November 2019 Rapid River Magazine

rapidrivermagazine

RAD’s burgeoning art scene this fall

RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE’S

ARTS& CULTURE

RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM

November 2019 • Vol. 23, Number 3

THE OLDEST AND MOST-READ ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE IN WNC


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FINE CRAFT

Register now to learn mosaic in 2020

BY STAFF REPORTS • NORTH ASHEVILLE

Local mosaic artist, Linda Pannullo,

continues to bring the best

instructors in the

world to Asheville

and 2020 is no

exception.

There are classes

for all levels, and

they are arranged

so novices can

take classes in

the spring and be

ready for the more

intermediate

ones later — a

great holiday gift

for the artist in

the family.

Dianne Sonnenberg

returns and

offers a threehour

Mini Master

Mosaic Class in

Outdoor Mosaic

Installation on Friday,

April 17, and for

the first time, there will be an Intro

to Smalti on April 18-19. Learn how

to work with this exquisite material.

Discover the different types of smalti,

cutting methods and techniques,

Andamento, adhesives, and more

with a combination of slide show

presentations, demonstrations, and

hands-on individual instruction.

Gila Rendlen returns June 12-14,

with her popular three-day Picassiette

Portraiture. Rendlen will share

her extensive knowledge about

creating mosaic portraits (human or

animal, your choice), with an emphasis

on PIcassiette (broken china).

Cutting, shaping, and incorporating

dishes and pottery

into mosaics

taught.

Mosaics can be animals, people or landscapes.

Mary Driver will

be here for the

first time for a

three-day creative

journey, Getting

the Light Right. In

this intermediate

class, Driver will

help you turn

a ho-hum

mosaic into a

spectacular

one with tips

to transform

your mosaic

landscapes,

still lifes or

portraits

into art that

will look like

a photo or

painting.

Linda Pannullo offers her FUNctional

classes, Lazy Susan class, March

7-8, Picassiette Potheads/planters

workshop, May 2-3. Great classes

for beginners to learn the basics and

create a FUNctional piece of art.

Linda Pannullo

All workshops will be held at

Majik Studios; please register at

www.lindapannullomosaics.com and

contact Linda Pannullo (828) 337-

6749 if you need more information.

IF

YOU

GO


VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 3


POTTERY

“Vessels of Merriment” Returns to Grovewood Gallery

BY STAFF REPORTS • NORTH ASHEVILLE

Vessels of Merriment

is back for another

round at Grovewood

Gallery.

This exhibition, celebrating

its third run,

will feature handcrafted

drinking vessels by

16 studio potters from

around the country.

An opening reception

will be held on

Saturday, November 16, 2-5 pm,

free and open to the public, where

viewers will have the opportunity to

meet some of the participating artists.

This show will remain on view

through December 31, 2019.

Vessels of Merriment will showcase

growlers, goblets, whiskey

cups, wine cups, tumblers, and

more. All pieces are for sale, making

this exhibition the perfect opportunity

for holiday gift buying. Most of

the vessels are priced between $30

- $60, an affordable price for oneof-a-kind,

handmade works of art.

Cups by Kelly Daniels

Industries, an Arts and

Crafts enterprise - initially

backed by Edith Vanderbilt

- that played a significant

role in the Appalachian

Craft Revival during the

early 20th century.

Today, Grovewood Gallery

offers two expansive floors

of handcrafted treasures,

contributed by over 400

artists and craftspeople

from across the US. The gallery also

555 Merrimon Ave • 828.424.7868

www.ashevilleravenandcrone.com

Herbal Apothecary • Tea & Reading Room

Essential Oil Blending Bar • Bath & Body

Events & Workshops • Local Artisans

Books • Jewelry • Unique Gifts


Visit Us at Facebook:

Asheville Raven & Crone

• •

Participating artists: Kurt Anderson,

Anja Bartels, Kelly Lynn Daniels,

Maria Dondero, Kim Dryden,

Lisa Gluckin, Phil Haralam, Jordan

Jones, Reiko Miyagi, Samantha

Oliver, Ronan Peterson, Helen

Purdum, Justin Rothshank, Amy

Sanders, Rebekah Strickland, and

Charlie Teft.

About Grovewood Gallery

Established in 1992, Grovewood

Gallery is nationally recognized

for its dedication to fine American

art and craft. Located in historic

Grovewood Village adjacent to The

Omni Grove Park Inn, the gallery is

noted for its charming, old-world

setting and rich craft heritage. This

site once housed the weaving and

woodworking operations of Biltmore

boasts an outdoor sculpture garden

and presents rotating exhibitions

throughout the year.

IF

YOU

GO

Justin Rothshank

Grovewood Gallery

Hours are Monday through Saturday

from 10-5:30 pm, and

Sunday from 11-5 pm. Free parking

is available on site. Visit www.grovewood.com

or call (828) 253-7651.

Opening reception, Saturday,

November 16, 2-5 pm.

111 Grovewood Rd, Asheville.

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CONTENTS

ON OUR COVER

November 2019 • Volume 23, NO. 3 15 15

ART AND MORE

FEATURES

COLUMNS /

DEPARTMENTS

6

8

12

19

Artists in the RAD Celebrate the

2019 Studio Stroll

“Every travel sketch has a story,”

Virginia Pendergrass show,

November 7 at Art Mob

Detail of the painting “Little Charmer,” by Angela Alexander

22nd Voorhees Family Art Show

At Firefly Taps and Grill, brunch

and Sale

reigns supreme

AmiciMusic presents “AMERICAN

29

FOUR-HAND” to celebrate

Veteran’s Day weekend.

310 Art: New Adventures in

Bill Walz: The fullness of

Learning at 310 ART

emptiness

10

21

Chicken Warrior and the Divorce

Art Classes

Attorney’ exclusive book preview

11

24

Asheville Gallery of Art:

Books: Top-eight overlooked books

“Reflection and Interpretation” features for autumn reading

14 work by Michael Robinson 25

Cover: Personality depicted in art — Black Mountain: Hogslop

15 interview with Angela Alexander

String Band performs at White

26 Horse Black Mountain on Friday,

Downtown Asheville: The

November 8

Haywood Street Fresco sabotages the

16 shame of poverty

Rapid River Magazine’s

18

30 Wild About Waynesville Comics

20

Exhibit showcases Asheville

artists’s diverse interpretation of

the figure

Health: Is CBD safe? And does it

help with chronic pain?

22

31

*Red # Artwork of the RAD

Short Fiction: While Rome

burns — The bat and his enemies

27 BILL BRYSON

27

28

NEW BOOK: ‘The Body: A

GUIDE FOR OCCUPANTS’ by

Black Mountain is alive with the

sound and sights of music!

Happenings: An Asheville

Vacation Rental Sends Guests

Through Portals and Alternate

Realities

NEXT MONTH

“It’s All About Me,” by Angela Alexander

rapidrivermagazine.com

Online NOW

8

“Every travel sketch has a

story,” Virginia Pendergrass

show

DECEMBER 2019

12

Chris Peterson, “Penny For

Your Thoughts”

HIGHLIGHTING 3D ARTWORK

IN WNC — JEWELRY,

POTTERY, SCULPTURE,

AND MORE.

Publisher/Layout and Design/Editor: Dennis Ray

CONTACT US: Rapid River’s Arts and Culture

Magazine is a monthly publication in WNC.

Mail: 85 N. Main St. Canton NC 28716

Email: Info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Phone: (828) 712-4752 • (office) 828-646-0071

Distribution: Dennis Ray/Rick Hills

Marketing: Dennis Ray/Rick Hills

ADVERTISING SALES:

Downtown Asheville and other areas —

Dennis Ray (828) 712-4752

Dining Guide, Hendersonville, Waynesville —

Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com

All Materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted

© by Rapid River’s Arts & Culture Magazine and the

individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions

expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the

opinions of Rapid River’s Arts and Culture Magazine or

the advertisers herein.

© ‘Rapid River’s Arts & Culture Magazine

November 2019 • Vol. 23, No. 3

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 5


RAD FINE ART

Artists in the RAD Celebrate the 2019 Studio Stroll

BY STAFF REPORTS • RIVER ARTS DISTRICT, ASHEVILLE

Mark your calendars for the Big Fall Art Event

on Saturday and Sunday, Nov 9th and 10th.

Continuing decades of ‘Strolls”, the very first of

its kind and the largest in our area, hundreds

of artists in the River Arts District will open their

studio doors to visitors all weekend 10-5 pm. Art

in all mediums and styles can be found from large

statement art pieces to small gift one-of-a-kind

gift items. Ride the free trolley, enjoy refreshments

in every building, and see many demonstrations

throughout the weekend. This is a great family-friendly

event. Just a few of the artists who can

be found are:

Peter Roux,

Riverview Station

#261

Peter Roux’s Suspension

series

utilizes somewhat

“epic” landscape

subjects - clouds,

“Suspension (east sky blue) no4,”

large open spaces.

He sets them

by Peter Roux, 36x48

against elements of flat mark-making as visual

pulls into imaginary space. In these offsets, he

creates tensions and relationships that reflect on

how contemporary spatial language, and therefore

contemporary space itself, can be understood.

“Roundabout,” by Nadine

Charlsen, watercolor

Nadine Charlsen,

310 ART at Riverview

Station, #310 ground

floor north end

Charlsen is the president

of the River Arts

District Artists. She

maintains a working

studio/gallery space

at 310 ARTand a home studio/gallery. She is an

experimental watercolor artist who specialized in

large format work. “Her work invites you to walk

into the story and become part of the story,” as

one visitor recently said. She teaches experimental

watercolor classes at 310 ART and Studio

classes year-round. See her Demos all weekend

for the Studio Stroll.

Catherine Cervas Heaton

Riverview Station #213 Soul

Sidewalk

This is a study of a Maple

tree in summer sunlight,

illuminating leaves to bright

yellow-green, contrasting

with some in shadow, and

the wind turning others over

to show their gray-silver side.

“Maplein Summer,” by

I love the immediacy of water Catherine Cervas Heaton,

watercolor gouache 5x8

media to capture a view that

strikes the eye and inspires the

necessity to record a slice of time and light.

Cindy Lou Chenard

- 362 Depot Street

Studios

Inspired by mid-century

modern artists, I “Orange Sky. Blue Ridges,” by

love to use solid, bold Cindy Lou Chenard, acrylic, 30x60

colors to portray the

feeling of the Blue Ridges at different times of the

day.

Painting Demos all day during studio stroll

“Traveling Companions,”

by Lori Jusino, assemblage

Lori Jusino, Eco-Depot

Marketplace

I am a multi-media assemblage

artist inspired by

Faith, Imagination, & Whimsy.

I create something new

from seemingly random

items that surround us daily.

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Susan Sinyai, 310 ART at

Riverview Station, #310

ground floor north end

I have become enamored of

the beautiful Aspen trees since

my daughter moved to Colorado,

and I have experienced

them in real life. I love the patterns

of the trunks, the white Susan Sinyai, pastel,

“Snowy Aspens,” by

25x19

that reflects the surrounding

light and colors. The Fall Aspens are the most

flamboyant with the brilliant yellow leaves, but

these snowy, Aspens in late afternoon winter light

display the stark beauty of the trunks.

“Kenilworth

Garden,” by Anne

Allen 12x12 Pastel

Anne Allen, 310 ART at Riverview

Station, Ground Floor

#310

En Plein air is a French expression

that means “in the open

air.” I love the energy that comes

when I capture landscapes and

garden views in natural light.

WNC offers a treasure of places

for painting outdoors. Recent visits have included

a private garden in Asheville’s Kenilworth neighborhood,

Grandad’s Apple Orchard, and the

North Carolina Arboretum.

Bet Kindley, 310 ART at Riverview Station,

#310 ground floor north end

I continue to enjoy

painting waterscapes.

I painted “Waterdance”

from a photograph

of a stream swirling

with colorful autumn

leaves. In contrast,

“Steady as she goes,” by Bet

“Steady As She Goes” Kindley, encaustic, 18x24

is a coastal scene depicting

the vast calm openness of the sea.

Lorelle Bacon, 310 ART at Riverview Station,

#310 ground floor north end

Commissioned portraits take up some of my time,

and I enjoy painting them; however, I am now

primarily a jewelry-artist with

the focus on wire wrapping and

metal clay. How exciting to still

be learning at 78 years of age. I

would encourage people of any

age to follow where their hearts

lead and live your passion if you

want a happy and fulfilling life.

RAD FINE ART

Erin Keane, 310 ART at Riverview

Station,

#310 ground floor

north end

Keane’s encaustic journals

are designed to honor

books as an art form. “The

Butterfly Book” is one of

“Abby The Spoon Lady,” by

Nadine Charlsen, 26x20,

watercolor

Wire wrap

jewelry by Lorelle

Bacon

her signature pieces and

only a handful of these

books are made each year.

She collects fallen butterfly

wings found on daily hikes, and she preserves

the wings between layers of encaustic beeswax.

The book is bound with a specially designed Butterfly

Stitch, and the covers are displayed open

to showcase the full wingspan.

Fleta Monaghan, 310 ART at Riverview Station,

#310 ground floor north end

Founder of 310 ART, the

oldest independent fine art

school for adults, and a vital

art gallery featuring 20 local

artists, Monaghan is also

a noted artist with work in

national and international

collections. She has recently

had two ink pieces go into

“Big Bend

Nightscape,” by

separate collections in Australia!

“I love the vibrant colors

Fleta Monaghan, ink,

24x18

and surprises that ink paintings

offer. I love to celebrate the landscape in a fun

and imaginative way.”

December Theme: 3D Art in WNC

Deadline Nov. 12

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 7


FINE ART

“The Sunbather,” 9 x 12, watercolor/ink

“City of Churches,” 7 x 10, watercolor/ink

“Every travel sketch has a story,” Virginia

Pendergrass show, November 7 at Art Mob

BY STAFF REPORTS • HENDERSONVILLE, RIVER ARTS DISTRICT, ASHEVILLE

Virginia Pendergrass has commented before

about the wonderful way that travel sketching

adds to her travel experience through the

careful attention to detail required in drawing

and painting.

“Now,” she comments, “when I look back

on paintings I have done over the years, I am

reminded of the story of each painting.”

“I painted City of Churches sitting on an empty

bus stop bench in Quebec City,” Pendergrass

recalls. “I spread out my painting materials on

the bench - it was so convenient with everything

right at hand- and concentrated on my painting.

At some point, I realized I was surrounded by

people standing while waiting for the bus. I hastily

began to gather my stuff so people could sit, but

my audience insisted that I continue painting —

they were delighted to see an artist at work on

the street.”

In Tokyo, Pendergrass saw a person of indeterminate

gender on a busy subway car completely

engrossed in a book. “This delightful

figure reminded me of a Texas description of a

tall, thin, refreshingly attractive individual- ‘long,

tall drink of water.’ This painting,” says Pendergrass,

“is called Long, Tall Reader. I managed to

get a rough sketch on the subway, but had to

complete a better drawing and apply watercolor

later.”

The Sunbather, surrounded by seaweed

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FINE ART

Antiques at Riverview Station

“Enter Here,” 7 x 10, watercolor/ink

“Long, Tall, Reader,” 9 x 12,watercolor/ink

washed up on a beach in St. Martin,

sat motionless as she gazed out to

sea. Pendergrass was attracted to

this scene because it was colorful

and had a lovely view; the figure

invited painting through her still

posture- the perfect model. “I was

most intrigued by imagining what

the solitary bather could be thinking

for such a long time,” she says.

In Aix-en-Provence, Pendergrass

saw several historic buildings with

huge sculptures of dual figures,

called atlantes, burdened by a

balcony framing the entry. Enter

Here shows one atlante of a pair at

the entry to Pavillon de Vendome,

a historic chateau surrounded

by beautiful, quiet gardens.

“My walking tour guide claimed

that these figures were found at

doorways of buildings owned by

very wealthy Aixoise. Although the

figures have another long architectural

history, in Aix, they are reputed

to signify that the owners did not

do manual labor — that’s the Aix

story, and I’m sticking to it.” She

concludes, “Every travel sketch has

a story.”

A reception for watercolor and ink

travel sketches by Virginia Pendergrass,

titled “Every Travel Sketch

has a Story,” will be held from 5 pm

to 7 pm on Thursday, November 7

at Art Mob, 124 4th Avenue E. in

Hendersonville, NC. The reception

is open to the public free of charge.

The watercolor and ink paintings will

remain on display at Art Mob until

Saturday, November 30. Regular

hours for Art Mob are 10-5 pm

Monday through Saturday and Sunday

1-4:30 pm.

Virginia Pendergrass

Her artwork is shown at Art

Mob in Hendersonville, NC, at

Trackside Studios in the River Arts

District in Asheville, NC, and on her

website at www.virginiapendergrass.

com. Email her at pendergrass.v@

gmail.com.

IF

YOU

GO

Open Daily

Booth Space Available

(828) 254-4410 • 191 Lyman Street, Asheville

Inside the River Arts District

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 9


310 ART Gallery

New Adventures in Learning at 310 ART

BY FLETA MONAGHAN • RIVER ARTS DISTRICT, ASHEVILLE

Our fine-art school for adults

was founded in 2006 and is now the

oldest independent school of its

type in the WNC region.

If that were not cause for

celebration enough, every year, we

create new courses and learning

opportunities, and this year, with

the creative thinking of three of our

resident artists, we have embarked

on new projects and opportunities!

Some of the new things happening

are unusual, exciting, and only

found at 310 ART.

Nadine Charlsen, our

Experimental Watercolor instructor

Bridget Benton inWax and Light workshop

nonpareil, created a new project that

has taken artists on an exploration

of paper and watercolor. “The Paper

Project” is related to our extensive

experimental watercolor program

and supported by our friends at

Cheap Joes, who provided 11

different papers for each artist.

The results have been a revelation.

Ten artists, starting in a one-day

workshop in June, have worked all

summer to paint a chosen subject

on these

different

papers to

see how the

paint behaved

and which

surface they

liked best. The

results vary

dramatically!

The project

has captured

the interest

of several

publications,

including a national magazine, and

will be published in 2020 as well as

shared with other students at 310

ART.

Bridget Benton, our lead

encaustic instructor, is offering oneon-one

coaching sessions through

310 ART that blend her experience

as an encaustic/mixed-media art

instructor and author of the awardwinning

book on intuitive artmaking

The Creative Conversation. A huge

success, the coaching sessions

focus on helping

emerging artists find

their unique creative

voice, and support

established artists in

addressing blocks,

slumps, or major

style transitions.

Benton says, “I

love helping people

make things. With

the Finding Your

Denise Markbreit’s press Voice sessions,

I want to help

artists access their

authentic creative voice, whether

they’re just starting or have been

working for years as professional

artists. Sometimes the pros need a

10 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


Shop, Learn, Explore. . . Everyday, All Year Round

Classes at 310 ART

chance to reconnect with

their love of artmaking -

something that can get

lost when you’re always

making things to sell.”

Benton has expanded

her home studio, which

is very close to 310 ART, to

accommodate this growing program, which also

includes private and semi-private encaustic, eco

printing, and nature printing classes, giving more

opportunities to schedule sessions.

Denise Markbreit, a professional printmaker,

joined 310 ART as a resident artist and

instructor this year. She will teach printmaking

courses and private instruction in partnership

with 310 ART at Asheville Print Studio, recently

opened this September, and is just upstairs

from the classroom at 310 ART. An exceptional

feature of this new studio is environmental

and health consciousness with materials.

Printmaking as long been associated with

the use of toxic materials. Now, Denise has

established the only independent green print

shop in the region. Using safe soy and waterbased

inks and paints, and no solvents have

proven to be a healthy environment for artists

of all ages wanting to learn. Some techniques

include one of a kind prints, mixed media

printmaking, fabric printing, solar plate, woodcut

and wood lithography in her fully equipped

studio. We are happy to announce we will

be offering private printmaking classes and

weekend workshops in the upcoming 2020

schedule.

IF

YOU

GO

Elizabeth Henderson paper project work

310 ART

310 ART is pleased to announce the 2020

schedule now online at www.310art.com.

Join us in our never-ending quest to learn more

and create more. 310 ART, 191 Lyman St,

#310, ground floor, also houses a large gallery

that features the work of 20 local artists. Gallery

hours M-Sat 11-5 and Sun 12-4, class times as

scheduled.

310 ART

AT RIVERVIEW STATION

Marvelous Mondays with Lorelle and Nadine

Beginner and Up! Open art studios

Mondays with instructor to guide you - start

and continue year round in our Monday

classes, 9:30-12:30pm and 1-4pm. Come the

dates that work for you!

See 310art.com for schedule and sign up.

Beginners welcomed!

Workshops: Coming Soon

Super Sunday Afternoon Watercolor classes are

resuming this fall.. see 310art.com for dates,

times and to sign up!

Workshops are:

Wax and Light-Encaustic on Paper - Nov 2

Pastels, Beginner and Up - Nov 9

Atmospheric Effects in Watercolor - Nov 16

All Occasion Cards - Dec 5

Completing Your Watercolor Demo - Dec 7

Drawing on the Right Side of the Shadow Mini -

Dec 7

See 2020 listings at 310art.com

Classes for adults at 310 ART, 191 Lyman Street,

#310, Asheville, NC 28801

www.310art.com gallery@310art.com

(828)776-2716 Adult classes, beginner and up,

most materials provided. Register online or at

the studio.

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 11


RAD ART

Exhibit showcases Asheville artists’s diverse

interpretation of the figure

BY STAFF REPORTS • RIVER ARTS DISTRICT, ASHEVILLE

The Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery will host an

exhibition of Asheville artists’ diverse approaches

to the figure in “Larger Than Life.”

Over a dozen artists will take on the wide-open

and wonderful subjectivity of the “larger than life”

theme, using a variety of media. The show is sure

to elicit surprise, amusement, and contemplation

from viewers as they drink in these works’ expansive

interpretations.

The freedom within the “larger than life” premise

allows the artists to break away from more

literal and traditional figurative studies. The very

phrase conjures countless subjective associations

that accompany life’s rich moments, both mundane

and momentous:

· A satisfying, true belly laugh

· Falling in love

· Momentary intense joy

· A single clear memory

· Authentic self expression

“Larger Than Life,” by Deb Williams

The group of local artists whose works constitute

Larger Than Life prove that, since life enpasses

limitless thoughts, feelings, and experiences,

the concept of approaching the figure

artistically is equally immeasurable.

Bettis intentionally curated an array of works

that capture the senses but spur interactive

engagement as well – and with that, provoke the

viewer’s emotional investment. “To be or experience

something ‘larger than life’ isn’t just one

thing, feeling, or person; we’ve all internalized different,

but equally meaningful moments and this

reality gives the show special power,” says Bettis.

Larger Than Life will debut with an opening

reception from 5:30pm to 7:30pm on November

9th, 2019 at Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery, located

at 123 Roberts Street in the River Arts District’s

historic WEDGE building. All the works on display

will be offered for sale. The reception will give

guests the opportunity to meet and talk with the

artists about their creative processes, learn what

shapes and fuels their work, and ask questions.

Refreshments and light hors d’ouevres will be

served.

12 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019

Artists in Show: Mark Bettis, Deb Williams, Rand

Kramer, Joyce Thornburg, Angela Cunningham,

Ray Fawley, René Roberts, Jesse Jason,


RAD ART

Rosa Friedrichs

Photo by Nick LaFone

“Strength,” Mark Bettis

“Flora Fauna,” Ben Hamburger, 78x30

Christopher Peterson, Melanie Norris Dulaney,

Duane Potosky, Anna Koloseike, Ben Hamburger

and Bruno Lenze

About Mark Bettis: Though his home base is

now Asheville, Mark Bettis is a Chicago native

and later attended the Ringling School of Art

and Design in Sarasota, Florida.

His educational and professional history includes

experience with computer animation and

advertising, but it’s his love of fine art that he decided

to fully pursue. One of the most intentional

steps in his journey as an artist was his move to

the creative mecca of Asheville. Bettis’ work is

known for its stylistic eclecticism, bold energy,

rich color, and texture augmented with natural

materials.

Bettis himself is recognized as an enthusiastic

teacher who shares his knowledge and processes

– like using cold wax in the art making process –

during his studio workshop classes. As an active

member of the community-at-large, and a proponent

of local artists, he has created a connected

and energetic community of peers.

Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery

Larger Than Life will be on view from November

9-25, Monday-Saturday, 10-5pm. For more

information on the exhibition and the Mark Bettis

Studio & Gallery, please visit www.markbettisgallery.

com or contact Bettis at (941) 587-9502 or email:

markdbettis@gmail.com.

IF

YOU

GO

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 13


Asheville’s Longest Established Fine Art Gallery with 31 Regional Artists

Asheville Gallery of Art 's November Artist

Asheville Gallery of Art’s November show, “Reflection

and Interpretation,” features the work

of Michael Robinson with landscape paintings

and drawings.

“French Broad Hominy”

“Reflection and Interpretation” features work by Michael Robinson

BY STAFF REPORTS • DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

“Beyond the pure tactile and creative pleasure of

putting the oil paint on canvas, I try to find ways

to convey the unique sensory experience of being

in a special place,” Michael

says. “In the mountains,

these experiences

can encompass crossing

high shadowed peaks

and grassy balds or walk

along bouldered streams

with swirling eddies. In

the Low Country, it may

be the color of the ocean under passing clouds,

a tideline at sunrise, or a rippled tidal creek under

a full moon. For me, the challenge of landscape

painting is not to record every detail, but to look

into the human experience of the moment and

bring it to life.”

Michael’s drawings from his sketchbooks include

scenes of China, Morocco, Vietnam, Thailand,

and Cambodia. “Over the years, traveling

with others, I’ve learned to artfully linger behind

and steal what’s important with just a few strokes

“Over the years, traveling with

others, I’ve learned to artfully linger

behind and steal what’s important

with just a few strokes of the pen.”

— Michael Robinson

“Black Balsam Ridge”

14 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019

“Foot log”

of the pen.”

Michael grew up in

Mitchell County, NC,

sketched and painted

from an early age,

and was selected to

study art at the NC

Governor’s School. In

college, he set aside

art for architecture at NC State University School

of Design, where, after graduation, he was drafted

into the army, which sidelined his architectural

career. Returning home, he studied photography

and printmaking at the Penland School of Craft

before earning a Master of Fine Arts degree at

UNC Greensboro. Michael practiced architecture

for more than 30 years, frequently calling on his

drawing and design skills.

IF

YOU

GO

Asheville Gallery of Art

For further information about this show,

contact Asheville Gallery of Art at (828)

251-5796, visit the gallery website at www.

ashevillegallery-of-art.com, or go to the gallery

Facebook page.

The show runs November 1-30 during gallery

hours, 11-6 pm Monday-Saturday and 11-4 pm

Sunday. A reception for the artist will be held

November 1, 5-8 p.m. at the gallery, 82 Patton

Avenue.


November's Cover Artist— Angela Alexander

Angela Alexander is an Asheville-based artist

specializing in pet portraits.

“Curious,” by Angela Alexander

Personality depicted in art — interview with Angela Alexander

BY STAFF REPORTS • RIVER ARTS DISTRICT, ASHEVILLE

Alexander starts with a black canvas and then

layers loose brushstrokes in vibrant colors to

reveal the dog, cat or farm animal she’s painting.

The bold colors that characterize her work represent

her subject’s energy and personality.

Rapid River Magazine: Can you tell me a little

bit about yourself and your journey with art?

Angela Alexander: I have always been creative,

but I didn’t start my career as an artist until later

in life. I was laid off from my job as a graphic

designer, and I wasn’t sure what my next step

should be. Then one day, I injured myself falling

down the stairs. While I was recovering, the only

position that didn’t hurt was lying down.

To keep me busy, I started painting whimsical

pictures of my Chihuahua, Sadie. Some friends

saw my work and encouraged me to begin selling

my paintings. I didn’t expect much at first, but

slowly things started to take-off. Fostering community

has been an essential piece to my success.

I would spend whole days at the Woolworth

Walk Gallery, talking to people interested in my

“Hurry Up,” by Angela Alexander

work and sharing my process with them. I love

partnering with local animal shelters and working

with restaurants and hotels to display my work. I

am an Asheville artist.

This community has been very supportive, and

I love finding ways to give back. As a result, my

art has reached many more people.

RRM: What initially sparked your interest in

animals—and, specifically, dogs?

AA: In general, dogs represent the purest form

of unconditional love for me. And my dog, Sadie,

who first inspired my work, was particularly

special. She was very playful, and even in old

age, she seemed so youthful. Her favorite activity

was chasing seagulls down the beach in Sunset

Beach, NC. She had unique markings around her

eyes that made it appear as if she was wearing a

mask. This is why all of my early subjects appear

to be wearing masks or glasses.

When she passed away, I slowly transitioned

out of that, but her energy and spirit continue to

inspire my work.

RRM: From a technical standpoint, how do

you go about crafting your paintings?

“You Make Me Smile,” by Angela Alexander

AA: This process has changed a lot for me over

the years. My initial paintings were a bit more

whimsical. There were lots of clean lines. To

make the colors really pop, I would outline each

element in a thin black stroke.

This process required a very steady hand and a

tiny brush. But over time, I began noticing a pain

in my elbow and wrist that made it very challenging

for me to use small brushes. My hand would

go numb, and I could only paint for very short

periods.

I eventually discovered I had Rheumatoid

Arthritis. One night out of frustration, I grabbed

a larger brush and began to paint, and I loved

what I created. This was a jumping-off point for

me. Out of necessity, I continued to experiment

with larger brushes and looser strokes until I

developed the style you see now. Today, I build

up from a black canvas. The colors I use, represent

the energy of the pet that I’m painting, and

the black canvas allows me to alter colors as the

painting develops.

RRM: Where do you draw your inspiration

‘Cover’ continued on page 23

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 15


More of what Makes Asheville Special: Dining • Shopping • Galleries • Music • Fun

D o w n t o w n A s h e v i l l e

The Haywood Street Fresco sabotages the shame of poverty

BY AMY MANIKOWSKI • DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

In downtown Asheville, a true Buon fresco

is being unveiled in the sanctuary of

297 Haywood Street.

It is an unlikely gallery for one of the oldest

and most demanding art forms known

to humankind. Since 2009 the Haywood

Street Congregation has opened its doors

and called everyone in, regardless of identity,

history, orientation, ability, or status.

The Fresco includes portraits of from the

community of Haywood Street, many of

whom have suffered from homelessness,

poverty, illness, and addiction. The uniqueness

of this representation is significant, the

goal being to sabotage the shame

Nearly ten years in the making, the Haywood Street Fresco came to life in 2019.

of poverty by announcing in plaster and pigment

the sacred worth of every human.

Fresco is a physically and mentally demanding

art form. The technique uses natural pigments

mixed with water and applied to a layer of wet

plaster. The colors are absorbed, becoming part

of the wall as it dries. The mixture of pigment

and lime creates a unique luminescence not

seen in other mediums.

Multiple layers of plaster ensure the stability

and durability of the project. While the initial

layers cured on the wall for seven months, the

artists did extensive sketching and composition

for the portraits in the Fresco, sitting and drawing

each person from life.

After the initial sketches, a huge fresco-sized

16 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


Downtown/Montford

95 Cherry Street North

Asheville, NC 28801

828.258.2435

South:

200 Julian Shoals Dr

Suite 20, Arden, NC 28704

828.687.8533

The Fresco team is made up of a band of fine artists who have dedicated their lives to learning the ancient

tradition, apprenticing themselves, and doing work that can only be done painstakingly and with the help of

others.

cartoon is created and then traced to

transfer onto the wall. Although this

is completely plastered over in the final

stages, it allows the artists to see

the entirety of the design to ensure

the composition works.

The pounced tracing paper is then

cut up so it can again be transferred

onto the wall in smaller pieces.

These pieces are what the artists

deemed themselves able to paint

in each 8-10 hour workday, as the

drying plaster allows. The final layer

of plaster is spread the morning of

each painting day, and the artist uses

the tracing to guide their painting on

the fresh wet wall. If anything goes

wrong during this process - color

mistakes, composition errors, plaster

irritability - the day’s work has to be

chipped away entirely redone.

The Fresco team is made up

of a band of fine artists who have

dedicated their lives to learning the

ancient tradition, apprenticing themselves,

and doing work that can only

be done painstakingly and with the

help of others. Led by principal artist

Christopher Holt, a native of Western

North Carolina, the fresco is a team

effort, with John Dempsey III, Caleb

Clark, and Jill Hooper assisting in key

components, as well as an apprentice,

Anselme Long, learning firsthand

the complexity of the craft.

The Fresco also includes other

architectural elements that residents

and visitors of Asheville will recognize

- the Jackson Building, the Basilica

of St. Laurence, the former Stephens

Lee High School, and the loggia

of the Central United Methodist

Church who owns the building that

Haywood Street Congregation calls

home.

Nearly ten years in the making, the

Haywood Street Fresco came to life

after over the summer of 2019. From

July 1-September 29, the team of

artists mixed and laid plaster, ground

pigments, and carefully painted the

details of the composition onto the

twenty-eight by eleven-foot wall.

An open house event will be held

Thursday, November 14, 5-7 pm at

297 Haywood Street in Asheville.

Meet the artists, hear the stories,

and experience the Beatitudes as

portrayed through the ancient art

form of Fresco.

Haywood Street Fresco

Learn more at:

haywoodstreetfresco.org and

follow via Instagram and Facebook:

@haywoodstreetfresco

INFO

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 17


WILD ABOUT WAYNESVILLE

Julie Calhoun-Roepnack at Twigs and Leaves Gallery

BY STAFF REPORTS • WAYNESVILLE

* Extra Virgin Olive Oils

* White & Dark

Balsamic Vinegar

* Infused Olive Oils

* Specialty Oil & Vinegar

* Bread Dip Seasonings

* Specialty Salts & Rubs

* Seasonings

* Handcrafted Pottery

224 Branner Ave. Waynesville, N.C.

828-246-6868 www.cornerstationoliveoil.com

Support

Clean / recyclable

Newsprint

Twigs and Leaves Gallery presents

potter Julie Calhoun-Roepnack at Art

After Dark, Friday evening, November

1, 6-9 pm.

Calhoun-Roepnack has always been

fascinated by the wide variety of colors

and textures exhibited by nature through

the course of four distinctive seasons.

This appreciation for variety has made

its way into her work, which she produces today.

Brightly colored glazes and innovative techniques

using scraffito, carving, and impressions characterize

her signature works.

Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s

140+ primarily regional artists, enjoy live

piano music and delight in savory hors d’oeuvres.

If you missed the Art After Dark this month,

don’t worry, Calhoun-Roepnack’s work is on

display at the gallery, and makes for a perfect

addition to your autumn and winter décor.

Art After Dark on Friday, Nov. 1. 6, 6-9 pm

Twigs and Leaves Gallery

98 North Main Street, Waynesville

Open Monday through Saturday 10-

5:30pm, Sunday, 1-4pm (828) 456-1940

www.twigsandleaves.com Find them on Facebook

and Instagram.

INFO

Simple, delicious food with vegetarian

options, Craft beer on draft, great wines,

kids menu, to go menu, daily specials.

112374 7376 Firefly 18 01 17

We’re bringing brunch downtown! Sundays 10:30 til 2:00.

Open daily except Wednesdays 11:30-9:00

454-5400

128 N Main Street, Downtown Waynesville

18 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


WILD ABOUT WAYNESVILLE

(L-R) Victor Llamas, Carmen Steinel, and David Garber

At Firefly Taps and Grill, brunch reigns supreme

BY STAFF REPORTS • WAYNESVILLE

Banana Foster. Created at Brennan’s restaurant in New Orleans in 1951, this classic

dessert was named after loyal customer Richard Foster

Eggs Benedict. This dish was first popularized in

New York City.

The fall season is fast approaching. With the

breathtaking change of colors comes the ritual

of sweaters, scarves, and pumpkin spice.

It is arguably the most beautiful time of the

year. Firefly Taps and Grill, located on Main Street

in downtown Waynesville, is just the place to go

to usher in the new season.

The Cipielewskis, Beth and Keith, have been a

staple in the neighborhood first with their restaurant

Blossom and then with the rebranding to

Firefly two years ago. If you haven’t stepped inside,

now is the time to do it. With a new brunch

menu and expanded hours, Saturday, 10:30 - 1

pm, and Sunday 10 - 2 pm, guests can choose

from yummy selections such as Creamy Grits

and Shrimp, with a siracha cheddar cheese

drizzle, Southern Skillet Scramble, or Pesto

Egg Sandwich with smoked pecan shoulder

bacon. Want more sweet than savory? Try the

Bananas Foster French Toast with a homemade

caramel sauce. The after-brunch crowd will love

the locally-sourced trout with a cream sauce,

and for a traditional Southern side, there are the

hand-breaded fried green tomatoes.

Chef Carmen Steinel’s offerings embrace

southern-home-cooking with a farmhouse-chic-dining-room-element

hosted by The

Cipielewskis’s new business partners, Victor Llamas

and David Garber. Llamas comes to Firefly

with over 20 years in guest relations and Garber

with 30+ years in family entertainment. This is an

experience that complements Firefly’s focus on

great food, cold craft beverages, and excellent

guest service.

“It begins as you walk through the front door.

This is home, and everyone is welcome in our

home,” shares Garber.

So, if you happen to be in the area and your

stomach starts to growl after taking in all the

fall beauty that surrounds Waynesville, stop by

Firefly Taps and Grill for brunch or any time. You

won’t leave disappointed.

The Cipielewskis, Victor, David, and Chef Carmen

say, “Y’all come by and visit.”

INFO

Firefly Taps and Grill

128 N Main St, Waynesville, NC 28786

(828) 454-5400 • fireflytapsandgrill.com

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 19


IS CBD SAFE? AND DOES IT HELP WITH CHRONIC PAIN?

Your Health

By Max Hammonds, MD

The latest “medical miracle” to come on the

scene is cannabidiol (CBD).

It is one of 113 compounds found in the

plant cannabis sativa. The common name

for this plant is hemp. But, in fact, there

are several strains, one which is rich in

tetrahydrocannabinol (THC – marijuana),

one which is rich in CBD (and low in THC),

several others which contain lesser amounts

of these two compounds, and some which

have none at all.

Hemp is one of the oldest fibrous plants

known since earliest recorded history. It has

been used in making rope, clothing, paper,

paint, fuel, and food. But because THC is

found in some strains, all cultivation of hemp

was banned in the US since the 1930’s and classified

as a Schedule I drug. The Farm Bill of December,

2018 de-scheduled hemp, allowing its

cultivation under strict guidelines state by state.

Hemp seeds (which contain no THC or CBD and

are used widely in human and animal food) were

declared “generally regarded as safe” (GRAS).

Because of the illegal status (federal government),

the research on the uses and effectiveness

of THC (marijuana) is scanty and questionable.

At best, observational studies suggest

— Caleb Simpson, an avid photographer, and owner of Hemp Daddy’s

Therapeutics, an online only CBD oil brand.

that marijuana may be helpful to 1) alleviate

chronic pain, 2) lessen anxiety (PTSD, etc.), 3)

reduce muscle spasms in multiple sclerosis, 4)

and improving cancer pain. But the increased

potency of the new varieties of marijuana, the

variable concentrations of THC in different plants,

and the high concentrations injected into various

foods makes the medical use of marijuana risky

without some professional guidance. Side effects

of THC include anxiety/panic attacks, loss of time

and spatial disorientation, paranoia, decreased

muscular activity, fluctuations in heart rate and

blood pressure – all making operating machinery

of any type extremely hazardous. Even medicinal

marijuana is still illegal in North Carolina.

The availability and legality of THC (psychoactive

marijuana) depends on the state in which you

reside. The federal government still regards the

sale, possession, or use of marijuana as illegal.

But 33 states allow it to be sold for medicinal

purposes and 11 states allow it to be sold for

recreational use.

CBD (containing no psychoactive activity) as

a drug has been approved by the FDA for two

rare types of epilepsy. Also, the FDA allows CBD

to be used in cosmetics, but does not allow it

to be used in food, beverages, or supplements

and does not allow hemp to be sold in interstate

commerce. North Carolina does allow the sale

of CBD oil. But otherwise, North Carolina follows

the restrictions of the federal government about

food, beverages, and supplements and shipment.

In fact, most foods, advertised as containing

CBD, usually contain very little or none. For those

who actually have added CBD to food or beverages,

the FDA has sent out warning letters to

cease and desist or face fines and/or criminal

‘Health’ continued on page 29

20 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


THE FULLNESS OF EMPTINESS

ZEN PHILOSOPHY WITH BILL WALZ

“Become totally empty. Quiet the restlessness of

the mind. Only then will you witness everything

unfolding from emptiness.” - Lao Tzu

Our typical American life is very full with possessions,

work, recreational activities, and very

busy minds. Yet many struggle with a feeling of

emptiness. We acquire more and more things,

and we are, to a degree, grateful for what we

have, yet the feeling of completeness, of needing

nothing more in order to be fulfilled eludes us.

We keep acquiring more and more and striving

for more and more, yet the abiding sense of

gratitude that makes life truly full and rich beyond

circumstances seems out of reach.

Buddhism and Taoism have a great deal to say

about this conundrum. These ancient Eastern

philosophies tell us that our problem stems from

attaching our value and well-being - importantly,

our very identity, in our external circumstances.

We confuse having with being. We believe that

the more we have materially, along with having

social status and affiliations, and having positive

emotional experiences, the better we are. We

depend on these circumstances being advantageous

for our well-being, but there is no lasting

certainty to any of this. So, our well-being swings

with the advantage or disadvantage of our circumstances.

Our problem is that in order to be

okay we need to feel filled with advantageous

circumstance, and this is pretty shaky ground

upon which to build a life.

When the great fountainhead of Taoism, Lao

Tzu, advised us to become totally empty, he was

telling us to go deeper into our foundational self,

to empty ourselves of all dependency on possessions,

status, and affiliations, all ideas, philosophies,

emotional dependencies, and preconceptions,

like pouring out the contents of a cup to

realize the infinite potential of the cup itself as a

vessel for anything, for everything. A cup of tea

is a cup of tea; the cup is full with one thing and

has no room for anything else. When we empty

the cup it is a space filled with infinite potential,

with the Universe itself, ready to accept whatever

is needed in the unique circumstance that is a

moment of life.

Importantly, every moment of our life is like a

cup, and only when we enter it empty can we be

filled with the moment’s own unique preciousness,

but we do not generally enter the moments

of our life empty. We enter the moment carrying

a train of previous memory-moments and anticipated

future-moments filled with our subjective

interpretation of what the value of those moments

has been and will be, shaping our sense of the

value of our life. The momentum of this train of

impressions and judgments is so great that we fly

on through each present-moment as we encounter

it, adding an occasional strongly positive or

negative moment on as one more box-car on the

train of our life speeding on to some future destination

where we hope to find fulfillment or, as it is

for too many, just a train to ride, going they know

not where but fearing it goes to nowhere.

Lao Tzu advises, “Quiet the restlessness of the

mind.” Our restless mind, seeking fulfillment, is

what already fills our cup and drives our train. We

enter the moment projecting into it our memories,

expectations, desires and fears. We have no

room in our cup to be present in wonder because

we are rehashing where we have been while

looking further down the track. We do not know

how to empty the cup, to stop the train. We don’t

know that we must quiet the mind that restlessly

pushes us forward, to avail ourselves fully to this

moment where Life is actually happening. We

don’t know that there are miracles and wonders

to be experienced while we are unavailable

because we are already filled and racing forward.

The result is that for too many we experience

life, instead of being filled with gratitude for these

wonders, as filled with grudging acceptance,

dissatisfaction and anxiety over the perceived

contents of our lives and our minds. They are

filled but still empty, racing into an uncertain

future. The miracles are lost as unnoticed blurs as

we speed past.

Only then will you witness everything unfolding

from emptiness.” It is quite remarkable and quite

a privilege to be alive at a time when science is

discovering the underlying quantum field nature

of reality. Just as the ancients intuited, it seems

to be true that every thing arises from no-thing.

The underlying reality of the universe seems to

be a field of energy potential containing no gaps

or no separations, truly a Uni-verse, a single

story/source of Creation. From this proto-energy

field arises spontaneously the building blocks of

atoms – electrons, gluons, quarks, Higgs-boson

particles that all become the stuff of the world,

the stars and the planets, the oceans and the

mountains, the trees and the rocks, the rivers and

the streams, the vegetation and the animals, and

you and me. All these things arise from what is

a no-thing because it has no boundary, and no

boundaried things within it. Everything unfolding

from emptiness.

So too, our minds are quite possibly like quantum

fields. In fact, the once very enlightened view

that the brain is like a computer that stores bits of

information in memory and has a remarkable retrieval

mechanism that allows us to creatively mix

and match the up to 100 terabytes of information

stored in a human brain, is giving way to a view

of the brain as a quantum storage, retrieval, and

reorganization biological information technology

that, like in the world of physics where particles

pop into materialization from out of what seems

to be a vacuum but is now described as “quantum

foam,” so too, quite possibly, does information

in the mind.

From this universal field of potential that

precedes and permeates everything, both the

physical world and the world of mind materialize,

exactly as they need to so as to create a world

of perfect balance and harmony with layer upon

layer of harmonized strata. When the balance is

upset by too much of anything, the balance is

restored naturally, but in the human mind, Nature

‘Walz’ continued on page 23

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 21


SHORT FICTION

While Rome burns — The bat and his enemies

BY PETER LOEWER • ASHEVILLE

With this issue, our old

scribe, Peter Loewer, returns

to write about current

WNC happenings, or a

very good — or occasionally

a very bad movie —

perhaps some profound

music, and sometimes a

fable that reflects today’s

realities.

A small Brown Bat, from

over near Bat Cave (his

home was on Bluerock

Mountain, the largest

known granite fissure

cave in North America),

accidentally fell to the

ground while flying over a

family gathering of Stoats.

Those Stoats were having a high old time just

drinking and Bar-B-Cuing on the mountainside.

One very crafty Stoat was standing to one side

and talking to another Stoat. Both Stoats were

rambling on and on about the amount of rain that

fell, and how bad the weather had become, and

how many folks would cotton to the opening of

a new Wal-Mart, anywhere such a store would

open.

Then the first Stoat felt something at his feet,

and looking down saw the Bat. Not wishing to

share this delicacy, he told his friend that somebody

was calling and the other Stoat rambled off,

leaving him alone with the Bat, which he promptly

picked off the ground and prepared to eat. But

the Bat didn’t want to be Stoat food so immediately,

though a rush of tears, begged for his

freedom.

The Stoat listened to the Bat, then said that

just on general principles, he couldn’t let any

Bat go free. After all, he—and all the members

According to a well-known expression, Rome’s emperor at the time, the decadent and unpopular Nero, “fiddled

while Rome burned.”

of his clan—were sworn enemies of every bird

that ever flew. Then, remembering some recent

chickens that he recently devoured, told the Bat

that Stoats even ate birds that didn’t fly and only

walked.

“But,” said the Bat, “I’m not a bird at all. Look

at me, and you’ll see that I’m a Mouse who just

invented a pair of artificial wings.”

With that, the Bat quickly folded up his wings

and, covering his prominent fangs with his upper

lip, smiled up at the Stoat.

“So you are,” said the Stoat. “Now that I look

closely at you, I can see you’re a rodent.”

And he let the Bat go free.

Sometime later, the Bat was lollygagging

around the night sky and dove to catch a Miller

Moth. But he missed the Moth and before he

could head back to the sky, was caught again,

this time by a tipsy Ferret who was one of a

bunch of Ferrets having a Catfish Fry over at the

Mayor’s house.

22 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019

As before, the Bat begged

for his life.

Said the Ferret, “I never let

a Mouse go, because all of us

members of the Ferret Clan

hate mice.”

“But I’m not a Mouse,” said

the Bat, “I’m a Bird,” and he

flapped his wings.

“Why, so you are,” said the

Ferret, and he, too, let the Bat

escape.

Now the Bat, feeling just a

bit cocksure about his seeming

ability to fend off his enemies,

forgot to watch where he was

flying and completely losing

track of his altitude, flew directly

into the feathered hat of a very

large woman who was attending

an outdoor evening meeting of

the local Master Gardeners.

“Eeeeeeeek,” cried the woman and, tearing off

her hat, she threw it—and the Bat—into a large

punchbowl on the table beside her.

The plunge into the cold punch snapped the

Bat back to reality, and before the woman could

marshal forces, he flew as fast and as high as he

could into the evening sky.

But this time, due to the excitement and the

effects of swallowing a dose of punch, the Bat

forgot to pay attention and wound up in the

clutches of an Old Owl.

“I just love Bats,” said the Old Owl.

“But I’m not a Bat—I’m a Mouse!”

“I just love Mice,” said the Old Owl and finished

his evening meal.

Moral: Remember, today, always look both ways

to see how the wind is blowing before you commit

yourself to anything.


‘Cover’ continued from page 15

from for your Spirit

Animal paintings? Do

storytelling and narrative

play into them?

AA: In the last two years,

I have been working on

expanding my body of

work to include many

different kinds of animals.

I find my inspiration

everywhere. Some of my

customers have provided

models, and occasionally

I’ll go out to local farms to

take pictures.

“Little Charmer,” by Angela Alexander

I painted many of my

horses during a particularly

challenging time in my life. They represented

freedom, strength,

and courage to me.

On the other hand, I

tried to capture more

of a sense of playfulness

and mischief in

my bear paintings.

Honestly, the process

for all my paintings

comes down to finding

a way to express

the true spirit of the

animals I paint.

RRM: What are

your hopes and

plans for the future

of your work?

AA: Well, right now, with the holidays fast

approaching, I am doubling down on my commission

list. So that will likely be the focus of my

immediate future, but beyond that, it’s hard to

say. I’d love to expand my reach by displaying my

work in new cities. On the creative side of things,

I never know what is around the corner.

My evolution as an artist has been very organic.

I try to respond to challenge and opportunity

as it arises with an open mind and heart. So far,

this has served me well, and I feel very blessed

with where this journey has taken me. I hope to

continue in the same way, and I look forward to

seeing where I end up.

Angela Alexander

www.angelaalexanderart.com

info@angelaalexanderart.com

Follow her on Facebook • (828) 273.4494

NorthLight Studios • 357 Depot St

WHEN

YOU

GO

CONTINUED

‘Walz’ continued from page 21

has created an anomaly, a phenomenon that

identifies and quantifies itself as separate from all

else, creating imbalance, felt as a kind of anxiety

that no other creature experiences. This sense of

separate self, or ego, builds and builds on itself,

erroneously hoping to manage the anxiety with

more of itself, but this is a tactic that simply does

not work. Just more imbalance is created, in

individual humans, human collectives, and in the

world inhabited and dominated by humans.

Yet within us is the way back to balance. The

mind must empty itself of established ideas and

emotional experience which create this false

sense of self. We must learn to make ourselves

available for new insight and perspective while

realizing the truth of the ancient teachings that tell

us we ARE Nature, already complete, just as is all

of Nature.

We must remember the ancient ways of

emptying the mind, of entering deeply into fertile

silence, remembering that only when the mind

is relatively free from running on its default mode

of holding onto and seeking itself in things can it

realize itself in its original potential. We must rediscover

that only when, even for a moment, the

mind is empty of running its story of filling cups

and rushing trains through time can it realize its

fullness as this and every moment arising in consciousness,

the Universe manifesting and realizing

itself, a great miracle and wonder happening

as a human life.

Then we can begin to reorganize our lives, both

individually and collectively, not as cups or trains

that we fill, but rather, simply as witness and participant

in Creation, where we and every moment

materialize from the field of infinite potential that

is the Universe, where our cups empty and fill

magically with the contents of the moment, with

what is needed to experience and build our lives

based in the natural harmony of Nature. I have

often thought that this is the real meaning of the

Biblical phrases that direct us to live our lives “at

play in the fields of the Lord” and to be “like the

little children” who show up in the moments of

their lives empty of the baggage of a developed

ego-self, to experience life “unfolding from emptiness.”

Human civilization will not collapse for letting go

of the ego-myth that more is better; it will find its

way back to harmony, no longer a train rushing

to a burned out bridge somewhere up ahead, but

rather a magical caravan that fully experiences,

explores, treasures and creates the terrain of Life

as it appears, fullness arising from emptiness.

Our cups will become cornucopias that magically

empty and refill moment to moment while we are

full in the magic of emptiness. And gratitude for

the miracle that is Life can travel with us as our

constant companion.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and

mindfulness in university and public

forums and is a private-practice meditation

teacher and guide for individuals in

mindfulness, personal growth and

consciousness. Information on classes,

talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone

consultations at (828)258-3241, e-mail at healing@

billwalz.com Learn more, see past columns, video and

audio programs at www.billwalz.com

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 23


BOOKS

Chicken Warrior and the Divorce Attorney’ exclusive book preview

BY MICHAEL BUTTACAVOLI • NATIONAL

Divorce statistics in the United States: 40 to 50% of

first marriages end in divorce, 67% of second marriages,

and 73% of third marriages.

Do couples uncover the reasons for divorce and

adopt strategies and tactics for successful coupling?

The Encounter

A party at a neighbor’s house on a private

mountain where Benny and Bella live.

Bella enters the room and sees a man at

the center, having a conversation. Armani

turns his head and makes eye contact with

Bella while opening his stance and turning

towards her. He is five-foot-four and 138

pounds with a 30-inch waist and has completed

a recent triathlon. At age 83, Armani

holds the geriatric world record for powerlifting

at 462 pounds. His nose is bulbous with

tiny, swelling red veins. Armani’s head is bald

down the center with crops of thin, stringy red hair

flowing down. His eyes are large ebony disks, and his

ears give the appearance of a sprouted vegetable. If

one stood next to him, you would get the feeling of

standing next to an electrical wire that had fallen from a

pole and was emitting sparks.

His glance lands and is greeted with a tilted head,

crinkled eyes, and widening cheeks. He says, “Welcome

to the party. I am a close friend of your neighbor

and pleased to meet you.”

Armani extends his hand, and Bella grasps it. Their

handshake lingers as their eyes engaged. The clasp

began dry, and as it remained, steam alighted from the

center of each palm. The uncoupling drifted frictionlessly.

W.C.Fields: “I was in love with a beautiful blonde once,

dear. She drove me to drink. That’s the one thing I’m

indebted to her for.”

Bella speaks to her neighbor. “I met your friend, and

I like him; we have birding in common, and I would like

to see him again. What is his email?”

“He is staying at my home and joining a group to

go birding tomorrow. Here are his email and phone

number.”

Bella’s irises enlarge in rooted azure. “I know the

birding group he is going with.” Her mouth opened,

the corners of her lips raised exposing her upper teeth,

the clefts along the sides of her nose tightened, eyelids

heightened. She raised her forefinger, her shoulders

bouncing up and down. “I’ll surprise him.”

4:30 am: The parking lot of a wildlife reserve where the

birding group meets.

Bella drives up and sees Armani talking to the group

leader. She parks and flings the car door open, takes a

deep breath, and explodes towards Armani. Her heart

rate hits 120 beats per minute. As she exits her car,

she feels a tingle in her inner thighs that speeds her

towards Armani.

Adagio (Second Movement)

One week after the union, Bella and Armani return to

their homes.

Armani emails Bella: it was fun to go birding with

you, we had a good time together. Armani’s body stirs

as he composes this email. His amygdala lights up.

Bella: I learned a lot, and I feel there is more you

can show me. We must stay in touch. When are you

returning? Her interior body was without motion.

Armani: I didn’t have plans to come north,

but you have changed that. I can train for my

next triathlon. I am buying a new red Porsche

convertible; we can break it in.

“My love life is terrible. The last time I was

inside a woman was when I visited the Statue of

Liberty.” Woody Allen

30 Days after the Encounter

Armani has an explosion of dream states

during his waking periods and while asleep:

he recalls Tarzan and Jane-the river scene

where she is about to be attacked by a crocodile.

Armani, in a loincloth, dives in the water,

turns the croc over and rips his knife through the soft

underbelly killing it. Jane’s body is limp as he scoops

her up. She emits a quiet sigh of sexual desire and

surrender. Armani cradles her in his arms as they exit

the river with their eyes ablaze in the full moon.

Armani calls Bella. Hi Bella, you have been on my

mind. I have been trying to complete a paper on quantum

theory dealing with superposition that is due to

be presented to the National Science Foundation next

month. When I do, I get a flashback of us watching

two cardinals mating the last time we met, and I felt a

spark as I touched your hand.

“I believe people ought to mate for life...like pigeons

or Catholics.” Woody Allen “

Oh, I have been thinking about you too. How are you

doing?” “Things have not been going well.”

“What do you mean,” asked Bella?

“Sex, sex, sex, I am up to here about it,” (he places

his hand under his chin), “but I haven’t gotten any lately.

The last time I called up my go-to hooker, she said

she had a headache.”

“I’m sorry to hear you say that, sweetie. Anything

else?”

“It brought back to memory, one time with my first

wife when we were doing it, I found a peeping tom at

the window who was booing me.”

“That’s terrible Armani, is there more?”

“Godfrey Daniels, with a different madame, when I

dropped my pants she started to laugh uncontrollably

and reduced her price.”

“You poor thing.”

“Beelzebub, now I know why I have attractive children

from my third marriage, and I am thankful.”

“Tell me, Armani.”

“My wife had a boyfriend who was a male model.”

“That’s awful. I feel for you.”

“Wait, it gets worse, her lover was her psychiatrist.

When I asked her how her therapy was going,

she smiled and said it felt good to lie on the couch.

My doctor said he had tests to run: urine, stool, and

semen. I gave him a pair of my briefs.”

“Armani, things will be different with me.”

“Wait, nothing goes right for me. I was suspicious

my first wife was faking orgasms and when I had lunch

with three of my friends they told me the same thing.”

“Armani, that’s a pity. Is there more?”

24 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019

“Blind dates, no more blind dates, I went out with a

woman who had pigtails.”

“What do you have against pigtails?”

“They were under her arms.”

“I can’t believe it, Armani.”

“You won’t believe this: I hold the world record for

powerlifting for men between age 80 and 90, and I

took one Viagra pill, and my tongue got hard.”

“Go on Armani, let it all hang out.”

“My second wife screams when she has sex. It

happened when I walked in on her. Oh, do I know

about oral contraception. I tried to get a woman in bed,

and she said no. It doesn’t end. At the beginning of my

marriage to my second wife, I asked her if we can have

sex twice a day. She said, ‘Sure, I’ll never be home.’

If it weren’t for pickpockets, I’d have no sex at all. My

wife said she wanted to have sex in the back seat of

the car. I grinned and said, ‘Let’s go.’ She said, ‘I want

you to drive.’”

“Sex at age 90 is like trying to shoot pool with a rope.”

~George Burns

Bella visits attorney Bonita Broadbottom. She is in

her late 70s, six-foot-seven, and 300 pounds. She

played substitute lineman for a division three college

football team. Her dress was haute couture from the

Salvation Army rack. A flowing denim skirt that if it

were canvas, you would think it was a tent. The skirt

was two inches below the knees and exposed hairy

inverted bowling pin legs. She wore a well-ironed white

short-sleeve shirt that sported tight, bulging 16-inch

biceps. When Bonita spoke, her jaw would move with

caution, as if she was grinding gravel.

“My husband and I are getting divorced, and we

signed this agreement, and I want to know if you can

get me more money.”

Bonita reads the paper. Drat, this is crooked as a

dog’s hind leg. Bonita jerked back her head and turned

it sideways, tilting it. The bluebonnet, with the words

stitched in the center “Go Cucamonga,” fell off and she

made a failed attempt to catch it. Exclaiming, “Lucifer

at play again.”

There is a bowl of long brown pretzels on Bonita’s

desk, she takes one out and snorts this is what I can

do to this agreement snapping the pretzel in two.

Bella shudders as she watches Bonita’s bicep

expand as the pretzel is reduced to powder as

Broadbottom grinds it into her desk. At the center of

her desk were two fifty-pound dumbbells. On the wall

was a photograph of Bonita with the football team of

Cucamonga Law School. Bonita shakes her finger at

the photograph and says I’ll take care of Benny. She

gnashes her teeth and twists her lips. Bonita writes a

formula on a piece of paper and hands It to Bella. “This

will get you more money.” She tilts her head and winks,

and her bluebonnet falls off her head.

This work intends to steer you towards critical thinking

and away from emotional reactions. If you apply a

minimal effort in analytical thought, you may be able to

reduce the large financial drain and psychological torture.

Available at Amazon.com


Top-eight overlooked books for autumn reading

LIST BY JUSTIN SOUTHER • NATIONAL

BOOKS

Cooler weather is an opportunity

to take a look at the beautiful, the

odd, and the overlooked books that

might just be the perfect gift. Here’s

a look at a few of the neatest titles

hitting shelves this fall season.

The Art of Film Projection: A

Beginner’s Guide

At first blush, this book —

a literal guide to a now

mostly antiquated skill

— may appear to niche

for most readers. But what’s

unique about this book (besides

its surprisingly practical approach

and attractive, simple layout) is how

it both wants to preserve the history

of film projection and exhibition, that

forgotten cog that brought cinema to

millions of viewers.

Remarkable Trees by

Christina Harrison and

Tony Kirkham

Part field guide, part

natural history of trees,

Christina Harrison, and Tony

Kirkham’s Remarkable Trees is a

gorgeous and informative arborary

tribute, filled with beautiful illustrations.

Hi-Fi: The History of High-

End Audio Design by Gideon

Schwartz

This book is a gorgeous

and exhaustive look at the

history of home sound system

equipment. This is more than just a

simple account, however, instead

truly focusing on decades worth of

design and innovation. Not only is it

a must-have for any audiophile, but

it also indeed shows the beauty and

intentionality of an everyday thing

inside your home.

Bowie: An Illustrated

Life Book by Fran Ruiz

and María Hesse

The second book

of illustrator Maria

Hesse’s biographies

(after Frida Kahlo: An Illustrated Life)

to be translated into English, Bowie is

an accessible, heartfelt, and colorful

look at the life of David Bowie. While

there’s been a dearth of books on

Bowie before (and especially after) his

death, An Illustrated Life has a whimsy

to it that fits the enigmatic nature

of the performer’s life.

Atlas Obscura, 2nd Edition

Book by Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton,

and Joshua Foer

The first edition of the Atlas

Obscura — a huge, thorough

look at the world’s

weirdest, most curious

locales — has been

a perennial bestseller at

Malaprop’s since it was published

in 2016. The newly released second

edition builds on top of this, adding

100-plus new locations, more

maps, and a slew of new city

guides, all with the goal of stoking

one’s wanderlust.

Black Mountain Poems

Jonathan C. Creasy (Editor)

It’s easy to forget that one of America’s

great art movements sprouted in

our backyard. Black Mountain Poems

puts the spotlight

on Black Mountain

College’s highly

influential, creative,

and the experimental

poetry scene. Edited

by BMC expert Jonathan C. Creasy,

this short but crucial anthology

includes the leaders of the Black

Mountain poets like Charles Olson,

Denise Levertov and Robert Creeley,

but really shines by spotlighting the

work of lesser-known members and

BMC alum (like John Cage and Josef

Albers) who are rarely if ever thought

of for their poetry.

South: Essential

Recipes and New

Explorations

Book by Sean

Brock

The South is blessed with a nearly

endless supply of talented culinary

minds and their accompanying

cookbooks, so it’s no small

feat to say that Charleston,

S.C. based chef Sean Brock,

likely has come out with the season’s

regional cookbook. A real love

letter to the wide array and depth of

Southern cooking.

Great Women Artists

by Phaidon Editors

A vast deep-dive

through centuries’

worth of female artists.

A massive, in-depth, and — yes —

an essential guide that fills in a lot of

gaps and overlooked talents in art

history.

NOVEMBER 2019

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings &

Book clubs, as well as Salons!

Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOK SIGNINGS

Kirsten & Christopher

Shockey present ‘Miso,

Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty

Ferments’ 11/05 - 6pm

Debra Diamond, Ph.D.

presents ‘Diary of a Death

Doula: 25 Lessons the Dying

Teach Us about the Afterlife’

11/06 - 6pm

Marc Grossberg presents ‘The

Best People: A Tale of Trials

and Errors’ 11/12 - 6pm

TElizabeth Chiles Shelburne

presents Holding on to

Nothing 11/14/2019 - 6:00pm

Terry Roberts, PhD launches

‘The New Smart: How

Nurturing Creativity Will Help

Children Thrive’ 11/20 - 6pm

UNC Press presents Randy

Johnson author of ‘Southern

Snow: The New Guide to

Winter Sports from Maryland

to the Southern Appalachians’

11/21 - 6pm

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM

Sunday 9AM to 7PM

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 25


Hogslop String Band performs at White Horse Black Mountain on Friday,

November 8

BY STAFF REPORTS • BLACK MOUNTAIN

The Hogslop String Band is a Nashville

based band comprised of four talented

young musicians hailing from Georgia &

Tennessee.

This dynamic quartette is comprised of

Kevin Martin on the fiddle, Gabriel Kelley on

guitar, Daniel Binkley on banjo, and Pickle

on washtub and standup bass. Hogslop

has shared stages with the likes of Avett

Brothers, Lucas Nelson, Del McCoury,

Charlie Louvin, Punch Brothers, The Infamous

Stringdusters, Dom Flemons, and

many more.

First and foremost, Hogslop is rooted in

traditional southern American old-time string

band music. Each member of the band was

naturally exposed to this wonderful musical heritage

through family and friends – just the way

traditional music has always been passed down.

The band formed in 2009, and soon set about

Kevin Martin on the fiddle, Gabriel Kelley on guitar, Daniel Binkley on

banjo, and Pickle on washtub and standup bass.

entering – and winning – every major string band

contest in the South, as well as putting on epic,

sweat-drenched square dances wherever space

allowed.

Fast-forward to 2017, and the boys begin writing

and arranging original material, shaking constraints

of traditional forms, but still lending their

old-time sensibility to a fresh new sound. With

influences ranging from The Byrds to John Prine,

Doug Kershaw (Guest Appearing on the album)

to the 1920’s sound of The Skillet Lickers, their

new direction is something not easily defined,

but unmistakably Southern, unmistakably raw

and exciting. This new material is on full display

in their first official, self-titled studio album, to be

released in 2019, accompanied by an extensive

schedule of live performances. If you’ve never

seen Hogslop live, you’re missing out on one of

the most exciting, floor-stomping musical rides

you’ll ever see. So be sure to check their tour

dates, because these fellas get around!

IF

YOU

GO

White Horse Black Mountain

Hogslop String Band performs Friday, November

8, 8 pm. Tickets are $10 advance,

$12 day of the show and can be purchased

www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

26 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


NEW BOOK: ‘The Body: A GUIDE FOR OCCUPANTS’ by BILL BRYSON

BY STAFF REPORTS • BLACK MOUNTAIN

Bill Bryson, the bestselling author of A

Short History of Nearly Everything, takes

us on a head-to-toe tour of the marvel

that is the human body.

As addictive as it is comprehensive,

this is Bryson at his very best, a

must-read owner’s manual for everybody.

Bryson once again proves himself to be

an incomparable companion as he guides us

through the human body–how it functions, its

remarkable ability to heal itself, and (unfortunately)

the ways it can fail. Full of extraordinary facts

(your body made a million red blood cells

since you started reading this) and irresistible

Bryson-esque anecdotes, The Body

will lead you to a deeper understanding of the

miracle that is life in general and you in particular.

As Bill Bryson writes, “We pass our existence

within this wobble of flesh and yet take it almost

entirely for granted.” The Body will cure that

indifference with generous doses of wondrous,

compulsively readable facts and information.

MORE

BILL BRYSON’s bestselling books include A

Walk in the Woods, The Life and Times of the

Thunderbolt Kid, and A Short History of Nearly

Everything (which won the Aventis Prize in Britain

and the Descartes Prize, the European Union’s

highest literary award). He was chancellor of

Durham University, England’s third oldest university,

from 2005 to 2011, and is an honorary fellow

of Britain’s Royal Society.

www.penguinrandomhouse.com

(L-r) “Blue pansy,” necklace, by Diane Mceachen; “Untitled,” mixed media painting, by Eileen Ross, ; wearable art scarf, by Ruth Duckworth

Black Mountain is alive with the sound and sights

of music!

BY STAFF REPORTS • BLACK MOUNTAIN

The Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League is singing

from the hills about this year’s holiday show:

Mountain Rhythms.

Shoppers will find musically inspired fine-art

treasures, one-of-a-kind ornaments, and stocking

stuffers galore decking the walls of the Red

House Gallery this season.

Why stand in line for cookie-cutter one-hit-wonders

at a box store when local art is serenading

from the Red House Gallery?

Tap your toes, warm your nose, and let your

eyes dance with us instead.

IF

YOU

GO

Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League

Jingle, all the way, to the opening reception

5-7 pm Friday, November 8; local musician

and studio artist Darcy Orr and friends will perform.

The perfect gift is waiting under the mistletoe at

the Red House Studios & Gallery, 310 West State

Street, Black Mountain. The show runs through December

29. Open seven days: Monday-Saturday,

10- 5 pm, Sunday 10 - 3 pm.

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 27


FINE ART

22nd Voorhees Family Art Show and Sale

BY STAFF REPORTS • NORTH ASHEVILLE

This year’s annual event will feature new

artwork created by four Voorhees family

members, along with two guest artists.

The event will again be featured in a family

home in Norwood Park, this year at Susan

Voorhees’ house. Meet this extraordinary

family of artists known throughout North

Carolina and the Southeast. A portion of

the proceeds will be donated to MANNA

FoodBank and Kiva, helping others locally

and globally.

The arts legacy began with Edwin Voorhees

(1919-1999) known for his NC coastal

watercolor seascapes, and Mildred Voorhees

and now their children and grandchildren.

Mildred (1924-2007) was best known for

her colorful, patterned watercolors and rich

oil still lifes and landscapes. Reproductions of

David Voorhees porcelain vase

Edwin and Mildred’s artwork will be available.

Edwin had long wanted to host a family art

show as a way of gathering the clan and sharing

the varied talents of those working in the arts.

So, the first Voorhees Family Art Show was held

in the family home in Morehead City in 1998.

Edwin passed away the next year, but the Voorhees

Family Art Show continued in Morehead for

several years. In later years the show was held in

Asheville in addition to Morehead City.

With Mildred’s move to Asheville, the show

followed with it being hosted in one of several

Voorhees family homes in North Asheville ever

since. This year’s show celebrates the 22ndshow

for the Voorhees Family and continues the

legacy begun by Edwin Voorhees back in 1998.

Three of Edwin and Mildred’s six children

and one daughter-in-law will be showing their

New Work by Rick Hills

Visit “Art by Rick Hills on Facebook”

828.452.0228

28 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


FINE ART

MUSIC

work at this event: Susan Voorhees, oil and

pastel paintings and art aprons; Jane Voorhees,

watercolors, pastels, prints, cards and calendars;

David Voorhees, wood-fired stoneware

and porcelain pottery; David’s wife, Molly Sharp

Voorhees, sterling silver and gold jewelry, some

incorporating natural beach stones. Also exhibiting

are guest artists Chad Alice Hagen, felted

art and handmade books and Cheryl Stippich,

stained glass, and polymer clay.

IF

YOU

GO

The 22nd Voorhees Family Art Show

and Sale

Saturday, November 23, 10-5 pm and

Sunday, November 24, 10 - 4 pm at 55 Woodward

Avenue in the Norwood Park area of North

Asheville. For more information and map visit

www.voorheesfamilyart.com

This art show and sale is free and open to the

public.

‘Health’ continued from page 20

actions.

As noted, CBD helps control certain kinds of

epilepsy. All other uses are based on patient testimonies

and little else. It does seem to help with

chronic pain (nerve pain, etc.). But it is not effective

in helping arthritis, cancer, opioid withdrawal,

and Alzheimer’s disease. And CBD inhibits the

metabolism of certain drugs, possibly increasing

blood levels of steroids, hormones, proton pump

inhibitors, and blood thinning medicines. Other

side effects of CBD include tiredness, sleepiness,

and diarrhea. Again, except for epilepsy, the use

of CBD oil is based on hearsay evidence at best.

The bottom line on THC and CBD is – so few

studies are available, it is too early to know for

sure what these compounds can actually do –

and the side effects and risks are considerable.

The safe bet is to wait until further research is

done before jumping on this bandwagon. If one

wants to try them for a specific medical problem,

do so with the advice of and under the observation

of a medical professional.

AmiciMusic will celebrate Veteran’s Day weekend

with a special four-hand piano program

entitled “AMERICAN FOUR-HAND” highlighting

great American music, including Sousa marches,

Ragtime, the Great American Songbook, plus fun

arrangements of Copland’s Appalachian Spring

and Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. Alex Watson

and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser will play the

88 keys together at one piano in a great ballet of

twenty fingers and four hands.

There will be three performances. On Friday,

November 8, at 7:30, they perform at a House

Concert in Hendersonville. Seating is limited, and

reservations are required. On Saturday, November

9, at 2 pm, they play at the White Horse in Black

Mountain, and on Sunday, November 10, at 2 pm,

the concert will be at the intimate St. Giles Chapel

in the Deerfield Retirement Community. Half-price

admission to all the public concerts for Veterans

and active Military.

IF

YOU

GO

For more information and to buy discount

seats in advance, please visit www.amicimusic.org

and click on the link to the “Asheville

Concerts” at the top of the page.

Alex Watson

AmiciMusic presents

“AMERICAN FOUR-

HAND” to celebrate

Veteran’s Day weekend.

BY STAFF REPORTS • HENDERSONVILLE

70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 29


November Comics

www.brotherrock.net

Ratchet and Spin

By Jess and Russ Woods

Ratchet and Spin © 2019

Corgi Tales

By Phil Hawkins

Best in Show

By Phil Juliano

30 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019


HAPPENINGS

An Asheville Vacation Rental Sends Guests Through

Portals and Alternate Realities

BY STAFF REPORTS • ASHEVILLE

Have you ever wondered

what it would be like to

get inside the mind of an

artist?

Imagine entering a

home that imbues intricate

details created from those

coveted neural pathways

and delights the senses prolifically, altering states of

consciousness even without a magic pill. Award-winning

filmmaker, Kira Bursky, makes this possible at her

upcoming installation: Considerations of Infinity.

Asheville Stay has added an Artist Residency program,

Vibe of Asheville, to its long-established vacation

rentals, offering guests the experience of living in

an immersive, interactive installation. Booking stays

enables travelers to support the work of participating

artists and to contribute to the art and culture that

gives every city its unique vibe. Meeting artists through

something as intimate as a living space brings a new

tangible dimension of connectivity to that which is often

out of reach. Public events begin November 18, as

considerations of Infinity opens, and continue monthly

through June of 2020.

Vibe supports our resident artists in reaching their

career goals. During Bursky’s yearlong residency, her

installation is part of the creative process toward developing

her first feature film. By hosting and engaging

local, national, and international artists, Vibe initiates

and fosters creative collaborations.

Attendees of the Immersive

Night will experience the creative

process of other local commissioned

talent: 6 visual artists, one

musician, and one projection artist

as they conceive original works in

real-time. Bursky will capture and

artistically recapitulate the artists’

work, producing a behind-thescenes

documentary film capturing

the making of Considerations of

Infinity that will premier within the installation itself.

The vibe of every city begins with its creators. By

providing another platform from which art can be expressed

and noticed, Vibe supports the uniqueness of

the culture of Asheville: home to the founder, Celeste

Gray, for 23 years. Artists, local communities, and

travelers alike benefit in a symbiotic way that cultivates

a collective alliance.

IF

YOU

GO

Kira Bursky

In 2009 award-winning filmmaker Kira Bursky

founded her production company All Around

Artsy. Her 60+ films and music videos have screened at

festivals around the world from Los Angeles to Berlin to

Beijing. Her YouTube channel has over 32,000+ subscribers

and 15 million+ views. She is currently developing

the script for her first feature film. On the web: www.

allaroundartsy.com

About Vibe of Asheville

Celeste Gray, with a profoundly inherent spirit of hospitality

and refined aesthete, began Asheville Stay in 2003

as a labor of love. Both, hosting and traveling, have been

how creative solutions that advocate for people and the

planet have been designed. Vibe of Asheville shares

revenue from stays booked with Artists in Residence and

supports their work in a myriad of ways. Vibe of London

is in the works with a vision for many other cities worldwide

in a global-meets-local-through-art initiative. www.

ashevillestay.com/vibe-of-asheville. (828) 275 5648

vibeofasheville@gmail.com

Asheville Raven & Crone

is a feast for your senses!

Get Ready for Fall with

Asheville Raven & Crone

It’s the favorite time of year

for many people in the mountains

of North Carolina.

Asheville Raven & Crone not

only provides items such as candles,

teas, incense, and books!

You will notice art all over the

shop from local artists such as

Nicole Scioscia and Emily Eagan.

We also have greeting cards by

Laura Tempest Zakroff and Florrie

Funk, who creates beautiful collage

cards of animals and goddesses.

Local artist Justine Briggs

provides stickers, altar cards,

postcards, and enamel pins. The

shop offers a beautiful space in

which to display local art, whether

in jewelry, prints, cards, pins, or

stickers.

Celebrate local women artists,

buy local, enjoy community, and

support local art, all while shopping

for locally made products at

Asheville Raven & Crone. Open

seven days a week, 11-7 pm.

Asheville Raven and Crone • 555

Merrimon Ave, Asheville,

(828) 424-7868

www.ashevilleravenandcrone.com

VOL. 23, NO. 3 — NOVEMBER 2019 | RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | 31


32 |RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM | RAPID RIVER’S ARTS & CULTURE | VOL. 23, NO. 3 NOVEMBER 2019

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