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contents

FEATURES

6

Aerial

Advantage:

Companies like Lucid Drone Tech

in North Carolina supply drones to

take lifts and other machinery out of

the pressure wash equation, saving

companies workers compensation

costs and making them more efficient

and less reliant on human labor

23

Winter is Coming:

Failure to properly winterize and store your pressure

washing equipment during freezing conditions can

prove ruinous to pressure wash operators

DEPARTMENTS

9

How to be a

good boss

A good boss makes employees feel

satisfied, productive, and valued in

their work environment. They don’t

behave like a dictator.

4 Editor’s Letter:

Hugging Your Haters

12 Guest Column:

Everybody Needs a Coach: As

evidenced by the annual pro football

draft, even the best talent still needs

guidance to go from good to great

16 Contents

under Pressure:

A look around the World Wide Web for wacky

examples of pressure washing in our culture’s

everyday life: Spidey-Sense

Vol. 1, No. 4, Fall 2019

Publisher: Jackson Vahaly

Editor: Drew Ruble

Design: Katy Barrett-Alley

Pressure Wash News is published 4 times per year and is independently owned by Jackson Vahaly.

All inquiries should be directed to:

Pressure Wash News, 110 Childs Ln. Franklin, TN 37067

jacksonv@pressurewashnews.com

Copyright © 2019 2 Dollar Enterprises/Pressure Wash News. All Rights Reserved.

VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | 3


EDITOR’S

NOTE

Hugging

Your Haters

Jay Baer is the author of six bestselling

books, has founded five multimillion-dollar

companies, and regularly

consults iconic brands like Hilton.

In the last edition of PW News,

I featured Jay’s advice about getting

customers to advertise your business by

effectively creating word of mouth.

Here I want to talk about another

of Jay’s business gems -- hugging your

haters.

According to Baer, 80% of businesses

believe they provide “superior service.”

Not adequate, or pretty good, but

superior.

Meanwhile, a mere 8% of customers

agree.

Clearly, Baer says, we have a fundamental

disconnect or misunderstanding

about what constitutes superior service.

How can you bridge the gap and

actually provide superior service?

Baer says it starts and ends with the

concept of “hugging your haters.”

It’s a business model wherein operators

embrace complaints -- not just

tolerate complaints.

Why?

“I would rather have a useful

complaint than a pat on the back

for something I already know,” Baer

explains. “Because one makes you better

and one doesn’t.”

Baer says every business should be

trying to triple the number of complaints

about their business that they are

receiving.

“The only way to get better is to know

the things you’re not perfect at, and the

only way that’s going to happen is if your

customers actually tell us,” he says.

“To get fewer complaints, first you

have to get more complaints. You ask

people for feedback, they tell you things

that you didn’t know, you fix them, and

then you have less complaints. You have

to know what to fix before you can fix it.”

Here’s the problem. You either aren’t

getting the complaints you need, or,

worse, you are not embracing the negative

feedback when it arrives.

It’s no wonder we don’t embrace the

criticism. It’s human nature. Baer says

usually when someone complains and

you are the owner, it feels like somebody

telling you that your baby is ugly. And

nobody wants to hear that even if they

know for sure that their baby is ugly.

How can you overcome that initial

reaction? Baer says “do the math.”

According to Baer, for every 100

dissatisfied customers only five will

complain.

“What that means mathematically

is on average every time somebody

complains, 19 other people are having

the exact same tissue and didn’t say

anything,” he says. “So, what kills a business

are not the people who complain.

What kills a business are the people who

had a problem and just disappear.”

Think about it. People who complain

are actually going out of their way to use

their time and effort to tell you how to run

a better business. That’s a gift!

As such, Baer says unhappy customers

are actually your most important

customers, describing them as your “early

warning detection system” for things that

you can do better.

Here’s the kicker. Research proves

that if you have a customer who has

an issue and you successfully solve that

problem, then that customer will buy

more and be more loyal to your business

than a customer who never had a

problem at all.

Said another way, if a customer has

a problem and you fix it they will spend

more money on your business than

someone who never had a problem in the

first place. It’s like a magic trick!

Here’s the bottom line: the people

who complain about your business are

not your problem; ignoring them is your

problem.

Here are some other key points Baer

makes in arguing that you must “hug

your haters”:

• no response is in fact still a response

-- it says we care so little about your

dissatisfaction that we refuse to even

acknowledge it

• even if you can’t fix a customer’s

problem but you just respond to them,

it increases their advocacy of your

business by 25%

• the customer is not always right; but

the customer should always be heard

• when you are responding to a

complaint via social media, there are

a whole lot of other people on-looking

from the sidelines and gauging how

you handle it; which means the

economic impact of any customer

interaction online is way higher than

a face-to-face conversation with an

unhappy customer

• you can’t fix what has already

happened but you have total and

complete control over what happens

next, meaning whether you respond,

how fast you respond, what you say,

and where you say it; and this can

have a massive impact on how your

business is viewed

• In today’s digital world, good service

is good marketing, they are essentially

indistinguishable

• your least-happy customers are your

most important customers so take the

time to listen to them and understand

it is what they are really looking for

Now go hug your haters!!!

Drew Ruble

drewruble@gmail.com

4 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


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Aerial

Advantage

Softwashing drones built by

North Carolina-based Lucid Drone

Technologies promise to make

businesses more efficient

BY DREW RUBLE

In a recent Forbes magazine article

titled “The Future of Work: Humans

+ Gigs + Robots are the New Blended

Workforce,” author Jeanne Meister explored

how it’s “humans AND machines

who comprise the new blended workforce,

not humans VS. machines.”

Meister highlights the new category

of jobs emerging that blend blue collar

work with digital know-how, which she

defined as “New Collar jobs.”

“What is needed” she says, “is the

ability to re-imagine how [businesses]…

invest in learning and development…

and nurture a new blended workforce.”

Twenty-somethings Andrew Ashur,

David Danielson, and Adrian Mayans

clearly see that same future for the pressure

washing industry. Together, the millennial

entrepreneurs co-founded Lucid

Drone Technologies near Charlotte,

North Carolina shortly after graduating

from Davidson College. Their mission?

To swell technology use in the pressure

washing industry in an effort to lower

costs, increase efficiency, and transform

blue collar into new collar.

Andrew Ashur David Danielson Adrian Mayans

A BETTER

WAY

It all started one day while the three

budding entrepreneurs were driving into

Charlotte. That’s when they happened

to witness a pressure wash operator

hanging off of the side of a tall building

in order to clean it.

“We basically said, ‘wow, that literally

looks like the worst job in the world.

With modern technology there has to

be a better way to do this,’” Mayans recalled.

“We started doing some research

into the space and quickly realized a

glaring market inefficiency.”

Enter drones.

Ashur, Danielson, and Mayans – all

certified remote drone pilots through the

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

– quickly set out to service the industry

with custom building cleaning drones.

The trio spent countless hours on the

Davidson campus in open areas testing

the mathematics inherent to using

drones as a cleaning device.

Each drone is tethered and is constantly

being fed the fluids necessary to

clean from a soft wash pump on the back

of a truck. The drone’s cleaning method

is soft washing, which uses a low pressure

solution (60 to 100 PSI) instead of blasting

a surface with 3000 to 4000 PSI. It’s

all about relying on responsible chemistry

to treat stains, whether it’s brick,

limestone, roofs, or any other surface.

“The product development cycle was

long. You think about a tethered system

where the softwashing hose is attached to

the drone… it’s variable payload – every

successive foot you go higher, you’re car-

6 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


ying more hose and fluids, resulting in

more weight,” Mayans said. “For a yearand-a-half,

we were out on Davidson College

fields flying drones every single day,

constantly iterating on both our hardware

and software to perfect the system. It was

a constant feedback loop for us, as product

development was extremely informed

by what happened on day-to-day cleaning

jobs that we did personally.”

As Mayans related, the three co-founders

started out by incorporating drones

into their own operations as a cleaning

company, proving that their technological

solution worked in real-world settings.

“While drone cleaning represents the

future of the industry, we understood that

widespread adoption of our technology

would be dictated by how much our

technology actually solved the pain points

that cleaning companies face on jobs,”

Mayans said. “So, our goal was to create

a system that allows cleaning companies

to be safer, more efficient on jobs, and less

reliant on human labor. We aim to give

companies the best tool in the tool kit.”

As the company went about its business

of incorporating drones into their

own operations, other cleaning companies

increasingly started reaching out to

Lucid asking where they got their drone

cleaners and how they could also get

their hands on one.

“We realized that we had a solution to

the deepest problems that cleaning companies

face when they operate aboveground.

So, why not exit the service

sector and fuel the success of so many

others in the space by giving them the

productivity-improving tool that they so

desperately need?” Mayans said. “That’s

when we pivoted away from service and

into being a technology provider.”

“The pressure washing industry is

super fragmented,” Mayans continued.

“Every cleaning company is hindered

by the problems that come with aboveground

cleaning. Their revenue potential

and profit margins suffer from the inefficiency

of current above-ground methods,

the egregious worker’s compensation

costs that result from the danger of those

methods, and the expensive costs associated

with obtaining lifting machinery.”

PASSING

THE BATON

So how exactly does the Lucid model work?

First, Lucid walks prospective drone

operators step-by-step through the FAA

process required to become a certified

drone pilot. The company then thoroughly

trains their clients on the technology

and how to use it. As a result of that

in-person onboarding process, Lucid ensures

each client has everything that they

need knowledge and equipment-wise to

show up to a job site and be totally proficient

in using the drone themselves.

continued ...

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VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | 7


AERIAL

ADVANTAGE

“We made sure that everything that

we did was extremely intuitive,” Mayans

said. “When considering drone

technology, I think some people immediately

peg it as too futuristic or difficult

to use. We were very aware that we

might encounter this type of skepticism,

so we put user-friendliness at the top of

our priority list during product development.

We made our drones extremely

easy to fly – so easy that we taught an

82-year-old with no prior drone experience

to effectively clean with our drone

within 15 minutes.”

Lucid is among the very few companies

nationwide through which pressure

wash operators can operate a drone. The

company’s month-to-month subscription

leasing model aims to address the fact

that there will be a service component to

properly satisfy the needs of customers.

“Right now, the way many companies

operate when doing above-ground

work is that they rent lifting machinery

on an as-needed basis,” Mayans said.

“If a company wins a bid to clean an

eight-story property, it typically has to go

out and rent an 80-foot lift. These lifts

significantly eat into the margins that

companies make on these multi-storied

jobs. It’s expensive, and modern technology

now offers a better solution.”

“For $3,000 a month, we supply the

drone, the training, and the necessary

certification to commercially operate a

drone. The monthly subscription also includes

full-service, meaning if it breaks

we give you a new one within 24-hours,”

Mayans said. “If you look at the tradeoffs

where you implement a drone instead

of a lift, on top of the efficiency

you’re getting time-wise, and the increase

in revenue potential, you’re also

saving money by shifting your worker

classification from above-ground work to

on the ground.

“Do the job in less time so you can

move onto your next revenue-generating

opportunity faster, keep your

workers safer and pay less on worker’s

compensation as a result, and

don’t spend money on an overpriced,

outdated piece of equipment.”

Since Lucid builds their our own

drones in-house, Mayans avers that the

company’s quality assurance processes

“can be a lot more intimate and informed

than a company relying on the

technology of a third party.”

“Doing the entirety of our product

development in-house, we have very few

constraints on our processes and can

even engineer custom solutions for particular

use cases.”

SEALING

THE DEAL

Still on the fence about acquiring and

using drones in your operations?

Mayans reiterates three key competitive

advantages pressure wash operators

can possess by entering in the drone business

- it’s faster, safer, and cheaper.

“Again, companies will be able to

complete jobs in less time, increase the

safety of their operations, and save money

both on worker’s compensation and

labor costs,” Mayans said. “We did jobs

in 30 minutes that took other companies

hours to complete, and we never had to

get on a ladder or walk on a roof.”

Eliminating the danger inherent to putting

people on a roof serves not just a humanitarian

goal but a financial one as well.

“We relocate all of your workers to

the ground,” he said. “So the workers’

compensation costs that our users pay

are instead reflective of an on-ground

worker, which is substantially lower.

Worker’s compensation rates vary state

by state, but bottom-line, your workers

would be reclassified to ground workers,

which results in significant savings.

As soon as you’re using ladders or lifts

to suspend your worker’s above-ground,

the costs soar. So the drone just exponentially

makes more sense.”

That’s significant given that insurance

rates in the pressure wash industry are

often already crippling to businesses and

seemingly getting worse by the minute.

Drone use additionally impacts a

company’s profile in their marketplace.

“Implementing our drone into their

operations will not only increase their

revenue potential, but also offers a distinct

marketing advantage. In an industry

where differentiation is hard to come

by, it’s important to note that drones

don’t only make jobs easier, but easier

to come by,” Mayans said.

According to Mayans, when Lucid

would be cleaning a house with a

drone up in the air, they would have

four or five neighbors emerge from the

nearby area to witness the cleaning and

to ask questions about the service.

“They would say ‘this is awesome,

can you do it on my house?’” Mayans

related. “So, we would clean houses that

weren’t even dirty – they were just intrigued

by our technology.”

Last, Mayans also allays fear that as

a result of user error operators might do

damage to a property and create an insurance

problem.

“We implemented a lot of fail-safes

throughout our product development,”

Mayans said. “We have multi-motor redundancy,

so the drone can safely operate

even if multiple motors were to fail.

We also have 360-degree obstacle avoidance.

So, even if a pilot tries to run into

the side of a building, the drone literally

wouldn’t allow it.”

In the end, Lucid’s drone technology

makes companies less reliant not on humans,

but on human labor. Armed with a

forward-thinking business model, a full-service

approach, and experience in the field,

it’s no wonder Lucid Drone Technologies

is one company in the cleaning equipment

sphere that is truly taking flight.

8 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


How to be a

Good Boss

A GOOD BOSS MAKES EMPLOYEES

FEEL SATISFIED, PRODUCTIVE, AND

VALUED IN THEIR WORK ENVIRONMENT.

THEY DON’T BEHAVE LIKE A DICTATOR.

BY DEBRA GORGOS

When you’re the boss, you’re not

only in charge of the employees, you’re

also the person who sets the tone of the

business’s lifeblood. You’re a conductor

who determines the pace, the energy, the

synergy, and of the pulse of the business’s

ultimate opus. Do you want employees

to fear you? To trust you? To never leave

you? Are they important to you?

It is important for bosses to not underestimate

their significance to the business.

And, it is also important for bosses

to realize the importance of their employees.

There’s a special balancing act

that is required for harmony, and it has

to do with proper hiring, training, motivation,

and discipline.

WHAT IS A

GOOD BOSS?

Let’s start with defining what it takes

to be a good boss. Jeffrey J. Fox of Fox &

Company, Inc., a management consulting

firm, is also a best-selling author of 11 business

books. His book, How to Become CEO,

was on The New York Times, Business Week,

Wall Street Journal, Knight-Ridder, and Amazon.com

best-seller lists. His family members

also owned businesses that

included a car wash, detail shop oil

lube, and emissions control shop.

Fox says to be a good boss you must:

✔✔

Be fair, firm and friendly, but not a friend

✔✔

Set quantitative performance metrics

✔✔

Train employees so that they can get

a job with another company, but treat

them so well

✔✔

they don’t leave.

✔✔

Constantly train, particularly on how

to provide good customer service.

✔✔

Expect on-the-job cleanliness in floor

space, uniforms, window glass, etc.

✔✔

Give surprise bonuses.

✔✔

Pay for ESL classes.

✔✔

Treat every employee with dignity.

✔✔

Hold mini contests with cool little prizes

such as free hours in a batting cage; gift

✔✔

certificate at grocery store, etc.

✔✔

Constantly asks employees their opinions;

Seeks out improvement ideas.

✔✔

Reward good employee suggestions

✔✔

Give recognition pins

✔✔

Pay above market

✔✔

Pay anniversary bonuses ($100 for

every year, etc. This is less expensive

than turnover).

Yvan Lacroix, founder and president

of Répare-brise and regional manager

for Optimum Polymer Technologies, believes

that being a good boss has to do

with really getting to know your employees

and using each individual’s strength

to your benefit.

There are a lot of moving parts to

a well-run organization, but taking the

time to see if one employee is good at

customer service while another one enjoys

working on a filthy job will pay off.

Some people shouldn’t be talking to

customers, shares Lacroix, so they are

given other tasks, while some employees

are very good at it. So, make sure the

strengths are being used properly.

THE MAKING OF A

GOOD EMPLOYEE

The key to having a good employee

starts with the hiring process. To weed

out potential problem employees (see

“Red Flag” sidebar), make sure you start

with a crystal clear written job description,

says Fox.

“The job description must define exactly

what is expected from the potential

candidate. Even if the candidate is not

proficient in English, or is a poor reader,

there must be a job description. The job

description is a good guide to use during

the interviewing process. Only the candidate

really knows if he can do the job.

Thus, it must be made clear that candidates

hire and fire themselves.”

Lacroix also suggests using recommendations

for his employees, and also

uses temp agencies.

“What is nice is that if a temp employee

isn’t working out, I can have the agency

let them know that their term is over.”

They should be interviewed by the

continued ...

VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | 9


GOOD

BOSS

owners and by trusted employees, especially

those who are proven to be good

detailers, says Fox.

“If the candidate has poor English,

there must be a translator in the interviewing

process.”

Fox also suggests giving each candidate

a paid one day or one week trial to

see if they are a good fit. Then, candidates

should be hired on a 30-60-90 day

evaluation schedule, says Fox.

“Poor employees are easily discovered

in this time period.”

It is also important to check the references

and do a background check.

Also, adds Fox, “existing employees

should be given a bonus for bringing in

good workers. That bonus is paid after

the evaluation period.”

HOW TO TRAIN

YOUR EMPLOYEE

One of the most important things a

boss needs to do is to properly train each

employee, and continually evaluate their

skills, making sure they are not making

any shortcuts.

“You need to show them everything

you know,” says Lacroix. “I think some

people are afraid to teach them all of

the skills because they are afraid they will

leave and use their skills somewhere else.”

But, even with that fear in mind, each

employee needs to be given ample and

proper training time.

Lacroix suggests giving a new employee

two weeks to a month to learn the

skills and execute them properly. To do

this, he says to have a manual of operating

practices, a checklist of what is

expected in each detail, and each employee,

even if they have detailed before,

has to be trained as if they are new to the

industry because each business, and the

tools included, are different.

Some employees have an attitude of,

‘I know what I’m doing and I am better

than my boss,’ and those are the toughest

to work with, says Lacroix. “You have to

make them understand that you’re the

boss and things are run at your place a

certain way.”

REWARDING GOOD

EMPLOYEES

When you have a good employee, it is

important to let them know you appreciate

their hard work. And, while you can’t

force them to stay and worry they will

someday leave, giving them

proper acknowledgement may help

in prolonging their tenure.

Matt Cowart, of Liberty Detailing

in Petoskey, Michigan, says good old

SOME OF THE WORST BOSSES OF ALL TIME

1

LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling

is known for crude racial com-

giving the option to sell. At the time, the

company was collapsing. Skilling and his

5

In the early 1900s Max Blanck and

Isaac Harris, owners of Triangle

7

In 2012, 47-year-old Debbie Stevens

of Long Island, New York,

ments (according to one lawsuit) and was

inner circle were, however, allowed to sell

Shirtwaist Garment Company, locked

was fired from the billion-dollar company,

sued multiple times for sexual harass-

their shares and Skilling was able to cash

their employees in the New York City

Atlantic Automotive Group, after donat-

ment and has been accused of heckling

his shares for $15 million after quitting

garment factory to keep them from steal-

ing a kidney to help her boss who needed

and yelling at his teammates. In 2014 he

and just after the company completely

ing. Regarding as a true “sweatshop,” in

a transplant. The boss, Jackie Brucia, ap-

was banned for life from the NBA for in-

flat lined.

1911, the factory caught fire and 146

parently wasn’t very grateful for Stevens’

decent comments he made which were

recorded and released to the public.

THE LESSON? Don’t be racist. Don’t sexually

harass your employees.

2 Al Dunlap a.k.a. “Chainsaw Al,”

fired 11,200 employees with his

first two years a CEO of Scott Paper and

Sunbeam. The former boss also pocketed

$100 million in stocks and salary

after getting rid of one-third of the em-

THE LESSON? Treat your employees as

equals.

4 Film producer Scott Rudin is rumored

to have fired over 200 personal

assistants and he even has admitted

to having a temper. In 2005, Kate Kelly

and Melissa Marr wrote a profile piece

on Rudin in the Wall Street Journal.

“Former assistants say he sometimes

vents his anger by throwing phones and

workers were killed.

THE LESSON? Treat your employees humanely.

6 Marge Schott, the former owner

of the Cincinnati Reds, in infamous

for using offensive language in regards

to African Americans, Asians and

those of Jewish faith. What’s even worse

was her outspoken support of Nazi party

autocrat Adolf Hitler. One of her for-

sacrifice. After returning to work four

weeks post-op, Stevens told ABC News

that she was horribly mistreated. “I don’t

have words strong enough or large enough

to describe her treatment of me,” Stevens

said. “Screaming at me about things I

never did, carrying on to the point where

she wouldn’t even let me leave my desk. It

was constant, constant screaming.”

THE LESSON? Be grateful for every gift

you receive from your employees.

ployee base.

office supplies, prompting assistants to

mer employees, Tim Sabo, sued her after

THE LESSON? Don’t fire and get rich at

the same time.

take precautions,” wrote Kelly and Marr.

One former assistant also claims he was

fired for bringing the wrong types of

he was fired, claiming it was because he

opposed her policy on not hiring African

Americans.

3 Jeffrey Skilling, former CEO of

Enron, apparently required that

employees had to invest their retirement

pensions in the company’s stock, without

muffins to a meeting.

THE LESSON? Don’t throw things at your

employees. Don’t get upset about the

wrong pastries.

THE LESSON? Don’t be racist. Don’t support

Hitler in any way, shape, or form.

10 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


fashioned praise works for him and his

detailers when it comes to rewarding his

employees.

For Lacroix, he says thanking his employees

is vital, but some of his employees

are motivated differently.

“What motivates one employee might

not motivate another,” he says.

Lacroix says he has one employee

who is motivated by praise and another

who is motivated by a gift card for a job

well done. Everyone is different, but it is

important to take the time to see what it

is that they need to feel appreciated.

THE RIGHT WAY

TO FIRE SOMEONE

Hands down, firing is one of the

hardest things about being a boss. According

to Lacroix, a problem with an

employee’s work is the responsibility of

the boss and may require some re-training.

But, if all else fails, it is necessary to

terminate their employment.

Cowart says some of the reasons for

termination include inconsistencies and

no pride in their work. He gives several

warnings to the employee, but, he says, “If

they don’t get it, they get pink slipped.”

If problems with an employee persist,

and a bad attitude or bad conduct is

unremitting (again, see the “Red Flags”

sidebar), and if a warning or warning

have already been given, then it is probably

time to part ways.

Here is how to do it, according to the

Harvard Business Review:

✔✔

Rehearse what you are going to say.

✔✔

Have an outline of why you are terminating

the employee.

✔✔

Do it as privately as possible.

✔✔

Be firm and direct.

✔✔

Don’t do it on a Friday, but on a

Tuesday instead (this is more fair to

the employee and allows them to start

looking for a new job more easily).

✔ Answer any questions he or she may have.

✔✔

Use phrases such as: “I have some

bad news for you. Today is your last

day here,” and “You’ve not been a

good cultural fit here.”

BOSSES TO ADMIRE

1. Gus Rodriguez, owner of the Jeep-

Chrysler-Dodge City dealership of

McKinney, Texas, didn’t like the way

his employee, Mike Bell, looked, according

to WFAA News.

2. Rodriguez encouraged Bell to take a

sick day and figure out what was going

on. That gesture ended up saving

Bell’s life. On his sick day, Bell collapsed

while at the hospital to get an

x-ray. He was then rushed into emergency

open-heart surgery. Rodriguez

took it one step further and helped

Bell out with his medical bills.

3. To celebrate making their goal, Jeff

Hildebrand of Houston-based Hilcorp

Energy, gave each of his 1,381

employees a $100,000 Christmas bonus

in 2015. Hildebrand did something

similar in 2010 and gave each

employee the option of a $50,000 car

or $35,000 in cash after reaching that

5-year goal at the time.

4. In 2015, Dan Price, CEO of credit

card processing company Gravity

Payments, gave up his own $930,000

salary to make sure each employee

was given at least $70,000 per year.

Upset with income inequality, and the

fact that his employees were struggling

with increased living expenses, Price

believed a salary hike would boost

his employees’ emotional well-being.

Price told Time magazine, “[We] only

get to live this life once. I want everybody

that I’m partnered with at Gravity

to really live the fullest, best life that

they can.”

5. Chuck Sibley, manager of the diesel

engine plant Navistar in Huntsville,

Alabama, was devastated when he

found out he had to lay off many of his

employees. Although it was only temporary,

Sibley still worried about the

welfare of those employees and determined

to make sure they were okay,

he created a way for them to earn a

paycheck through a community outreach

program sponsored by Navistar.

About 50 employees were able to do

work for Habitat for Humanity and

RED FLAGS TO LOOK

FOR WHEN IT COMES

TO HIRING AN EMPLOYEE

1. Offensive tattoos featuring

anything from a swastika to a

swear word. Need we say more?

2. Bad body odor

3. Someone who swears

4. Bad police record.

5. Doesn’t show up on time for job

interview.

6. Rudeness

7. Always on their cell phone

8. Isn’t willing to be “re-trained”

9. Talks down to other employees

ARE YOU ON THIS LIST?

Unhappy employees can now strike

back at their bosses and leave

reviews on the website ebosswatch.

com. It is unclear if each review

is qualified, but according to the

Facebook page description, it

promotes both good and bad reviews.

eBossWatch.com is a free career

resource that enables people to rate

their bosses so that job-seekers can

evaluate prospective employers and

avoid workplace jerks.

VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | 11


GUEST

COLUMN

Everybody

Needs a Coach

As evidenced by the annual pro football draft,

even the best talent still needs guidance to go

from good to great

Colby B. Jubenville, PhD,

is a recognized author, international

BY DR. COLBY JUBENVILLE

No, I didn’t get drafted by Joe. The

truth is, I begged him to meet with me

basis. We want to be better tomorrow

than we are today. That’s growth.

speaker, business consultant

and professor. He is the founder

and the director of the Center for

Student Coaching and Success

(www.mtsu.edu/cbhssuccess)

on the campus of Middle

Tennessee State University, the

largest undergraduate college in

Tennessee. A Senior Consultant

with Brentwood, TN based

Brent Consulting Group, he is

the recipient of the Nashville

Emerging Leaders Impact Award

presented by the Nashville Area

Chamber of Commerce and YP

Nashville. The award honors one

of Nashville’s top leaders who

has made a significant impact

on Nashville’s young professional

demographic. Most recently, he

was a blogger for the Washington

Times focused on self-reliance

and developing an entrepreneurial

mindset. His website can be found

at www.drjubenville.com, and his

latest book can be found at

www.mepersonalbranding.com.

Kyler Murray. Nick Bosa. Daniel

Jones. They all share something in common.

By virtue of being drafted (read:

hired) in the top 10 picks overall in the

2019 NFL draft, they were considered to

be some of the best young football players

in America. Each is expected to one

day lead corporations named the Cardinals

and Giants to success. But they aren’t

exactly expected to produce hall of

fame dividends overnight. Organizations

know they will need coaching to season

them into great professionals.

You are no different. Nor are your

employees. Heck, I was no different either.

Coming out of college and starting

out down my own professional path, I

certainly fit the description of a raw talent

who needed coaching and seasoning

to produce dividends.

Joe Calloway was one of my coaches.

The author of “Category of One” impacted

my life in numerous ways. But he

didn’t draft me. In fact, he didn’t even

know me until I called him up and told

him that I used his wisdom every day in

everything I did.

and to become my coach. Looking back,

it was borderline stalking. But Joe’s response

to my begging changed my life.

I’ll never forget what he said when I finally

gave him a chance to speak on the

phone. He said ‘Colby, if you think I can

help you, then come on up and we’ll

meet.’ I was probably in the car and on

my way before he even finished that sentence.

And in our first meeting, I recall

spending no less than five hours asking

him questions about everything he knew.

Why did I do it? Why did I push Joe

so hard to be my coach? Because I firmly

believe that everybody in life needs a

coach. Great coaches push us to where

we need to be and where we want to go.

At some point in life, and certainly

on a professional path, all of us reach a

ceiling of complexity. It’s where we can’t

seem to get any farther, or, perhaps better

said, higher, and we need to turn to

somebody else and say ‘I need your help.’

Believe me, when you reach – or hit

-- the ceiling of complexity, you will need

a coach. It’s the same reason we all seek

out conferences to attend on an annual

Here, then, is the $64,000 question?

How do you get a coach? Mind you, I do

not recommend pestering geniuses like

Joe Calloway at their personal addresses.

Perhaps instead you could develop such

a relationship through a conference visit

where your idol is speaking? Or through

a very professional email?

Regardless of your chosen approach,

the key to striking up a coaching relationship

is that you must add value first.

Don’t just ask for help (which is exactly

what I did to Joe, poor soul!). As “the

minimalists” Joshua Fields Millburn and

Ryan Nicodemus have said, contributing

to other people—or adding value to their

lives “is the only way to gain another

person’s buy-in, and it’s one of the few

ways to get others to believe in you.”

How do you do that? You’ll have to

figure that one out for yourself. As examples,

though, “the minimalists” have

suggested options including: creating

something someone can use, inspiring

someone to take action, lending a helping

hand, showing someone how to do

continued ...

12 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


something, showing someone a better

things a day, five days a week, and 60

that if the container is bad then it really

is a dividend of hard work, discipline,

way, providing a new perspective, or

times a month that point directly to the

doesn’t matter how good the athlete is.

persistence, and commitment. Honestly,

even just listening or giving someone

your full attention.

I think that in the complicated world

we live in today, we are in the midst of

a great coaching revolution. To me, in

modern life and business, you either are

a coach, have a coach, or don’t want to

be coached. And if you are in the latter

group, you will be left behind.

Find people to coach you – people

who can grow the skills you brought to

the table and get you past that inevitable

ceiling of complexity. Then maybe

someday like Murray, Bosa, and Jones,

you too can develop in to a hall of famer!

Here’s an example of some good

coaching I got. If I asked you to do three

dominant focus in your life or your business,

could you do it? Could your employees

do it? The answer is a resounding

‘yes!’ Try it! And start today!

In my life, coaches like Joe Calloway

have taught me many more lessons like

the one above that have been essential

to my personal success. I list a few of

those below.

Stop looking for shortcuts.

In other words, know and teach the

rules. You have to commit to yourself,

to the task, and to the coach. There’s no

wiggle room. What is your substance?

Are you tough enough to see this

through? Because any athletic coach will

tell you that all talent has a container and

Get Real.

In other words, follow the action,

stop fooling yourself, and keep score. It’s

like in golf. You’re not really getting any

better by taking mulligans, altering the lie

of the ball, or reporting less strokes than

you actually took. Face the truth and let’s

actually start making some progress.

Own it.

In other words, provide a stake in

the outcome. The consequences of not

following through have to be greater

than simply throwing yourself a pity

party. And the coach you pick had

better not be easy on you when you

feel like quitting. Everything you want

skill and talent are secondary to human

achievement. Does all that really sound

so bad to you? Isn’t that what you want?

And isn’t it worth the perspiration?

Aren’t you tired of failing to achieve

your stated goals because you continue

to be your own worst obstacle?

Experience culture shock.

Culture is about repetition.

Acknowledge that your present culture

doesn’t work. Try something different

and stick to it. Trust the process. Why

else would you be reading here? Why

else would you be recruiting a coach?

You have to change the batter if you

want to be better.

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CONTENTS

UNDER

PRESSURE

A POP CULTURE-

INSPIRED LOOK

AT THE PRESSURE

WASH INDUSTRY

A look around

the World

Wide Web

for wacky

examples

of pressure

washing

in our culture’s

everyday life

BY DREW RUBLE

SPIDEY-

SENSE

“Spidey Sense” is the

superpower possessed by the

fictional character Spider-Man.

Defined as instinct or

intuition, it describes the

superhero’s uncanny ability to

sense that something is going

to happen before it can be

perceived by other senses.

continued ...

16 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


CONTENTS

UNDER

PRESSURE

According to Marvel Comics, the

creators of Spiderman back in 1962,

Spidey-Sense “presents a psychological

awareness of Spider-Man’s

surroundings…Spidey-Sense is precognitive

in nature and Spider-Man

always acts before realizing it.”

One could argue that Miami-area

pressure wash operator Demetrio

Garcia has Spidey-Sense. That’s

because earlier this year, Garcia encountered

inspiration, had the instinct

to act on it, and, by doing so,

quickly and completely overhauled

his entire business and brand to

adopt to a social and cultural phenomenon.

What did he do? He wore a Spiderman

suit to the job site.

At the dawn of 2019, Garcia was

merely the owner of a cookie-cutter

South Florida pressure wash company

called Sunset Pressure Wash. But

the Miramar businessman said one

day he had the idea to buy a Spiderman

suit and wear it on to a job site.

He says can’t really explain why he

had the thought, other than the fact

that Marvel was beginning to come

out with what appeared to be a string

of blockbuster films featuring infamous

characters like Aquaman and

Spiderman. Erring on the side of instinct

instead of over-thinking his inspiration,

Garcia bought and donned

the suit on the job.

What happened next was nothing

short of a tidal of national attention

for Garcia. A resident of

a neighborhood he was pressure

washing in shot a video of Garcia

cleaning a roof in a Florida subdivision

and posted the video on social

media.

The video went viral within a matter

of hours, literally spanning the

globe.

“Once I got the suit, I got on top

of a roof, and somebody filmed me

there, and that video went viral,” he

said. “From there, I’ve been invited

to be on local television and all

kinds of other experiences. It went

all around.

“It was amazing. Across the nation

people picked up on that video

clip and story. And the outfit was just

my crazy idea.

“Business was pretty good as

Sunset; but then I got the suit and

the video went viral and things went

crazy. It is just crazy from there.

“Everything’s been changed. Everywhere

I go everybody knows me.

They say ‘I saw you on TV!’”

Garcia, though, didn’t rest of

his laurels. Seizing what he saw as

a business opportunity, he fearlessly

rebranded his entire operation.

“I put Superhero as my new

business name and rewrapped my

truck with Superhero,” he said.

“I’ve had a lot of fun with it. Kids

always come out to take pictures and

get autographs. When I’m working,

people come out and take pictures

and video. It’s been nice and good

for business. It’s good marketing, oh

continued ...

18 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


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CONTENTS

UNDER

PRESSURE

yeah. Every day I go to work people

take pictures of me now.”

Rebranding overnight to Superhero

Wash was a pretty courageous

move on Garcia’s part. To go “all

in” and differentiate his business

based on his momentary period of

media spotlight was bold to say the

least. But looking back on Garcia’s

life, one might say he’s always been

a risk taker.

Garcia grew up in Santo Domingo

in the Dominican Republic. In

1977, he moved to New York and ran

a landscape company. Then in 1988,

he went back to Santo Domingo.

There, from 1988 to 2000, Garcia

was a celebrated champion in Motocross

in the elite 250 class.

“In 1989, I became a champion

in Motocross in Santo Domingo,”

he said. “Until 1998, from there, I

went all around Costa Rica, Venezuela,

Colombia, and even Texas

representing the Dominican Republic,

racing on the 250. And from that

I got 16 broken bones!”

When his motocross career ended

in 2000, Garcia moved to the Miami

area with his wife and four kids.

He reentered the landscape business

but eventually sold that company.

Then, semi-retired, he decided to

get into pressure cleaning business,

launching Sunset.

“It’s been very good. It’s been a

good business for me,” Garcia said.

“But nothing like what has happened

since Superhero. People want

Spider-Man to come clean their

house!”

So, what’s next for Garcia? He

says he purposefully renamed his

company “Superhero” pressure

wash instead of a specific Marvel

character like Superman so that

he can change out characters when

deemed appropriate. So, for instance,

based on the success of the

recent Aqua man movie, he could

arguably switch to that suit in the

year ahead.

“I’m Spider-Man so far but I

could be Superman when he’s out

of the market,” Garcia said. “I don’t

lock myself in. I could be Aquaman

or one of those other heroes. I can

go after that and keep it fresh.”

Interestingly, the costume that

launched Garcia’s story is actually

good for pressure washing

“It’s a good water suit,” he said.

“People say ‘isn’t the suit a problem?’

But no, it’s like cool-dry. It’s

always cool. It’s amazing. It’s an

amazing suit. I didn’t expect it to be

that good. It worked out perfect. It’s

the best possible uniform for pressure

washing.”

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

In his book Maverick Startup, entrepreneur and

author Yanik Silver outlined seven things to consider when

determining a name or new name for your business.

1. The name needs to sound good when it’s said aloud

2. Use a name that has meaning to it and conveys a benefit

3. Avoid Web 2.0-ish syndrome like spelling Flickr without

an “er”

4. Beware initials because they are boring

5. Use specifics -- don’t use a generic name that doesn’t

mean anything

6. Make sure you can trademark the name

7. Test it out online -- there might be a slightly different

name out there that might get more attention on the Internet

Silver adds that if you really want to get advanced, try to

come up with a name that could be eventually used as a

verb, or lends itself to the creation of your own “language.”

20 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


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Failure to properly winterize and store your pressure

washing equipment during freezing conditions can

prove ruinous to pressure wash operators

BY JOE ANISH

winterizing pressure washing equipment

tended period of time.

When it comes to being successful in

the pressure washing business, your equipment

functionality is the key to success. I

have seen more equipment ruined during

the winter than any other season. This is

due in part to improper storage and not

during freezing conditions.

Following a few simple steps and taking

the necessary time can increase your

success when Spring arrives. Even if you

are not in an area where freezing conditions

occur, these guidelines work well

when storing a pressure washer for an ex-

At Vilco Supply when a customer

brings a pressure washer in for winterizing,

regardless if it is a commercial pressure

washing company, small business, or

a residential client, we follow these simple

steps and they can help you as well.

Even though some pressure washers

have more bells and whistles the overall

winterizing of a unit is basically the

same. The first step always involves the

continued ...

VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | 23


THE PUMP

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10 TH

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engine and fuel system when winterizing

a unit. We always drain the engine oil,

replace the oil filter, and add the proper

amount of new oil before anything else.

Next, inspect or replace the fuel filter.

Preparing the fuel from freezing, condensation,

varnish, or corrosion is critical.

By preparing the fuel first we can

eliminate a few steps while incorporating

a fuel stabilizer into the system. This

gives adequate time for proper circulation

of the fuel stabilizer through the engine

and fuel system.

Use a quality full stabilizer or storage

fuel additive to the full fuel tank according

to the label instructions. After the

stabilizer is added, connect a water supply

hose or open the storage tank valve

as you normally would when pressure

washing. Start the engine and use the

pressure washer for 10-15 minutes. This

allows the stabilizer to properly circulate

through the fuel tank into the carburetor

and fuel lines. Shut the engine off and

finish the engine later.

Now let’s prepare the pump for winter!

And when I say, “prepare the pump

for winter,” I am actually preparing the

entire pressure pump, hose, fittings, and

regulator -- basically everything from the

inlet of the pump all the way to the tip of

the wand. I have seen where some maintenance

companies or customers fail to

properly prepare these components from

freezing. This method allows us to winterize

the entire pump system.

By using environmentally safe antifreeze

such as RV antifreeze, we can eliminate

the system from freezing. Purchase a

few gallons of RV antifreeze from a local

continued ...

A MAN FOR

ALL SEASONS

It’s winter, and business simply isn’t quite as robust.

Sure, you’ve got some jobs, and maybe even a niche,

weather-proof business, perhaps in the agricultural

space, that keeps the money flowing.

But for many operators, winter is a time not just to

winterize the equipment but to focus on other aspects of

their business as well.

Here are just a few ideas about things to think about

or do for your business this winter when your schedule

slows down a bit.

WINTER IS

COMING

• Work on targeting new areas, generating new

commercial customers, rebuilding or upgrading

equipment

• Capitalize on the downtime to get a game plan

together

• Relationship building: target sectors where you

wish to generate work, conducting research on

managers in the area. Contact them and submit

bids

• Knock on some doors and leave behind business

cards with prices

• Spend time with your family! Use your neglected

gym membership! Focus on being a dad (or

mom)! Then get busy scheduling and preparing

for the busy times of the year!

[Editor’s Note: Over nearly five decades in business, Vilco Supply has seen its share of customers

who succeed by maintaining their equipment for every season. This summer season has been

Vilco’s busiest since establishing our company in 1974. Not only has the number of pressure

washing companies increased but business has also picked up as a result of the availability of

inexpensive home owner pressure washing equipment to the general public. As a pump maintenance

company, specifically Cat Pump, Vilco takes its responsibility to keep those units running

seriously, not just by making repairs but also educating customers about proper care and protection

of their equipment now and for the future. If you have any pump maintenance questions, visit the

company at Vilcosupply.com, or call 888-255-4181.]

VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | 25


WINTER IS

COMING

parts store or big box retailer. We like to

use -50 degree product when winterizing

our units.

Carefully pour several gallons of antifreeze

into a clean bucket (do not add

water). If your system uses a water storage

tank, remove your pick-up or supply

line and place the line in the bucket of

antifreeze. Start the pressure washer engine

as if you are pressure washing. Allow

the existing water in your system to pump

through the entire system.

Once the antifreeze is spraying out the

tip, place the wand tip into the antifreeze

bucket and allow it to circulate through

the system for a minute or so. Shut the

unit off and remove the supply line. Drain

the system storage water storage tank and

leave the drain valve open all winter. Be

sure the line going to the pump is either

plugged off or full of antifreeze, then

re-connect it to the storage tank with the

supply valve shut off.

Now the antifreeze is in your pump,

fittings, regulator, bypass hose, pressure

hose, spray wand handle, and tip. This

method also helps seals and O-rings from

dying out during storage. If your unit requires

water pressure to operate, you will

need to use a different method to supply

the antifreeze into your pump.

For this method, you will need a supply

pump to pressurize the antifreeze equal

to typical water pressure from your utility

supplier (40 to 60 psi). We use the smallest

sump pump or utility pump with a hose

adaptor that can supply around 3-8 gallons

per minute, depending on the demand

your pressure washer (check your owner’s

manual for water supply requirements).

With this method, the only difference

is that we hook up the supply hose from

the pressure washer to the sump pump and

immerse the sump pump into the bucket

of RV antifreeze. Start the sump pump

and pressure washer approximately at the

same time. Follow the same steps as we described

with the storage tank method.

After you have circulated the RV antifreeze,

remove the supply line and dispose

of or store the remaining antifreeze referencing

the product label.

Now, back to the engine. Since the

engine has now operated for the last

time before storing the unit for winter, fill

the fuel tank to full capacity leaving just

enough room to add additional fuel stabilizer

according to the amount of fuel

you topped off with. This step in very important

to prevent any unnecessary voids

in the fuel tank. When voids are present

in a fuel tank, it gives an area for water

to condensate.

Finish winterizing the engine by removing

the spark plug. Once the spark

plug is removed, you can either put approximately

¼ ounce of SAE 30 oil directly

into the open cylinder or purchase

some fogging oil from a local parts store.

Either method will keep the cylinder from

corroding, rusting, or sticking when restarting

next Spring. We like to use fogging

oil to completely cover the cylinder

walls and cylinder head.

Once the oil is added into the cylinder,

make sure the kill switch is in the

“off” position and pull the starting cord

a few times to properly disperse the oil in

the cylinder. Before replacing the spark

plug, inspect for carbon buildup. [Pictures

7a and 7b] Replace the spark plug

if necessary. Place the spark plug back in

cylinder head, tighten, and be sure to reconnect

the plug wire.

By following these few simple steps to

winterize a pressure washer system, you

can eliminate the possibility of freezing,

engine or fuel line corrosion, and keeping

the seals from drying out during the

winter months. While these steps are an

excellent guideline for preparing a pressure

washer for the winter months, you

should always do preventive maintenance

as needed according to the amount of use

your equipment experiences.

26 | PRESSURE WASH NEWS | VOL. 1, NO. 4 | FALL 2019


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ADVERTISERS

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jacksonv@pressurewashnews.com


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