEST, YOU CAN EXPECT:

The rates start from Ksh 45,000 and include breakfast,

WiFi, laundry, daily cleaning and a local advisor.

Contact via www.cozypointhomes.com

• Three master bedrooms with bathrooms

and walk-in closets. There are air

conditioners, mosquito nets, linens and

towels in all rooms.

• The entrance has a relatively large

reading area. A wide verandah with a

living room and dining table are on the

first floor. The main verandah is on the

ground floor and has a lounge and a big

dining table.

• Spacious kitchen with a local chef

• Store for sports gear

• Swimming pool with sun beds and towels

• Daily cleaning services and laundry are

available.

• Guard and Security services 24 hours

• Local advisor and assistance all day at the

residence

• Masseuse (there is a massage room),

personal trainer and yoga instructor can

be arranged on request

• Recommended minimum stay is three

nights, and children under the age of 15

are not admitted in the main house but

are welcome at the beach.

DAILY ACTIVITIES

• Visit local communities

• Explore the surrounding beaches

• Shop from the town’s tailors, shoemakers,

basket makers, craftsmen and fabric sellers.

• Check out Malindi’s art and meet the

artists

• Excursions like diving, horse riding, golfing

and deep-sea fishing

• We organise lunches and dinners

(personalized menus, shopping lists and

cooking) and have a convenient formula of

sharing the shopping costs

• We can set up any type of events such as

honeymoons, birthdays, anniversaries,

marriage proposal, small weddings, private

dinners with music, yoga and wellness

retreats and more.

I have international experience having planned

events all over the world, and can help you

organise whatever event you want.


@cozypointhomes

Travel without feeling foreign

info@cozypointhomes.com || +25 472 6313101

www.cozypointhomes.com

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 41


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42 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE

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WE ARE SPECIALIST IN: SOUTH AFRICA, KENYA, ZAMBIA, NAMIBIA, ZIMBABWE, BOTSWANA, TANZANIA, RWANDA, UGANDA

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With years of experience in this industry we have

the right people, locations and packages that

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P.O Box: 579 – 80200, Malindi, Kenya.

Phone: +254 717 340 333, +254 715 096 099

@acheche NOMAD MAGAZINE @achechetours

2019 43


LUANDA: A CITY ON

THE MOVE

Maurice Schutgens heads to Angola and with only a day to spare,

explores what he describes as ‘one of Africa’s greatest mysteries’.

Luanda’s cuisine

is famous for its

strong Portuguese

and Brazilian

influences, with

signature seafood

dishes.

44 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


DISPATCH

F

or many, Angola is the last piece

of Africa’s travel puzzle. Once

known as the mighty Kingdom

of Ndongo ruled by Ngola

(kings) it is a country that has

been virtually ‘closed’ to the

outside world since it cast off the

shackles of Portuguese colonial rule. It is a

country that has been shaped by a painful

history of war and conflict, and yet today

it is experiencing transformative change as

certain as it is unpredictable.

For most, knowledge about Angola starts

and ends with war. This is unfortunate but

unsurprising for a country that was embroiled

in a bitter complex civil war that spanned 27

years and caused immeasurable damage.

While the war ended in 2002, its scars are

yet to fully heal. Tourists, therefore, haven’t

flocked to Angola’s shores in great numbers

and it is this that has transformed the country

into one of Africa’s greatest mysteries.

The plane banked steeply over the

dazzling waters of the Atlantic Ocean

below us, the sun casting blinding reflections

of the newly built skyscrapers rising from

Luanda’s central business district. But it was

something else altogether that caught my

eye - the sprawling shanty towns (locally

known as Musseques) home to the majority

of Luanda’s eight million souls. It was literally

a sea of humanity contained in a chaotic

maze of corrugated iron dwellings. I knew,

well before the tyres kissed the tarmac, that

Luanda would be a city of unfathomable

contrasts.

Luanda was undeniably hot and

somewhat humid, probably a climate not

too different from when it was founded in

1576 by Portuguese explorer Paulo Dia

de Novais under the flowery name of São

Paulo da Assunção de Loanda. From the

moment of its birth and for centuries after,

Luanda’s existence was inextricably linked

to the movement of human cargo: the slave

trade. Some three million souls destined for

the plantations of South America and the

Caribbean passed through its port. It was

something to contemplate as the taxi whisked

me through traffic.

I parked myself in the Hotel Continental

just a stone's throw away from the Baía de

Luanda (Bay of Luanda) and situated directly

next to crumbling facades of houses built

some 400 years ago. Luanda is however

more than a few crumbling buildings; new

construction projects are springing up

across the city with an insatiable appetite,

from modern gated condominiums in

the Talatona neighborhood and Chinese

financed (and built) skyscrapers to fine

dining establishments along the bay. There

is no doubt that this city is Angola’s heart;

a cosmopolitan and frenetic city, alive and

heaving just below the surface.

The next morning at sunrise, I hit the

Avenida 4 de Fevereiro, situated along

the bay, for a run. I swept past the Banco

Nacional de Angola, a stunning relic of

architecture with its perfect pink dome

designed by Vasco Regaleira and inaugurated

in 1956, before backtracking and heading for

the Ilha do Cabo (Cape Island), a long spit of

land jutting out into the Atlantic and lined with

restaurants. By the time I got back to my hotel,

Luanda was starting to wake from its slumbers

and I prepared to head down the coast.

Nearly half a century ago Parque

Nacional da Quiçama (Kissama) was

teeming with an abundance of wildlife, from

the critically endangered Giant Sable to a

nationally important population of elephants

roaming freely in this 12,000 km² park.

Initially established as a hunting reserve, its

birth as a national park in 1975 coincided

with the eruption of civil war and like many

of Angola’s National Parks, Quiçama was

abandoned. Today, driving through the park,

it is clear that while Quiçama no longer hosts

the multitudes of wildlife like it did in the past

it is experiencing a resurgence of sorts and

offers the best opportunity for spotting wildlife

close to Luanda.

In the late afternoon we left Quiçama

behind us and headed back towards the

capital, with one brief stop. The Miradouro

da Lua (Viewpoint of the Moon) is one of

Angola’s most spectacular natural sights, a

lunar-martian landscape of deep shades of

red and pink and earthy browns intricately

carved by rain and wind over time. The cliffs

tumble down to Angola’s wild coast in the

distance. It is one of Angola’s most easily

accessible sights just an hour (40km) out of

Luanda.

I returned to the city just in time to head

up to the imposing Fortaleza de São Miguel

guarding the entrance to Luanda Bay,

constructed by the Portuguese in 1576. It is

Luanda's oldest surviving building and home

to the National Military Museum. Along

with several planes and artillery housed in

the courtyard it offers sweeping views of the

surrounding.

As night fell, I headed out in search of

a meal. Luanda’s cuisine is famous for its

strong Portuguese and Brazilian influences,

with signature seafood dishes. For those on

a culinary adventure, sampling traditional

Angolan dishes like Funge ( dish made with

cassava flour) and Muamba de Galinha

(aromatic chicken stew) are a must. I played it

safe with the fresh lobster curry eaten on the

rugged wooden deck of the contemporary

Cafe del Mar, situated near the end of the

Ilha do Cabo.

Make no mistake, Angola is outrageously

expensive and difficult to travel around,

but is absolutely raw in every sense of the

word. Hidden within its borders lie mystical

waterfalls, impenetrable equatorial rainforests

and isolated beaches. It is an unexplored

paradise and so as the Angolan Proverb

goes: “The mysterious road beckons the

young man”. I know I will return; sooner rather

than later.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 45


46 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


CONSERVATION

E

buru Forest was gazetted

in 1936 and falls under

the Mau Forests Complex

which is fully managed

by the Kenya Forestry

Services (KFS). Compared

to other forests, Eburu is a

small forest of 8,700 hectares on the rolling

foothills, deep valleys and steep slopes

of little known Mount Eburu. This prime

indigenous forest nestles within the folds of a

geologically active volcanic mountain which

overlooks Lake Naivasha, Lake Elementaita

and Lake Nakuru, and is the source of the

Ndabibi River, numerous streams and ground

springs.

Most motorists zoom past on the Nakuru

highway not realising that travelling along

the North Lake Road towards the Rift

Valley Lodge, on the northern side of Lake

Naivasha, it is easy to get to the Eburu

Forest. Those of us who have visited have

been delighted to find this tranquil forest and

have spent a relaxed day either exploring,

bird watching, hiking or picnicking in the

glade.

Leaving the tarmac close to the Rift Valley

Lodge you head continually uphill for 12km

on a reasonable dirt road, following the

KenGen Eburu Geothermal Power Station

signs, passing through farmlands growing a

wide range of food-crops. The countryside

is dotted with dwellings, village shops and

rural schools. It comes as a surprise to see

the steam bellowing from the geothermal

plant just inside the Eburu Gate, making you

realise just how active this mountain really is.

Entering the calm, green forest the track

narrows considerably and you drive down

fern-lined tracks and through tree tunnels

into the heart of the reserve. Stepping into

the forest is like entering another world. You

leave all the fuss and stresses of a busy life

behind, to be greeted with the tranquillity

and fragrance of nature. Branches covered

in lichen hang over ferns and vines tangle

themselves around the majestic trees

towering above. The earthy smell of damp

ground combined with fallen leaves has an

instant calming effect.

Continuing along the track it leads you

into thick upland forest and down scenic

valleys until you reach the forest glade. Pack

a picnic, bring binoculars, a book or simply

ON THE RADAR:

EBURU FOREST

Eburu Forest is a treasure of the Great Rift Valley and that is why the Rhino Ark

Charitable Trust stepped in and is engaged in a major long-term conservation exercise to

preserve and sustainably manage it, writes Diane McLeish

doze off for an afternoon nap in the dappled

light of the forest canopy. While a day trip is

wonderful, a weekend is better as you can

camp overnight. There are no facilities so

everything needs to be brought in, including

water. For those who don’t want to camp,

there are plenty of accommodation options

around Lake Naivasha.

The forest is a paradise for bird watchers

as it has a rich variety of upland birds. The

delightful walking trails plus the opportunity

of having knowledgeable birding guides

makes this forest an appealing destination. It

is also the home to an extraordinary diversity

of butterflies, moths and insects as well as

over 40 species of mammals.

As rich and diverse as this ecosystem is,

the forest hasn’t always been so blessed.

Deforestation had been ruthless especially in

the 90s. It was heavily damaged due to 50%

deforestation from unauthorised logging,

charcoal production and fires and by

bushmeat poaching and livestock invasion.

Eburu Forest is a treasure of the Great

Rift Valley and that is why the Rhino Ark

Charitable Trust stepped in and is engaged

in a major long-term conservation exercise

to preserve and sustainably manage it.

Forests are the water towers of Kenya

and since the 43.3 km electric fence

was completed in 2014 there have been

significant improvements in natural forest

regeneration in Eburu. The partners of KFS:

Rhino Ark Charitable Trust, Kenya Wildlife

Services, M-PESA Foundation and Flamingo

Horticulture have been instrumental in

fundraising and promoting conservation of

Eburu Forest.

Local communities have benefitted from

the success of the fence through activities

such as eco-tourism, honey production from

the 1,000 beehives within the forest and

other conservation-related activities. Farmers

have reported less human-wildlife conflict

as crop raiding animals like the buffaloes

and bush pigs are confined to the forest.

This has resulted in safer living conditions

and improved crops. A wildlife corridor and

dispersal area has been opened up through

Loldia farm to the shores of Lake Naivasha.

There are no more cattle in the forest and no

dead wood is allowed out.

What you will now see is commitment, not

just from the conservationists and donors but

from the local Eburu communities who are

proud of its revival and growing reputation.

Communities who were once seen as

opposing conservation are now important

partners and see themselves to be custodians

of the forest.

And there is more good news……

The habitat of undisturbed mountain

forest, steep valleys, springs and waterfalls

make this precious ecosystem the ideal home

for about 12 mountain bongo thought to be

surviving here. This represents 10% of global

wild population of the critically endangered

bongo. While still far from secure, the bongo

is being given every chance to bounce back

from the brink of extinction.

Patrols have removed hundreds of snares

and traps. Remote camera “traps” and

GPS devices have been placed and are

being monitored by the Bongo Surveillance

Project. They patrol the forest checking the

40 cameras and give feedback on their

findings. Translocation into the forest of other

mountain bongo may be the only way to

preserve this species.

Eburu Rafiki, the forest community group,

supports the rejuvenation of the forest

reserve. During May 2019, they planted

11000 seedlings on the lower slopes of

the denuded mountain. They don’t just

plant seedlings but husband the plants by

weeding, watering, inspecting and replacing

any damaged ones.

The attraction of this forest is to walk in

it while taking in the remarkable natural

scenery. There are six trails, all of special

interest, which take in some of the most

beautiful scenery within the forest. The trails

vary in distance covered and steepness as

well as difficulty. The two longest trails are

the summit routes which are about 6km long

taking between four to six hours to complete.

There are four other trails taking from two

to four hours to complete as well as shorter

walks to the crater and around the glade.

TIP: Get The Mau Eburu Forest Guide, which

can be purchased at the entrance as well

as other locations, to help you navigate this

forest.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 47


With an array of African

art, textiles, jewellery,

music instruments and

more collected from over

20 African countries,

coupled with its unique

architecture inspired by

the traditional mud houses

across the continent,

African Heritage House

is indeed an art lover’s

paradise.

HOME IS WHERE

THE ART IS

Text: Wendy Watta Photography: Brian Siambi


SPOTLIGHT

This property overlooks the

Nairobi National Park where

a pair of binoculars reveal

a dazzle of zebra pottering

about in the distance. A cargo

train chugs across. Our host,

dressed in a kofia and bright

red tye-dye African print shirt befitting of the

surroundings, plays a recording of owner

Alan Donovan’s voice on a portable radio.

By Alan’s account, the shade under which

we presently stand is cast by a so-called

wedding tree, because love-birds would

get off the train to come get married in this

very spot. I momentarily zone off and start

to daydream about a couple that may have

eloped to come get hitched here in the early

2000s...

Our group of four

then moves to the

mazeras-lined pool

where I’m instantly

drawn to a metallic

‘Roaming Lady’

sculpture which stands

out because it has some

of the older handheld

mobile phones. I

remember having

one of those in high

school, and sending a

text message was like

thumb wrestling. Across

from it stands a blue

human-sized sculpture

called ‘Three in One’ by

Ugandan artist Francis

Nnaggenda. The pool itself is surrounded

by smaller sculptures, a favourite being a

crested crane (the bird found in Uganda’s

flag, done by an artist paying homage to his

country) which overlooks the park.

The structure of this building is Swahili,

and it is adorned in everything from sisalwoven

fishing nets which were used along

the coast, a Luo spear and a Maasai shield

made from real buffalo hide. The adjacent

pool changing house is equally as striking,

with Kisii soapstone pieces, a Lamu door,

Tinga Tinga art whose origins are in

Tanzania, and much more.

We then shuffle to the mustard-yellow

main house which is the main attraction. It

is based on the pre-colonial mud houses

of Africa, drawing inspiration from all

over. The part facing the road is based on

Northern Nigeria and the park-facing side

is inspired by Mali, specifically the mud

mosques of Timbuktu and the Grand Mosque

in Djenne. Etched on the exterior walls are

geometric designs apparently drawn from

Ghana. Stepping inside, you can understand

why African Heritage House claims to be

the most photographed house in Africa

having appeared on the cover of Marie

Claire, being the first house in Africa to be

featured in Architectural Digest, among other

accolades.

The house is filled with instruments,

fabrics, jewellery, tools and other artifacts

collected everywhere from Congo to Egypt

and beyond. Standout pieces are from

Turkana, curved by women who only had

shields and knives to work with yet the

craftsmanship is remarkable. I also find the

ibeji dolls handmade by Yoruba women

rather fascinating, as is the peculiar history

of multiple births surrounding them.

We head upstairs to talk to Alan, an

American who first arrived in Africa in

1967 as an army officer during the Nigeria-

Biafra war. He says he was actually made

a Yoruba chief in Nigeria and has the

photos and accompanying paraphenalia to

prove it. He then resigned two years later,

bought a volkswagen in Paris which he then

drove across the Sahara back to Nigeria,

collecting art from everywhere he went.

Later selling the car, he made a collection of

everything he had curated and brought them

to Nairobi. Friends at the embassy urged

him to set up a collection because a lot of

people had not seen those items, not even in

the Nairobi Museum. His first exhibition was

therefore in 1970.

He would then team up with Joseph

Murumbi, Kenya’s second vice president and

an avid private collector, whose dream it

was to open a Pan-African center in Nairobi

where all the creativity of the continent could

be seen. Together they opened African

Heritage Gallery in the CBD along Kenyatta

Avenue (where the I&M building currently

stands) and for years, it was a huge success.

“We always had at least 600 people

everyday, and that’s only because the fire

department wouldn't allow us to have more,”

says Alan.

The museum burned down in 1996

and just like that, all the stock was gone

and it took some years to rebuild. When

Alan finally bought the current property in

Kitengela, he slept on the floor of his house

for a year because he had to go to 20

countries to curate again. The process of

buying stock and building the main house

took five years to complete.

He is currently working on a magnificent

museum beside the house, and it is based on

the last oasis in the sahara desert where the

salt caravans passed through...it was one of

the few routes where people entered africa,

long before ships.

African Heritage House is available for

tours, meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinners

on the rooftop or by the refreshing pool),

conferences/functions, as well as overnight

stays in its luxurious rooms filled with African

art and furnished with modern appointments.

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 49


50 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


ORNELLA HOUSE is a 5 bedroom villa located in Malindi.

Just 2.6 km from Malindi Marine National Park and a few

kilometrese from the old Portuguese Chapel, as and Vasco da

Gama Pillar. This villa is suitable for groups of friends or family

who want a quiet escape thats 5 minutes from the beach.

WHITE

NYUMBA

LUXURY PEARL WHITE VILLA!

Hear nothing but sounds of nature in this elegant 4 bedroom

villa, there’s a spacious outside living area and a pool. A lovely

outside seating area on the top floor of the villa that gives

just the perfect blend of indoor and outdoor.

White Nyumba offers you a private pool, a personal butler on

request and a bbq station.

DECEMBER BOOKINGS ACCEPTED

Tel: +254722166613 & +254722688026

rashmi_raipal@hotmail.com shalinirajpal@yahoo.com

White Nyumba.indd 1 12/09/2019 18:23

DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE

EARLY BIRD RATES

ADVERTISE

WITH US

Email for special rates.

vanessa@nomadmagazineafrica.com

NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 51


WHAT I PACK

Vanessa Wanjiku is a vivacious and laid back personality, and when she’s not

traveling, she works as the Head of Sales at Nomad.

MISS DIOR PERFUME - This is one of my favourite scents! I love roses and

this is very floral, which I like. It’s also small enough to carry around in my

travel bag.

MAC BOOK AIR - Being a salesperson, the work never stops. In any new

town when I’m meeting clients, I find moments in between when I go to a

quiet cafe or if I’m lucky, hang out at a beach and enjoy some sunshine

while catching up on emails.

WALLET - I have this really durable wallet that I got from Mr Price and I

carry it around to organise business cards as well as hold some of mine

because I get to meet so many people on the job

BOUNTY CHOCOLATE BAR - I love to snack and when I’ve been running

around all day, it’s always nice to have a quick pick me up

MAYBELLINE MASCARA - You have to look presentable on the job, and this

volumizing mascara is always a go-to

WHITE NGOMA SHOES FROM BATA - They class up any outfit and are

perfect for running around, whether I’m working or hiking up a hill.

LOUBOUTIN NUDE HEELS - When the work is done, the heels come out.

JBL HEADPHONES - I love music and I’m constantly listening to 2pac...that

gets me through the day.

BLACK LEATHER JACKET FROM TOI MARKET - It’s a staple item in my

wardrobe and goes with so many of my outfits.

BIBLE - Mine is golden covered and was gifted to me by my mum. I like

taking some time in the day to read a verse or two.

52 DISCOVER EXPLORE EXPERIENCE


NOMAD MAGAZINE 2019 53


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