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ESKENAZI

MUSEUM

OF ART

ISSUE 6 | SPRING 2020

ESKENAZI MUSEUM OF ART 1


ESKENAZI

MUSEUM OF ART

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

admission is always free

ESKENAZI

MUSEUM OF ART

1133 E. 7th st.

bloomington, in 47405

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

6 8 12

gallery hours

Monday - Closed

Tuesday - 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Wednesday - 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Thursday - 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Friday - 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Saturday - 10 a.m.–7 p.m.

Sunday - 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

café hours

Monday - 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Tuesday - 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Wednesday - 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Thursday - 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Friday - 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Saturday - 10 a.m.–7 p.m.

Sunday - 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

contact us

iuam@indiana.edu

812.855.5445

artmuseum.indiana.edu

connect with us f t i

Sign up for our email newsletter:

artmuseum.indiana.edu/newsletter

CONTENTS

3 FROM THE DIRECTOR

4 WHAT’S NEW IN THE GALLERIES

5 FEATURED EXHIBITIONS

Jim Dine: Pinocchio, Geppetto, and

Other Personal Metaphors

8 CENTER FOR CONSERVATION

magazine staff

David A. Brenneman

Wilma E. Kelley Director

Mariah Keller

Director of Creative Services

Shanti Knight

Photographer

Kristin Londergan

Marketing and Communication

Coordinator

Cassi Tucker

Manager of Museum Technology

Jennifer Witzke

Graphic Designer

10 CENTER FOR PRINTS, DRAWINGS, AND PHOTOGRAPHS

12 EVENTS

Grand Reopening Celebration

Social Saturdays

14 CENTER FOR CURATORIAL STUDIES

18 CENTER FOR EDUCATION

22 ART AND A MOVIE

24 UPCOMING SPECIAL EXHIBIT

Costume Collection of Actress Glenn Close

on the cover

Vassily Kandinsky, Russian, 1866–

1944, Small Worlds (Kleine Welten)

VII from Small Worlds (Kleine Welten)

1922, Color lithograph on paper,

Image: 10 11/16 x 9 1/8 in. (27.1 x

23.1 cm); sheet: 13 7/8 x 11 3/16 in.

(35.2 x 28.4 cm), Sidney and Lois

Eskenazi Museum of Art, Collection

of Diether Thimme, 98.360

thank you

100% of the museum’s annual funding for special exhibitions, educational

programs, special events, and publications is provided by individuals like you,

and we are grateful for your support.


FROM THE DIRECTOR

DEAR FRIENDS OF ESKENAZI MUSEUM OF ART,

As we near the reopening of our world-class teaching museum, I am reminded of the first masterpieces of visual art that I was able

to examine intimately. This occurred during my early years as a graduate student at Brown University while I held fellowships in

OM the THE print rooms DIRECTOR

of the Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art and the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University. These direct

engagements with incredible objects were lifechanging. Through the privilege of being in close proximity to my subjects, I realized

that original, great works of art are not just ephemeral images, like slides on a screen, but also tangible, durable things that communicate

the sublime ideas and consummate skills of their makers. I also realized that these works are authentic and that their makers

Eskenazi Museum of Art,

were real, too, not just fictional personalities. And finally, I recognized that this epiphany could only have happened as a result of my

engagement with original works of art.

reopening of our world-class teaching

R

m reminded of the first masterpieces

After graduate school, I built a career as a curator and museum administrator, and always

that I was able to examine intimately.

tried to transmit my fascination and passion for original works of art to others. When the

g ng my early years as a graduate student

opportunity to lead a great university art museum presented itself, I was eager and ready

while I held fellowships in the print

for the challenge. I was especially interested in engaging students with original works

Island School of Design Museum of

of art, knowing that the world had changed significantly since I was a university student.

Technology and the proliferation of digital imagery is a mixed blessing. On the

t nt Museum at Harvard University. These

with incredible objects were lifehe

privilege of being in close proximity

one hand, it makes vast amounts of information available at the touch of a button.

LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR On the other, it simply cannot function as a viable substitute for the direct multisensory

experience of the original. How can a museum full of great original works

se lized that original, great works of art

ral images, like slides on a screen,

LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR

Dear friend of the IU Eskenazi Museum of Art,

of art make the case for the intimate,

ty rable things that communicate the

direct experience of great art when so

As we near the reopening of our world-class teaching

Dear friend of the IU Eskenazi Museum of Art,

museum, I am reminded of the first masterpieces

onsummate skills of their makers. I of visual art that I was able to examine intimately.

much can be seen and learned on the

As This occurred we near the during reopening my early of years our world-class a graduate teaching student

ese works are authentic and that Brown museum,

their University I am reminded while I held of the fellowships first masterpieces

in the print

of visual art that I was able to examine intimately. Internet?

rooms of the Rhode Island School of Design Museum of

This occurred during my early years as a graduate student

o, not just fictional personalities. Art and And the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University. These

at Brown direct University engagements while with I held incredible fellowships objects in the were print life-

rooms

that this epiphany could only have changing. of the Rhode Through Island the privilege School of of Design being in Museum close proximity of

Art to and my the subjects, Fogg Art I realized Museum that Harvard original, University. great works Digital These of art technology is an incredible tool, and

direct

ir

are engagements not just ephemeral with incredible images, like objects slides were on a lifechanging.

but also Through tangible, the durable privilege things of being that communicate in close reconceiving proximity the the Eskenazi Museum of Art, we

screen,

t of my engagement with original

to my

d

sublime subjects, ideas I realized and consummate that original, skills great of their works makers. of art I

are also not just realized ephemeral that these images, works were like are slides authentic on guided a screen, and that their by the fact that technology undergirds

but makers also tangible, were real, durable too, not things just that fictional communicate personalities. the And

and influences everything

sublime finally, ideas I recognized and

we

consummate

do. that this Understanding epiphany skills of their could makers. only have I

the full potential and limits of technology

as is a also curator key and makers

also happened realized that as a these result works of my are engagement authentic with and that original their

l, I built a career to managing works were of art. real, too, not just fictional personalities. And

and “curating” the art museums of the future. How can

Gallery technicians Brandon Alexander,

finally, I recognized that this epiphany could only have

or, and always we harness tried to transmit digital technology my happened After graduate as a result school, of my engagement with original

to I built awaken a career as a curator new and generations of students and learners

Gallery technicians Brandon Alexander, Max Shaw, and Kaila Austin take some time to view newly installed works in the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Gallery.

works museum of art. administrator, and always tried to transmit my

on for original to the works wonders of art to of others. great

fascination

works

and passion

of

for original

art?

works

That

of art to others.

is our challenge and that is how we went

After When graduate the opportunity school, I built to lead a career a great as a university curator and art museum

Gallery technicians Brandon Alexander, Max Shaw, and Kaila Austin take some time to view newly installed works in the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Gallery.

y to lead a about great university reshaping art our museum presented administrator, itself, I was and eager always and tried ready to for transmit the challenge. my I was Sidney and Lois Eskenazi, there is so much potential

incredible museum.

fascination and passion for original works of art to others.

Gallery technicians Brandon Alexander, Max Shaw, and Kaila Austin take some time to view

especially interested in engaging students with original works for learning and inspiration that we can finally unleash

eager and ready for the challenge. When of art, the I knowing opportunity was that to the lead world a Sidney great had university changed and significantly art museum Lois since Eskenazi, through four new there study centers, is so three much new art study potential

rooms,

presented I was a itself, university I was student. eager and Technology ready for and the challenge. the proliferation I was of

in engaging I am students very excited with original

especially digital

about works imagery interested is a in mixed engaging blessing.

our museum for

students

learning On the with one original hand,

and its and

works

makes

magnificent inspiration

for learning with the and IU community. inspiration

that Through that

collections. we can the can

finally renovation finally

unleash and our

Thanks unleash

of art, to tremendous

changed support significantly On a the university

vast knowing amounts that of the information world had available changed at significantly the touch of since a button.

through recommitment four new study to being centers, a teaching three new museum, art study we are rooms, honoring

I was

e world had from since other, it student. simply cannot Technology

President through function and as the a proliferation viable

Michael four substitute of educational

A. new McRobbie study the original programming,

centers, vision of our and founders, staff who

and a three Herman are eager

transformative new B Wells to engage

art and Henry study gift rooms,

digital from

for imagery the direct is multisensory a mixed blessing. experience On the of one the hand, original. it makes How can

with Radford the IU community. Hope. In recognition Through the of this renovation legacy, we and have our named the

vast

s ent. Technology Sidney Sidney and and Lois the Lois Eskenazi, proliferation a amounts

Eskenazi, there museum of full information

is of

there so great much original available

is educational works the

so potential

of art touch make of the a button.

much programming, case for

recommitment west wing of to the being

potential for learning and building a teaching after staff Henry museum,

who Hope. we are honoring

and inspiration eager to engage

On the the other, intimate, it simply direct cannot experience function of great as a art viable when substitute so much can

the original vision of our founders, Herman B Wells and Henry that

for the be seen direct and multisensory learned on experience the

ixed blessing. we can On the finally one unleash hand, it makes through four with

Internet? of the original. How can Radford

new IU study community.

I hope Hope. you

centers, Through

will In recognition join me for the of this

three new the

grand legacy,

s

renovation

unveiling we have of our named teaching the

for learning and inspiration that we can finally unleash

art study and rooms, our

a museum full of great original works of art make the case for west museum wing of for the the building twenty-first after Henry century Hope. and sample some of the

the Digital intimate, technology direct experience is incredible of great tool, art and when in so reconceiving

much can amazing works of art that are just waiting for you to connect

e mation through available educational four the new touch programming, study of centers, a button. three and staff new recommitment who study are rooms, eager to being to engage a teaching with museum, the IU we community.

are honoring

be seen the Eskenazi and learned Museum on the of Internet? Art, we were guided by the fact that

I hope with you in meaningful will join me ways. for the grand unveiling of our teaching

technology undergirds and influences everything we do.

museum for the twenty-first century and sample some of the

y f cannot educational function Through as programming, the a viable renovation substitute

Digital and and staff our who the recommitment are original eager vision to engage to of our being founders, a teaching Herman museum, B Wells and we are Henry

Understanding technology is the an full incredible potential tool, and and limits in reconceiving

of technology is

amazing With my works warmest of art that and most are just enthusiastic waiting for regards, you to connect

the also Eskenazi key to Museum managing of Art, and we “curating” were guided the art by museums the fact that of the

with in meaningful ways.

nsory s experience with honoring the IU of community. the original. Through technology How undergirds

vision can the and

of renovation influences

our Radford everything

founders, Hope. and we do. our Herman In recognition B Wells of this and legacy, Henry we Radford have named Hope. the

future. How can we harness digital technology to awaken new

Understanding generations the of students full potential and learners and limits to of the technology wonders of is great

With my warmest and most enthusiastic regards,

n. t original recommitment In works recognition of art make to being of the this a also case teaching key to managing

legacy, for and

we museum, “curating”

have west the art wing named we museums are of the

honoring the building west wing after of Henry the building Hope.

works of art? That is our challenge and that is how we went

after Henry

future. about How reshaping can we harness our incredible digital museum. technology to awaken new

perience the Hope. of original great art vision when of our so much generations founders, can of students Herman and learners to B the Wells wonders of great and Henry

works I am of very art? excited That is our about challenge our museum and that and is its how magnificent we went

n

the Internet? Radford Hope. In recognition about reshaping of this our incredible legacy, I museum.

David A. Brenneman

collections. Thanks to tremendous hope support we you have from President will named join me the for the grand unveiling of our teaching

Wilma E. Kelley Director

Michael A. McRobbie and a transformative gift from

I am very excited about our museum

r west I hope wing of you the will building join me after for Henry the grand Hope.

and its magnificent

unveiling for the of twenty-first our teaching century museum and David A. sample Brenneman

for the some of the

collections. Thanks to tremendous support from President

1

Wilma E. Kelley Director

Michael A. McRobbie and a transformative

n n incredible twenty-first tool, and in century reconceiving and sample amazing

gift from

some of works the amazing of art that works are just of waiting art that for are you just to connect

of Art, I hope we waiting were you guided will for join you by me to the 1for connect fact the that grand with unveiling in with meaningful of meaningful our teaching ways. ways.

s and influences museum for everything the twenty-first do. century and sample some of the

ll potential amazing With and my limits works warmest of of technology art that and are most is just waiting enthusiastic With for my you warmest regards, to connect and most enthusiastic regards,

and “curating” with meaningful the art museums ways. of the

arness digital technology to awaken new

ts and With learners my warmest to the wonders and most of great enthusiastic regards,

DAVID A. BRENNEMAN

our challenge and that is how we went

Wilma E. Kelley Director

ncredible museum.

Sidney educational and Lois programming, Eskenazi, there and is so staff much who potential are eager to engage

During a cleaning of the museum’s Resting Satyr (Roman, ca. 320 BCE), freelance object conservators Amy and Greg Byrne discover previously undetected pigment.

above Gallery technicians Brandon Alexander,

Max Shaw, and Kaila Austin take some time to

view newly installed works in the Sidney and

Lois Eskenazi Gallery.

For more on the museum’s research into polychromy, visit our website: artmuseum.indiana.edu.

During a cleaning of the museum’s Resting Satyr (Roman, ca. 320 BCE), freelance object conservators Amy and Greg Byrne discover previously undetected pigment.

For more on the museum’s research into polychromy, visit our website: artmuseum.indiana.edu.

below During a cleaning of the museum’s

Resting Satyr (Roman, ca. 320 BCE), freelance

object conservators Amy and Greg Byrne

discover previously undetected pigment.

For more on the museum’s research into

polychromy, visit artmuseum.indiana.edu.

2

2

ut our museum and its magnificent

tremendous support from President

and a transformative gift from

David A. Brenneman

Wilma E. Kelley Director

ESKENAZI MUSEUM OF ART 3

During a cleaning of the museum’s Res


WHAT’S NEW IN THE GALLERIES

What’s New?

The museum’s four galleries have been renovated with our visitor in mind, with brand

new lighting and layouts that highlight and embrace I.M. Pei’s original design.

Transparency has been introduced throughout the building, with tinting removed from

the windows, allowing a view of the art inside via many new vantage points outside the

museum, such as a new sidewalk that runs in front of the building, along 7th Street.

There are three new galleries on the first floor with redesigned thresholds that allow

for dramatic, inviting sneak peeks of the treasures inside.

Our European and American art collection has been divided into two galleries: The

Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Gallery in the Hope Wing displays modern and contemporary

art, and the Jane Fortune Gallery in the East Wing houses works from the medieval

period to 1900. A third gallery will host featured exhibitions.

OUR NEWLY RENOVATED

GALLERIES FEATURE

▲▲

▲▲

▲▲

Redesigned layouts with more

intuitive navigation

Museum-wide, high-speed

wifi that allows for immediate

sharing via social media

Interpretative strategies that

encourage attentive viewing

and connections with art

The reinstallation includes works that have never been on view and many others that

have not been seen in several years. In the Jane Fortune Gallery, all eight panels from

our Spanish altarpiece by Felipe Vigarny will be shown together for the first time, in a

display specially designed by the museum’s installation crew.

above Felipe Vigarny (French, active Spain, ca. 1475–1542), Eight Scenes from the Life of the

Virgin, ca. 1515. Polychromed relief: tempera on gold leaf on wood, 48 x 30 in. each. William

Lowe Bryan Memorial, Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University, 65.46–65.51, 65.112, 65.113

4 ESKENAZI MUSEUM OF ART

▲▲

▲▲

▲▲

Carefully placed seating meant

for contemplative study of

particular works

Enhanced lighting that will give

viewers a fresh perspective on

old favorites

Focus spaces that will highlight

themes from each collection


y

8

We also designed and fabricated new

mounts and platforms for the works on

view, and each gallery includes recent

acquisitions. A contemporary work by the

Ghanian sculptor El Anatsui, generously

donated by Jane Fortune, is featured in

the Raymond and Laura Wielgus Gallery

for arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.

In the second floor gallery for arts

of Asia and the Islamic world, a selection

of the Japanese bamboo sculptures

donated by Ann and Rusty Harrison are

also on view.

o, and Other Personal Metaphors

20

nd Photographs, East Wing, 3rd Floor

ew Center for Prints, Drawings, and

by noted American painter, sculptor,

You will find contemporary art throughout

the building, including in the Luzetta and

Del Newkirk Café and Gift Shop, where the

8

English artist Paul Cocksedge installed a

wonderful work of art for this new entrance

to the museum. We are grateful to

Nancy and Bill Hunt, who provided funding

for Cocksedge’s Gust of Wind.

udes the artist’s gift of his 44

ent self-portrait print, as well as

which relates to one of his early

his later Pop art works, The Crash has

lso featured are 11 other works from

ighlight Dine’s interests in poetry,

, and the fine art of drawing. The

omplemented by treasures from other

dition of Carlo Collodi’s The Adventures

ly Library and one of Dine’s first filmed

n Television (NET) in the IU Libraries

Jim Dine

(American, born

1935) Untitled

[Pinocchio] from

Pinocchio, 2006.

Color lithograph

on paper,

Image/sheet: 22

x 17 ¼ in.

Gift of the

artist, Eskenazi

Museum of

Art, Indiana

University,

2017.75.11

JIM DINE

FEATURED EXHIBITIONS

Jim Dine (American, born 1935)

Untitled [Pinocchio] from Pinocchio, 2006

Color lithograph on paper, Image/sheet: 22 x 17 ¼ in.

Gift of the artist, Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University,

2017.75.11

PINOCCHIO, GEPPETTO,

and OTHER PERSONAL METAPHORS

November 7, 2019–May 10, 2020

CENTER FOR PRINTS, DRAWINGS, AND PHOTOGRAPHS

East Wing, 3rd Floor

sedge

Paul Cocksedge

top Tanabe Kochikusai (Japanese, b. 1935)

Flight, 2012. Madake, susutake, and rattan, 21

x 16 x 16 in. Gift of Ann S. Harrison, Eskenazi

Museum of Art, Indiana University, 2019.141

14

The inaugural exhibition in the new Center for Prints, Drawings, and Photographs

will focus on work by noted American painter, sculptor, and printmaker Jim Dine. It

includes the artist’s gift of his 44 plate Pinocchio series and a recent self-portrait

print, as well as his first print series, The Crash, which relates to one of his early

performative Happenings. Like his later Pop art works, The Crash has autobiographical

significance. Also featured are 11 other works from the museum’s collection that

highlight Dine’s interests in poetry, psychoanalysis, transformation, and the fine art

of drawing. The museum’s works on paper are complemented by treasures from

other IU collections, including a first edition of Carlo Collodi’s The Adventures of

Pinocchio (1883) from the Lilly Library and one of Dine’s first filmed interviews for

National Education Television (NET) in the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive.

ESKENAZI MUSEUM OF ART 5


OPENING FALL 2020

Non Profit Organization

U.S. Postage

PAID

Permit No. 171

Bloomington, IN

Upcoming Exhibition

COSTUME

COLLECTION

of actress Glenn Close

This collection of Close’s

treasured costumes

spans her celebrated

career through film,

television and theater

and includes pieces from

some of her most iconic

performances, including

items from “The Big Chill,”

“Fatal Attraction” and

“101 Dalmatians.”

ESKENAZI

MUSEUM OF ART

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

1133 East ESKENAZI Seventh Street

Bloomington, MUSEUM IN 47405-7509 OF ART

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

artmuseum.indiana.edu

GRAND REOPENING CELEBRATION

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Welcome Home! Please join us at as we reopen the

museum to the public on November 7, in conjunction

with the IU Arts and Humanities Council First

Thursdays festival. The celebration is open to all

and includes a block party on the plaza, a dramatic

opening of the doors, live music in the renovated

building, and experts on hand to answer questions

in the reinstalled galleries and new centers. There

will also be art-making experiences in the Center for

Education, art games throughout the evening, and a

closing musical event.

6 ESKENAZI MUSEUM OF ART

We are grateful to Gregg and Judy Summerville for their support of

the reopening event and the museum’s First Thursday programs.

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