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The Mountain Times - Volume 48, Number 44: Oct. 30 - Nov. 5, 2019

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Mou nta i n Ti m e s<br />

<strong>Volume</strong> <strong>48</strong>, <strong>Number</strong> <strong>44</strong> I’m FREE - Pick me up and be prepared. Paper beats rock. <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

CLOCKS FALL BACK<br />

Don’t forget, this<br />

Sunday, clocks go back<br />

one hour.<br />

By Polly Mikula<br />

SHIFFRIN TAKES<br />

SECOND<br />

Ski racer Mikaela<br />

Shiffrin came up short<br />

to 17-year-old Alice<br />

Robinson in the season<br />

opener at Soelden.<br />

Page 3<br />

Submitted<br />

NEW RESTAURANT<br />

OPEN FOR SEASON<br />

Flannels Bar and Grill<br />

in Mendon opened<br />

<strong>Oct</strong>. 10.<br />

Page 2<br />

Courtesy Lavallee Brensinger Architects<br />

Architectural sketch shows the proposed new Woodstock Middle School-High School building on its current campus off Route 4 ,West of the village.<br />

Feasibility of new high school questioned<br />

By Curt Peterson<br />

Ben Ford, chair of the Windsor Central middle school/high school<br />

campus configuration committee moderated a discussion with the<br />

district school board on the financial feasibility of the committees’<br />

recommendation for a new school. <strong>The</strong> three-hour meeting took place<br />

Wednesday, <strong>Oct</strong>. 23.<br />

<strong>The</strong> new building, as designed, is tentitively projected to cost, $63 million.<br />

Additionally, the committee recommended adding in $4 milllion for<br />

Starbucks set to open with Chipotle<br />

and yet-to-be-named retailer by spring<br />

By Virginia Dean<br />

<strong>The</strong> corporate headquarters<br />

of Starbucks in<br />

Chicago has confirmed that<br />

it is opening a new location<br />

at 37-41 North Main Street<br />

in Rutland this spring.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Development Review<br />

Board gave its nod in<br />

September 2018.<br />

<strong>The</strong> store will feature a<br />

drive-thru and two retail<br />

stores including the Mexican<br />

restaurant Chipotle and<br />

another unknown retailer<br />

that, according to a subcontractor<br />

last weekend at the<br />

site, has yet to be determined.<br />

Speculation about the<br />

third retailer, however, has<br />

included a hair salon or<br />

cell phone store, according<br />

to Planning and Zoning<br />

Administrator Tara Kelly.<br />

Starbucks would be<br />

situated on the south end<br />

of the building, retail in<br />

the center, and Chipotle –<br />

with a drive-thru - on the<br />

northern end.<br />

Property owner Jeff Turkanis<br />

of OceanGate Realty<br />

Advisors in Marblehead,<br />

Massachusetts, however,<br />

did not want to reveal any<br />

plans when reached by<br />

phone.<br />

“We cannot comment<br />

on any information at this<br />

time,” said Turkanis.<br />

OceanGate, which is a<br />

real estate investment firm<br />

with offices in Boston and<br />

New York City, also owns<br />

the adjacent CVS Pharmacy<br />

property. It purchased<br />

the original Royal Hearthside<br />

building for $650,000<br />

the district’s elementary schools to be renovated/upgraded and $1 million<br />

for <strong>The</strong> Prosper Valley School to be repaired/upgraded, which brings<br />

the total amount to be raised to $68 million.<br />

Killington board representative Jim Haff said a $68 million bond would<br />

increase education taxes about <strong>30</strong>% for district towns.<br />

“Taxes are a major issue in our town,” Haff said. “High taxes turn off<br />

prospective new families, and as taxes go up, people cut back on other<br />

WCUUSD > 17<br />

Starbucks > 32<br />

ALL HALLOWS’ EVE<br />

Doors for the legendary<br />

Wobbly Barn Halloween<br />

Party open at<br />

9 p.m. on <strong>Oct</strong>. 31. See<br />

the calendar for other<br />

Halloween events.<br />

Page 14<br />

By Virginia Dean<br />

Starbucks building takes shape at the intersection of Routes 4 and 7 in Rutland.<br />

By Curtis Harrington<br />

Silas Harrington (pictured center foreground) sat atop<br />

a bale of hay wrapped in orange plastic with classmates<br />

during the school excursion earlier this month.<br />

Students perused pickings<br />

at Papa’s pumpkin patch<br />

Dan and Laurie <strong>Nov</strong>otny welcomed Rochester and<br />

Stockbridge Kindergarten and 1st grade students to<br />

“Papa’s pumpkin patch” in Stockbridge, Tuesday,<br />

<strong>Oct</strong>. 8.


2 • LOCAL NEWS<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Submitted<br />

CSJ gym opens<br />

City rec dept. hosts open house, Friday<br />

Rutland City’s Recreation and Parks Department invites<br />

community members of all ages to attend an Open House<br />

at the CSJ gymnasium on Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 1, 4:<strong>30</strong>-7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

After finalizing a lease with CSJ last week, the Recreation<br />

and Parks Department is thrilled to open gymnasium doors<br />

to the public and provide a sneak peek to the opportunities<br />

the new space will provide.<br />

Community members will be able to participate in some<br />

of these activities at the open house, including: basketball<br />

open gym, racquetball, guided walking tours, an evening<br />

movie, and more! A few of our special guests and vendors<br />

will include the National Guard, Rutland City Police<br />

Department’s K-9 Unit, Rutland City Fire Department, and<br />

Come Alive Outside will be there with their smoothie bike!<br />

Businesses and organizations interested in potential facility<br />

rentals are also encouraged to attend the Open House<br />

and view the space available.<br />

Staff report<br />

After five years, a vacant restaurant building in Mendon<br />

has new life.<br />

Flannels Bar and Grill opened <strong>Oct</strong>. 10 at the former Tap<br />

House on Route 4.<br />

This is owner and chef Josh Bartholomew’s first time<br />

owning a restaurant. He admitted it’s been a learning<br />

experience.<br />

“I’ve never been one for front of the house — I’m learning<br />

that on the fly,” said Bartholomew.<br />

Bartholomew got his start in the industry<br />

working at the former Panache in Killington<br />

before he followed the head chef to<br />

open a restaurant in Maine. Bartholomew<br />

returned to Vermont three<br />

years ago and became the chef at the<br />

Hermitage Club, where he served<br />

1,800 lunches a day in the 90,000<br />

square foot clubhouse.<br />

Bartholomew attended Le<br />

Cordon Bleu culinary school and<br />

was previously nominated best chef<br />

in Vermont.<br />

“I’m used to high end (food) — this is<br />

more tavern,” he said.<br />

Despite the simpler<br />

menu, Bartholomew is using<br />

all the same ingredients and<br />

food sources he’s used at previous<br />

restaurants, including<br />

wagyu beef and fish and chips from Maine. He’s also putting<br />

Following the open house, the rec department welcomes What time into the are presentation you of the waiting food. for?<br />

everyone to bring a blanket and some friends to watch the “We’re off the beaten path,” Bartholomew said. “We have<br />

film, “Night at the Museum,” on the big screen in the CSJ to be unique to draw people in.”<br />

Gymnasium at 7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Bartholomew operates the restaurant with investors John<br />

For more info visit rutlandrec.com, or call 802-773-1822. Kalish and Matt Camereno and Manager Sharon Greene.<br />

Flannels restaurant opens in Mendon<br />

As the name suggests, all of the staff, including Bartholomew,<br />

wear flannel shirts. <strong>The</strong> inside of the building is<br />

decorated with flannel strips around the table centerpieces<br />

and flannel scarves around taxidermy.<br />

“(When) you think of Vermont — you think of the woods<br />

— it’s flannel,” said Greene.<br />

Greene, who grew up on Long Island, moved to West<br />

Rutland 13 years ago to raise a family. She’s worked at four<br />

restaurants since she’s been here, including<br />

Johnny Boy’s Pancake House, Little Harry’s<br />

Restaurant, Three Tomatoes and Southside<br />

Steakhouse.<br />

Like Bartholomew, the job is new<br />

for Greene, who has mostly worked<br />

as a waitress and bartender.<br />

“I’m in charge of a lot more<br />

now,” she said. “Now it’s a personal<br />

mission — this place has to<br />

do well because my name’s here.”<br />

Greene, a self-described people<br />

person, said restaurants are what<br />

she loves.<br />

“I feed off of chaos. I tried a 9 to<br />

5 job and I quit three of them in two<br />

By Katy Savage<br />

Flannels manager Sharon Greene and owner/chef<br />

Josh Bartholomew plan to have the restaurant open<br />

seven days a week.<br />

months,” she said. “I need the<br />

excitement.”<br />

Bartholomew has a number of<br />

specials planned for the restaurant,<br />

which will soon be open<br />

seven days a week from 4-10 p.m. Bartholomew also wants<br />

to start serving breakfast and brunch on the weekends. He<br />

plans to connect the restaurant to the VAST snowmobile<br />

trail, which runs behind the building.<br />

“We’re going with the flow,” Greene said. “We have a lot in<br />

the works — it’s all setting it into play.”<br />

Where<br />

the living<br />

is easy.<br />

Want to make good money during the<br />

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combine to form the perfect retirement community.<br />

For information or a tour,<br />

call Randi Cohn at 802-770-5275 or visit us online.<br />

240 Gables Pl, Rutland, VT<br />

www.themeadowsvt.com<br />

BINGO<br />

Every Thursday<br />

Doors open 5pm<br />

Games start 7pm<br />

American Legion - Post<br />

87 871 Pleasant Street<br />

West Rutland, Vt 05777<br />

Seeking temporary support staff<br />

at Killington World Cup:<br />

1. 2 physically able men to assist<br />

in building, dismantle and packing<br />

of temporary displays.<br />

2. 1 outgoing person to work in a<br />

sponsor display. $20 per hour.<br />

Contact: Craig@slidemkt.com<br />

FOLLOW US ON<br />

@themountaintimes


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> LOCAL NEWS • 3<br />

Shiffrin takes<br />

second in season<br />

opener<br />

Staff report<br />

Mikaela Shiffrin settled for second in the FIS women’s<br />

alpine season opener in Soelden, Austria, Saturday,<br />

<strong>Oct</strong>. 26. Shiffrin, 24, who grew up skiing at Burke<br />

<strong>Mountain</strong> Academy, was knocked out of first place by<br />

a close .06 seconds to 17-year-old Alice Robinson of<br />

New Zealand in the Giant Slalom. Tessay Worley, <strong>30</strong>, of<br />

France took third with a time of 2.17:72.<br />

“While there was some disappointment in coming<br />

up a little short, I was so happy to lay down the turns<br />

I’ve been working on and kick off the season with a<br />

Shiffrin >19<br />

PLANNING COMMISSION<br />

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE<br />

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO<br />

KILLINGTON ZONING BYLAWS<br />

<strong>The</strong> Killington Planning Commission will<br />

hold a public hearing on the proposed<br />

Town of Killington Zoning Bylaw<br />

Amendments on Wednesday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember<br />

20, <strong>2019</strong> at 7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. at the Town Offices<br />

at 2706 River Road in Killington. This<br />

public notice is given pursuant to 24 V.S.A.<br />

Section <strong>44</strong><strong>44</strong>.<br />

<strong>The</strong> principal purpose of the proposed<br />

zoning bylaw amendments is to require a<br />

permit for short-term rental of a dwelling<br />

unit and to allow accessory dwelling units<br />

within accessory buildings.<br />

<strong>The</strong>se amendments will affect every<br />

geographical area of Killington. <strong>The</strong><br />

section headings affected by the<br />

proposed zoning bylaw amendments are:<br />

Definitions, Section 407 – Short-Term<br />

Rental of Dwelling Unit, Section 417 –<br />

Accessory Dwelling Unit, and Section 640<br />

– Certificate of Occupancy or Use.<br />

<strong>The</strong> full text of the proposed Town of<br />

Killington Zoning Bylaw Amendments may<br />

be found at the Town Clerk’s office and<br />

on the Planning Commission page of the<br />

Town’s website at https://KillingtonTown.<br />

com.<br />

Dated at Killington, Vermont this 24th day<br />

of <strong>Oct</strong>ober <strong>2019</strong>.<br />

Preston Bristow, Town Planner, Town of<br />

Killington, Vermont


4 • LOCAL NEWS<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Veterans to share stories at town hall events<br />

Community invited to attend and listen as Veterans Day approaches<br />

RUTLAND—This Sunday<br />

in Colchester, Rutland, and St.<br />

Johnsbury, veterans are invited<br />

to speak, unscripted, about<br />

what their service means to<br />

them. All community members<br />

are encouraged to attend and<br />

to listen.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Rutland event will be<br />

held Sunday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3, at 1 p.m.<br />

at the Rutland Free Library,<br />

10 Court Street, in downtown<br />

Rutland.<br />

Kyle Aines, who will host the<br />

Rutland Veterans Town Hall,<br />

grew up in the small mountain<br />

town of Tinmouth. He joined<br />

the Army in 2003 and served<br />

two tours in Iraq as a combat<br />

medic. He graduated from Castleton<br />

with a degree in criminal<br />

justice before joining Community<br />

College of Vermont as a<br />

veteran and military resource<br />

advisor, and now is CCV’s<br />

associate director of veterans<br />

and military services. He has<br />

been with CCV since 2014 and<br />

his office is located in Rutland,<br />

although he travels throughout<br />

“Support of our military does not start<br />

with a ‘support the troops’ bumper<br />

sticker and culminate with grilled chicken<br />

on Memorial Day weekend,” said Aines.<br />

the state in his role.<br />

“Support of our military<br />

does not start with a ‘support<br />

the troops’ bumper sticker and<br />

culminate with grilled chicken<br />

on Memorial Day weekend,”<br />

said Aines. “As military members<br />

struggle to reintegrate<br />

back into society, it is imperative<br />

that society have a clear<br />

understanding what they are<br />

transitioning from. <strong>The</strong> Veterans<br />

Town Hall is that bridge<br />

and connection.”<br />

Inspired by author Sebastian<br />

Junger, these gatherings aim to<br />

establish a greater understanding<br />

between local veterans<br />

and the friends and neighbors<br />

they fought for. In the tradition<br />

of warrior storytelling,<br />

veterans are invited to describe<br />

the pride, grief, rage, or quiet<br />

appreciation of life that the<br />

war bestowed upon them —<br />

to share a story, summary of<br />

service, message, letter home,<br />

excerpt from a war journal,<br />

or even the story behind a<br />

photograph. <strong>The</strong> events are<br />

non-political, and all perspectives<br />

are valued.<br />

“We often hear about<br />

veterans, but we very rarely<br />

get to hear from them, to hear<br />

their own voices talking about<br />

their experience,” said Marty<br />

McMahon, the host at the<br />

St. Johnsbury location, and<br />

a member of CCV’s Veterans<br />

Services Team. “We can’t have<br />

a real dialogue with veterans<br />

until we take the time to listen<br />

with no judgment.”<br />

“For many veterans, it may<br />

be difficult to speak of their<br />

experience out of concern for<br />

judgment and misunderstanding,”<br />

added Jon Turner, Chittenden<br />

County event host and<br />

an outings leader for the Sierra<br />

Club Military Outdoors. “<br />

“Having an opportunity<br />

to gather with community<br />

members to be heard assists<br />

with the reintegration process<br />

and makes it possible to find<br />

trust in those whom we did not<br />

serve with,” he said.<br />

<strong>The</strong> event format is drawn<br />

from a June 2015 Vanity Fair<br />

article by Sebastian Junger,<br />

highlighting the challenges of<br />

post-traumatic stress among<br />

veterans. He suggested “making<br />

every town and city hall in<br />

the country available to veterans<br />

who want to speak publicly<br />

about the war” and believed<br />

holding these community<br />

forums would “return the<br />

experience of war to our entire<br />

nation, rather than just leaving<br />

it to the people who fought.”<br />

U.S. Representative Seth<br />

Moulton (D-MA), a Marine<br />

combat veteran, hosted the<br />

first Veterans Town Hall of this<br />

kind in 2015 in Marblehead,<br />

Massachusetts. 2017 marked<br />

the first Vermont event, a Burlington<br />

town hall spearheaded<br />

by local event coordinator<br />

Kristen Eaton. Eaton, who continues<br />

to facilitate the annual<br />

Veterans Town Hall in Chittenden<br />

County, emphasizes<br />

that the events would not be<br />

possible without the dozens of<br />

individuals and organizations<br />

who have offered support and<br />

feedback since 2017.<br />

Among those are Community<br />

College of Vermont (which<br />

has coordinated the Rutland<br />

event since 2018, and added<br />

the St. Johnsbury location<br />

this year) and Saint Michael’s<br />

Veterans are invited to describe the<br />

pride, grief, rage, or quiet appreciation<br />

of life that the war bestowed upon them.<br />

College Military Community<br />

Services and Student Veteran<br />

Association (the venue sponsors<br />

for the Chittenden County<br />

event).<br />

RSVPs are encouraged at<br />

vtvetstownhall.eventbrite.com.<br />

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<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> LOCAL / STATE NEWS • 5<br />

WCUUSD amends policy for potential school closure<br />

By Curt Peterson<br />

<strong>The</strong> Windsor Central Unified Union School District<br />

Board unanimously added two new articles for approval<br />

by district voters at Town Meeting 2020 at a<br />

meeting <strong>Oct</strong>. 28.<br />

<strong>The</strong> articles developed during negotiations between<br />

the district and the Barnard School Board pursuant<br />

to a possible merger of Barnard Academy into<br />

the WCUUSD. Barnard had been resisting the merger,<br />

mandated under Act 46 school consolidation, since<br />

2017. School closure and grade configuration policies<br />

were part of Barnard voters’ concerns.<br />

Barnard representative Pamela Fraser has pointed<br />

out during discussions that the board policies on closure<br />

and re-configuration are important to all district<br />

towns and not just Barnard.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Vermont Cheese Council (VCC), an organization<br />

dedicated to the production and advancement of<br />

quality Vermont cheese announced that seven Vermont<br />

cheesemakers took home 19 medals at the World Cheese<br />

Awards held in Bergamo, Italy, and hosted by Annual<br />

Guild of Fine Foods with partners FORME, the Italian &<br />

International Cheese Festival and B2Cheese trade show.<br />

Vermont cheese companies winning awards included<br />

Cellars at Jasper Hill Farm in Greensboro; Parish Hill<br />

Creamery in Westminster West ; Cabot Creamery Cooperative<br />

in Cabot; Spring Brook Farm in Reading ; von<br />

Trapp Farmstead in Waitsfield and collaborations with<br />

Grafton Village Cheese Company with Crown Finish<br />

Caves; and Vermont Creamery with Wegman’s Markets.<br />

Rogue Creamery in Central Point, Oregon won best<br />

of show for its Organic Rogue River Blue. This is the first<br />

time that an American-produced cheese has earned<br />

this top award. Additionally, seven American cheese<br />

companies won Super Gold Trophies, placing them in<br />

the running for Best of Show Cheese.<br />

“It’s wonderful to see Vermont cheesemakers getting<br />

the respect they deserve on the world cheese stage,” said<br />

Vermont Cheese Council Executive Director Tom Bivins.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> importance of the dairy and cheese industry to<br />

Vermont agriculture is significant socially and culturally,<br />

as well as enhancing our sense of place and supporting<br />

agriculture economies in their communities.<br />

Cheese is an<br />

economic engine<br />

for the state<br />

and represents<br />

a great<br />

opportunity<br />

for entrepreneurs.<br />

<strong>The</strong>se<br />

cheesemakers<br />

are<br />

ambassadors<br />

for Vermont.<br />

We are very<br />

proud of their<br />

success.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> Guild of<br />

Fine Food in the UK<br />

is one of the most prestigious<br />

of the world food guilds and manages the World<br />

Cheese Awards, along with Great Taste, a specialty food<br />

awards and Shop of the Year 2020. Over 260 judges from<br />

around the world were on hand to judge 3,804 cheeses<br />

from 42 countries for this competition. Judging took<br />

place in a single day. American cheeses won 126 medals<br />

Labeled “Articles 13 and 15,” the new documents<br />

include procedures intended to protect both the<br />

goals of the overall district and the rights of individual<br />

member towns.<br />

Under Article 13, consideration of school closure<br />

is driven by per student costs relative to the district<br />

average per-student cost.<br />

If one of the district’s campuses exceeds a cost per<br />

student of 120% of district average and the superintendent<br />

recommends closing that school, and the<br />

district board votes at least 75% in favor of closure,<br />

the affected town will get to vote on the issue. Closure<br />

would require 60% approval by local voters.<br />

For a campus that exceeds 1<strong>30</strong>% of the district per<br />

student cost for three years, and 75%of the district<br />

Vermont cheesemakers take<br />

home 19 medals in Italy<br />

in numerous categories across all milk types.<br />

Winning Cheeses from Vermont:<br />

· Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Cabot Alpine Cheddar,<br />

Bronze<br />

· Cellars at Jasper Hill Farm, Greensboro: Bayley Hazen<br />

Blue, Gold; Moses Sleeper, Gold; Cabot Clothbound<br />

Cheddar, Silver; Vault 5 Cave Aged, Silver; Oma, Silver;<br />

Willoughby, Silver; Hartwell, Silver; cave-aged Cheddar,<br />

Bronze; Harbison, Bronze<br />

· Crown Finish Caves, Brooklyn, New York with<br />

Grafton Village Cheese Company, Grafton: Bismark,<br />

Bronze; Barnburner, Bronze<br />

· Parish Hill Creamery, Westminster: Humble,<br />

Bronze; Idyll, Bronze<br />

· Spring Brook Farm/Farms for City Kids Foundation,<br />

Reading: Tarentaise, Bronze; Ashbrook, Bronze;<br />

· von Trapp Farmstead, Waitsfield: Mad River Blue,<br />

Bronze; Mt Alice, Bronze<br />

· Wegman’s Markets, Rochester, NY with Vermont<br />

Creamery, Websterville: 1916, Silver<br />

<strong>The</strong> state celebrated for its focus on family agriculture,<br />

small farms, and Vermont-made products, including<br />

cheese, boasts more state-inspected cheese companies<br />

per capita than any other state in the nation-close to one<br />

cheesemaker for 13,000 people. <strong>The</strong>re are currently 54<br />

members of the Vermont Cheese Council making over<br />

225 varieties of cheese. Cheesemakers range in size from<br />

producers for local farmers markets to producers<br />

selling in regional, national, and<br />

international markets. Cheesemaking<br />

represents over $1 billion in revenue<br />

for Vermont companies.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Vermont<br />

Cheese Council is a<br />

statewide membership-based<br />

organization<br />

with 54 principal<br />

cheese- producing<br />

members and over 20<br />

associate members.<br />

<strong>The</strong> VCC is committed<br />

to promoting the<br />

advancement and<br />

quality of Vermont cheese<br />

through promotion, education,<br />

and active peer to peer support.<br />

<strong>The</strong> organization has been in existence since 1996.<br />

For more information, please contact: Tom Bivins,<br />

executive director at tom@vtcheese.com, call 802-451-<br />

8564 or visit the Vermont Cheese Council website at<br />

vtcheese.com.<br />

board votes for closure, a district-wide Australian ballot<br />

vote of 60% in favor would be required in order to<br />

close the school.<br />

Grade re-configuration —moving grades from<br />

campus to campus or rearranging multiple grades in<br />

one classroom – will be based on “sustainability” or<br />

“educational aims or initiatives,” Article 15 says, and<br />

will be affected only with 60% board vote approval.<br />

<strong>The</strong> article requires specific means of community<br />

consultation. “In considering any plan that involves<br />

grade re-configuration at a campus or campuses,<br />

public input will be sought and considered,” the article<br />

states. “<strong>The</strong>re will be not less than two Informational<br />

Meetings, including one in each town where an<br />

affected school is located.”<br />

School closure > 19<br />

Table of contents<br />

Local News................................................................. 2<br />

State News.................................................................. 5<br />

Opinion...................................................................... 8<br />

News Briefs.............................................................. 10<br />

Calendar................................................................... 14<br />

Music Scene............................................................. 18<br />

Living ADE............................................................... 20<br />

Food Matters............................................................ 26<br />

Pets........................................................................... <strong>30</strong><br />

Mother of the Skye................................................... 31<br />

Columns................................................................... 32<br />

Classifieds................................................................ 34<br />

Service Directory..................................................... 36<br />

Real Estate................................................................ 38<br />

Mou nta i n Ti m e s<br />

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6 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

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<strong>2019</strong>-10-03 3:40 PM


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> STATE NEWS • 7<br />

Holcombe sets sights on governor’s office<br />

By John Flowers/Addison County Independent<br />

Just two years ago, Rebecca Holcombe<br />

was working for Gov. Phil Scott<br />

as Vermont’s Secretary of Education.<br />

She’s now campaigning to succeed<br />

him as the state’s chief executive, and<br />

is doing so on a platform of decreasing<br />

health care costs and creating an action<br />

plan for climate change.<br />

Holcombe, a 52-year-old Norwich<br />

Democrat, announced her bid for governor<br />

this past summer. She stopped by<br />

the Addison Independent to share her<br />

vision for the state at this early stage of<br />

her campaign.<br />

She said the experience of traveling<br />

around the state and chatting with voters<br />

has been “fascinating.” Two issues in<br />

particular have risen to the top: Climate<br />

change and the rising costs of health<br />

insurance.<br />

“Health care represents about 20 percent<br />

of our state product right now,” she<br />

said. “<strong>The</strong>re’s no way you can negotiate<br />

yourself out of a double-digit increase<br />

in health care costs each year. I’ve<br />

spoken with business owners who aren’t<br />

able to give their employees the plans<br />

they used to have and are struggling to deal with the costs as they go up.<br />

“People are really concerned, and they want somebody who will have Vermonters’<br />

back on health care and work to bring those costs down,” she added.<br />

Holcombe said she was stunned the Legislature didn’t pursue additional health<br />

care reforms this past session. She pointed out that health care costs are contributing<br />

to the education funding conundrum.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> education fund is increasingly underwriting mental health services<br />

through designated agencies,” Holcombe said. “So there’s been a cost-shift into<br />

the education fund. <strong>The</strong> problem is the state’s mental health system is under-supported.<br />

So we can treat kids at schools, but if we send them back into families that<br />

are still struggling and have no support, we haven’t solved the problem. Because<br />

the family needs to be healthy so the family can support the kid, or (the treatment)<br />

is just going to get undone. So we need to figure out, as a state, how we’re going to<br />

address the significant mental health issues… If we have healthier families, we are<br />

going to have fewer children coming into schools with significant trauma.”<br />

And Vermont, according to Holcombe, already spends “substantially more” per<br />

capita on social services than other states.<br />

“We should be transparent and say that some of what we call ‘education’ — and<br />

pay with our property taxes, which is a more regressive way of paying for services<br />

— is actually social services that are paid out of social service budgets in other<br />

states.”<br />

Along with rising costs, the health care industry has a shortage of registered<br />

nurses, Holcombe noted. She said she’d support a program through which the<br />

state would reimburse nursing students in return for a pledge to work a set number<br />

of years in Vermont. Such an arrangement, Holcombe believes, would also<br />

reduce labor expenses at Vermont hospitals that are now<br />

having to fill roster spots with traveling nurses who command<br />

premium pay.<br />

“We need more Vermont nurses,” Holcombe said.<br />

“Instead of paying people to move here, why don’t we pay<br />

people to get an RN, with the agreement that they work in a<br />

Vermont hospital afterwards?”<br />

Holcombe is pleased to hear during her travels that<br />

Vermonters are thinking long-term — particularly when<br />

it comes to climate change. She said the state should take steps to replace fossil<br />

fuel consumption with locally produced renewable energy, and turn the global<br />

warming problem into an economic opportunity: Creating more jobs in the green<br />

energy sector.<br />

“People are really worried about climate and trying to figure out the relationship<br />

between climate and some kind of sustainable economic development solution<br />

that preserves a future for Vermont as we know it,” Holcombe said. “<strong>The</strong>re’s a<br />

real concern we aren’t being proactive to plan for what people already believe is a<br />

climate-altered future.”<br />

Climate change is having an increasing impact on several Vermont industries,<br />

according to Holcombe.<br />

“If you’re a farmer, you’re seeing it in a change in your season. If you’re a ski<br />

By Steve James<br />

Former Vermont Education Secretary Rebecca Holcombe has her sights set on the governor’s<br />

office. <strong>The</strong> Norwich Democrat took her campaign to Addison County.<br />

Climate change is having<br />

an increasing impact on<br />

several Vermont industries,<br />

according to Holcombe.<br />

resort owner, you’re obviously worried<br />

about it,” she said. “People know<br />

it’s here and they want to know what<br />

our plan is, and they don’t think we<br />

have one. So they’re asking for some<br />

accountability on that.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> ultimate plan, she said,<br />

should include “figuring out how to<br />

invest in Vermont instead of relying<br />

on out-of-state fossil fuels,” and<br />

“figuring out how to increase our dependence<br />

on some of the electricity<br />

we’re generating locally — building<br />

that local resilience.”<br />

Because of her past experience<br />

as education secretary, Holcombe’s<br />

campaign pronouncements on<br />

public schools will come under particular<br />

scrutiny. And there will be no<br />

shortage of education-related topics<br />

that candidates will be asked to field.<br />

Perhaps the biggest will be school<br />

consolidation, a step that Addison<br />

Northwest School District voters will<br />

consider on <strong>Nov</strong>. 7 and that Addison<br />

Central School District residents are<br />

likely to face within a year or two.<br />

<strong>The</strong> debate surrounding school closings comes around four years after the<br />

passage of Act 46, a new state law that provided communities with incentives to<br />

consolidate education governance as a means of achieving more operational and<br />

financial efficiencies. But with declining enrollment and surging costs, several<br />

Vermont school districts are seriously considering shuttering some of their<br />

schools and transferring those students to other schools with the capacity to take<br />

them.<br />

Some residents in the ANWSU communities of Addison and Ferrisburgh have<br />

organized to oppose the proposed closing of their schools. A group of Ripton residents<br />

has started to rally behind that community’s school.<br />

Supporters to closing small community schools point to diminishing studentteacher<br />

ratios and the prospect of huge education tax increases to keep the buildings<br />

open. Opponents are saying that closing the local school would rob young<br />

families of a quality, local education for their children, as well as eradicate an<br />

important community focus.<br />

Holcombe is encouraging communities to have spirited conversations about<br />

the value of their local schools — in terms of both education quality and affordability.<br />

She said she can see both sides of the argument.<br />

“At the Agency of Education, we used to say, ‘You can’t have a 28-course buffet<br />

and pay $3 for it.’ So I think there’s this tension between how much breadth and<br />

depth we want, and what we can actually afford.”<br />

While in Addison County on Monday, Holcombe attended a school consolidation<br />

informational meeting in Vergennes. She listened intently to the discussion.<br />

“A senior citizen stuck her hand in her pocket and put her change on the table<br />

and said, ‘This is all I’ve got; I can’t pay more,’” Holcombe<br />

recalled. “<strong>The</strong>re’s this tension of how to meet her need to<br />

stay in her home, and also make sure we’re providing high<br />

quality opportunities to learn for all kids.”<br />

Communities, Holcombe believes, would be best served<br />

framing their long-range planning around the premise of,<br />

“How do we strengthen our community so that we save our<br />

schools?” rather than “Let’s try to use the school to save the<br />

community.”<br />

And that broader conversation, according to Holcombe, should include planning<br />

for more local affordable housing, broadband infrastructure and wastewater<br />

treatment systems. <strong>The</strong>se are the kinds of amenities that will encourage settlement<br />

of both new residents and businesses that will fuel local economies, she<br />

reasoned.<br />

“You have to look at your own particulars to make the right decision,” she said.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> genius and the curse of our education system is that we provide tremendous<br />

financial support to communities. And if we didn’t, frankly all these schools would<br />

be closed already. But we do support them, because there is something in us that<br />

believes we need these communities to have our schools. But at the same time…<br />

we also have this very fragmented governance system that puts a tremendous<br />

amount of responsibility for communities to have these conversations and make<br />

Holcombe > 18


Opinion<br />

8 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

OP-ED<br />

Dragging the<br />

GOP to ruin<br />

By Angelo Lynn<br />

Trump’s decision to withdraw American troops in<br />

northern Syria — which allowed Turkey to execute a<br />

planned invasion across the Turkey-Syria border into<br />

an area protected in part by Kurdish rebels, who have<br />

fought with American forces to contain ISIS — has led to<br />

another crisis of confidence in America’s foreign policy.<br />

Foreign leaders can no longer trust America’s word or<br />

its political or military support, a fact that undermines<br />

beneficial alliances America has had since before WWII.<br />

Meanwhile, Trump has once again supported a dictator<br />

in Turkey, aided Syria’s ruthless leadership, handed<br />

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin free-rein in a huge<br />

swath of the Middle East and given the Kurds a reason to<br />

run to Russia for aid and protection.<br />

It is another colossal foreign policy blunder. One of<br />

many in the past two years. This time, however, even<br />

Trump’s own party is pushing back against his ignorance<br />

and witless whim.<br />

In a House resolution that passed Wednesday, 354-60,<br />

129 Republicans broke ranks to condemn Trump’s troop<br />

withdrawal and, worse, the abandonment of the Kurds.<br />

“Alliances and values are important,” said Rep. John<br />

GOP > 9<br />

<strong>The</strong> day Sen.<br />

Aiken planted his<br />

anti-Vietnam War<br />

acorn<br />

LETTERS<br />

Let’s allow our children to<br />

express themselves<br />

Dear Editor,<br />

I was taken quite by ran around the countryside<br />

surprise while watching the in just her shorts without a<br />

By Stephen C. Terry<br />

NBC news at 6:<strong>30</strong> p.m. on top, just as the boys did and<br />

What happens when you speak truth to power? Often, <strong>Oct</strong>. 3. <strong>The</strong>re was a human they took baths together<br />

no immediate impact. But the words themselves can be like interest story about a boy and loved running nude in<br />

planting an acorn that grows into an impressive oak tree. It and his doll that perked me the rain. People wondered<br />

usually takes about 50 years for a small acorn to grow into a right up and my very first how they would ever learn<br />

big oak tree, a well-known fact for the farmer-horticulturalist<br />

thought was, “My gosh, they to not bathe together, wear<br />

from Putney, George D. Aiken.<br />

have finally caught up with a top, or whatever else I<br />

This analogy helps to describe the lasting impact of me — 59 years later. Sure was letting them do out of<br />

a speech delivered on the Senate Floor on <strong>Oct</strong>. 19, 1966, took long enough.” And my the ordinary. Not to worry<br />

some 53 years ago, by Vermont’s senior Republican Senator next thought as they moved it would all come together<br />

Aiken.<br />

into an ad before the story and they would indeed<br />

On that fall day Sen. Aiken delivered a 10-minute speech was, “I wonder what they learn to respect each others’<br />

that has since been called one of the most important will say?”<br />

privacy, and the little girl<br />

speeches on the subject of the Vietnam War.<br />

I had my four children, would put on a shirt in due<br />

In his remarks on the Senate floor, Aiken said the time three boys and a girl during time.<br />

had come for the United States to declare a “victory” in the 1960s raising them<br />

<strong>The</strong>n there were the<br />

Vietnam, in that no other military force could defeat the through the 1970s into toys: A much more limited<br />

United States. Given the reality of the military situation on adulthood in the 1980s. I supply in the ‘60s and ‘70s.<br />

the ground, Aiken said that the U. S. military forces in South was called, not by choice, Plastic had not yet hit big<br />

Vietnam, by then close to 200,000 troops, could begin a one of those back to nature time and toys weren’t a<br />

gradual and phased down military withdrawal from the flower people. I was just dime a dozen. Toys came<br />

region.<br />

being me, doing what I felt I now and then mainly on<br />

Senator Aiken’s 1966 speech came as advice to President<br />

could do best being a mom special occasions and I was<br />

Lyndon B. Johnson as the Commander-in-Chief was and a teacher. I actually big on toys that left tons of<br />

leaving for Manilla to meet with U. S. allies to plan war went to college to be both room for the imagination.<br />

strategy. <strong>The</strong> president summarily rejected Aiken’s advice. of these.<br />

And most were wooden or<br />

When President Johnson returned to the United States he From the very beginning metal. I was adamant that<br />

approved a rapid escalation of U. S. troops to the war zone I fought against the stereotype.<br />

I would not buy toy guns<br />

in Vietnam. <strong>The</strong> immediate impacts of Aiken’s speech were<br />

I refused to put my or any other violent toys. If<br />

front page news stories in the morning newspapers of <strong>Oct</strong>. boys in blue and my girl in they wanted a gun they had<br />

20, 1966, including a front-page placement in the New York pink. My choice of color was to make their own or use<br />

<strong>Times</strong>.<br />

yellow. I refused to make the their thumb and pointer<br />

A consistent theme of the news stories was that Aiken boys’ bedrooms obviously finger to make that “bang,<br />

was proposing that the U. S. “declare victory and withdraw for boys or my girl’s obviously<br />

bang.”<br />

from Vietnam.” Historical records indicate that Aiken never<br />

for a girl. My little girl Of course there were<br />

Sen. Aiken > 9 Children > 18<br />

Dear Editor,<br />

<strong>The</strong> recent revelations<br />

by the Civil Rights Office<br />

at U.S. Health and Human<br />

Services, in which a nurse<br />

was reportedly compelled<br />

under pain of a loss of employment<br />

and potential loss<br />

of a nursing license to assist<br />

in an elective abortion procedure<br />

in violation of her<br />

conscience, are nothing shy<br />

of unconscionable. Now,<br />

four other nurses are making<br />

similar allegations.<br />

It seems that the medical<br />

center has failed to grasp<br />

the meaning of a pervasive<br />

corporate commitment to<br />

ethical and lawful behavior,<br />

despite prior events<br />

of clear-cut violation of<br />

Federal law (i.e. the Renaissance<br />

travesty).<br />

It also appears in that<br />

the medical center’s zeal<br />

to embrace the broad<br />

By Pat Bagley, <strong>The</strong> Salt Lake Tribune, UT<br />

Forced abortion procedure<br />

‘unconscionable’<br />

practice of abortion, it may<br />

have made the decision to<br />

trample on the legal and<br />

ethical rights of its most<br />

valuable resource – its human<br />

resources.<br />

Finally, it made an asinine<br />

financial calculation:<br />

Is its desire to practice abortion<br />

is worth jeopardizing<br />

the financial stability of the<br />

institution? Could UVMMC<br />

leadership not have<br />

achieved its goal without<br />

bringing down the wrath of<br />

the Federal government?<br />

Shame on the entirety<br />

of the board for its failure<br />

to learn from the Renaissance<br />

Project and its failure<br />

to live up to one of its most<br />

fundamental obligations,<br />

the protection of the assets<br />

of the institution.<br />

Pete Gummere,<br />

St. Johnsbury<br />

WRITE TO US.<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> encourages readers to<br />

contribute to our community paper by writing<br />

letters to the editor. <strong>The</strong> opinions expressed<br />

here are not endorsed nor are the facts<br />

verified by the <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong>. We ask submissions<br />

to be <strong>30</strong>0 words or less.<br />

Email letters to<br />

editor@mountaintimes.info<br />

Mounta in <strong>Times</strong>


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> CAPITOL QUOTES • 9<br />

CAPITOL QUOTES<br />

On the killing of Islamic State leader Abu<br />

Bakr al-Baghdadi…<br />

“Abu Bakr al Baghdadi was a murderer<br />

and a terrorist responsible for terrible<br />

suffering and death. <strong>The</strong> fight against<br />

ISIS would not be possible without the<br />

brave efforts of the Kurds and other<br />

U.S. allies,”<br />

Said Sen. Bernie Sanders on <strong>Oct</strong>. 27.<br />

“He died like a dog. He died like a<br />

coward,”<br />

Said President Donald Trump.<br />

“Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi led a campaign of<br />

mass violence and terror that devastated<br />

the region and threatened the world. His<br />

death is a setback for ISIS and a victory<br />

for justice. I am grateful for the skill and<br />

courage of our special operations and<br />

intelligence professionals. Baghdadi’s<br />

death closes one chapter, but it is not<br />

the end of our fight against terrorism.<br />

We need a settlement that ends the<br />

suffering and destruction in Syria—and<br />

ultimately, a long-term plan to counter<br />

extremism and allow the region to<br />

achieve peace and stability,”<br />

Said Sen. Elizabeth Warren on <strong>Oct</strong>. 27.<br />

“Thank you to our special forces,<br />

intelligence professionals and Kurdish<br />

allies who brought ISIS leader al-<br />

Baghdadi to justice. Your courage and<br />

skill keeps our nation safe and secure,”<br />

Said Rep. Peter Welch on <strong>Oct</strong>. 27.<br />

><br />

GOP: Trump’s syrian decision may be GOP’s undoing<br />

from page 8<br />

Shimkus (R-Ill.) speaking on the House<br />

floor, according to the Washington Post.<br />

“Walking away from friends is a sad<br />

indication of policy that we don’t want to<br />

support, we don’t want to condone. Yes,<br />

we want America to be great, but we’re<br />

also great because of our friends and our<br />

allies. Coalitions are not bad. Coalitions<br />

strengthen our public policy around the<br />

world.”<br />

Finally, we see Republicans willing to<br />

buck Trump’s misguided foreign policy,<br />

which has translated to trashing previous<br />

alliances and supporting Trump’s dictatorial<br />

friends with haphazard recklessness.<br />

Meanwhile,<br />

Trump has been<br />

his usual, nasty<br />

and petty self.<br />

In a meeting<br />

to discuss the<br />

crisis that has<br />

unfolded along the Syrian-Turkish border,<br />

he flippantly dismissed the notion he has<br />

put the Kurd fighters and Syrian civilians<br />

in danger or strengthened the hand of<br />

Russia, Iran, Syria and ISIS. He reverted<br />

to his school-boy tactics of name-calling,<br />

tagging his former Defense Secretary Jim<br />

Mattis as the “world’s most overrated general,”<br />

according to the Post’s report, and<br />

falsely boasted (in his continual delusion<br />

of self-grandeur) that he had “captured”<br />

the Islamic State, adding “I captured them<br />

in one month.”<br />

Even the most clueless of Trump supporters<br />

must be stunned by such shameless<br />

self-infatuation.<br />

Meanwhile, Republicans in the Senate<br />

are barely raising an eyebrow.<br />

><br />

129 Republicans broke<br />

ranks to condemn Trump’s<br />

troop withdrawal .<br />

Sen. Aiken: Remembering his advice<br />

from page 8<br />

actually used those exact words. That said,<br />

never once in the many years after his<br />

famous speech did he claim that the reporting<br />

of it was not accurate.<br />

In fact, as time went on and<br />

before his Senate retirement<br />

in 1975, Aiken himself<br />

would describe his advice<br />

to President Johnson as to<br />

say we won and get out.<br />

Aiken’s 1966 speech on Vietnam was<br />

praised on the Senate Floor by Majority<br />

Leader Sen. Mike Mansfield of Montana<br />

and proved to be a crucial element in building<br />

bipartisan anti-Vietnam war sentiment<br />

in the Senate. Aiken was declared the “wise<br />

owl” in the Vietnam debate, a debate that<br />

was divided between the “hawks” and the<br />

“doves.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> Vermonter’s public opposition to the<br />

Vietnam War was a distillation of his private<br />

views that he had held for many years during<br />

his time on the Senate Foreign Relations<br />

Committee, starting in 1954.<br />

During Aiken’s remaining time in the<br />

U.S. Senate, until in retirement on Jan. 2,<br />

1975, the Vermonter continued his opposition<br />

to any expansion of the Vietnam War,<br />

whether it be by President Johnson or President<br />

Richard M. Nixon. Aiken supported<br />

Nixon’s plan of gradual withdrawal of U.S.<br />

troops from South Vietnam, but opposed<br />

<strong>The</strong> president...<br />

rejected<br />

Aiken’s advice<br />

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell<br />

raised a meek regret that America<br />

had abandoned the Kurds, but was too<br />

cowardly to confront the president’s idiocy.<br />

Why are most Senate Republicans<br />

so sheepish? Because Trump’s political<br />

strategy for keeping his party in line, as<br />

reported by CNN last week, has been to<br />

strong-arm Republican senators. According<br />

to the Post’s story, Trump has been<br />

“calling McConnell regularly and threatening<br />

to attack senators who publicly<br />

break with him.”<br />

Pure and simple, it’s shades of McCarthyism<br />

with very much the same insidious<br />

effect on the<br />

party and nation.<br />

Sen. Mitt Romney,<br />

one of the few<br />

Republican Senators<br />

willing to speak<br />

his mind, said of<br />

the Trump’s abandonment of the Kurds:<br />

“<strong>The</strong>y are our friends, they have been our<br />

ally (fighting the Islamic State), and abandoning<br />

them was a very dark moment in<br />

American history.”<br />

In reality, it’s just another dreary day in<br />

Trump’s self-absorbed world.<br />

When, oh when, will Trump supporters<br />

get the message? <strong>The</strong>y support a liar, a<br />

cheat, a clueless braggart with a vision of<br />

being king, not president of a nation representing<br />

the free world. If they continue<br />

to support him, it should be obvious by<br />

now he’ll drag the party to ruin, deservedly<br />

so.<br />

Angelo Lynn is the editor and publisher<br />

of the Addison County Independent, a<br />

sister publication to the <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong>.<br />

Nixon’s frequent practice of intensifying<br />

bombing strikes over North Vietnam.<br />

By January 1973 a cease-fire between<br />

United States and North<br />

and South Vietnam forces<br />

was announced with a<br />

withdrawal of U. S. troops<br />

within 60 days.<br />

U. S. involvement in<br />

the Vietnam War did not officially end<br />

until April <strong>30</strong>, 1975, when North Vietnam<br />

took control of South Vietnam. By then,<br />

Aiken had retired from the Senate and had<br />

returned to Vermont. Nixon had resigned<br />

the presidency in disgrace in August 1974,<br />

faced with certain impeachment and removal<br />

from office. President Johnson died<br />

Jan. 22, 1973, five days before the Vietnam<br />

War cease-fire was signed.<br />

Before his death, and after Johnson had<br />

left the presidency, Leonard Marx asked<br />

Johnson why he was so angry at Senator<br />

Aiken in 1966 when the Vermonter urged<br />

Johnson to declare victory and withdraw.<br />

Johnson responded, “because he was right.”<br />

Senator Aiken died on <strong>Nov</strong>. 19, 1984. His<br />

many obituaries made frequent references<br />

to his famous <strong>Oct</strong>. 19, 1966 speech on<br />

Vietnam.<br />

Stephen C. Terry lives in Middlebury. He<br />

served as legislative assistant to Senator<br />

Aiken from 1969 to 1975.


10 • NEWS BRIEFS<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Rutland-Wallingford Catholic Church<br />

receives <strong>2019</strong> community action award<br />

BROC Community Action presented<br />

its <strong>2019</strong> Community Action Award to the<br />

Rutland-Wallingford Catholic Community<br />

in recognition for outstanding efforts<br />

to improve the lives of area people in need<br />

and the most vulnerable living in poverty.<br />

Bernard Bourgeois, pastor, accepted<br />

the award on behalf of the parishes of<br />

Christ the King and Immaculate Heart<br />

of Mary in Rutland and St. Patrick’s in<br />

Wallingford.<br />

He said it was an honor to receive the<br />

award in the name of these three parishes.<br />

“We have made a concerted effort to<br />

be more involved in community efforts to<br />

alleviate some of the poverty of our area,”<br />

he added.<br />

<strong>The</strong> award was presented <strong>Oct</strong>. 17 at<br />

BROC’s annual meeting in Rutland.<br />

“We chose to recognize these parishes<br />

because of their outstanding efforts to<br />

address community need by helping our<br />

most vulnerable living in poverty,” said<br />

Thomas Donahue, CEO of BROC Community<br />

Action.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Rutland-Wallingford Catholic Community<br />

made significant efforts to feed the hungry by raising<br />

thousands of pounds of food during the annual Stuff-<br />

A-Bus initiative, and the parishes lead the first-ever<br />

Pampers to pre-school diaper drive that benefitted local<br />

low-income families in need at BROC Community<br />

Action and the Rutland Community Cupboard. <strong>The</strong><br />

parishes provided more than $3,000 worth of baby<br />

necessities.<br />

Pastor Bernard Bourgeois displays BROC plaque.<br />

Submitted<br />

In addition, this year Christ the King Church joined<br />

BROC’s Sponsor-A-Shelf Campaign that raised more<br />

than 1,000 items for the BROC Community Food<br />

Shelf.<br />

“Jesus is clear that we are to give bread to the hungry.<br />

It is part of our mission as a church and as a parish,”<br />

Bourgeois said. “As BROC and the Community<br />

Cupboard are two of the key agencies in town leading<br />

this effort, we have partnered with them.”<br />

Submitted<br />

Coat donation drive<br />

underway for 14th year<br />

Every year, with the help of our friends and community<br />

members, William Raveis Vermont Properties in<br />

Ludlow has been able to collect more than 100 winter<br />

clothing items to donate to Black River Good Neighbors<br />

Services. This will be the company’s 14th year collecting<br />

gear.<br />

From now until Dec. 1, William Raveis will be collecting<br />

gently used, clean outerwear.<br />

Since beginning the yearly efforts, William Raveis<br />

has collected over 1,750 coats and other outerwear. All<br />

donations help keep local families warm, in one way or<br />

another. <strong>The</strong> outerwear will either be given to someone<br />

in need or sold at the Black River Good Neighbors store<br />

where the proceeds will fund programs that provide<br />

heat, utilities or food to local families.<br />

Drop your gently used, clean coats and outerwear off<br />

at William Raveis Vermont Properties at 29 Locust Hill<br />

Road in Ludlow Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m.- 5<br />

p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Call 802-228-8877 for<br />

more information.


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> NEWS BRIEFS • 11<br />

Come to a FREE MVP Medicare Seminar near you. Compare MVP Medicare plans, find the one that makes the<br />

most sense for your needs, and learn how you can earn a $100 gift card for health and wellness activities.<br />

To reserve your spot, call 1-833-368-4622 (TTY: 1-800-662-1220)<br />

Monday–Friday, 8 am–6 pm Eastern Time.<br />

<strong>Oct</strong>ober 1–March 31, Saturdays, 8 am–12 pm.<br />

Or visit MovetoMVP.com/VT<br />

For accommodation of persons with special needs at meetings, call 1-833-368-4622.<br />

<strong>The</strong> annual election period for MVP Health Care Medicare Advantage health plans is <strong>Oct</strong>. 15–Dec. 7, <strong>2019</strong>. MVP Health Plan, Inc. is an<br />

HMO-POS/PPO/MSA organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in MVP Health Plan depends on contract renewal.<br />

Y0051_<strong>44</strong>76_M<br />

You’ll be amazed at what MVP packs into a<br />

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Addison County<br />

Ilsley Public Library Community Meeting Room<br />

75 Main Street, Middlebury<br />

Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 2, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 15, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Bennington County<br />

Hampton Inn<br />

51 Hannaford Square, Bennington<br />

Thursday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 7, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Manchester Community Library<br />

138 Cemetery Avenue, Manchester Center<br />

Wednesday, <strong>Oct</strong>ober <strong>30</strong>, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Tuesday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 19, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Rutland County<br />

Holiday Inn Rutland/Killington<br />

476 Holiday Drive, Rutland<br />

Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 8, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Tuesday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 12, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Thursday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 21, <strong>2019</strong><br />

1 pm<br />

10 am<br />

2 pm<br />

2 pm<br />

2 pm<br />

11 am<br />

10 am<br />

11 am<br />

Windham County<br />

Holiday Inn Express & Suites <strong>The</strong> Windham Room<br />

100 Chickering Drive, Brattleboro<br />

Wednesday, <strong>Oct</strong>ober <strong>30</strong>, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Thursday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 7, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Tuesday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 19, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Windsor County<br />

Hartford Town Hall<br />

171 Bridge Street, Room 2, White River Junction<br />

Thursday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 21, <strong>2019</strong><br />

<strong>The</strong> Nolin-Murray Center at St. Mary’s Church<br />

Cafe on the Lower Level<br />

38 Pleasant Street, Springfield<br />

Monday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 11, <strong>2019</strong><br />

10 am<br />

10 am<br />

10 am<br />

10:<strong>30</strong> am<br />

11 am


12 • NEWS BRIEFS<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Achieving OUR Best for YOU<br />

Healthgrades evaluates<br />

hospital quality for<br />

conditions and procedures<br />

based solely on clinical<br />

outcomes. Hospital<br />

performance is measured<br />

for the most common<br />

in-hospital procedures and<br />

conditions and adjust for<br />

each patient’s risk factors,<br />

such as age, gender<br />

and medical condition.<br />

Healthgrades analysis is<br />

based on more than 45<br />

million Medicare medical<br />

claims records for the most<br />

recent three-year time<br />

period available from nearly<br />

4,500 hospitals nationwide.


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> NEWS BRIEFS • 13<br />

Woodstock library reaches<br />

$500K fundraising goal<br />

Three months and 19<br />

days after the Norman<br />

Williams Public Library<br />

(NWPL) officially called<br />

on the greater Woodstock<br />

community for help in<br />

funding an urgent heating<br />

and cooling system<br />

replacement, the library’s<br />

Board of Trustees announced<br />

that it has raised<br />

the $500,000 needed to do<br />

the job.<br />

“When we heard how<br />

expensive it would be to<br />

replace the heating and<br />

AC system in our historic<br />

building, we collectively<br />

gulped at what we thought<br />

would be a huge fundraising<br />

challenge. But the incredible<br />

generosity of this<br />

community enabled us<br />

to succeed in what must<br />

be record time,” said Ron<br />

Miller, president of the<br />

NWPL Board of Trustees.<br />

“On behalf of all of us at<br />

the NWPL, I want to thank<br />

everyone who contributed<br />

to the project, and I invite<br />

all of you to come in and<br />

enjoy the comfortable<br />

temperatures for many<br />

years after the work is<br />

done.”<br />

As newly designed, the<br />

NWPL’s state-of-the-art<br />

system will be significantly<br />

more energy-efficient<br />

and will reduce the<br />

library’s use of fossil fuels.<br />

According to campaign<br />

leaders Development<br />

Committee Chair and<br />

Trustee Laurie Chester<br />

and NWPL Director of<br />

Development Michael<br />

Ricci, surging community<br />

support followed two<br />

very generous matching<br />

donors who helped<br />

kickstart the campaign.<br />

Further, about one third of<br />

all campaign contributors<br />

<strong>The</strong> Rutland County Humane<br />

Society is launching a<br />

new dinner card.<br />

With it, cardholders can<br />

visit a variety of participating<br />

Rutland County restaurants<br />

and purchase an entrée. <strong>The</strong>ir<br />

guest will receive an entree of<br />

the same or lesser value free. It’s<br />

a win for the restaurant, a win for<br />

the cardholder and a win for the<br />

animals at the Rutland County<br />

Humane Society who need care<br />

while they wait to find their forever<br />

homes. If your restaurant<br />

would like to participate in the<br />

RCHS dinner card, visit the RCHS<br />

website at rchsvt.org to learn<br />

more. <strong>The</strong> RCHS dinner card will be<br />

available as gifts for the holidays.<br />

If you have any questions or would<br />

like to participate, contact Beth at the<br />

shelter via email shelterbeth@rchsvt.org or<br />

by telephone at 802.<strong>48</strong>3.9171.<br />

Courtesy Norman Williams Public Library<br />

Woodstock’s after school children celebrate the Norman<br />

Williams Public Library in Woodstock achieving<br />

its fundraising goal for a new HVAC system. Back row<br />

from left, Asher Emery, Brian Kardashian, Elvis Lavallee,<br />

Agnes Kardashian and Maddie Waller. Front row<br />

from left, Benjamin Williams, Genevieve Williams, Kiera<br />

Simpson and Eleanor Williams.<br />

were first-time donors,<br />

said Ricci.<br />

<strong>The</strong> board has assured<br />

patrons that the heating<br />

portion of the project will<br />

be operational prior to the<br />

arrival of winter and that<br />

visitors will be comfortably<br />

warm throughout the<br />

installation process. <strong>The</strong><br />

library’s regular operations<br />

and robust series of<br />

programs will be uninterrupted<br />

by the project.<br />

RCHS launches local<br />

dinner card program<br />

Rutland city fire department<br />

denied grant for new truck<br />

By Ed Larson<br />

Rutland City’s $1 million<br />

request for a Federal<br />

grant to assist in replacing<br />

a 32-year-old tower<br />

truck was recently denied.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>re was considerable<br />

competition” for<br />

available money, Rutland<br />

Board of Aldermen President<br />

Sharon Davis said.<br />

<strong>The</strong> tower truck is estimated<br />

to cost $1.3-$1.5<br />

million total equipped<br />

with essentials.<br />

<strong>The</strong> grant application<br />

had been endorsed by all<br />

three members of Vermont’s<br />

congressional delegation<br />

and the president<br />

of the Rutland Regional<br />

Medical Center.<br />

“Although disappointing,<br />

we have been<br />

successful with other<br />

grant opportunities and<br />

will continue to work<br />

to provide the City Fire<br />

Department and all departments<br />

the tools and<br />

equipment they need to<br />

do their job and keep the<br />

community safe,” Rutland<br />

City Mayor David<br />

Allaire said.<br />

Two other pieces of<br />

apparatus will require<br />

replacement in 2026 and<br />

20<strong>30</strong> respectively as the<br />

trucks reach what is considered<br />

life expectancy.<br />

Fire Chief James<br />

Larsen previously<br />

advised the Board of<br />

Aldermen that if the grant<br />

request were denied that<br />

By Ed Larson<br />

<strong>The</strong> city fire department seeks to replace tower truck.<br />

funds be available in the<br />

equipment replacement<br />

fund, which is supported<br />

by local municipal tax<br />

collected.<br />

In May of this year,<br />

Larsen informed the<br />

Board of Aldermen that<br />

some $143,000 in annual<br />

payments would still be<br />

covered by the annual<br />

$175,000 equipment fund<br />

levy. Additionally, a potential<br />

deferred two-year<br />

payment would allow<br />

the city of Rutland to set<br />

aside $350,000 to assist in<br />

paying down the debt.<br />

In September, the<br />

city fire department did<br />

receive a $47,000 grant<br />

from the Federal Emergency<br />

Management<br />

Agency for gear used to<br />

extricate people from<br />

wrecked vehicles, replacing<br />

gear that was 40 years<br />

old.<br />

Solid Waste Transfer Station<br />

OPEN SATURDAY + MONDAY 8 A.M.- 2 P.M.<br />

FREE Bulky Days: <strong>Nov</strong>. 2 nd & 4 th (8 a.m. - 4 p.m.) &<br />

<strong>Nov</strong>. 3 rd (8 a.m. - 12 p.m.)<br />

All stickers and coupon cards may be purchased at the<br />

Town Office Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.<br />

and at the Transfer Station


Calendar<br />

14 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

WOBBLY BARN HALLOWEEN PARTY<br />

THURSDAY, OCT. 31, 9 P.M.<br />

Submitted<br />

WEDNESDAY, OCT. <strong>30</strong><br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

6 a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 6 a.m. IHP; 9 a.m. 60 min. 26+ yoga; 4 p.m. bikram<br />

60; 5 p.m. IHP; 6:15 p.m. Baptiste Flow. 22 Wales St., Rutland. truenorthyogavermont.com.<br />

Active Seniors Lunch<br />

12 p.m.<br />

Killington Active Seniors meet for a meal Wednesdays at the Lookout<br />

Bar & Grille. Town sponsored. Come have lunch with this well-traveled<br />

group of men and women. $5/ person. 908-783-1050. 2910 Killington<br />

Road, Killington.<br />

• TeenTober<br />

3 p.m.<br />

Rutland Free Library’s new Teen Services department hosts<br />

movie and craft program, for grades 7-12. Free, in the Fox<br />

Room. Supplies provided, no pre-registration. Today, 3-4:<strong>30</strong><br />

p.m. Movie: “Ghostbusters.” Craft: Glow-in-the-dark slime.<br />

Open Studio Hub<br />

3 p.m.<br />

Chaffee Art Center opens doors to teens and young people Wednesday,<br />

3-6 p.m. A place to create, image, inspire. Free. Draw, paint, craft,<br />

do homework, listen to music, read, create a club, join yoga, creative<br />

space, and more. 16 S. Main St., Rutland. chaffeeartcenter.org.<br />

Heart of Ukulele<br />

5 p.m.<br />

Chaffee Art Center holds informal ukulele group Wednesday, 5-7 p.m.<br />

Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.<br />

Kripalu Yoga<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Kripalu Yoga at Killington Yoga with Alison. 37<strong>44</strong> River Rd, Killington.<br />

killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.<br />

Rotary Meeting<br />

6 p.m.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Killington-Pico Rotary club cordially invites visiting Rotarians,<br />

friends and guests to attend weekly meeting. For <strong>Nov</strong>ember, meet at<br />

Charity’s Tavern, Killington Road, 6-8 p.m. for full dinner and fellowship.<br />

802-773-0600 to make a reservation. Dinner fee $20. KillingtonPicoRotary.org<br />

Halloween<br />

THURSDAY,<br />

OCT. 31<br />

Killington Bone Builders<br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

6 a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 6 a.m.Bikram<br />

60; 9 a.m. IHP; 5 p.m. Bikram<br />

60; 6:15 p.m. IHP. 22 Wales St.,<br />

Rutland. truenorthyogavermont.<br />

com.<br />

Meditation Circle<br />

8 a.m.<br />

Maclure Library offers meditation<br />

circle Thursdays, 8 a.m.<br />

802-<strong>48</strong>3-2792. 840 Arch St.,<br />

Pittsford.<br />

Playgroup<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Maclure Library offers playgroup,<br />

Thursdays, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Birth<br />

to 5 years old. Stories, crafts,<br />

snacks, singing, dancing. 802-<strong>48</strong>3-<br />

2792. 840 Arch St., Pittsford.<br />

Story Time<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Story time at West Rutland Public<br />

Library. Thursdays,10 a.m. Bring young<br />

children to enjoy stories, crafts, and<br />

playtime. 802-438-2964.<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Bone Builders meets at Sherburne Memorial Library, 2998 River Rd.,<br />

Killington, 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Free, weights supplied.<br />

802-422-3368.<br />

Mendon Bone Builders<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Mendon Bone Builders meets Thursdays at Roadside Chapel, 1680<br />

Townline Rd, Rutland Town. 802-773-2694.<br />

Kripalu Yoga<br />

10:<strong>30</strong> a.m.<br />

Gentle therapeutic yoga class with Petra O’ Neill, LMT at Petra’s Wellness<br />

Studio. Howe Center, 1 Scale Ave., Rutland. RSVP to 802-345-<br />

52<strong>44</strong>, petraswellnessstudio@gmail.com.<br />

Bridge Club<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Rutland Duplicate Bridge Club meets Thursday, 6-10 p.m. Godnick<br />

Adult Center, 1 Deer St., Rutland. 802-773-9412.<br />

All Levels Yoga<br />

6:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Chaffee Art Center offers all level yoga class with Stefanie<br />

DeSimone, 50 minute practice. $5/ class, dropins<br />

welcome. 16 South Main St., Rutland. Bring a mat.<br />

Meditation Group<br />

7:15 p.m.<br />

Chaffee Art Center holds meditation group Tuesday,<br />

Thursday, Friday, 7:15-7:45 a.m. Donations<br />

appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.<br />

• Spooky Stories<br />

8:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Chandler Center for the Arts holds<br />

Halloween night event for ages<br />

12+. Come share a spooky story<br />

with friends and neighbors. By<br />

donation, all welcome. Read<br />

someone else’s work, read your<br />

own, recite something, or speak<br />

something true. 71 Main St.,<br />

Randolph.<br />

• Wobbly Halloween Party<br />

9 p.m.<br />

An annual Killington tradition, the<br />

Wobbly Barn Halloween party is the<br />

biggest in the area. Doors open 9 p.m.<br />

Costumes required for admission - best<br />

costume, best couple, best group awards<br />

include season passes! Krishna Funk Band<br />

plays live music. Door proceeds benefit Killington<br />

VFD. Killington Road, Killington. killington.<br />

com.<br />

FRIDAY, NOV. 1<br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

6 a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 6 a.m. IHP; 9 a.m. bikram 90; 12 p.m. IHP; 5 p.m.<br />

Baptiste Flow. 22 Wales St., Rutland. truenorthyogavermont.com.<br />

Level 1 Yoga<br />

8:<strong>30</strong> a.m.<br />

Basic Yoga at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury, RYT 500. 37<strong>44</strong> River<br />

Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.<br />

Library Book Sale<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Rutland Free Library book sale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Public welcome. Thousands<br />

of organized, gently used books, CDs, DVDs, and puzzles for all<br />

ages. $0.25-$3. rutlandfree.org. 10 Court St., Rutland.<br />

Creative Space<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Chaffee Art Center holds creative space Friday, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Bring<br />

tools/supplies to create works of art with other inspiring artists. Open to<br />

all. Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.<br />

Mighty Acorns<br />

11 a.m.<br />

Mighty Acorns Preschool Explorers Club: Forest Senses and Fort<br />

Building, 10;11:<strong>30</strong> a.m. at <strong>The</strong> Nature Museum of Grafton. $5/ child,<br />

drop-ins $8. register: nature-museum.org. Fort-building and free play.<br />

Story Time<br />

11 a.m.<br />

Sherburne Memorial Library holds story time Fridays, 10:<strong>30</strong>-11 a.m.<br />

Stories, songs, activities. All ages welcome! 2998 River Road, Killington.<br />

802-422-9765.<br />

Knitting Group<br />

2 p.m.<br />

Maclure Library offers knitting group, Fridays, 12-2 p.m. 802-<strong>48</strong>3-2792.<br />

840 Arch St., Pittsford.<br />

CSJ Gym Open House<br />

4:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Open House at CS Gym, 4:<strong>30</strong>-7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. then screening of “Night at the<br />

Museum” after. Activities include basketball, racquetball, guided walking<br />

tours, and more. National Guard, Rutland PD K-9 Unit, Rutland FD,<br />

Come Alive Outside with a smoothie bike, and more. rutlandrec.com.<br />

71 Clement Ave., Rutland.<br />

Adult Ballet<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

For fitness, strength, and flexibility. Basic ballet exercise to help<br />

improve posture, find your center, improve core strength, improve<br />

coordination, memory, flexibility, and more. $10 suggested donation at<br />

the door. Pierce Hall, Main St., Rochester.<br />

MAMMA MIA!<br />

AT THE PARAMOUNT<br />

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, NOV. 1-3<br />

Submitted


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> CALENDAR • 15<br />

AMAS Dinner<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Ascutney <strong>Mountain</strong> Audubon Society autumn dinner and program -<br />

turkey dinner and talk with Mike Clough about raptors, with live bald<br />

eagle. United Methodist Church, 10 Valley St., Springfield. Free, open<br />

to public. $12/ person. amasvt.org.<br />

Open Gym<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Friday night open gym at Head Over Heels, 152 North Main<br />

St., Rutland. 6-8 p.m. Ages 6+. Practice current skills, create<br />

gymnastic routines, learn new tricks, socialize with<br />

friends! $5/ hour members; $8/ hour non-members.<br />

Discount punch cards available. 802-773-1404.<br />

Mamma Mia!<br />

7 p.m.<br />

Paramount Players present “Mamma Mia!<br />

the funny tale of love, laughter and friendship.<br />

Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre, <strong>30</strong> Center St.,<br />

Rutland. paramountvt.org for tickets.<br />

Durham County Poets<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

On most recent tour of USA, Canadians<br />

the Durham County Poets<br />

perform at Brandon Music. Tickets<br />

$20; RSVP at 802-247-4295. info@<br />

brandon-music.net. 62 Country Club<br />

Road, Brandon.<br />

SATURDAY,<br />

NOV. 2<br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 7:<strong>30</strong> a.m. Bikram 90; 9:<strong>30</strong><br />

a.m. IHP; 11 a.m. Baptiste Power Flow<br />

75. 22 Wales St., Rutland. truenorthyogavermont.com.<br />

Audubon Seed Sales<br />

8 a.m.<br />

Rutland County Audubon bird seed<br />

sales: 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Garland’s Farm &<br />

Garden, 70 Park St., Rutland and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at Blue Seal Feeds,<br />

Route 7, Brandon. birding@rutlandcountyaudubon.org.<br />

Process Painting<br />

9 a.m.<br />

Process painting with Annie Moore, e/o Saturday at ArtisTree Center,<br />

2095 Pomfret Road, So. Pomfret. All materials provided. By donation,<br />

$10 suggested per class. For beginners or professionals. artistreevt.<br />

org.<br />

Vermont Farmers’ Market (Rutland)<br />

9 a.m.<br />

<strong>The</strong> indoor winter market is held every Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at Vermont<br />

Farmers’ Food Center, 251 West St., Rutland. vtfarmersmarket.<br />

org<br />

Library Book Sale<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Rutland Free Library book sale, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Public welcome. Thousands<br />

of organized, gently used books, CDs, DVDs, and puzzles for all<br />

ages. $0.25-$3. rutlandfree.org. 10 Court St., Rutland.<br />

Open Gym<br />

11 a.m.<br />

Saturday morning open gym at Head Over Heels, 152 North Main St.,<br />

Rutland. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. All ages welcome. Practice current skills, create<br />

gymnastic routines, learn new tricks, socialize with friends. $5/ hour<br />

members; $8/ hour non-members. Discount punch cards available.<br />

802-773-1404.<br />

Kids’ Saturday Classes<br />

11 a.m.<br />

Chaffee Art Center offers different activity for kids each week - painting,<br />

cooking, craft making and more. $10, pre-register at 802-775-0036;<br />

$15 drop in. 16 S. Main St., Rutland. chaffeeartcenter.org.<br />

Live from the Met<br />

1 p.m.<br />

Live from the Metropolitan Opera, an encore performance of Massenet’s<br />

sensual score, “Manon.” Adults $24, students $10. Town Hall<br />

<strong>The</strong>ater, 68 Pleasant St., Middlebury. Tickets townhalltheater.org. Run<br />

time, 4 hours, 12 minutes; includes 2 intermissions.<br />

Japanese Class<br />

2 p.m.<br />

Rutland Free Library hosts Japanese class, first and third Saturdays of<br />

each month. 2nd floor, 10 Court St., Rutland. Info, 802-773-9594.<br />

Yomassage<br />

4 p.m.<br />

Yomassage combination of restorative postures and receiving massage<br />

with Petra O’Neill, LMT at Petra’s Wellness Studio. Howe Center, 1<br />

Scale Ave., Rutland. RSVP to 802-345-52<strong>44</strong>, petraswellnessstudio@<br />

gmail.com<br />

THE “LOGGER” AT CHANDLER<br />

SATURDAY, NOV. 2, 7:<strong>30</strong> P.M.<br />

Roast Pork Dinner<br />

4:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Ladies and Gentlemen’s Supper Club invites all to dinner at Pawlet<br />

Community Church: Roast pork, all the fixings, dessert, beverages. $12<br />

adults, $6 age 6-12. Free age 5 and under. Take outs available day of:<br />

802-325-<strong>30</strong>22.<br />

Bingo<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Bridgewater Grange Bingo, Saturday nights, doors open at 5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Games start 6:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Route 100A, Bridgewater Corners. Just across<br />

bridge from Junction Country Store. All welcome. Refreshments available.<br />

Mamma Mia!<br />

7 p.m.<br />

Paramount Players present “Mamma Mia! the funny tale of love,<br />

laughter and friendship. Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre, <strong>30</strong> Center St., Rutland.<br />

paramountvt.org for tickets.<br />

Rusty DeWees “<strong>The</strong> Logger”<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Chandler Center for the Arts hosts Rusty DeWees and Patrick Ross in<br />

Tiny Town Hall Tour: An Evening of Local Laughs and Great Music. $20,<br />

chandler-arts.org. 71 Main St., Randolph.<br />

Michele Fay Band<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Folk/Americana group the Michele Faye Band perform at Brandon Music,<br />

62 Country Club Road, Brandon. Tickets $20, brandon-music.net.<br />

SUNDAY, NOV. 3<br />

Plant Rich Diet Challenge<br />

350 Rutland County announces Plant Rich Diet Challenge, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3-9.<br />

Eating a plant rich diet comes in at No. 4 out of 100 proposals for<br />

mitigating climate change. Eat less beef and more plants during this<br />

week-long challenge.<br />

Fall Rummage Sale<br />

9 a.m.<br />

Rutland Jewish Center holds annual fall rummage sale, 9 a.m.-12:<strong>30</strong><br />

p.m., then bag sale 1:<strong>30</strong>-3:<strong>30</strong> p.m. 96 Grove St., Rutland. Household<br />

items, furniture, art work, clothing, books, toys, collectibles, antiques.<br />

Submitted<br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 9:<strong>30</strong> a.m. Baptiste Power Flow; 11 a.m. IHP; 4:<strong>30</strong><br />

p.m. Bikram 60; 5:45 p.m .Yin. 22 Wales St., Rutland. truenorthyogavermont.com.<br />

Veterans Town Hall<br />

1 p.m.<br />

Bridging the divide between veterans and the communities they<br />

served. Held at Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St., Rutland. RSVP<br />

encouraged to vtvetstownhall.eventbrite.com. Vets invited to speak,<br />

unscripted,about what their service means to them. All community<br />

members encouraged to attend and listen.<br />

Mamma Mia!<br />

2 p.m.<br />

Paramount Players present “Mamma Mia! the funny tale<br />

of love, laughter and friendship. Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre, <strong>30</strong><br />

Center St., Rutland. paramountvt.org for tickets.<br />

Science Pub Starts<br />

4 p.m.<br />

Season 8 begins at Fair Haven Inn, with Jean-<br />

Sebastian Gagnon presenting “Search for Life in the<br />

Universe.” Come get answers in this free event. 5<br />

Adams St., Fair Haven.<br />

Connection Support Group<br />

4:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

NAMI Vermont’s connection support group at<br />

Rutland Mental Health Services, 78 S. Main St.,<br />

Rutland. 4:<strong>30</strong>-6 p.m. First and third Sunday of<br />

each month. Free recovery support group for<br />

people living with mental illness. Learn from one<br />

another, share coping strategies, offer mutual<br />

encouragement and understanding.<br />

Songs of Faith for All Saints<br />

7p.m.<br />

Under the direction of Dr Sherrill Blodget, Grace<br />

Church Sanctuary Choir and the Castleton University<br />

Chorale will offer Gwyneth Walker’s cantata, Songs of<br />

Faith, for choir, soloists, organ and brass. During this<br />

time, we will remember those who have died through music,<br />

poetry and prayer. Grace Congregational UCC, 8 Court<br />

St., Rutland.<br />

MONDAY, NOV. 4<br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

6 a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 6 a.m. IHP; 9 a.m. 60 min. Bikram; 4 p.m. IHP; 5<br />

p.m. Baptiste Flow; 6:15 p.m. Bikram Beats. 22 Wales St., Rutland.<br />

truenorthyogavermont.com.<br />

Killington Yoga<br />

8:<strong>30</strong> a.m.<br />

Vinyasa Yoga, 8:<strong>30</strong> a.m. at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury, RYT 500.<br />

37<strong>44</strong> River Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.<br />

Killington Bone Builders<br />

11 a.m.<br />

Bone Builders meets at Sherburne Memorial Library, 2998 River Rd.,<br />

Killington, 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Free, weights supplied.<br />

802-422-3368.<br />

Sunday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3, <strong>2019</strong> at 7 p.m.<br />

Calendar > 16<br />

Songs of Faith for<br />

All Saints<br />

Grace Congregational UCC<br />

Under the direction of Dr Sherrill Blodget, Grace<br />

Church Sanctuary Choir and the Castleton University<br />

Chorale will offer Gwyneth Walker’s cantata,<br />

Songs of Faith, for choir, soloists, organ and brass.<br />

During this time, we will remember those who have<br />

died through music, poetry and prayer.<br />

www.gracechurchvt.org<br />

@GraceChurchVT


16 • CALENDAR<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

><br />

Calendar<br />

from page 15<br />

Rutland Rotary<br />

12 p.m.<br />

Rotary Club of Rutland meets Mondays for lunch at <strong>The</strong> Palms Restaurant.<br />

Learn more or become a member, journal@sover.net.<br />

Monday Meals<br />

12 p.m.<br />

Every Monday meals at Chittenden Town Hall, 12 noon.<br />

Open to public, RSVP by Friday prior, 802-<strong>48</strong>3-62<strong>44</strong>.<br />

Gene Sargent. Bring your own place settings. Seniors<br />

$3.50 for 60+. Under 60, $5. No holidays. 337 Holden<br />

Rd., Chittenden.<br />

Playgroup<br />

1 p.m.<br />

Maclure Library offers playgroup, Mondays, 11<br />

a.m.-1 p.m. Birth to 5 years old. Stories, crafts,<br />

snacks, singing, dancing. 802-<strong>48</strong>3-2792. 840<br />

Arch St., Pittsford.<br />

Bridge Club<br />

4 p.m.<br />

Rutland Duplicate Bridge Club meets Monday,<br />

12-4 p.m. in Engel Hall, Christ the King Church,<br />

12 Main St., Rutland. 802-773-9412.<br />

Book Sale<br />

5 p.m.<br />

Fair Haven Free Library offers half-price book<br />

sale, 5-7 p.m. at the library, North Main St., Fair<br />

Haven.<br />

VETERANS TOWN HALL<br />

SUNDAY, NOV. 3, 1 P.M.<br />

Submitted<br />

Tobacco Cessation<br />

5 p.m.<br />

Quit smoking, e-cigs, and JUUL - free help! Want to quit smoking/<br />

vaping, but nothing seems to help? Join a group and get free nicotine<br />

patches, gum or lozenges. Group/replacement therapy doubles your<br />

chances of staying quit for good! Free. 802-747-3768. Mondays, 5-6<br />

p.m., RRMC CVPS Leahy Center, 160 Allen St., Rutland.<br />

Walking Group<br />

5:15 p.m.<br />

Chaffee Arts Center holds walking group Monday, 5:15 P.M. Open to<br />

all. Donations appreciated. 16 S. Main St., Rutland.<br />

Adult Ballet<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

For fitness, strength, and flexibility. Basic ballet exercise to help<br />

improve posture, find your center, improve core strength, improve<br />

coordination, memory, flexibility, and more. $10 suggested donation at<br />

the door. Pierce Hall, Main St., Rochester.<br />

Vermont Adult Learning<br />

Vermont Adult Learning will offers free citizenship classes. Call Marcy<br />

Green, 802-775-0617, and learn if you may qualify. 16 Evelyn St.,<br />

Rutland. Also, free classes in reading, writing, and speaking for English<br />

speakers of other languages. Ongoing.<br />

TUESDAY, NOV. 5<br />

Bikram Yoga **<br />

6 a.m.<br />

True Yoga classes: 6 a.m. Bikram 60 beats; 9 a.m. IHP 12 p.m. Baptiste<br />

Flow; 5 p.m. Bikram 60; 6:15 p.m. IHP. 22 Wales St., Rutland. truenorthyogavermont.com.<br />

Mendon Bone Builders<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Mendon Bone Builders meets Tuesdays at Roadside Chapel, 1680<br />

Town Line Road, Rutland Town. 802-773-2694.<br />

Story Hour<br />

10 a.m.<br />

Fair Haven Free Library offers story hours Tuesday mornings at Fair<br />

Haven Free Library, North Main St., Fair Haven. All welcome. Stories,<br />

activities, games, crafts.<br />

Tobacco Cessation<br />

11 a.m.<br />

Quit smoking, e-cigs, and JUUL - free help! Want to quit smoking/<br />

vaping, but nothing seems to help? Join a group and get free nicotine<br />

patches, gum or lozenges. Group/replacement therapy doubles your<br />

chances of staying quit for good! Free. 802-747-3768. Tuesdays, 11<br />

a.m.-12 p.m. at Heart Center, 12 Commons St., Rutland.<br />

Kripalu Yoga<br />

12 p.m.<br />

Gentle therapeutic yoga class with Petra O’ Neill, LMT at Petra’s Wellness<br />

Studio. Howe Center, 1 Scale Ave., Bldg 3, 3rd floor, Rutland.<br />

RSVP to 802-345-52<strong>44</strong>, petraswellnessstudio@gmail.com.<br />

Vinyasa Yoga<br />

5 p.m.<br />

Vinyasa Yoga at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury, RYT 500. 37<strong>44</strong> River<br />

Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.<br />

Live from the Met<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Live from the Metropolitan Opera, an encore performance of Massenet’s<br />

sensual score, “Manon.” Adults $23, students $10. Paramount<br />

<strong>The</strong>atre, <strong>30</strong> Center St., Rutland. Tickets paramountvt.org. Run time, 4<br />

hours, 12 minutes; includes 2 intermissions.<br />

29 th ANNUAL KILLINGTON<br />

GOOD GUY’S PARTY<br />

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3 rd AT 3 PM<br />

JOIN US TO GET YOUR 50% OFF CARD<br />

You MUST bring last year’s card, or you WILL be charged a new fee!<br />

Last year’s card will no longer be valid after 11/3 (1 card per person).<br />

• 50% off Chinese Appetizers •<br />

50% off Sushi a la Carte • 50% off Hibachi*<br />

CARD IS VALID ALL SEASON LONG, SUNDAY — FRIDAY 3–6!<br />

*Some exclusions apply.<br />

ONE NIGHT ONLY<br />

802-422-4241<br />

DON’T MISS OUT!<br />

1807 KILLINGTON RD, VT • VERMONTSUSHI.COM


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> • 17<br />

Level 1 Yoga<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Level 1 Hatha Yoga at Killington Yoga with Karen Dalury, RYT 500.<br />

37<strong>44</strong> River Rd, Killington. killingtonyoga.com, 802-770-4101.<br />

Yomassage<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Delightful restorative yoga class while receiving massage with Petra<br />

O’Neill, LMT at Petra’s Wellness Studio. Howe Center, 1 Scale Ave.,<br />

bldg. 3, 3rd floor, Rutland. RSVP to 802-345-52<strong>44</strong>, petraswellnessstudio@gmail.com<br />

Taking Off Pounds Sensibly<br />

6 p.m.<br />

TOPS meets Tuesday nights at Trinity Church in Rutland (corner of<br />

West and Church streets). Side entrance. Weigh in 4:45-5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Meeting 6-6:<strong>30</strong> p.m. All welcome, stress free environment. 802-293-<br />

5279.<br />

Bereavement Group<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Pawlet Public Library hosts Great Little Halloween Parade, 10 a.m.-<br />

noon. Parents and children ages birth through grade 6. Public welcome<br />

to join parade! 9:<strong>30</strong> a.m. line up at library; 10 a.m. parade begin, up<br />

School St. and back. Refreshments follow. 141 School St., Pawlet.<br />

pawletpubliclibrary.wordpress.com.<br />

Bridge Club<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Rutland Duplicate Bridge Club meets Tuesday, 6-10 p.m. in Engel Hall,<br />

Christ the King Church, 12 Main St., Rutland. 802-773-9412.<br />

Rutland Area Toastmasters<br />

6 p.m.<br />

Develop public speaking, listening and leadership skills. Meets first<br />

and third Tuesdays, 6-7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. in Courcelle Building, 16 North St Ext.,<br />

Rutland. toastmasters.org, 802-775-6929. Guests welcome.<br />

Legion Bingo<br />

6:15 p.m.<br />

Brandon American Legion, Tuesdays. Warm ups 6:15 p.m., regular<br />

games 7 p.m. Open to the public. Bring a friend! Franklin St., Brandon.<br />

Chess Club<br />

7 p.m.<br />

Rutland Rec Dept. holds chess club at Godnick Adult Center, providing<br />

a mind-enhancing skill for youth and adults. All ages are welcome;<br />

open to the public. Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m. 1 Deer St., Rutland.<br />

><br />

WCUUSD: Committee mulls costs, benefits of new school campus<br />

from page 1<br />

expenses. It hurts local businesses old. School board members were this project to keep up with those<br />

too.”<br />

given two opportunities to take a changes.”<br />

Burlington voters recently approved<br />

tour with Facilities Manager Joe<br />

A few slides of the proposed<br />

a $70 million school bond, Rigoli to see some of the problems buildings and interior design were<br />

Ford wrote in an email to the <strong>Mountain</strong><br />

first hand.<br />

projected at the meeting, but Ar-<br />

<strong>Times</strong>.<br />

Ford also reminded the school chitect Leigh Sherwood of Lavallee<br />

But they “have about 4,000 kids board of the past work that has Brensinger Architects had previously<br />

compared to our 1,000. … the resulting<br />

lead to the campus configuration reviewed more indepth designs with<br />

tax impact is also about a quarter committees recommendation. In the board.<br />

of what we would see if we were to put 2017, the district kicked off the 21st Many board members, representing<br />

the entire cost … in a bond measure.” Century School Master Plan. In<br />

their individual towns within the<br />

Ford believes the district can mitigate<br />

2017-2018 a baseline facility study school districts, voiced questions<br />

the effect on education taxes if the was done and visioning workshops and concerns about the project.<br />

bond amount can be reduced.<br />

held. In 2018-<strong>2019</strong> architectural Many said raising taxes will be a<br />

“We’re working hard to find ways options were developed and presented—option<br />

tough sell in their towns.<br />

to not have to [put the entire cost in<br />

1 was renovating Barnard representative Pamela<br />

the bond], like finding private/grant the existing building and had a Fraser said she didn’t feel there were<br />

funding, energy performance credits, projected cost of $46-$51 million; enough solid numbers regarding the<br />

leveraging local option tax proceeds, option 2 was part renovation, part final tax implications.<br />

etc.,” Ford wrote.<br />

new construction and came with an “I might not even endorse the<br />

At the Wednesday meeting, the estimated cost of $70-$77.5 million; project myself,” she said.<br />

board calculated $<strong>30</strong> million in and option 3 was a new school,<br />

Patti Kuzmickas, Pomfret representative,<br />

non-bond funding would reduce the projected to cost $58-66.5 million,<br />

said there is resentment<br />

education tax increase to around 18%. according to Ford’s presentation among residents in her town about<br />

Finance and Facilities Manager <strong>Oct</strong>. 14. With that information, this Prosper Valley still being closed that<br />

Mike Concessi said he will get interest past June, the campus configuration<br />

will create an additional obstacle.<br />

rate quotes from banks and other<br />

committee was tasked with “People won’t understand why they<br />

sources for comparison, as small evaluating the financial feasibility<br />

should approve $68 million for a new<br />

changes in the interest rate used<br />

of a new MS/HS building and school when the district won’t spend<br />

produced bigger savings than some elementary school upgrades. $500,000 to re-open <strong>The</strong> Prosper Valley<br />

entire line items discussed.<br />

Superintendent Mary Beth Banios<br />

School,” she said.<br />

<strong>The</strong> board agreed that “something”<br />

made a short presentation echoing Board co-chair Paige Heller, who<br />

has to be done to improve the importance of space designed to left the meeting early, gave some<br />

the conditions of the existing Middle/High<br />

connect student’s ideas and foster parting advice. “Make the goal a max-<br />

School buildings, which entrepreneurial learning.<br />

imum tax increase of 10-15%, then<br />

were erected in 1957 and added to “Education is changing rapidly,” design the project and the financing<br />

in 1960, making them over 60 years Banios told the board, “and we need to meet that goal,” she said.<br />

Being Pain-Free Has Made<br />

a Huge Difference For Me<br />

“Now I can walk with confidence. I can garden,<br />

play with my dogs, take care of my pigs. <strong>The</strong>se<br />

procedures have been almost life-changing in giving<br />

me the opportunity to do the things that I like to do<br />

without pain. My care at Rutland Regional Medical<br />

Center was excellent. <strong>The</strong>y were kind, considerate<br />

and respectful. I highly recommend them.”<br />

Amanda Bodell, Waltham, Vermont<br />

Watch Amanda’s video at http://bit.ly/RRMCPatientStories<br />

160 Allen Street, Rutland, VT | www.RRMC.org | 802.775.7111<br />

3 Albert Cree Drive, Rutland, VT<br />

802.775.2937<br />

www.vermontorthoclinic.org


[MUSIC Scene] By DJ Dave Hoffenberg<br />

18 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

WED.<br />

OCT. <strong>30</strong><br />

BRANDON<br />

6 p.m. Neshobe Country<br />

Club – Ryan Fuller<br />

PAWLET<br />

7 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Barn Restaurant<br />

and Tavern -<br />

“Pickin’ in Pawlet”<br />

QUECHEE<br />

6 p.m. Public House –<br />

Blues Night with Arthur James<br />

RANDOLPH<br />

6:<strong>30</strong> p.m. One Main Tap<br />

and Grill -<br />

Open Mic with Silas McPrior<br />

RUTLAND<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Center Street<br />

Alley –<br />

Open Mic with Zach Zepson of<br />

Hamjob<br />

WOODSTOCK<br />

6:<strong>30</strong> p.m. 506 Bistro and<br />

Bar - Live Jazz Pianist<br />

7 p.m. Town Hall <strong>The</strong>atre<br />

- Vermont Horror Road<br />

Show<br />

THURS.<br />

OCT. 31<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Moguls Sports<br />

Pub – Duane Carleton<br />

9 p.m. Wobbly Barn –<br />

Halloween Party with the<br />

Krishna Funk Band<br />

QUECHEE<br />

7 p.m. Public House –<br />

Halloween Party & Costume<br />

Contest with Jack in the Pulpit<br />

WOODSTOCK<br />

7 p.m. Town Hall <strong>The</strong>atre<br />

- Practical Magic Movie &<br />

Costume Party<br />

FRI.<br />

NOV. 1<br />

BOMOSEEN<br />

6 p.m. Iron Lantern –<br />

Aaron Audet<br />

BRANDON<br />

7 p.m. Red Clover Ale<br />

Company – Ryan Fuller<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Brandon Music<br />

– Durham County Poets<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

6 p.m. Hops on the Hill<br />

– Grand Opening Party with<br />

Nikki Adams<br />

7 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Foundry –<br />

Jenny Porter<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. McGrath’s<br />

Irish Pub – Erin’s Guild<br />

9 p.m. Jax Food and<br />

Games – Tony Lee Thomas<br />

9 p.m. Moguls Sports<br />

Pub – DJ Dave’s Halloweenish<br />

Dance Party<br />

PAWLET<br />

7 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Barn Restaurant<br />

and Tavern –<br />

Zack Slik<br />

POULTNEY<br />

7 p.m. Taps Tavern –<br />

Fiddle Witch<br />

QUECHEE<br />

7 p.m. Public House –<br />

Sammy B<br />

RUTLAND<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. <strong>The</strong> Hide-A-<br />

Way Tavern – Matthew<br />

Ames<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. <strong>The</strong> Venue -<br />

Karaoke with Jess<br />

10 p.m. Center Street<br />

Alley - DJ Dirty D<br />

SAT.<br />

NOV. 2<br />

BOMOSEEN<br />

6 p.m. Iron Lantern –<br />

Carlo Romeo<br />

BRANDON<br />

7 p.m. Town Hall –<br />

Brandon Has Talent Show<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Brandon Music<br />

– Michelle Fay Band<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

7 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Foundry –<br />

Ryan Fuller<br />

7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. McGrath’s<br />

Irish Pub – Erin’s Guild<br />

9 p.m. Jax Food and<br />

Games – Tony Lee Thomas<br />

9 p.m. Moguls Sports<br />

Pub – Super Stash Bros<br />

QUECHEE<br />

7 p.m. Public House –<br />

Automatic Slim<br />

RUTLAND<br />

5 p.m. Franklin Conference<br />

Center –<br />

<strong>The</strong> Homeless Prevention<br />

Center’s Dinner, Dance and Silent<br />

Auction with DJ Dave<br />

9 p.m. Center Street Alley<br />

- DJ Mega<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. <strong>The</strong> Hide-A-<br />

Way Tavern –<br />

Karaoke 101 with Tenacious T<br />

SUN.<br />

NOV. 3<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

3 p.m. Sushi Yoshi –<br />

Good Guy’s Party<br />

4 p.m. McGrath’s Irish<br />

Pub – Extra Stout<br />

5 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Foundry -<br />

Jazz Night with the Summit Pond<br />

Quartet<br />

7 p.m. Moguls Sports<br />

Pub – Duane Carleton<br />

QUECHEE<br />

4 p.m. Public House –<br />

Kevin Atkinson<br />

RUTLAND<br />

7 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Hide-A-Way<br />

Tavern – Rick Webb<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. <strong>The</strong> Venue –<br />

Open Mic<br />

STOCKBRIDGE<br />

12 p.m. Wild Fern -<br />

Cigar Box Brunch w/ Rick<br />

Redington<br />

1 p.m. Wild Fern -<br />

<strong>The</strong> People’s Jam<br />

MON.<br />

NOV. 4<br />

LUDLOW<br />

8 p.m. <strong>The</strong> Killarney -<br />

Open Mic<br />

PITTSFIELD<br />

7 p.m. Clear River Tavern<br />

– Clay Canfield<br />

TUES.<br />

NOV. 5<br />

CASTLETON<br />

6 p.m. Third Place Pizzeria<br />

- Josh Jakab<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Hops on the<br />

Hill – Chamber Mixer<br />

LUDLOW<br />

7 p.m. Du Jour VT -<br />

Open Jam Session with Sammy<br />

B and King Arthur Junior<br />

POULTNEY<br />

7 p.m. Taps Tavern -<br />

Open Bluegrass Jam Hosted by<br />

Fiddle Witch<br />

QUECHEE<br />

6 p.m. Public House –<br />

Open Mic with Jim Yeager<br />

RUTLAND<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. <strong>The</strong> Hide-A-<br />

Way Tavern -<br />

Open Mic with Krishna Guthrie<br />

9:<strong>30</strong> p.m. <strong>The</strong> Venue -<br />

Karaoke with Jess<br />

Children: We must break through stereotypes in children’s toys, clothing<br />

from page 8<br />

seems like maybe some of becoming a driver, just like<br />

society is finally catching up a little boy. A girl dresses<br />

with me.<br />

like mommy and so does<br />

A little girl plays with the boy. How does it feel? A<br />

her doll and it helps her boy dresses like daddy and<br />

><br />

the dolls, trucks and dress<br />

up. From the very beginning<br />

dolls, stuffed animals,<br />

trucks, cars, farm machinery,<br />

trains, etc., dress<br />

up clothes, and playing<br />

house were available to all<br />

equally to do with as they<br />

saw fit. And here is where<br />

the news story takes over.<br />

As I listened and heard the<br />

words and saw the little<br />

boy playing with his doll so<br />

lovingly I thought to myself<br />

it sounds like she read my<br />

study I did in the ‘60s about<br />

the development of a boy<br />

from birth to six years. But<br />

that wasn’t possible, so it<br />

I refused to put my boys in blue and<br />

my girl in pink. My choice of color<br />

become a mom. Well, little<br />

boys getting the chance to<br />

play with a doll can help<br />

them become a dad. A little<br />

girl pushing a truck may<br />

be developing skills for<br />

was yellow.<br />

so does the girl. How does<br />

it feel? Dad’s shoes are so<br />

big, and Mom’s red high<br />

heels are so neat. And the<br />

petticoats on either girl or<br />

boy are such fun for a little<br />

while; both sexes learning<br />

about each other. When<br />

my first boy held his doll he<br />

tenderly pretended to nurse<br />

it just like mom. When my<br />

little girl got her very own<br />

yellow dump truck she immediately<br />

painted it blue so<br />

her brothers knew for sure it<br />

was hers.<br />

<strong>The</strong>n the biggie, the color<br />

of the doll on the news story<br />

— brown. That is a problem<br />

obviously for adults. That’s<br />

where the teaching begins<br />

for kids. In the ‘60s I wasn’t<br />

able to find a brown doll,<br />

but I do remember finding a<br />

boy doll with a penis for my<br />

little girl. She was thrilled for<br />

she now had a boy and girl<br />

doll. <strong>The</strong> grandchildren are<br />

now playing with that doll. I<br />

remember getting a boy doll<br />

as a kid — but it was never<br />

real because it was missing<br />

you know what.<br />

When I got grandkids I<br />

was able to finally find some<br />

brown dolls. So now we had<br />

both sexes and both colors.<br />

Which doll was the favorite<br />

depended on the individual<br />

child, but it was obvious all<br />

the dolls were loved, not<br />

one got left behind.<br />

In the 1960’s when I started<br />

my family I had a vision,<br />

one of many, a vision of how<br />

our children could more<br />

easily accept each of us as<br />

we are, to not be ashamed<br />

of whom they were, or who<br />

they wanted to be, to feel<br />

free to be a kid and play with<br />

what ones heart desires.<br />

Over the years there were<br />

many ups and downs and<br />

it so often seemed it was all<br />

for nothing, and then on<br />

national news a little white<br />

boy showed up holding on<br />

tightly to his little brown<br />

doll. 59 years later, maybe<br />

there was still some hope.<br />

Frances L. Stone,<br />

Orwell


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> • 19<br />

Shiffrin: Shiffrin settles for second at the first race of the World Cup season in Soelden, Austria, and encourages winner’s ambitions<br />

from page 3<br />

podium!” Shiffrin posted on her Facebook<br />

page after the race on Saturday.<br />

Robinson is coached by Chris Knight,<br />

who coached Lindsey Vonn between<br />

2015 and 2018 and Jeff Fergus, who<br />

coached Vonn<br />

By Polly Mikula<br />

between 2010<br />

and 2014.<br />

“Alice is<br />

going to be a<br />

really strong competitor, and obviously<br />

she’s young, so for many years to come,”<br />

Shiffrin said in an interview with NBC<br />

on Monday, <strong>Oct</strong>. 28. “She has the ability<br />

to train a lot because all summer long,<br />

our summer, she’s in New Zealand,<br />

and she’s training. And then during our<br />

winter, she’s racing. So<br />

she has this opportunity<br />

to get massive amounts<br />

of volume in, and she’s<br />

motivated.”<br />

“I was so happy to lay down<br />

the turns,” she said.<br />

Nina O’Brien, 21, who graduated<br />

from Burke <strong>Mountain</strong> Academy and<br />

now attends Dartmouth College, was<br />

the only other American to finish the<br />

race. She took 21st place in Soelden<br />

with a time of<br />

2.19:84.<br />

O’Brien<br />

scored her first<br />

World Cup<br />

Points at Killington last year, when she<br />

took 23rd place.<br />

<strong>The</strong> women next race in Levi,<br />

Finland, in four weeks. And are then<br />

scheduled to race in Killington over<br />

Thanksgiving weekend, for the Killington<br />

Cup, <strong>Nov</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - Dec.1.<br />

Holcombe: Plans run for governor of Vermont<br />

from page 7<br />

><br />

decisions they think are best. So<br />

we get tremendous variation.”<br />

Vermont communities are proceeding<br />

at different rates of speed<br />

when it comes to exploring the<br />

long-range future of their schools,<br />

Holcombe noted.<br />

While the ANWSD and ACSD<br />

are currently exploring dramatic<br />

changes, other districts are still<br />

cutting costs and looking at different<br />

ways of capitalizing on their<br />

buildings.<br />

She cited as an example<br />

the Mill River Unified<br />

Union School District,<br />

which she said has dramatically<br />

reduced its budget<br />

and is looking to place<br />

child care services into the<br />

excess room within its elementary<br />

buildings.<br />

“What they’re looking at is how<br />

can they make the buildings work<br />

more hours,” Holcombe said. “I<br />

think we’re starting to see some of<br />

that entrepreneurialism. I think<br />

the more people are entrepreneurial<br />

about putting resources<br />

together, the better off we are.”<br />

Holcombe acknowledged being<br />

a little surprised with the current<br />

state of the school closure debate,<br />

adding that the language of Act 46<br />

expressly stated that the intent of<br />

the law was not to close schools.<br />

“What surprised me is the way<br />

the attention has focused on the<br />

elementary schools, because the<br />

really serious challenges about<br />

affordability are at the high school<br />

level,” she said. “What we see is<br />

that when a high school starts<br />

Vermont, according to Holcombe,<br />

already spends “substantially<br />

more” per capita on social<br />

services than other states.<br />

to approach around 100 kids, it<br />

begins to really struggle, because<br />

it can’t offer the breadth and depth<br />

of opportunities that kids want.<br />

So we just assumed that districts<br />

would make decisions to partner<br />

on high schools.”<br />

She noted Bethel and Royalton<br />

approved a school merger in<br />

2017 that saw all middle school<br />

students got to Bethel and all high<br />

school kids go to Royalton.<br />

Both communities OK’s the<br />

transition by substantial margins.<br />

“Was it hard? Yes. But if you ask<br />

the kids, they’re pretty psyched to<br />

have (athletic) teams to choose<br />

from and they have a band now,”<br />

Holcombe said.<br />

Dairy farmers continue to labor<br />

in a market that generates a lot of<br />

milk for little money to the producers.<br />

She blamed the national<br />

commodity market for<br />

stagnant milk prices.<br />

Until and unless<br />

there’s a national solution,<br />

Holcombe believes<br />

the state should help<br />

those farmers who want<br />

to use their land for growing<br />

food.<br />

“I think that’s the transition<br />

we need to help people figure out<br />

how to make, is how do you move<br />

from dairy to food production?”<br />

Holcombe said.<br />

“If we did that, it would help the<br />

water problem as well. It doesn’t<br />

have to be agriculture versus<br />

water, it should be agriculture and<br />

water,” she added.<br />

><br />

School closure: New measures will be on the ballot for Town Meeting vote<br />

from page 5<br />

A public survey will be taken in each member<br />

town, “and the Board and Administration will weigh<br />

the results when deciding on the matter.”<br />

Another issue discussed concerned school choice.<br />

One parent of a 5-year-old appealed Superintendent<br />

Mary Beth Banios’s decision that his son could not<br />

move from his “choice” school in Killington, to Woodstock<br />

Elementary, to accommodate a major change<br />

in family employment.<br />

Kevin O’Neill and his wife Molly had applied to<br />

place their son in Killington Elementary because she<br />

worked in Rutland at the time and could drop him off<br />

and pick him up on her way through Killington.<br />

Now, O’Neill said, Molly is actually employed at<br />

Woodstock Elementary School and transporting their<br />

son to and from Killington every day is an extreme<br />

effort.<br />

District chair Paige Heller pointed out that school<br />

choice issues, by procedure, are left to the administration’s<br />

discretion. Careful not to discuss O’Neill’s<br />

individual case, the board discussed the procedure,<br />

its fairness and its efficacy at length, some members<br />

advocating for change, others reluctant to set a precedent<br />

of overruling the superintendent.<br />

Banios herself said making decisions regarding individual<br />

family situations was “very hard,” and done<br />

carefully and as sensitively as possible.<br />

<strong>The</strong> board ultimately delegated the policy committee<br />

to consider the overall procedure at the group’s<br />

next meeting in <strong>Nov</strong>ember.


LivingADE<br />

20 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

This week’s living Arts, Dining and Entertainment!<br />

told on Halloween night<br />

Thursday, <strong>Oct</strong>. 31, at 8:<strong>30</strong> p.m.—RANDOLPH—Why should kids have all<br />

the fun? Even the dead are said to come back to life on this night. So<br />

why not do something different?<br />

Maybe something truly a<br />

little scary for you? Come share<br />

a spooky story with your friends<br />

and neighbors. Storytelling<br />

begins at 8:<strong>30</strong> p.m. and continues<br />

until we run out of ghost<br />

stories…<br />

or ghastly<br />

things…<br />

or it gets<br />

ghoulishly<br />

late.<br />

This<br />

event<br />

is “by<br />

donation”<br />

and all are welcome (if you are over 12 years<br />

old).<br />

You may chose to read someone else’s work,<br />

or read your own work, or recite something from<br />

memory, or just speak about something spooky<br />

that really happened to you. All storytellers welcome.<br />

Chandler Center For <strong>The</strong> Arts is located at<br />

71 N. Main Street in Randolph.


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> LIVING ADE • 21<br />

<strong>30</strong>Halloween<br />

<strong>Oct</strong>.<br />

TeenTober presents<br />

Beetlejuice<br />

at Rutland Free Library<br />

Wednesday, <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong>, at 3 p.m.—RUTLAND—<strong>The</strong> Rutland Free Library will<br />

screen the movie Beetlejuice from 3-4:<strong>30</strong> p.m. this Wednesday.<br />

TeenTober is a new, nationwide celebration hosted by libraries every <strong>Oct</strong>ober<br />

that aims to celebrate teens, promote year-round teen services and the<br />

innovative ways libraries help teens learn new skills and fuel their passions<br />

inside and outside the library.<br />

Rutland Free Library’s new Teen Services department will host three<br />

“Movie & Craft” programs in <strong>Oct</strong>ober specifically for teens in grades 7-12.<br />

All programs are free and will take place at RFL in the Fox Room. All supplies<br />

will be provided and there is no pre-registration.<br />

<strong>The</strong> PiTTsford fire deParTmenT’s 39Th annual<br />

Haunted House<br />

Thank you<br />

for all of your support.<br />

See you<br />

next year!<br />

Follow us on Facebook.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Wobbly Barn Halloween Party<br />

A legendary party with valuable prizes<br />

from Killington Resort<br />

Thursday, <strong>Oct</strong>. 31, 9 p.m. —KILLINGTON—<strong>The</strong><br />

legendary Wobbly Barn Nightclub opens its doors on<br />

Halloween night for the best costume party in town!<br />

Doors open at 9 p.m.<br />

Live music from the Krishna Funk Band will kick<br />

off the season and plenty of tricks and treats will be had on the spookiest<br />

night of the year!<br />

Door proceeds benefit the Killington Volunteer Fire Department.<br />

Costumes are required for admission and it’s worth putting some<br />

thought into it because there are big prizes on the line:<br />

1. Best Costume - Killington Season Pass<br />

2. Best Couple - 2 Season Passes to Pico <strong>Mountain</strong><br />

3. Best Group - Dinner at the Wobbly Barn<br />

POOL • DARTS • HORSEHOES • FREE MINI GOLF<br />

BURGERS • BBQ RIBS • SALADS • STEAK TIPS • GYROS<br />

• MON: FREE POOL<br />

& 50 WINGS ALL<br />

DAY<br />

• THURS: FREE POOL &<br />

DUANE CARLETON<br />

• FRI: DJ DAVE 9PM<br />

• SAT: STASH BROS. &<br />

COLLEGE FOOTBALL<br />

• SUN: FOOTBALL &<br />

DUANE CARLETON<br />

$3DRAFTS<br />

BURGER & BEER<br />

3 CHOICE<br />

$9.99 MON. & THURS.<br />

OPEN THURS, FRI, SAT, MON: 3 P.M. - 2 A.M.<br />

SUN: NOON - 2 A.M.<br />

Winners of the Rutland Halloween parade floats<br />

• Most Original:<br />

Randolph Union High School<br />

• Most Original runner up:<br />

Rutland County Audubon<br />

• Best in Parade: Rutland County 4-H<br />

• Best in Parade runner up:<br />

Casella Construction and Casella Waste<br />

Management on behalf of Wheels for<br />

Warmth<br />

• Most Creative: Fabian Earth Moving, Inc<br />

• Most Creative runner up:<br />

Relay for Life of Rutland County<br />

• Best Costumed Marching Band:<br />

Rutland Town School<br />

• Best Costumed Marching Band runner<br />

up: Barstow Memorial School<br />

• Best Costumed Marching Unit:<br />

Fitness Made Fun<br />

• Best Costumed Marching Unit runner<br />

up: Drum Journeys of Earth<br />

• Tom Fagan Award:<br />

Rutland Regional Medical Center<br />

• Honorable Mention:<br />

Proctor Jr./Sr. High School, Heaven’s<br />

Roses Boutique, Woods Roofing,<br />

Castleton University Alumni Association,<br />

Wayne’s Body Shop, Emma’s Ladybugs<br />

BE<br />

HEARD.<br />

MOUNTA IN TIMES<br />

mountaintimes.info


22 • LIVING ADE<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

<strong>The</strong> spirited Durham County Poets<br />

return to Brandon Music<br />

Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 1 at 7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.—<br />

BRANDON—By popular demand<br />

Brandon Music is thrilled to<br />

welcome back Durham County<br />

Poets on their most recent tour of<br />

the USA. Hailing from Ormstown,<br />

Quebec, and the surrounding Chateauguay<br />

Valley, the five seasoned<br />

musicians, all of whom are songwriters,<br />

work together individually<br />

and collaboratively in composing<br />

their music. Delving into a variety<br />

of styles and genres, their musical<br />

influences include a broad range<br />

of artists. From <strong>The</strong> Band to Dire<br />

Straits, Leon Redbone to James<br />

Taylor and Neil Young, they have<br />

managed to put it all together to<br />

create their own musical style best<br />

described as bluesy country/folk<br />

with a lot of verve. <strong>The</strong> lead singer,<br />

Kevin Harvey, is a naturally laid<br />

back vocalist who nails the essence<br />

of whatever song he’s singing,<br />

bringing it to life in a way that<br />

serves the music and, particularly,<br />

the lyrics. <strong>The</strong> obvious joie de vivre<br />

expressed while performing together<br />

is reflected in the good time<br />

feel that the band creates, which has<br />

been captivating their audiences<br />

consistently since their inception<br />

six years ago. <strong>The</strong>y have just added a<br />

drummer to the band – Rob Couture<br />

(formerly of the Echo Hunters.) <strong>The</strong><br />

Durham County Poets also feature<br />

David Whyte on electric guitars and<br />

vocals, Neil Elsmore on guitars and<br />

vocals and Carl Rufh on double bass<br />

and vocals.<br />

Submitted<br />

“<strong>The</strong>re’s something about the<br />

Durham County Poets that leaves<br />

you feeling that everything might<br />

be OK in the world after all. <strong>The</strong>re’s<br />

a human spirit that lives in these<br />

people and their music is the medium<br />

that allows that spirit to roam<br />

free,” said Bill Hurley, extended play<br />

sessions.<br />

Concert begins at 7:<strong>30</strong> p.m. Concert<br />

tickets are $20. A pre-concert<br />

dinner is available for $25. Reservations<br />

are required for dinner and<br />

recommended for the show. Venue<br />

is BYOB. For more information call<br />

802 247-4295 or visit brandon-music.net<br />

or email info@brandon-music.net.<br />

Brandon Music is located at<br />

62 Country Club Road in Brandon.<br />

Paramount<br />

Players presents<br />

‘Mamma Mia’<br />

All-local cast presents legendary<br />

ABBA musical<br />

Friday-Sunday <strong>Nov</strong>. 1-3 at 7 p.m. & 2 p.m.—RUT-<br />

LAND—ABBA’s hits tell the hilarious story of a young<br />

woman’s search for her birth father. This sunny and<br />

funny tale unfolds on a Greek island paradise. On the<br />

eve of her wedding, a daughter’s quest to discover the<br />

identity of her father brings three men from her mother’s<br />

past back to the island they last visited 20 years ago.<br />

<strong>The</strong> story-telling magic of ABBA’s timeless songs propels<br />

this enchanting tale of love, laughter and friendship,<br />

creating an unforgettable show.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Paramount Players, featuring an all local cast of<br />

60 plus community members is excited about its debut<br />

performance Friday night.<br />

<strong>The</strong> director of the show is Mikki Lane, the music<br />

director is David Otis Castonguay, the stage manager is<br />

Barb Lassen and the producers are Diane Liccardi and<br />

Eric Mallette.<br />

Shows will be Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 1 and Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 2 at 7<br />

p.m. and Sunday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3 at 2 p.m.<br />

For more information visit paramountvt.org.<br />

NOVEMBER WINE DINNER<br />

Zinfandel Wine Dinner: Cheers to America’s Grape!<br />

Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>ember 1st 6:<strong>30</strong> pm<br />

Experience Zinfandel wines, made from America’s bold and zesty heritage grape.<br />

Accompanied by a one-time, five-course chef's pairing menu.<br />

$80 per person plus tax and gratuity, served community-style.<br />

Reservations required: 802.775.2290<br />

350 Rutland County Plant Rich Diet Challenge<br />

Sunday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3—RUTLAND COUNTY—350 Rutland County has announced a<br />

week-long Plant Rich Diet Challenge beginning Sunday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3 until Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 9.<br />

According to the book “Drawdown — <strong>The</strong> Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed To<br />

Reverse Global Warming,” eating a plant rich diet comes in at No. 4 out of 100 proposals<br />

for mitigating climate change.<br />

As we have learned more about the total impact of beef and other meat production<br />

including nitrogen fertilizers for feed production, methane releases from livestock,<br />

processing, packaging and shipping, the group at 350 Rutland County is inspired to<br />

change our eating habits. In fact, eating lower on the food chain is an empowering way<br />

that individuals can choose to lower their personal contributions to climate change.<br />

Each day on the group’s Facebook page they will share some insights into the positive<br />

benefits of eating a plant rich diet, and will include a recipe that we recommend.<br />

Please join with them to eat healthier for a healthy planet. For more information follow<br />

or like @ 350 Rutland on Facebook.<br />

Restaurant Open Thursday - Monday, 5:<strong>30</strong> - 9pm<br />

802.775.2290 | RedCloverInn.com<br />

7 Woodward Road, Mendon, VT<br />

Just off Route 4 in the heart of the Killington Valley


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> LIVING ADE • 23<br />

IT’S A CRAZY GOOD SKI BOOT SALE! Surefoot’s annual <strong>Oct</strong>ober Madness Sale is so crazy that<br />

we’re holding it in <strong>Nov</strong>ember this year! Stop by the store <strong>Nov</strong>ember 1-3 to find the perfect boot for<br />

you and your skiing ability. New this year, the Surefoot Contoura liners offer a revolutionary internal<br />

heating system! Don’t miss our only sale on 2020 model ski boots this year. Loyal locals get 20% off<br />

our latest and greatest new models of boots, liners, and selected accessories which have just arrived<br />

in our stores. Whether you are an entry level skier or a World Cup athlete, Surefoot boots and liners<br />

offers the comfort and performance you need. In addition to our custom ski boots we also offer<br />

standard ski boots from Tecnica, Nordica, Lange, Full Tilt, Atomic, Salomon and more.<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

NOVEMBER 1-3 9AM-6PM<br />

802-422-BOOT • 937 Killington Road


24 • LIVING ADE<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Mighty Acorns preschool explorers club presents Senses and Fort Building<br />

Friday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 1, at 10 a.m. —<br />

GRAFTON—A nature-based<br />

program for preschoolers in<br />

Grafton presents Forest Senses<br />

and Fort Building this Friday<br />

from 10-11:<strong>30</strong> a.m. at <strong>The</strong> Nature<br />

Museum in Grafton. Entry is $5<br />

per child, drop-ins are welcome<br />

for $8. For more information<br />

visit nature-museum.org.<br />

With autumn chills turning<br />

into the first winter winds, the<br />

forest has a new look. Experience<br />

the forest through testing<br />

some of our senses and other fun<br />

exploration activities. <strong>The</strong> forest<br />

is the perfect place to play in any<br />

season. Get creative and tinker<br />

through fort-building and free<br />

play.<br />

Join a local community of<br />

parents and budding scientists<br />

with <strong>The</strong> Nature Museum’s<br />

Mighty Acorns Club. <strong>The</strong> Mighty<br />

Acorns Club provides creative,<br />

exploratory preschool programs<br />

which celebrate curiosity and<br />

encourage a love and respect for<br />

the natural world.<br />

<strong>The</strong>se monthly, interactive,<br />

nature-based experiences are<br />

offered for children ages 3-5 and<br />

their caregivers. Experienced<br />

and energetic environmental<br />

educators lead regular Mighty<br />

Acorns Club programs on the<br />

first Friday morning of the<br />

month at <strong>The</strong> Nature Museum,<br />

and the themes are always closely<br />

tied to the seasonal rhythms of<br />

the natural world.<br />

<strong>The</strong> schedule for the fall<br />

started with Autumn Learning<br />

Adventures on <strong>Oct</strong>. 4, and now<br />

offers Forest Senses and Fort<br />

Building on <strong>Nov</strong>. 1. Fantastic<br />

McGrath’s<br />

Irish Pub<br />

Feathered Birds will be held on<br />

Dec. 6. <strong>The</strong> second series begins<br />

in January and runs through<br />

May, continuing to meet on<br />

the first Friday morning of the<br />

month.<br />

Come learn about why fall is a<br />

special time for the many plants,<br />

animals, and humans who call<br />

Vermont home, and be ready to<br />

take an adventure into the fall<br />

forest and explore and discover<br />

with new eyes. <strong>The</strong> group will<br />

spend most of our time outdoors<br />

regardless of the weather, so<br />

come prepared with cozy boots,<br />

jackets, and hats so we can really<br />

experience the elements.<br />

Drops-ins are welcome. Preregistration<br />

is encouraged but<br />

is not required. When pre-registered<br />

on-line, <strong>The</strong> Mighty Acorns<br />

Club costs $5 per child. Drop-ins<br />

Inn at<br />

L ng Trail<br />

T<br />

Deer Leap<br />

are welcome at the door for $8.<br />

<strong>The</strong>se programs are geared<br />

towards children ages 3-5, but<br />

older children are welcome to<br />

attend if interested. Caregivers<br />

McGrath’s<br />

Irish Pub<br />

Delicious pub menu with<br />

an Irish flavor<br />

Submitted<br />

and babes-in-arms are always<br />

welcome to attend for free. To<br />

learn more about upcoming<br />

programs and to register, visit<br />

nature-museum.org.<br />

Inn a<br />

L ng<br />

2.2 mi. from<br />

start to<br />

Monday - Friday<br />

open at 3pm daily<br />

Saturday & Sunday 11:<strong>30</strong>am<br />

McGrath’s<br />

Irish Pub<br />

nn<br />

McGrath’s<br />

McGrath’s<br />

Rte. 4 between Killington & Pico<br />

802-775-7181<br />

innatlongtrail.com<br />

Rooms & Suites available<br />

What’s your style?<br />

Twist<br />

Irish<br />

Irish Pub Pub<br />

Inn Inn<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>The</strong><br />

LIVE MUSIC 7:<strong>30</strong>PM<br />

<strong>Nov</strong>ember 1 st & 2 nd -<br />

ERIN’S GUILD<br />

McGraths<br />

Irish Pub Pub<br />

Ball<br />

he e Inn Inn<br />

MOUNTA IN TIMES<br />

Nest<br />

Psst... Really, it’s ok... just read me first.<br />

McGrat<br />

McGrath<br />

Irish<br />

Irish P<br />

THE<br />

THE<br />

at<br />

at<br />

L


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> LIVING ADE • 25<br />

Brandon Music welcomes the Michelle Fay Band<br />

Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 2, at 7:<strong>30</strong><br />

p.m.—BRANDON—Lovers of<br />

authentic folk and Americana<br />

music welcome opportunities to<br />

hear the Michele Fay Band perform<br />

original well crafted original<br />

songs and Americana music.<br />

This energetic and unpretentious<br />

group brings forth a comfortable<br />

groove of folk, swing,<br />

and bluegrass-influenced songs,<br />

woven seamlessly together. Fay’s<br />

heartfelt lyrics are central to the<br />

ensemble, as she sings with a<br />

crystal clear, authentic voice.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Rutland Herald called her<br />

voice “smooth and entrancing”<br />

and says “While the band’s playing<br />

is top-notch, there’s a reason<br />

it’s called the Michele Fay Band,<br />

and that’s Michele’s voice.”<br />

Fay’s three band musicians<br />

are a perfect match for her talent<br />

as a singer-songwriter, and they<br />

add to the charm and sincerity<br />

of these songs without detracting<br />

from their earnest messages.<br />

Kalev Freeman, on fiddle, brings<br />

forth a light-hearted, lilting<br />

sound. Michael Santosusso, on<br />

upright bass, “(Smokin’ Grass,”<br />

“Big Spike,” “Hot Pickin’ Party”)<br />

adds dynamic beat and perfectly<br />

matched harmonies and Fay’s<br />

husband, Tim Price, contributes<br />

accomplished, melodic<br />

instrumentals on mandolin and<br />

guitar.<br />

“<strong>The</strong>re is something so<br />

reassuring about this kind of<br />

music… these tunes are Grand<br />

Ole Opry worthy. <strong>The</strong>y make me<br />

think of the kind of songs country<br />

folks would love to dance to<br />

on a saw-dusted wooden floor,”<br />

says Kimmy Sophia Brown of<br />

<strong>The</strong> Noise-Boston.com.<br />

<strong>The</strong> band’s growing musicianship<br />

is increasingly well received<br />

throughout the region as it continues<br />

to gather its well-deserved<br />

recognition. “Michele is now<br />

recognized as a performer who<br />

knows how to write strong songs<br />

and deliver them entertainingly.”<br />

(Art Edelstein, Rutland Herald)<br />

Submitted<br />

<strong>The</strong> Michelle Fay Band has the<br />

skill to entertain their audience<br />

and put them at ease.<br />

Concert begins at 7:<strong>30</strong> p.m.<br />

Concert tickets are $20. A preconcert<br />

dinner is available for<br />

$25. Reservations are required<br />

for dinner and recommended<br />

for the show. Venue is BYOB.<br />

For more info visit brandonmusic.net<br />

or call (802) 247-<br />

4295. Brandon Music is located<br />

at 62 Country Club Road in<br />

Brandon.<br />

CROSSWORD PUZZLE<br />

Solutions > 33<br />

SUDOKU<br />

Solutions > 33<br />

“Life can only<br />

be understood<br />

backwards; but<br />

it must be lived<br />

forwards.”<br />

– Søren Kierkegaard<br />

How to Play<br />

Each block is divided by its own matrix<br />

of nine cells. <strong>The</strong> rule for solving Sudoku<br />

puzzles are very simple. Each row,<br />

column and block, must contain one of<br />

the numbers from “1” to “9”. No number<br />

may appear more than once in any row,<br />

column, or block. When you’ve filled the<br />

entire grid the puzzle is solved.<br />

made you look.<br />

imagine what space<br />

can do for you.<br />

CLUES ACROSS<br />

1. Third-party access<br />

(abbr.)<br />

4. This (Spanish)<br />

8. Goals<br />

10. Something to do<br />

lightly<br />

11. “Great” North Sea<br />

Empire legend<br />

12. Iced or chilled<br />

drink<br />

13. Weight units<br />

15. Immune system<br />

response<br />

16. Groundbreaking<br />

German pharmacologist<br />

17. Milk-supplying<br />

companies<br />

18. Enjoyable distraction<br />

21. Doctor of Education<br />

22. Type of submachine<br />

gun (abbr.)<br />

23. Curved shape<br />

24. Brew<br />

25. <strong>The</strong> 13th letter of<br />

the Hebrew alphabet<br />

26. Advanced degree<br />

27. Shock rocker<br />

34. Enthusiast<br />

35. Quiet’s partner<br />

36. Hijacked<br />

37. TV’s once needed<br />

them<br />

38. Brings together<br />

39. Narrow piece of<br />

wood<br />

40. Paths<br />

41. Monetary unit<br />

42. Wings<br />

43. Soviet Socialist<br />

Republic<br />

CLUES DOWN<br />

1. Gear<br />

2. Outer part of a<br />

bird’s wing<br />

3. Good luck charm<br />

4. Removing from<br />

memory<br />

5. Group of seven<br />

people<br />

6. Records<br />

7. German river<br />

9. “Last of the<br />

Mohicans” actress<br />

Madeleine<br />

10. Ancient Greek<br />

war galley<br />

12. Nonsensical<br />

speak<br />

14. Title of respect<br />

15. Cast out<br />

17. Have already<br />

done<br />

19. Wood-loving<br />

insects<br />

20. Analog conversion<br />

system (abbr.)<br />

23. Pokes holes in<br />

24. Waiver of liability<br />

(abbr.)<br />

25. Sea cow<br />

26. Protein coding<br />

gene<br />

27. Where boats park<br />

28. <strong>The</strong> top of a jar<br />

29. Fitting<br />

<strong>30</strong>. German city<br />

31. Martens<br />

32. <strong>The</strong>y’re all over<br />

the planet<br />

33. One that nests<br />

34. Coming at the<br />

end<br />

36. Croatian coastal<br />

city<br />

Mounta in <strong>Times</strong><br />

802.422.2399 • mountaintimes.info


Food Matters<br />

26 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Back Country Café<br />

<strong>The</strong> Back Country Café is a hot spot<br />

for delicious breakfast foods. Choose<br />

from farm fresh eggs, multiple kinds of<br />

pancakes and waffles, omelet’s or daily<br />

specials to make your breakfast one of a kind. Just the right heat Bloody<br />

Marys, Mimosas, Bellini, VT Craft Brews, Coffee and hot chocolate drinks.<br />

Maple Syrup and VT products for sale Check Facebook for daily specials.<br />

(802) 422-<strong>44</strong>11.<br />

Charity’s<br />

A saloon inspired eatery boasting over<br />

a century of history! Home to Charity’s<br />

world-famous French onion soup, craft<br />

beer and cocktails, and gourmet hot dogs,<br />

tacos and burgers. It’s no wonder all trails lead to Charity’s. charitystavern.com<br />

802-422-3800<br />

Choices Restaurant<br />

& Rotisserie<br />

Chef-owned, Choices Restaurant and<br />

Rotisserie was named 2012 ski magazines<br />

favorite restaurant. Choices may<br />

be the name of the restaurant but it is also what you get. Soup of the day,<br />

shrimp cockatil, steak, hamburgers, pan seared chicken, a variety of salads<br />

and pastas, scallops, sole, lamb and more await you. An extensive wine<br />

list and in house made desserts are also available. choices-restaurant.com<br />

(802) 422-40<strong>30</strong>.<br />

Clear River Tavern<br />

Headed north from Killington on Route<br />

100? Stop in to the Clear River Tavern<br />

to sample chef Tim Galvin’s handcrafted<br />

tavern menu featuring burgers, pizza, salads,<br />

steak and more. We’re in Pittsfield, 8 miles from Killington. Our live music<br />

schedule featuring regional acts will keep you entertained, and our friendly<br />

service will leave you with a smile. We’re sure you’ll agree that “When You’re<br />

Here, You’re in the Clear.” clearrivertavern.com (802) 746-8999.<br />

Casey’s Caboose<br />

Come for fun, amazing food, great drinks, and<br />

wonderful people. A full bar fantastic wines and<br />

the largest selection of craft beers with 21 on tap.<br />

Our chefs create fresh, healthy and interesting<br />

cuisine. Try our steaks or our gourmet burgers<br />

made with 100% Vermont ground beef, U.S. lamb or home-grown pork— we<br />

have 17 burgers on our menu! Try our famous mac n’ cheese with or without<br />

lobster. Yes! the train is still running... 802-422-3795<br />

Dream Maker Bakers<br />

Dream Maker Bakers is an all-butter, fromscratch<br />

bakery making breads, bagels, croissants,<br />

cakes and more daily. It serves soups,<br />

salads and sandwiches and offers seating<br />

with free Wifi and air-conditioning. at 5501 US<br />

Route 4, Killington, VT. Open Thurs.- Mon. 6:<strong>30</strong> a.m.-3p.m. No<br />

time to wait? Call ahead. dreammakerbakers.com 802-422-5950<br />

dreammakerbakers.com<br />

Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre to broadcast<br />

Massenet’s ‘Manon’<br />

Second Opera of the <strong>2019</strong>/20 Met Live Season at the theatre downtown<br />

Tuesday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, at 5:<strong>30</strong> p.m.—RUTLAND—<strong>The</strong> Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre continues the <strong>2019</strong>/2020 Live in HD from the<br />

Met Series with another specially timed encore screening. Massenet’s “Manon” will screen at 5:<strong>30</strong> p.m. on Tuesday,<br />

<strong>Nov</strong>. 5, at <strong>The</strong> Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre, located at <strong>30</strong> Center St. in Rutland.<br />

Soprano Lisette Oropesa stars as the irresistible title character, the tragic beauty who yearns for the finer things<br />

in life in Laurent Pelly’s revealing production. Tenor Michael Fabiano is the besotted Chevalier des Grieux, whose<br />

desperate love for Manon proves their undoing. Maurizio Benini conducts Massenet’s sensual score.<br />

“Manon” follows the rise and fall of an ambitious woman as she rises through the Parisian demimonde and follows<br />

her through covetousness, young heartbreak, glamorous reign atop high society, a spiral down into greed, and<br />

ultimate redemption in death.<br />

Bruce Bouchard, executive director, commented, “Manon” is an Opera for the upside-down world in which we<br />

live today. In a Trumpian world of desperate striving to belong and be respected and validated, the central character<br />

might just as well be an Ivanka Trump “would be” modern-day courtesan, straining and striving for inclusion into<br />

the world she so desperately seeks.”<br />

Running time is 4 hours and 10 minutes. Tickets are $23 for adults, $10 for students and children. Paramount <strong>The</strong>atre<br />

Box Office is open Thursday and Friday 11 a.m.- 6 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more information call (802)<br />

775-0903 or visit ParamountVT.org.<br />

Highlights from reviews:<br />

• New York <strong>Times</strong> (Joshua Barone): “Très charmante — especially as sung by the soprano Lisette Oropesa in<br />

the Metropolitan Opera’s revival of Massenet’s “Manon,” which opened on Tuesday evening. With a voice<br />

by turns brightly crystalline and arrestingly powerful, she persuasively inhabits the role of this chameleon<br />

coquette.<br />

• Opera Wire (David Salazar): “Lisette Oropesa has<br />

a major success in her first Met ‘Manon.’” <strong>The</strong> title<br />

role is a mammoth undertaking and has proven a<br />

touchstone role for many famed divas of the past.<br />

Moreover, Pelly’s production requires a singer who<br />

can also dominate as an actress, navigating the<br />

complex world that the director created for the<br />

opera and character.”<br />

• Bachtrack (Ako Imamura): “Lisette Oropesa, making<br />

her role debut as Manon, sang with an elegance<br />

and style that was perfect for a heroine with little<br />

control over her fate. Her French diction was incisive<br />

and clear, and her high notes soared into a long<br />

and sustained arc.”<br />

‘Manon’ also screens in<br />

Middlebury, Saturday<br />

Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 2, at 1 p.m.—MIDDLEBURY— This<br />

showing is an encore screening of the live performance<br />

on <strong>Oct</strong>. 26.<br />

Showtime begins at Town Hall <strong>The</strong>ater Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>.<br />

2 at 1 p.m. Jim Pugh will give a pre-show talk in the Byers<br />

Studio downstairs at Town Hall <strong>The</strong>ater at 12:15 p.m.<br />

Tickets are $24 for adults and $10 for students and<br />

may be purchased at townhalltheater.org or by calling<br />

802-382-9222 or at the door 1 hour before show time.<br />

Town Hall <strong>The</strong>ater is located at 68 S. Pleasant Street in<br />

Middlebury.


Food Matters<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> • 27<br />

<strong>The</strong> Foundry<br />

at Summit Pond<br />

<strong>The</strong> Foundry, Killington’s premier dining<br />

destination, offers fine cuisine in a stunning<br />

scenic setting. Waterside seating<br />

welcomes you to relax and enjoy craft beer and wines selected by the house<br />

sommelier. Impeccable, chef-driven cuisine features locally sourced meats<br />

and cheeses, the freshest seafood, homemade pastas and so much more.<br />

foundrykillington.com 802-422-5335<br />

Lake Bomoseen Lodge<br />

<strong>The</strong> Taproom at Lake Bomoseen Lodge,<br />

Vermont’s newest lakeside resort & restaurant.<br />

Delicious Chef prepared, family<br />

friendly, pub fare; appetizers, salads,<br />

burgers, pizzas, entrees, kid’s menu, a great craft brew selection & more.<br />

Newly renovated restaurant, lodge & condos. lakebomoseenlodge.com, 802-<br />

468-5251.<br />

Full Service Vape Shop<br />

Humidified Premium Cigars • Hand Blown Glass Pipes<br />

Hookahs & Shisha Roll Your Own Tobacco & Supplies<br />

<strong>Mountain</strong> CBD Products • Smoking <strong>Times</strong><br />

Accessories<br />

131 Strongs Avenue Rutland, VT<br />

(802) 775-2552<br />

Call For Shuttle Schedule<br />

Like us on<br />

Facebook!<br />

McGrath’s<br />

Irish Pub<br />

Inn at Long Trial<br />

Looking for something a little different? Hit up<br />

McGrath’s Irish Pub for a perfectly poured pint<br />

of Guinness, Inn live music at on the weekends and delicious<br />

food. Guinness not your favorite? <strong>The</strong>y also<br />

L ng Trail<br />

have Vermont’s largest Irish Whiskey selection.<br />

Rosemary’s Restaurant is now open, serving dinner.<br />

Reservations appreciated. Visit innatlongtrail.<br />

com, 802-775-7181.<br />

JAX Food & Games<br />

Killington’s hometown bar offering weekly<br />

live entertainment, incredible food and an<br />

extensive selection of locally crafted beers.<br />

Locals favorite menu items include homemade<br />

soups of the day, burgers, nachos, salads and daily specials. #seeyouatjax<br />

www.jaxfoodandgames.com (802) 422-5334<br />

Jones’ Donuts<br />

Offering donuts and a bakery, with a<br />

community reputation as being the best!<br />

Closed Monday and Tuesday. 23 West<br />

Street, Rutland. See what’s on special at<br />

Facebook.com/JonesDonuts/. Call (802)<br />

773-7810<br />

Killington Market<br />

Take breakfast, lunch or dinner on the go<br />

at Killington Market, Killington’s on-mountain<br />

grocery store for the last <strong>30</strong> years.<br />

Choose from breakfast sandwiches, hand<br />

carved dinners, pizza, daily fresh hot panini, roast chicken, salad and specialty<br />

sandwiches. Vermont products, maple syrup, fresh meat and produce along<br />

with wine and beer are also for sale. killingtonmarket.com (802) 422-7736<br />

or (802) 422-7594.<br />

Open<br />

Thurs. - Mon. 6:<strong>30</strong> a.m. - 3 p.m.<br />

Check out our NEW dining area!<br />

All butter from scratch bakery making<br />

breads, bagels, croissants, cakes and more.<br />

Now serving soup, salad and sandwiches....<br />

seating with Wifi and AC.<br />

Lookout Tavern<br />

Enjoy our new rooftop patio for lunch or dinner with<br />

an amazing view of the mountain. Select burgers,<br />

salads, sandwiches and daily specials with<br />

K-Town’s best wings. lookoutvt.com (802) 422-<br />

5665<br />

Moguls<br />

Voted the best ribs and burger in<br />

Killington, Moguls is a great place<br />

for the whole family. Soups, onion<br />

rings, mozzarella sticks, chicken<br />

fingers, buckets of chicken wings, salads, subs and pasta are<br />

just some of the food that’s on the menu. Free shuttle and<br />

take away and delivery options are available. (802) 422-4777<br />

<strong>Mountain</strong> Top Inn<br />

Whether staying overnight or visiting for<br />

the day, <strong>Mountain</strong> Top’s Dining Room &<br />

Tavern serve delicious cuisine amidst one<br />

of Vermont’s best views. A mix of locally<br />

inspired and International cuisine – including salads, seafood, poultry and a<br />

new steakhouse menu - your taste buds are sure to be satisfied. Choose from<br />

12 Vermont craft brews on tap.Warm up by the terrace fire pit after dinner! A<br />

short drive from Killington. mountaintopinn.com, 802-<strong>48</strong>3-2311.<br />

Red Clover Inn<br />

Farm to Table Vermont Food and Drinks.<br />

Thursday night Live Jazz. Monday night<br />

Chef Specials. Open Thursday to Monday,<br />

5:<strong>30</strong> to 9:00 p.m. 7 Woodward Road,<br />

Mendon, VT.<br />

802-775-2290, redcloverinn.com<br />

5501 US Route 4 • Killington, VT 05751<br />

802.422.5950<br />

Breakfast • Pastries • Coffee • Lunch • Cakes • Special Occasions<br />

A Magical Place to eat and drink<br />

Incredible<br />

SEAFOOD<br />

Choose from 18<br />

BURGERS<br />

21 Craft<br />

Drafts<br />

Farm to Table<br />

Children’s<br />

Menu<br />

802 422 3795<br />

19<strong>30</strong> Killington Rd<br />

Yes, the train<br />

is still running!!<br />

Not fine dining, Great Dining!!!<br />

GROCERY<br />

MEATS AND SEAFOOD<br />

beer and wine<br />

DELICATESSEN<br />

BAKERY PIZZA CATERING<br />

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner To Go<br />

www.killingtonmarket.com<br />

Hours: Open 7 days 6:<strong>30</strong> am - 9:<strong>30</strong> pm<br />

2023 KILLINGTON ROAD<br />

802-422-7736 • Deli 422-7594 • ATM<br />

LOOK!!!<br />

Amazing<br />

STEAKS<br />

Gin<br />

Kitchen<br />

Our Famous<br />

WINGS<br />

Great Wines<br />

GET SIDE<br />

TRACKED!<br />

Vegetarian<br />

Choices<br />

FISH & CHIPS<br />

HEADY<br />

TOPPER<br />

DELIVERED<br />

THURS. AFTER-<br />

NOON


Food Matters<br />

28 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Science Pub Season<br />

starts Sunday<br />

Sunday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 3, at 4 p.m.—FAIR HAVEN—<strong>The</strong> <strong>2019</strong>-20<br />

lineup for the ongoing popular Science Pub series kicks off<br />

Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Fair Haven Inn.<br />

Jean-Sebastien Gagnon, assistant professor of physics<br />

at Norwich University and a Rutland resident will present<br />

“Search for Life in the Universe.”<br />

Professor Gagnon works at the intersection of physics<br />

and cosmology where he seeks answers to the big questions:<br />

How did the universe start? How did the elements<br />

form immediately after the Big Bang? How did the universe<br />

evolve after that? And how to look for life in the universe?<br />

People are invited to come to this free event and get<br />

some answers. Maybe…<br />

Science Pub takes place the first Sunday of the month,<br />

<strong>Nov</strong>ember to April and is free and open to the public.<br />

BASIN<br />

BLAST-OFF<br />

NOV.<br />

2 ND<br />

Homeless Prevention Center to<br />

celebrate 20 years of service to<br />

the Rutland Community<br />

Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 2, at 5 p.m.—<br />

RUTLAND—Saturday evening<br />

the Homeless Prevention Center<br />

will host a dinner dance and silent<br />

auction at the Franklin<br />

Conference Center in<br />

Rutland.<br />

Along with great<br />

food, an auction,<br />

dancing and music by<br />

DJ Dave, the night will celebrate<br />

two decades of service to the<br />

greater Rutland community and<br />

raise funds to continue the critical<br />

mission of this local non-profit<br />

organization.<br />

HPC works to prevent and<br />

eliminate homelessness. Depending<br />

on the needs and goals of the<br />

people they work with, that can<br />

mean providing rental assistance;<br />

helping someone find an affordable<br />

apartment; assisting a family<br />

In <strong>2019</strong>, the organization helped over 500<br />

Vermonters who were homeless or atrisk<br />

of homelessness.<br />

in the eviction process; or helping<br />

people manage other challenges in<br />

their life.<br />

<strong>The</strong>ir services are free to participants<br />

and supported by grants and<br />

private donations.<br />

In <strong>2019</strong>, the organization helped<br />

over 500 Vermonters who were<br />

homeless or at-risk of homelessness.<br />

“Preventing and ending homelessness<br />

involves the whole community.<br />

It can be tough work, but<br />

we get to see inspiring<br />

successes each week.<br />

This event provides<br />

a chance to share<br />

and celebrate some<br />

of those success with<br />

our partners, neighbors and the<br />

greater community,” said Angus<br />

Chaney, HPC’s executive director.<br />

<strong>The</strong> festivities will begin at 5<br />

p.m. and go until 11 p.m. Cost is<br />

$40 per person. Dress in your favorite<br />

70s or 80s attire (optional).<br />

For more information call (802)<br />

775-9286 or visit HPCVT.org.<br />

2 ND 422-40<strong>30</strong> • 2820 KILLINGTON RD.<br />

Open Daily for<br />

Lunch & Dinner<br />

BURGERS<br />

BURRITOS<br />

SEAFOOD<br />

CRAFT BEER<br />

BEST WINGS<br />

PASTA<br />

SANDWICHES<br />

BBQ RIBS<br />

NACHOS<br />

DAILY SPECIALS<br />

KIDS MENU<br />

GAME ROOM<br />

happy hour 3-6p.m.<br />

KILLINGTON<br />

IN YEARS<br />

20 CELEBRATING<br />

2910 KILLINGTON ROAD, KILLINGTON VT<br />

802-422-LOOK<br />

IN<br />

YOUR FIRST STOP OFF THE MOUNTAIN<br />

LOOKOUTVT.COM<br />

JONES<br />

DONUTS<br />

“Jones Donuts and Bakery is a<br />

must stop if you reside or simply<br />

come to visit Rutland. <strong>The</strong>y have<br />

been an institution in the community<br />

and are simply the best.”<br />

open wed. - sun. 5 to 12<br />

closed mon. + tues.<br />

Rosemary’s<br />

Rosemary’s will be open Friday and<br />

Saturday nights from 6 - 9 p.m. during the<br />

Summer season serving a delightful menu<br />

of fresh and superbly seasoned selections. Built around an indoor boulder, we<br />

also feature an illuminated boulder garden view, and photographs capturing<br />

the Inn’s history. Chef Reggie Serafin , blends the flavors of Ireland with those<br />

of countryside New England created with a host of fresh local Vermont and<br />

New England seafood products. We take pride in serving you only the best<br />

quality, and supporting the local farmers. Reservations Appreciated.<br />

(802) 775-7181<br />

Seward’s Dairy<br />

If you’re looking for something truly<br />

unique and Vermont, check out Seward<br />

Dairy Bar. Serving classic homemade<br />

food including hamburgers, steaks, chicken, sandwiches and seafood. Craving<br />

something a little sweeter? Check out their own homemade 39 flavors of<br />

ice cream. Vermont products also sold. (802) 773-2738.<br />

23 West St, Rutland<br />

802-773-7810<br />

Sushi Yoshi<br />

Sushi Yoshi is Killington’s true culinary adventure.<br />

With Hibachi, Sushi, Chinese and Japanese, we<br />

have something for every age and palate. Private<br />

Tatame rooms and large party seating available.<br />

We boast a full bar with 20 craft beers on<br />

draft. Lunch and dinner available seven days a week. We are chef-owned<br />

and operated. Delivery or take away option available. Now open year round.<br />

www.vermontsushi.com (802) 422-4241<br />

• A Farm to Table Restaurant<br />

• Handcut Steaks, Filets & Fish<br />

• All Baking Done on Premises<br />

Sugar and Spice<br />

Stop on by to Sugar and Spice for a home style<br />

breakfast or lunch served up right. Try six different<br />

kinds of pancakes and/or waffles or order up<br />

some eggs and home fries. For lunch they offer<br />

a Filmore salad, grilled roast beef, burgers and<br />

sandwiches. Take away and deck dining available.<br />

www.vtsugarandspice.com (802) 773-7832.<br />

Culinary<br />

Institute of<br />

America<br />

Alum<br />

WED, THURS & SUN - 5:00-9:00<br />

FRI & SAT - 5:00-10:<strong>30</strong><br />

• Over 20 wines by the glass<br />

• Great Bar Dining<br />

• Freshly made pasta<br />

Sundays half price wines by the glass<br />

All entrées include two sides and soup or salad<br />

WWW.CHOICES-RESTAURANT.COM


Food Matters<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> • 29<br />

‘<strong>The</strong> Logger’ is back locally for laughs<br />

Submitted<br />

Rusty DeWees, a.k.a. “<strong>The</strong> Logger,” will perform, Sunday.<br />

Saturday, <strong>Nov</strong>. 2, at 7:<strong>30</strong><br />

p.m.—RANDOLPH—<br />

Chandler Center for the<br />

Arts welcomes “<strong>The</strong> Logger”<br />

on Saturday as part of<br />

comedian Rusty Dewees’<br />

Tiny Town Hall Tour. He’ll<br />

be joined by Patrick Ross<br />

for an evening of local<br />

laughs and great music.<br />

Rusty Dewees was born<br />

in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,<br />

but raised in Stowe<br />

where he attended Stowe<br />

High School. He played<br />

basketball and percussion<br />

in the school band<br />

and showed a talent and<br />

comedic timing in his high<br />

school’s theater productions.<br />

After graduating<br />

DeWees worked as a school<br />

bus driver, a basketball<br />

coach, a stonemason, a<br />

logger and a gas jockey.<br />

Curious to follow up<br />

on his early performance<br />

experiences, he relocated<br />

to New York City where he<br />

studied at the George Loris<br />

Actors <strong>The</strong>atre School and<br />

the Lee Strasberg Institute.<br />

At the same time, he<br />

was hired as the personal<br />

assistant to William Doyle,<br />

founder of the prestigious<br />

Doyle Galleries. During<br />

this period, Rusty acted<br />

in scores of notable roles<br />

off-Broadway as well as<br />

television, film, and dozens<br />

of national (and international)<br />

commercials.<br />

Rusty returned to<br />

Vermont and developed<br />

“<strong>The</strong> Logger,” his most<br />

notable comedy persona.<br />

An eclectic and innovative<br />

act, “<strong>The</strong> Logger” is a oneman<br />

comedy show often<br />

described as “Blue Collar<br />

Comedy” meets “Prairie<br />

Home Companion.”<br />

He has sold out theaters<br />

throughout New England<br />

for nearly two decades. <strong>The</strong><br />

success of “<strong>The</strong> Logger”<br />

performances have led to a<br />

fleet of Logger DVDs, several<br />

CDs, calendars, apparel<br />

items and a small cottage<br />

industry of Logger-related<br />

accessories.<br />

Recently, Rusty has<br />

expanded his horizon to<br />

include writing. His two<br />

books are: “Scrawlins,”<br />

a compilation of Rusty’s<br />

columns for syndicated<br />

and regional newspapers,<br />

and “Scrawlins Two,” a<br />

sequel. He produces,<br />

writes, directs, provides<br />

voice talent and often<br />

musical accompaniment<br />

for radio and television<br />

spots throughout New<br />

England. His “every few<br />

years” holiday shows are a<br />

showcase for the region’s<br />

undiscovered talent as well<br />

as a celebration of community<br />

and common ground<br />

experience.<br />

Dewees won Best Actor<br />

at the Los Angeles Method<br />

Fest dependent Film<br />

Festival for his role as<br />

Jerry in “Mud Season.” In<br />

addition to acting DeWees<br />

is a musician and plays<br />

with his band, <strong>The</strong> Fellers.<br />

Dewees also races stock<br />

cars at Thunder Road<br />

Speedbowl. Dewees works<br />

with charities such as<br />

Ronald McDonald House,<br />

Make-a-Wish, and Meals<br />

on Wheels. He also does<br />

motivational speaking to<br />

high schools and businesses.<br />

“Rusty has a keen eye<br />

for what makes Vermont<br />

such a special place...<br />

he conveys the heritage,<br />

intricacies, contradictions<br />

and joys of modern life in<br />

the Green <strong>Mountain</strong>s. We<br />

should never take ourselves<br />

too seriously, and Rusty<br />

makes sure we don’t,”<br />

said Jim Douglas, governor<br />

of Vermont, 2002-2011.<br />

As is his usual offer to<br />

support local farmers,<br />

DeWees makes his show<br />

available for free to anyone<br />

DeWees makes his show available<br />

for free to anyone who drives a<br />

tractor to the performance.<br />

who drives a tractor to the<br />

performance. Tickets are<br />

$20 at chandler-arts.org or<br />

at 802-728-9878.<br />

Great Breakfast Menu<br />

Mimosas ~ Bellinis ~ Bloody Marys<br />

EGGS • OMELETTES • PANCAKES • WAFFLES<br />

Open Friday-Monday at 7 A.M.<br />

923 KILLINGTON RD. 802-422-<strong>44</strong>11<br />

follow us on Facebook and Instagram @back_country_cafe<br />

Vermont<br />

Gift Shop<br />

RUTLAND<br />

CO-OP<br />

grocery<br />

I<br />

household goods<br />

77 Wales St<br />

(802) 773-2738<br />

produce<br />

health and beauty<br />

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner<br />

LARGEST SELECTION OF ICE CREAM TREATS!<br />

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!<br />

Celebrating our 74th year!<br />

Open Daily 6:<strong>30</strong> a.m.<br />

Specials<br />

Daily<br />

BB A<br />

KIL<br />

Come to our sugarhouse fot the<br />

best breakfast around!<br />

After breakfast, check out<br />

our gift shop for all your<br />

souvenier, gift, and maple<br />

syrup needs. We look forward<br />

to your visit!<br />

Serving Breakfast & Lunch<br />

7a.m. - 2p.m. daily<br />

Breakfast all day!<br />

Sugar & Spice Restaurant & Gift Shop<br />

Rt. 4 Mendon, VT<br />

802-773-7832 | www.vtsugarandspice.com


<strong>30</strong> • PETS<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

Rutland County Humane Society<br />

REBEL<br />

Rebel with a cause and that cause is to love you!!! Rebel<br />

is a 9 month old cattle dog mix. Rebel is very active boy and<br />

will enjoy an equally active person/family. Rebel loves food,<br />

and he already knows “sit!” Rebel was fine with our cats. He<br />

is very playful and will need a playful doggy sibling, or he<br />

would be fine as an only child.<br />

CASPER - 7-year-old<br />

spayed female. Domestic<br />

Short Hair. Black and white.<br />

I am enjoying myself and<br />

all of the cats I have met in<br />

my cat room, there’s still no<br />

place like home.<br />

RED - 5-year-old neutered<br />

male. Domestic Short Hair.<br />

Orange tabby. can be a little<br />

shy when I first meet you<br />

but once I warm up you will<br />

see my true personality.<br />

PEANUT - Adult. Male.<br />

American. Rabbit. White.<br />

Hi, I’m Peanut. I’m a happy<br />

go lucky bunny who would<br />

love to brighten your day.<br />

DON - 3-year-old neutered<br />

male. Domestic Short Hair.<br />

Black. I am very shy so it<br />

might be best that I go to a<br />

quiet home.<br />

This pet is available for adoption at<br />

Springfield Humane Society<br />

401 Skitchewaug Trail, Springfield, VT• (802) 885-3997<br />

Wed. - Sat. 12-4p.m. Closed Sun. Mon. Tues •spfldhumane.org<br />

SHADOW<br />

“I’m a 4-year-old neutered male. Before I came to Lucy<br />

Mackenzie I used to live in a home, but things didn’t quite<br />

work out for me. I’m playful, and quite confident, but<br />

sometimes I can get over-stimulated, I guess. (I just love<br />

life so much!) I’d prefer to be an “only cat” once I find my<br />

forever home, and also live with no dogs or children either.<br />

(As they can be quite the distraction for me!) I like to keep<br />

to myself a lot, but do have lots of love to give. (Especially<br />

being pet ted and being held – but not for too, too long!) If<br />

you’ve been looking for a new feline companion, drop by<br />

the shelter today, and come meet me?”<br />

This pet is available for adoption at<br />

Lucy Mackenzie Humane Society<br />

<strong>48</strong>32 VT-<strong>44</strong>, Windsor, VT • (802) <strong>48</strong>4-5829<br />

Tues. - Sat. 12-4p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. • lucymac.org<br />

LULU - 8-year-old spayed<br />

female. Briard mix. Thor<br />

and I would like to go to our<br />

forever home together so if<br />

one dog is great then two<br />

dogs is better, right?<br />

URUSLA - 4-year-old<br />

spayed female. Domestic<br />

Short Hair. Tortoiseshell. I<br />

am a lovely girl and I do like<br />

to talk, so if you would like<br />

to come have a conversation<br />

I am ready to chat with<br />

you.<br />

ZEUS<br />

2-year-old neutered male. Pit Bull. Tan and<br />

white. I have had some unpleasant encounters<br />

with other dogs, so I may be happier in a home by<br />

myself.<br />

All of these pets are available for adoption at<br />

Rutland County Humane Society<br />

765 Stevens Road, Pittsford, VT • (802) <strong>48</strong>3-6700<br />

Tues. - Sat. 12-5p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. • www.rchsvt.org<br />

JEDI - 4-year-old spayed<br />

female. Domestic Short<br />

Hair. Gray tiger. I can always<br />

be found in a comfy<br />

spot around the house.<br />

However, I would love that<br />

to be in your house.<br />

DUTCHESS - 2-year-old<br />

spayed female. Otterhound<br />

mix. I’m a high energy<br />

gal and I tend to get into<br />

things if I don’t get enough<br />

exercise and play time so<br />

an active family will be best<br />

for me.<br />

THOR - 6.5-year-old neutered<br />

Male. Labrador retriever/Pit<br />

Bull mix. I’m a<br />

little more playful than Lulu<br />

is so I hope you stock up on<br />

some toys for me.<br />

THUMPER - 8 years old.<br />

Neutered male. Hound mix.<br />

Black. Running and romping<br />

around in a fenced in<br />

yard would be ideal for me<br />

because of my energy level<br />

but please. I enjoy walks<br />

with my family best.<br />

CARLY - 2-year-old spayed<br />

female. Domestic Long<br />

Hair. Brown Tiger w/white.<br />

When you stop by to meet<br />

me you will find me curled<br />

up in the box mounted on<br />

the wall. Hope to see you<br />

soon!<br />

POLLY - 12-year-old<br />

spayed female. Domestic<br />

Short Hair. Black. I am<br />

currently in a cat room at<br />

the shelter and I am really<br />

enjoying my stay, but moving<br />

on to my forever home<br />

sounds even better.


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> MOTHER OF THE SKYE • 31<br />

Aries<br />

March 21 - April 20<br />

If you’re a little antsy it would surprise<br />

me. Things have been in a holding pattern<br />

and the level of frustration is pretty<br />

strong. You’re either waiting for things<br />

to pan out, or wondering if you missed<br />

the boat entirely. Patience was never your<br />

strong suit, and not knowing where to go<br />

or what to do is driving you nuts. If you<br />

can get past the surface reactions you will<br />

notice that as hard as this is, there’s a lesson<br />

in it. <strong>The</strong>re are no easy answers and no one<br />

can tell you how to handle it. Keep your<br />

own counsel and hold steady. Things will<br />

start to move as soon as you pass this test.<br />

Taurus<br />

April 21 - May 20<br />

You’re in for a surprise or two. All kinds<br />

of adjustments are about to be made.<br />

Don’t be put off when others suggest that<br />

you re-work some of your plans. If it gets<br />

to be too much, do what you can to make<br />

light of what other people seem to need<br />

more than anything. <strong>The</strong>mes that speak to<br />

the idea of getting side tracked, along with<br />

situations that crop up unexpectedly, will<br />

conspire to bring you exactly where you<br />

need to go. When it’s all said and done you<br />

will look back on this as a point of miraculous<br />

change which, for the next few weeks,<br />

will feel more like a roller coaster.<br />

Gemini<br />

May 21 - June 20<br />

You keep thinking that your life is supposed<br />

to look like what we call normal<br />

As you strive to achieve this, you are<br />

puzzled by the way things have turned out.<br />

In this dimension, there is no one size fits<br />

all formula for what life is meant to be. At<br />

the moment you are hung up wondering<br />

when it will be your turn to have everything<br />

fall into place. Let me remind you that the<br />

laws of Karma are different for everyone.<br />

None of us came here to live a simple or<br />

trivial life. You would save yourself a heap<br />

of frustration if you could lose your normal<br />

pictures and start loving what is.<br />

Cancer<br />

June 21 - July 20<br />

You already know what to do. <strong>The</strong>re<br />

is no longer an ounce of doubt. <strong>The</strong><br />

problem is, your old fashioned standards<br />

and your fears about what will happen to<br />

your well feathered nest if you follow your<br />

bliss are making it difficult to take this leap.<br />

I have to ask: What have you got to lose?<br />

And, how can you talk about trusting life<br />

and listening to your heart, when the bigger<br />

part of you is stuck on money and fear?<br />

You’re more than ready to go for it. All<br />

the angels in heaven are waiting for you<br />

to walk your talk. Now is the time. This<br />

chance won’t come around again.<br />

Leo<br />

July 21 - August 20<br />

How much will it cost you to get real?<br />

When it’s time to dig deep it helps to<br />

be willing to pull whatever it takes out of<br />

your guts and see it for what it is. It’s easier<br />

to be the soul of honesty when it comes to<br />

others; the truth is harder to come by when<br />

it comes to yourself. As far as that goes, the<br />

motivation to come to terms with the last<br />

thing you want to see will rise out of the<br />

awareness that it’s costing you a fortune<br />

to remain asleep to it. Waking up is No. 1<br />

on your list and right now, the potential for<br />

sudden change and illumination is equal to<br />

your desire for it.<br />

Virgo<br />

August 21 - September 20<br />

At the moment a raft of decisions need<br />

to be made and the deeper part of you<br />

is reluctant to commit. If it’s hard for you<br />

to pin things down, it’s because you stand<br />

midway between one thing, or one phase,<br />

and another. It’ll take about three more<br />

weeks to get your bearings. If you can<br />

lighten up and relax enough to let life bring<br />

things together naturally, what is currently<br />

driving you nuts will cease to be an issue. I<br />

am pretty sure that the message in all of this<br />

is telling you to take care of your inner being,<br />

and be wise enough to know that God<br />

will cover the details.<br />

Libra<br />

September 21 - <strong>Oct</strong>ober 20<br />

You are just beginning to tap into your<br />

reason for being here; here on this<br />

planet, and here in your current situation.<br />

So much has been in limbo for so long it’ll<br />

be good to feel like you know what’s going<br />

on. Some of it is bound to involve kids,<br />

your own, or other people’s, along with the<br />

possibility of a new job, or in some cases a<br />

new relationship. <strong>The</strong>re is still a lot more<br />

that needs to come to light, but the openings<br />

that keep showing up to give you a<br />

reason to live have been heaven sent. Keep<br />

watching the signs and remain cool and<br />

calm enough to see what is needed.<br />

Scorpio<br />

<strong>Oct</strong>ober 21 - <strong>Nov</strong>ember 20<br />

You’re ready for something totally new<br />

and different. <strong>The</strong> rat-race, the treadmill,<br />

and/or the same-old-thing is in need of<br />

a transplant. Anyone else would look at you<br />

and wonder where all this lack of contentment<br />

is coming from; after all, according<br />

to them you have it made. <strong>The</strong>re’s some<br />

truth to this on the outside, but the deeper<br />

part of your being isn’t satisfied. When life<br />

gets like this it’s good to know how to be<br />

still and wait. <strong>The</strong> next round of inspiration<br />

is always right in front of us. Stop long<br />

enough to read the signs and know that this<br />

is where your future lies.<br />

Copyright - Cal Garrison: <strong>2019</strong>: ©<br />

Sagittarius<br />

<strong>Nov</strong>ember 21 - December 20<br />

You just hit a wall and came out of the<br />

impact with a dose of instant enlightenment.<br />

It’s unusual to make such a quick<br />

turnaround without losing your grip. Now<br />

that your super powers are no longer in<br />

question, don’t be surprised if more is expected<br />

of you. On any other day life expecting<br />

more from you would make you want<br />

to crawl back in bed - but not these days.<br />

You’ve got too many good aspects giving<br />

you the power to do it all with a smile<br />

on your face, the sense that nothing is too<br />

much, or too hard, or impossible will supercharge<br />

your energy flow for a while.<br />

Capricorn<br />

December 21 - January 20<br />

<strong>The</strong> reason this feels the way it does is<br />

because you’ve lost touch with something.<br />

<strong>The</strong>re’s no need to panic but you<br />

could use a good dose of the truth. Others<br />

are aware of your feelings. On some<br />

level they wish they could help but this<br />

isn’t about them; it’s about you and how<br />

things have changed. On your way to the<br />

next thing a few items are due to fall off<br />

the wagon. Don’t try to hang on to whoever<br />

you think you are. At this point the only<br />

thing that matters is reigniting your passion<br />

and getting on with the business of finding<br />

out what it is that you came here to do.<br />

Aquarius<br />

January 21 - February 20<br />

With all of your best intentions, what<br />

seemed like such a good idea at the<br />

time appears to be rolling to a halt. It’s your<br />

turn to decide whether to keep it going, or<br />

head off in another direction. In the midst of<br />

this quandary other elements are materializing<br />

out of the blue. It’s too soon to tell but<br />

it looks like one door is closing and another<br />

one is ready to open. How you feel about it<br />

is the main thing. If the thought of breaking<br />

new ground makes your heart sing, go for<br />

it. Yes there are risks; everything is at stake.<br />

But the greater risk lies in choosing to get<br />

stuck in a rut that won’t pan out.<br />

Pisces<br />

February 21 - March 20<br />

<strong>The</strong> only way to discharge all of the duties<br />

and responsibilities that have come<br />

up just to see how much you can handle is<br />

to take one thing at a time. It’s a good thing<br />

you have lots of experience when it comes<br />

to being patient with people because you<br />

are being tested to the max. Within this set<br />

of variables it is your job to stay balanced<br />

and sane enough to make everyone else’s<br />

life work out for the best. How you deal<br />

with yourself at a time like this is another<br />

story. Stay clear enough to remain present<br />

and accounted for and get good at knowing<br />

when it’s time to shut people off.<br />

What Halloween is<br />

all about<br />

Mother’s<br />

Celestial<br />

Inspirations<br />

By Cal Garrison<br />

This week’s horoscopes are<br />

coming out under the light of a<br />

new, Scorpio moon, on the eve of<br />

the Halloween cross quarter. So<br />

much has been lost to the passage<br />

of time when it comes to our understanding<br />

of what Halloween is<br />

all about. From both an astronomical<br />

and an astrological perspective,<br />

it could be considered the most<br />

powerful moment in the yearly<br />

cycle. <strong>The</strong> reason for this and what<br />

nobody bothered to tell us, is that<br />

the Pleiades are situated directly<br />

over the Bermuda Triangle on Halloween night.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Bermuda Triangle is located on one of the main<br />

vortices of what is known as the “Earth grid.” <strong>The</strong> Earth grid<br />

is an icosa-dodecahedron field of energy or conglomeration<br />

of ley lines that connects all of the power points on<br />

the planet. Crystalline in nature, its geometrically spaced<br />

points of intersection form<br />

portals or openings, through<br />

which energy is exchanged<br />

between the Earth and the<br />

greater cosmos. If you do a<br />

little research it won’t be long<br />

before you notice that all of<br />

the ancient megalithic structures<br />

on this planet are located<br />

either at the main intersections<br />

of the Earth grid or on the ley lines that connect them.<br />

Most of us think of the Bermuda Triangle as “That weird<br />

place where ships, planes, and people vanish into thin<br />

air for no apparent reason.” In actual fact, the Bermuda<br />

Triangle is a dimensional portal, a location where the veil<br />

that separates the third dimension from the higher realms<br />

is wide open. From another point of view, it is a place where<br />

anomalies in the gravity wave cause anything that passes<br />

through that area of the Atlantic Ocean to disappear.<br />

Occult literature tells us that this point on the globe was<br />

once the western coast of the Atlantean continent. According<br />

to writers on the subject, the high priests of Atlantis<br />

were sorcerers who, among other things, happened to be<br />

experts in the realm of crystal technology. <strong>The</strong> main crystal<br />

that provided all of the power for everything in Atlantis was<br />

situated right where the Bermuda Triangle is now. About<br />

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Columns<br />

32 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

<strong>The</strong> Outside<br />

Story<br />

By Brett Amy<br />

<strong>The</strong>len<br />

A macabre menagerie<br />

Last year, I showed up to work on <strong>Oct</strong>. 31 in one of my<br />

old park ranger’s uniforms, torn to fake-bloody shreds in<br />

an imaginary bear attack. One year earlier, I drank smoothies<br />

for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because, ironically,<br />

my prosthetic vampire fangs were too fragile to sink into<br />

solid food. As a twentysomething<br />

undertaking a year of national service,<br />

I once asked my supervisor if I<br />

couldn’t make a few small modifications<br />

to my uniform and come to<br />

work on the last day of <strong>Oct</strong>ober as<br />

an “AmeriCorpse.” (He said no.)<br />

In other words, I am a lifelong<br />

Halloween enthusiast. Costumes.<br />

Ghost stories. Jack o’lanterns. I love<br />

it all.<br />

As a biologist, however, I’m no<br />

fan of typecasting local wildlife<br />

species as mere spooky stereotypes.<br />

Owls aren’t portenders of doom, but precision<br />

predators who’d be delighted to help you with your mouse<br />

problem. Bats aren’t demons with wings, but devoted<br />

mothers and important allies in the fight against mosquito-borne<br />

illness – and, for the most part, tucked snugly<br />

away in their winter hibernacula by the time Halloween<br />

rolls around in New England. Spiders? Underappreciated<br />

fiber artists.<br />

That said, there are species whose appearance or actions<br />

border on the macabre. In the spirit of the season, I<br />

hereby offer this brief introduction to a few who haunt the<br />

Northeast:<br />

Ghost Plant. Also called corpse plant, ghost pipe, or<br />

Indian pipe (Monotropa uniflora), this forest dweller takes<br />

on a ghostly pallor as it rises, white and sometimes nearly<br />

translucent, out of the leaf litter in summer and early autumn.<br />

Its spectral appearance stems from a lack of chlorophyll,<br />

the pigment responsible not only for photosynthesis<br />

but also for the green hue found in most other plants.<br />

True to its name, the ghost plant shirks sunlight and survives<br />

by feeding off the energy of the living – in this case by<br />

sapping nutrients from mycorrhizal fungi associated with<br />

the roots of nearby trees.<br />

Dodder’s (Cuscuta spp.)<br />

many common names<br />

underscore its ghoulish<br />

behavior. Known<br />

alternately as strangleweed,<br />

hellvine, witch’s<br />

guts, or devil’s hair, this<br />

wide-ranging parasite<br />

grows in dense, tangled<br />

strands that resemble<br />

orange silly string or,<br />

for the gastronomically<br />

inclined, angel hair<br />

pasta. When a dodder<br />

seedling finds its way to a<br />

host plant, it twines around the host’s stem, penetrates the<br />

host’s vascular tissue with specialized, nutrient-absorbing<br />

structures known as haustoria (from the Latin for “thing<br />

that draws in”), and uses the vampirized nutrients to fuel<br />

rapid growth, attaching and re-attaching itself to the host<br />

until it looks like Cousin Itt’s mane. In something straight<br />

out of a horror flick, even if the entire external portion of a<br />

strangleweed plant has been killed, it can re-sprout completely<br />

from the haustoria embedded in its victim’s body.<br />

Butcher Birds. Northern shrikes (Lanius borealis),<br />

whose grisly dining habits have earned them the nickname<br />

“butcher birds,” breed in the taiga of the far North,<br />

wintering in southern Canada and the northern U.S. In<br />

the words of Michelle Donahue, who wrote about shrikes<br />

for Audubon in 2016: “Shrikes are sweet-looking songbirds<br />

[who] rip their prey to shreds and festoon their territory<br />

with their mutilated corpses.” Technically speaking, these<br />

collections of mutilated corpses are called “larders,” and<br />

they may contain up to a dozen vertebrate prey (mice,<br />

shrews, voles, other songbirds) at a time, impaled on sharp<br />

objects in conspicuous places. Predated birds are generally<br />

hung by their neck, head, or shoulders, mammals by<br />

their forelimbs. Invertebrate prey, such as grasshoppers,<br />

are sometimes speared while still alive.<br />

Dead Man’s Fingers. <strong>The</strong> fruiting bodies of the fungus<br />

Xylaria polymorpha occasionally appear solo, but<br />

more commonly emerge from the base of decaying tree<br />

stumps in clusters of two to five finger-shaped growths<br />

– looking not unlike, say, the blackened fingers of the<br />

undead slowly pushing their way up from the bowels of<br />

the earth.<br />

Bleeding Tooth Fungus. For sheer fake gore, the<br />

bleeding tooth fungus (Hydnellum peckii) is unrivaled.<br />

When their fruiting bodies are young, thick red liquid<br />

oozes through dozens of pores on the mushroom caps,<br />

leaving the distinct impression that they’ve just been<br />

visited by a coven of ravenous vampires. It’s not true<br />

blood, of course, but the droplets do contain an anticoagulant.<br />

Look for it among the pine needles on coniferous<br />

forest floors.<br />

Brett Amy <strong>The</strong>len is science director at the Harris Center<br />

for Conservation<br />

Education<br />

in Hancock. <strong>The</strong><br />

illustration for<br />

this column was<br />

drawn by Adelaide<br />

Tyrol. <strong>The</strong> Outside<br />

Story is assigned<br />

by Northern Woodlands<br />

magazine<br />

and sponsored<br />

by the Wellborn<br />

Ecology Fund of<br />

the New Hampshire<br />

Charitable<br />

Foundation.<br />

<strong>The</strong> investment<br />

risk you’ve never<br />

heard of<br />

Knowledgeable investors are aware that investing in the<br />

capital markets presents any number of risks—interestrate<br />

risk, company risk, and market risk. Risk is an inseparable<br />

companion to the potential for long-term growth.<br />

Some of the investment risks we face can be mitigated<br />

through diversification.<br />

As an investor, you face another, less-known risk for<br />

which the market does not compensate<br />

you, nor can it be easily<br />

reduced through diversification.<br />

Yet it may be the biggest challenge<br />

to the sustainability of your retirement<br />

income.<br />

This risk is called the sequence<br />

of returns risk.<br />

Money<br />

Matters<br />

By Kevin <strong>The</strong>issen<br />

<strong>The</strong> sequence of returns risk<br />

refers to the uncertainty of the<br />

order of returns an investor will<br />

receive over an extended period<br />

of time. As Milton Friedman once<br />

observed, you should, “Never try<br />

to walk across a river just because it has an average depth of<br />

four feet.”<br />

Mr. Freidman’s point was that averages may hide<br />

dangerous possibilities. This is especially true with the<br />

stock market. You may be comfortable that the market will<br />

deliver its historical average return over the long-term, but<br />

you can never know when<br />

you will be receiving the<br />

varying positive and negative<br />

returns that comprise<br />

the average. <strong>The</strong> order in<br />

which you receive these<br />

returns can make a big difference.<br />

Averages<br />

may hide<br />

dangerous<br />

possibilities.<br />

For instance, a hypothetical market decline of <strong>30</strong>% is not<br />

to be unexpected. However, would you rather experience<br />

this decline when you have relatively small retirement savings,<br />

or at the moment you are ready to retire — when your<br />

savings may never be more valuable? Without a doubt, the<br />

former scenario is preferable, but the timing of that large<br />

potential decline is out of your control.<br />

<strong>The</strong> sequence of returns risk is especially problematic<br />

while you are in retirement. Down years, in combination<br />

with portfolio withdrawals taken to provide retirement<br />

income, have the potential to seriously damage the ability<br />

of your savings to recover sufficiently, even as the markets<br />

fully rebound.<br />

If you are nearing retirement, or already in retirement,<br />

it’s time to give serious consideration to the “sequence of<br />

returns risk” and ask questions about how you can better<br />

manage your portfolio.<br />

Kevin <strong>The</strong>issen is the owner of HWC Financial in Ludlow.<br />

><br />

Starbucks: Project cleared all requirements and review; opening planned for spring<br />

from page 1<br />

in <strong>Nov</strong>ember 2018. As part of the sale, OceanGate acquired<br />

the development plans for Starbucks. <strong>The</strong> original plans<br />

also require an access easement with CVS.<br />

On behalf of the property owners, Patrick Griffin of<br />

Enman Kesselring Consulting Engineers in Rutland filed an<br />

application with the city of Rutland for undisputed changes<br />

to the site plan to accommodate the retail shops and a<br />

250-square foot patio seating area and additional dumpster<br />

space.<br />

<strong>The</strong> amendments arose during construction and would<br />

accommodate the tenants and change some parking lot<br />

configuration. <strong>The</strong> Development Review Board met in late<br />

September <strong>2019</strong> to go over the revised site plan.<br />

Kelly said by phone last week that there have been no<br />

public objections to the changes. “It’s very straightforward,”<br />

said Kelly. “<strong>The</strong> changes were minor and easily approved.”<br />

Kelly related at the September meeting that a traffic<br />

study was done and was deemed sufficient for all expected<br />

retailers. Kelly reviewed the study in detail and agreed that<br />

the requested site plan changes should cause less of a traffic<br />

impact since the retailers would be less intense than high<br />

turnover restaurants.<br />

Griffin related that the state’s wastewater permit had<br />

been issued for up to 50 seats per tenant based on use<br />

categories identified by the zoning ordinance versus the<br />

specific tenant since the tenant isn’t always known.<br />

In its architectural review at the July 31, 2018 DRB<br />

meeting, Nicole Kesselring of Enman Engineering gave<br />

an overview of the proposed project. <strong>The</strong> plan was to raze<br />

the former Royal Hearthside house and construct a 6,000<br />

square foot building with 43 parking spaces and implement<br />

a robust landscaping plan. Access for the drive-thru would<br />

be on the north side and run parallel with Route 7.<br />

At that meeting, issues were raised about the fit of the<br />

proposed building design with the North Main Street of<br />

old Rutland that some members wanted reworked in<br />

order to be more compatible with historic architecture. It<br />

was agreed that a design with roof shapes, fenestration<br />

and exterior materials should fit with the district. At the<br />

Aug. 29, 2018 DRB meeting, a redesign was presented.<br />

Board members agreed that it was an improvement to the<br />

estimated $3 million project.


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> COLUMNS • 33<br />

Last week, my son decided that it<br />

might be fun to throw his sharpened<br />

pencil into the ceiling of his school<br />

classroom (apparently, he stuck it in<br />

clean on the first try). But no sooner<br />

was he reveling in his accuracy than<br />

his teacher asked him to leave the<br />

classroom<br />

and head to<br />

the principal’s<br />

office.<br />

I, of course,<br />

heard about<br />

this via an<br />

email before<br />

<strong>The</strong> Movie<br />

Diary<br />

By Dom Cioffi<br />

the day was<br />

out. I did<br />

the parental<br />

dance and<br />

apologized<br />

on behalf of my son and promised<br />

that we would be speaking about his<br />

behavior immediately after school.<br />

When I picked him up at the bus<br />

stop, he had a solemn look on his face.<br />

He threw his backpack in the backseat<br />

and then climbed into the front.<br />

Before I could say anything, he started<br />

talking.<br />

“Listen,” he explained. “I know<br />

that sticking a pencil into the ceiling<br />

is the absolute dumbest thing I could<br />

ever do, and that there is zero excuse<br />

for this kind of behavior. You should<br />

definitely punish me and, in fact, here<br />

is my phone. I don’t deserve it.”<br />

He then reached over and placed<br />

his cellphone on the console, sat back<br />

in the seat, took a deep breath, and<br />

closed his eyes.<br />

I was somewhat flustered. He had<br />

virtually negated all the lecturing I had<br />

planned; there was nothing left to say.<br />

I sat quiet for a moment and contemplated<br />

whether he had just executed a<br />

brilliant play on my psyche.<br />

. Your quickest path to redemption<br />

is too simply admit complete and utter<br />

<strong>The</strong>re’s an app for that<br />

responsibility.<br />

In this instance, he had obviously<br />

taken my advice.<br />

My son knows I have a temper.<br />

While I would never physically hurt<br />

him, I am not opposed to raising my<br />

voice to draw home an important<br />

point. Throwing a pencil into the ceiling<br />

with a teacher in close proximity<br />

was a perfect example of something<br />

that might push me to the point of<br />

being red-faced and excessively loud<br />

in my criticism.<br />

A few days later, while I was telling<br />

some coworkers about this situation,<br />

one young woman piped in to claim<br />

that I was soft in my parenting. I argued<br />

that if she experienced one of my<br />

rants, she might think differently.<br />

“Ha!” she laughed. “Anyone can<br />

handle a little verbal berating. You<br />

should see what I grew up with.” I<br />

found her comment interesting, so I<br />

bit and asked what made her childhood<br />

so difficult.<br />

That’s when she began telling a<br />

small group of us how her father used<br />

to punish she and her sister whenever<br />

they misbehaved.<br />

Apparently, they lived on a small<br />

farm in a rural area. <strong>The</strong> girls’ father always<br />

told them that wolves inhabited<br />

the forest and periodically, when they<br />

were very hungry, would wander into<br />

the cornfield and beyond searching<br />

for fresh food.<br />

He assured the girls that he had<br />

traps set up that protected the house,<br />

but they always played in the yard<br />

with a sense of minor panic that a wolf<br />

might wander in.<br />

Things got sketchier when the girls<br />

misbehaved. That’s when their father<br />

would grab them and place them on<br />

the back porch, inevitably around<br />

dusk. He would then lock the door<br />

and yell out the window at the top of<br />

his lungs, “Release the wolves!” after<br />

which he would howl like a wolf.<br />

<strong>The</strong>ir father would wait a minute<br />

or two and then rush out the door<br />

to drag them in as they screamed in<br />

agony. Eventually they caught onto his<br />

scheme, but to this day she says she<br />

gets nauseous whenever she hears an<br />

animal howl.<br />

This week’s feature, “Countdown,”<br />

was also a bit nauseating – not because<br />

of the fear it meant to impart,<br />

but because it was one of the more<br />

ridiculous premises I’ve ever seen<br />

made into a motion picture.<br />

<strong>The</strong> film revolves around the idea<br />

that there is an app that has a countdown<br />

clock to the day you will die.<br />

One young woman discovers she only<br />

has days to live. <strong>The</strong> whole movie is<br />

her trying to outsmart the app.<br />

It’s Halloween so you have to expect<br />

a few films will try to capitalize on<br />

the public’s desire for terror. While this<br />

movie offered up several tense moments,<br />

it never succeeded in delivering<br />

a truly scary experience.<br />

A spineless “C-” for “Countdown.”<br />

><br />

Horoscopes: About the Bermuda Triangle<br />

from page 31<br />

13,000 years ago, when by all. <strong>The</strong> Druids weren’t<br />

Atlantis sank beneath the just whistling Dixie when<br />

waves, that crystal exploded.<br />

they gathered at Stone-<br />

Some say that its henge on <strong>Oct</strong>. 31. Among<br />

remnants have a lot to do other things, Stonehenge<br />

with why the energies in the is a battery. It is one of the<br />

Triangle are so mysterious. Earth’s power cells. During<br />

So what does all of this their Samhain rituals the<br />

have to do with the Pleiades Druid High Priests were<br />

and Halloween? <strong>The</strong> Pleiades,<br />

attuning to cosmic forces<br />

also known as the <strong>The</strong> that would recharge and<br />

Seven Sisters, is a group of ‘enlighten’ the entire<br />

stars in the Taurus constellation.<br />

planet for the coming year.<br />

<strong>The</strong>y are part of “How all of the above<br />

<strong>The</strong> Big Dipper. One of the got reduced to Trick-orseven<br />

stars that make up Treat is a good question.<br />

the Pleiades is Alcyone. Interestingly, we wouldn’t<br />

Alcyone is a central star even know about Halloween<br />

around which the entire<br />

here in the States<br />

galaxy revolves.<br />

if the British monarchy<br />

Here’s a passage from hadn’t engineered the<br />

“<strong>The</strong> Secret Doctrine” potato famine and driven<br />

written by Helena Blavatsky:<br />

millions of Highland-<br />

“Back in ancient ers and Irish people out<br />

times, the Pleiades were of the realm. When the<br />

also referred to as the immigrants wound up in<br />

Atlantides, which gives North America, it was they<br />

us our first clue to their who brought the Samhain<br />

connection to Atlantis. traditions with them. That<br />

Relative to our solar system<br />

was in the late 18 th and<br />

they are said to be the 19 th centuries. Since then,<br />

source of electrical energy. what was actually meant<br />

<strong>The</strong>ir position, directly to be a deeply sacred moment<br />

over the Bermuda Triangle<br />

in time has devolved<br />

vortex on Halloween night into a dark and meaningless<br />

becomes significant in<br />

masquerade.”<br />

that, it is at that time that When I think of these<br />

the Pleiades charge the things I have to ask myself,<br />

entire Earth Grid with a ‘What world are we in?’<br />

huge amount of electricity,<br />

‘How did things get this<br />

along with informa-<br />

nuts?’ It might be good to<br />

tion from the higher consider that something<br />

realms. You might say that entirely different is going<br />

everything on this planet on. This is an incredibly<br />

gets a cosmic re-boot on holy and powerful time.<br />

Halloween night.<br />

Let me leave you with that<br />

“ <strong>The</strong>re was a time and invite you to take what<br />

when these things were you can from this week’s<br />

known and understood ‘scopes.<br />

PUZZLES on page 25<br />

CROSSWORD PUZZLE<br />

><br />

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week’s movie<br />

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34 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

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Used as a law office over<br />

<strong>44</strong> years, suitable for any<br />

office; Configuration may be<br />

changed; Parking; Located<br />

in Rutland City on busiest<br />

highway in the County. Enjoy<br />

the benefits of Vermont living:<br />

skiing, hiking, camping,<br />

lakes for sailing, fishing,<br />

boating. $75,000. Call 802-<br />

775-5066, 802-459-3350,<br />

802-558-2383.<br />

KILLINGTON—2 BDRM<br />

1.5 bath condo, <strong>Mountain</strong><br />

Green bldg. 2. FP, ski lockers,<br />

health club membership.<br />

$92K. Owner, 800-<br />

576-5696.<br />

LAND FOR SALE: Improved<br />

building lot in Killington<br />

neighborhood with ski home<br />

benefits. Views. Call 802-<br />

422-9500.<br />

ERA MOUNTAIN Real Estate,<br />

1913 US Rt. 4, Killington—killingtonvermontrealestate.com<br />

or call one<br />

of our real estate experts for<br />

all of your real estate needs<br />

including Short Term & Long<br />

Term Rentals & Sales. 802-<br />

775-0340.<br />

KILLINGTON PICO RE-<br />

ALTY Our Realtors have<br />

special training in buyer<br />

representation to ensure a<br />

positive buying experience.<br />

Looking to sell? Our unique<br />

marketing plan features your<br />

very own website. 802-422-<br />

3600, KillingtonPicoRealty.<br />

com 2814 Killington Rd., Killington.<br />

(next to Choices<br />

Restaurant).<br />

KILLINGTON VALLEY<br />

REAL ESTATE Specializing<br />

in the Killington region<br />

for Sales and Listings for<br />

Homes, Condos & Land<br />

as well as Winter seasonal<br />

rentals. Call, email or stop<br />

in. We are the red farm<br />

house located next to the<br />

Wobbly Barn. PO Box 236,<br />

2281 Killington Rd., Killington.<br />

802-422-3610, bret@<br />

killingtonvalleyrealestate.<br />

com.<br />

KILLINGTON SHARES<br />

off Access Road. Fun established<br />

large ski house.<br />

Weekend, mid-week & year<br />

round usage. All new construction.<br />

Shares available<br />

781-962-3425<br />

PEAK PROPERTY GROUP<br />

at KW Vermont. VTproperties.net.<br />

802-353-1604. Marni@peakpropertyrealestate.<br />

com. Specializing in homes/<br />

condos/land/commercial/<br />

investments. Representing<br />

sellers & buyers all over<br />

Central Vt.<br />

THE PERFORMANCE<br />

GROUP real estate 1810<br />

Killington Rd., Killington.<br />

802-422-32<strong>44</strong> or 800-338-<br />

3735, vthomes.com, email<br />

info@vthomes.com. As the<br />

name implies “We preform<br />

for you!”<br />

PRESTIGE REAL Estate<br />

of Killington, 2922 Killington<br />

Rd., Killington. Specializing<br />

in the listing &<br />

sales of Killington Condos,<br />

Homes, & Land. Call 802-<br />

422-3923. prestigekillington.<br />

com.<br />

SKI COUNTRY REAL ES-<br />

TATE, 335 Killington Rd., Killington.<br />

802-775-5111. Ski-<br />

CountryRealEstate.com – 8<br />

agents servicing: Killington,<br />

Bridgewater, Mendon, Pittsfield,<br />

Plymouth, Stockbridge,<br />

Woodstock areas.Sales &<br />

Winter Seasonal Rentals.<br />

Open Monday-Saturday: 10<br />

am – 4 pm. Sunday by appointment.<br />

OPENING<br />

COACHING POSITIONS<br />

FOR<br />

AMERICAN LEGION POST 31<br />

BASEBALL: 2020 BASEBALL SEASON<br />

Open positions for Head Coach<br />

& 2 Assistants<br />

Please send Resume and/or Documents & References to:<br />

Ron Fairbanks<br />

12 Tremont St.<br />

Rutland, Vt 05701<br />

802-558-3965<br />

KILLINGTON VALLEY- <strong>44</strong>.7<br />

ACRES - $229,900.00, high<br />

above the bustle of daily<br />

life, peaceful views of the<br />

farm valley below, views of<br />

city lights, pico, & killington.<br />

year round stream, room<br />

to roam, plenty of trails for<br />

hiking, mountain biking,<br />

ready to build on with state<br />

approved septic design, utilities<br />

at road. close to skiing,<br />

rutland’s downtown & excellent<br />

hospital. Call Owner For<br />

details 802-236-1314<br />

PITTSFORD CONDO For<br />

Sale 1BR/1BA. Walk out.<br />

Completely updated in 2015.<br />

Fireplace, maple cabinets<br />

and flooring. Storage locker,<br />

coin-op laundry. HOA $85/<br />

monthly. Leased @ $850/<br />

monthly in <strong>2019</strong> w/selling<br />

clause. Primary, vacation<br />

home or investment. MLS#<br />

4766606 $80,250 Amy@<br />

AdirmontRealEstate.com 4<br />

Carver St., Brandon 802-<br />

989-1866<br />

KILLINGTON VALLEY 237<br />

Acres - Plymouth. Recorded<br />

survey in 3 lots, abundant<br />

road frontage on Class 4,<br />

near lakes & skiing. Being<br />

sold with timber, NOT in<br />

current use. Timber cruise<br />

available. $259,900. Call<br />

Owner 802-236-1314<br />

COMMERCIAL<br />

SPACE<br />

COMMERCIAL SPACE<br />

AVAILABLE with another<br />

well established business.<br />

Small or large square footage.<br />

Close to ski shop, restaurant<br />

and lodging. Great<br />

location for any business.<br />

Call 802-345-5867<br />

MOUNTAIN GREEN Condominiums<br />

in Killington has<br />

commercial space available<br />

from <strong>30</strong>0 to 4,000 sq feet for<br />

retail, food-service, office or<br />

other commercial ventures.<br />

Call us to discuss what might<br />

work for you. 802-779-91<strong>44</strong><br />

RENTALS<br />

ESTABLISHED WEEKEND<br />

ski house has space available.<br />

Bedrooms have private<br />

baths, no bunks, two per<br />

room, singles or couples,<br />

on the Access Rd. walkway<br />

close to nightlife. No full<br />

timers/pets/children. Send<br />

inquiries to tlr@gmail.com.<br />

WINTER FAMILY SKI shares<br />

available! Beautiful 6BD,<br />

outdoor hot tub, close to everything!<br />

Full or half shares.<br />

We have two teens. Dec<br />

to April. Call Sue at 781-<br />

234-8123. Cedarwalk at<br />

Killington.<br />

PICO Village Winter Rental:<br />

3 BR 2 BA Furnished and<br />

equipped. Short walk to the<br />

lifts. $14,000 plus utilities.<br />

Call Louise Harrison, 802-<br />

747-8<strong>44</strong>4.<br />

KILLINGTON ROYAL<br />

FLUSH Rentals/Property<br />

management. Specializing<br />

in condos/winter & summer<br />

rentals. Andrea Weymouth,<br />

Owner. www.killingtonroyalflush.com,<br />

802-746-4040.<br />

NEWLY RENOVATED large<br />

1 bedroom apartment. Mendon.<br />

Includes everything. No<br />

pets. $1,150/mth plus deposit.<br />

Jamie 802-558-02<strong>44</strong>.<br />

KILLINGTON SEASONAL<br />

RENTAL 4 BEDROOMS,<br />

2 bathrooms, hot tub, flat<br />

driveway, fireplace and only<br />

1 mile to Skyeship. <strong>Nov</strong>-May<br />

$12,000 plus utilities. Call<br />

Jack at 516-993-3799 or<br />

973-478-0893<br />

ROOM FOR Rent 1 Bedroom<br />

w/Private Bath, 1<br />

Queen Bed and hi-ceiling.<br />

Killington Forest and <strong>Mountain</strong><br />

View windows. $<strong>30</strong>0/wk,<br />

$200/3-day, $100/day. Journeys<br />

End Manor (802)770-<br />

8786<br />

KILLINGTON YEAR<br />

ROUND apt rental 3-BRs<br />

1.5 baths, partially furnished.<br />

References. Judy 802-345-<br />

0719<br />

KILLINGTON 2 BEDROOM,<br />

1 Bath Apartment for rent.<br />

Seasonal rental at the top<br />

of the Killington Road, furnished.<br />

$1,500/month. Utilities<br />

included. 802-770-2375.<br />

APARTMENT FOR RENT- 2<br />

Bedroom in-law apartment<br />

with private entrance. 6<br />

miles to Killington, 6 miles to<br />

Rutland. Photos on request.<br />

None smokers, pets ok. All<br />

included. 1st month rent and<br />

last month rent. 3 months<br />

minimum stay. Reference<br />

required. Call or text 802-<br />

770-8786<br />

3-BEDROOM apartment, 1<br />

bath, washer/dryer, full kitchen<br />

eat-in, living room, dining<br />

room, hot tub, deck. Central<br />

location off Killington Road.<br />

Top level of duplex. $18,000<br />

seasonal rental, plus utilities<br />

and security deposit. Call<br />

Jamie 802-558-8550.<br />

2-BEDROOM apartment,<br />

ground level, full bath, full<br />

kitchen eat-in, living room,<br />

dining room. $12,000 seasonal<br />

rental, plus utilities and<br />

security deposit. Call Jamie<br />

802-558-8550.<br />

SKI SHARES/Full rooms<br />

available. Prime location in<br />

the heart of Killington. 2B<br />

per room/singles. Lots of<br />

amenities. 917-796-4289,<br />

outdoordiva7@yahoo.com.<br />

RENT WHOLE DUPLEX.<br />

5 bedrooms 2 separate entrance.<br />

First unit: ground<br />

floor, 2-bedrooms, full bath,<br />

full kitchen eat-in, living<br />

room, dining room. Second<br />

unit: Upper level 3-bedroom,<br />

1 bath, washer/dryer, full<br />

kitchen eat-in, living room,<br />

dining room, hot tub, deck.<br />

Central location off Killington<br />

Road. $<strong>30</strong>,000 plus utilities<br />

and security deposit. Call<br />

Jamie 802-558-8550.<br />

PET FRIENDLY LITTLE<br />

TINY HOME for rent. 800<br />

square feet. Full house.<br />

Central location 2 miles from<br />

lifts just off Killington Road.<br />

2 bedrooms. Completely<br />

renovated. Fireplace and<br />

deck. Seasonal rental starts<br />

mid-December. $15,000.<br />

OR $1850/month for a year<br />

rental. Plus utilities and security<br />

deposit. Call Jason<br />

802-342-3456<br />

FURNISHED ONE-BED-<br />

ROOM CONDO FOR<br />

RENT. First floor, on site<br />

coin laundry, community hot<br />

tub, wood stove and wood<br />

available, no pets. Minutes<br />

to Killington. Wintergreen<br />

condos. $650 a month plus<br />

utilities. Call 802 779 2712<br />

or 802 345 4377<br />

SEASONAL RENTAL RUT-<br />

LAND <strong>Nov</strong>ember 1 to April<br />

1 -2 bedroom (sleeps 3) 1<br />

bath, upper unit, furnished,<br />

garage/ off street parking.<br />

$7,500. (dates and payment<br />

options are flexible) 802-<br />

345-3913 txt/ call<br />

LUDLOW, VT SKI HOUSE<br />

FOR SEASONAL RENTAL:<br />

This property is 1.5 miles<br />

from Okemo <strong>Mountain</strong> and<br />

Jackson Gore, a popular ski<br />

resort. Sleeps 8. 3 bedrooms:<br />

2 queen size, 4 bunk<br />

beds. 1.5 baths, kitchen,<br />

dining area, TV and internet.<br />

On-site parking and snow removal<br />

included. Not offered<br />

as a daily/weekly rental.<br />

Many seasonal activities<br />

located nearby. We are a pet<br />

friendly home. Price for the<br />

season of 11/15/19 - 4/15/20<br />

is $7,500.00. Contact Nick<br />

at 860-690-7000<br />

SEASONAL RENTAL 5<br />

MILES FROM THE KIL-<br />

LINGTON ACCESS ROAD-<br />

Completely renovated 4-<br />

bedroom 3 bath home with<br />

fireplace. Ideal for families.<br />

no pets, no smoking $10,500<br />

for the season. Jack 860-<br />

9<strong>44</strong>-1180<br />

HOME FOR RENT. NEW<br />

CONSTRUCTION 3 bedroom,<br />

3 bath on large country<br />

estate deck overlooks<br />

bubbling brook west woodstock,<br />

15 minutes to gondola<br />

and bear mtn, available <strong>Nov</strong><br />

15- April <strong>30</strong> $11,000 plus<br />

utilities. Contact Dan (802)<br />

672-3579 or (857)207-2422


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> CLASSIFIEDS • 35<br />

FOR SALE<br />

MASTER BEDROOM furniture:<br />

Dresser, bureau, 2<br />

night tables. Frank, 802-353-<br />

8177. $100.<br />

FIREWOOD for sale, we<br />

stack. Rudi, 802-672-3719.<br />

PIRELLI SNOW TIRES.<br />

Four 235/60/R18 tires. Used<br />

one winter season. Call<br />

Dotty 802-342-6150<br />

NEW GREGORY HIKING<br />

frame pack for the serious<br />

hiker. $250 list price, Sale<br />

$100. 802-773-7687<br />

MENS XL SKI jacket and<br />

pants. Original USA ski team<br />

outfit, impressive. $100.<br />

802-773-7687<br />

SPLIT WOOD FOR SALE.<br />

16-inch. Mostly Rock Maple.<br />

Killington area. $275/cord<br />

you pick up, $320 delivered.<br />

802-779-1710<br />

2013 Toyota Corolla 14,000<br />

miles, good condition,$8000,<br />

802-558-7974 leave a message<br />

MOVING SALE-2008 JEEP<br />

GRAND CHEROKEE,<br />

craftsman riding mower,<br />

kenmore sewing machine<br />

and more. Casa Bella Inn,<br />

3911 Rt. 100, Pittsfield, VT<br />

802-746-8943 or 802-282-<br />

28<strong>30</strong><br />

ASSISTED<br />

HOUSING<br />

FOR RENT NOTICE OF AC-<br />

CEPTING APPLICATIONS<br />

RUTLAND-EP MANAGE-<br />

MENT CORP IS ACCEPT-<br />

ING APPLICATIONS for our<br />

Waiting List for efficiency,<br />

one-bedroom, and accessible<br />

units at <strong>The</strong> Bardwell<br />

House. Wheelchair accessible<br />

building. Wheelchair<br />

accessible laundry on site.<br />

Meals on Wheels congregate<br />

meal site Monday-<br />

Friday. Services Coordinator<br />

on staff. 24-Hour emergency<br />

maintenance. Downtown<br />

location. Income limits apply.<br />

Ten3719ant pays approximately<br />

<strong>30</strong>% of monthly<br />

income toward rent-utilities<br />

included. Must be 62 years<br />

of age or older or disabled.<br />

Verification of eligibility required.<br />

For application call<br />

802-775-1100 ext 2 or e-mail<br />

lisa@epmanagement.com.<br />

Equal Housing Opportunity.<br />

FREE<br />

FREE COUCH blue plaid,<br />

comfy, clean and ready for<br />

a new home. Must pick up.<br />

Pico. 734-777-5724.<br />

FREE LOWREY electric<br />

organ MX2. 802-417-5131.<br />

FREE REMOVAL of scrap<br />

metal & car batteries. Matty,<br />

802-353-5617.<br />

SERVICES<br />

CHIMNEYS CLEANED,<br />

lined, built, repaired. 802-<br />

349-0339.<br />

POWER WASHING SPE-<br />

CIALISTS. Call Jeff at First<br />

Impressions, 802-558-4609.<br />

LOT CLEARING and stumping.<br />

802-672-3719, 802-558-<br />

6172.<br />

BEAUREGARD PAINTING,<br />

<strong>30</strong> years experience, 802-<br />

436-1337.<br />

WANTED<br />

HIGHEST PRICES PAID<br />

- Back home in Vermont<br />

and hope to see new and<br />

returning customers for the<br />

purchase, sale and qualified<br />

appraisal of coins, currency,<br />

stamps, precious metals in<br />

any form, old and high quality<br />

watches and time pieces,<br />

sports and historical items.<br />

Free estimates. No obligation.<br />

Member ANA, APS,<br />

NAWCC, New England Appraisers<br />

Association. Royal<br />

Barnard 802-775-0085.<br />

EMPLOYMENT<br />

PAINTER EXTERIOR<br />

through Fall season. Drivers<br />

license required. 802-<br />

770-5543.<br />

WRIGHT CONSTRUCTION<br />

now accepting applications<br />

for full-time carpenters &<br />

laborers. Health ins, paid<br />

vacations, 401K. Competitive<br />

wages. 802-259-2094/<br />

info@wrightconstruction.<br />

com.<br />

we offer excellent<br />

benefits, including:<br />

PUB/PREP COOK needed.<br />

Call Inn at Long Trail for interview.<br />

802-775-7181.<br />

BIKE MECHANIC/Retail<br />

Help. Busy Killington bike<br />

shop looking for part-time<br />

seasonal help. Start immediately.<br />

Experience preferred,<br />

but training available for the<br />

right persons. Competitive<br />

salary DOE. EOE. Send<br />

qualifications, availability<br />

and contact info to tracy@<br />

snowsportsmarketing.com.<br />

PART TIME Waitstaff needed<br />

at Drewski’s. Please call<br />

802-422-3816, email or stop<br />

in for an application.<br />

MOGULS SPORTS PUB<br />

help wanted: waitstaff, kitchen<br />

staff, line-cook, bartender,<br />

dishwasher, doorperson.<br />

Apply in person at Moguls<br />

M-F, on the Killington Access<br />

Road. 802-422-4777.<br />

SNOWMAKING Killington<br />

Resort is now hiring. All positions.<br />

Training, uniforms,<br />

perks provided. Visit www.<br />

killington.com/jobs to view<br />

all open positions or our<br />

Welcome Center at 4763<br />

Killington Rd. (800) <strong>30</strong>0-<br />

9095 EOE.<br />

CASHIER: A.M. preferable.<br />

PT/FT/Year round. Competitive<br />

wage. Killington. Please<br />

call 802-558-0793.<br />

ASSISTANT PROPERTY<br />

MANAGER- ski pass with<br />

no black out dates <strong>The</strong> Killington<br />

Group is looking for<br />

motivated individual to assist<br />

with the day-to-day operation<br />

of our rental and property<br />

management businesses.<br />

Task include maintenance<br />

activities and property inspections.<br />

Winter seasonal<br />

or year-round position. Valid<br />

drivers license and vehicle<br />

required. Email resume to<br />

gail@killingtongroup.com or<br />

call 802-422-2<strong>30</strong>0<br />

We are looking for the following seasonal positions:<br />

call center representatives<br />

In North Clarendon & Manchester<br />

distribution center & operations clerks<br />

In North Clarendon<br />

• 40% discount at our<br />

stores and online<br />

is hiring for our<br />

Holiday hustle<br />

& Bustle<br />

Overtime Encouraged!<br />

EARN UP TO A<br />

$1000 End-of-Season Bonus!<br />

• Potential for<br />

full-time employment<br />

Visit www.vermontcountrystore.com<br />

Click on the CAREERS link at the bottom of the page.<br />

KILLINGTON SKI PATROL-<br />

NEW OPPORTUNITIES<br />

Killington is looking for individuals<br />

interested in keeping<br />

our mountain and guests<br />

safe. Visit www.killington.<br />

com/jobs to view all open<br />

positions or our Welcome<br />

Center at 4763 Killington Rd.<br />

(800)<strong>30</strong>0-9095 EOE<br />

KILLINGTON RESORT<br />

COOKS- Killington Resort,<br />

all skill levels, multiple locations.<br />

Uniforms, free meal<br />

and other perks provided.<br />

Visit www.killington.com/<br />

jobs o view all open positions<br />

or our Welcome Center<br />

at 4763 Killington Rd.<br />

(800)<strong>30</strong>0-9095 EOE<br />

KILLINGTON RESORT<br />

HOUSEKEEPING- Killington<br />

Resort is looking for<br />

energetic people to become<br />

a part of our housekeeping<br />

team. Condo’s and Killington<br />

Grand now hiring. Visit<br />

www.killington.com/jobs to<br />

view all open positions or<br />

our Welcome Center at 4763<br />

Killington Rd. (800)<strong>30</strong>0-9095<br />

EOE<br />

DELI: Sandwich/Prep cook.<br />

Experience would be great,<br />

but if you enjoy working with<br />

food, we will train. Competitive<br />

wage. Please call 802-<br />

558-0793.<br />

KILLINGTON DELI/Vt Liquor<br />

Outlet is hiring for deli/<br />

liquor store help. Year-round<br />

position, M-F. Access to ski<br />

pass. Apply in person at Killington<br />

Deli, Route 4.<br />

NORTH COUNTRY Property<br />

Management looking<br />

for hard working individuals<br />

to join our team. Full-time<br />

position providing building<br />

and grounds maintenance<br />

for properties in the Rutland/<br />

Killington, VT area. Must<br />

have valid drivers license<br />

and be able to work overtime<br />

during winter months<br />

for snow removal. Contact<br />

Jim at 802-773-4322 for<br />

interview.<br />

• Free on-site<br />

fitness center<br />

PEPPINO’S IS LOOKING<br />

FOR A PART TIME AND<br />

FULL TIME SOUS CHEF.<br />

Can you bump and jump in<br />

the kitchen? Stay cool and<br />

calm under pressure? Want<br />

to ski by day and work by<br />

night? Weekends a must.<br />

Closed Thanksgiving and<br />

Christmas. 18 plus per hour<br />

commensurate with experience.<br />

Contact Lou at Peppinosvt@comcast.net<br />

to set<br />

up interview.<br />

THE PLYMOUTH School<br />

House is seeking to hire a<br />

Program Director/Classroom<br />

Teacher for its Early<br />

Childhood Program. Contact<br />

Lauren Skaskiw at 802-417-<br />

6895.<br />

HOUSEKEEPER $25/hour.<br />

Text 212-727-2227.<br />

WANTED Need help getting<br />

app on internet. Computer<br />

savvy. App developed. Text<br />

212-727-2227.<br />

CHOICES RESTAURANT<br />

EXPERIENCED line cook<br />

with sautéed experience and<br />

waitstaff with wine knowledge.<br />

If interested, contact<br />

claudeschoices@yahoo.<br />

com/802-422-40<strong>30</strong><br />

Want to submit a classified?<br />

HAVE WINE KNOWL-<br />

EDGE? Hiring waitstaff<br />

with wine knowledge & PT<br />

host position. Email claudeschoices@yahoo.comor<br />

call<br />

802-422-40<strong>30</strong><br />

SEEKING MOTIVATED<br />

NEAT- freak with transportation<br />

for house and condo<br />

cleaning in Killington/Mendon<br />

area. Hours are flexible<br />

10-<strong>30</strong> hours per week, but<br />

must work some weekend.<br />

Pay based on experience.<br />

Call Jeremy 802-773-2<strong>30</strong>1<br />

BARTENDER NEEDED,<br />

PT Evenings for Pinnacle<br />

Spa Bar in Killington. $12/<br />

hr+tips. If interested email<br />

pinnaclevtpropmgmt@outlook.com<br />

or call 802-345-<br />

1918 for details.<br />

MANAGER and/or assistant<br />

for busy resort health club.<br />

Management experience a<br />

must. Water facility management<br />

important. Seasonal.<br />

Weekends and holidays.<br />

Also looking for attendants.<br />

Call Mike @ 802-779-91<strong>44</strong>.<br />

Email classifieds@mountaintimes.info or call<br />

802-422-2399. Rates are 50 cents per word, per week;<br />

free ads are free.<br />

Massage therapist and nail technician positions<br />

available full or part time. Getting ready for the busy<br />

winter season, will do additional training if needed.<br />

Contact Deanna at<br />

A Signature Day Spa 802-747-7726<br />

FREE SKI PASS<br />

ASSISTANT PROPERTY MANAGER<br />

-<br />

SKI PASS WITH NO BLACK OUT DATES<br />

<strong>The</strong> Killington Group is looking for motivated<br />

individual to assist with the day-to-day operations<br />

of our rental and property management business.<br />

Tasks include maintenance activities and property<br />

inspections. Ski pass with no blackout dates<br />

provided. Winter seasonal or year-round position.<br />

Valid driver’s license and vehicle required.<br />

Email resume to gail@thekillingtongroup.com<br />

or call 802-422-2<strong>30</strong>0


SERVICE DIRECTORY<br />

Service Directory<br />

36 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

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<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> SERVICE DIRECTORY • 37<br />

New offers look at ski<br />

industry’s transformation<br />

By Karen D. Lorentz<br />

“SKI Inc. 2020,” released on <strong>Oct</strong>. 29, is must reading<br />

for anyone interested in what’s happening in the<br />

ski industry or trying to keep track of the consolidations<br />

and emergence of major ski companies or understand<br />

the changes and how they are transforming<br />

the ski business.<br />

<strong>The</strong> subtitle may be long<br />

but says it all: “Alterra counters<br />

Vail Resorts; mega passes<br />

transform the landscape; the<br />

industry responds and flourishes.<br />

For skiing? A North<br />

American Renaissance.”<br />

And while some may worry<br />

about what mega passes<br />

and mega companies mean<br />

for the independents, the<br />

book offers a positive view<br />

for those ski areas that are<br />

well managed and maintain<br />

their loyal customer<br />

niches.<br />

“SKI Inc. 2020” is<br />

worth reading because<br />

author Chris Diamond<br />

is a <strong>44</strong>-year ski industry<br />

veteran and his editor<br />

and collaborator Andy<br />

Bigford has spent nearly<br />

40 years in ski-related<br />

publishing. <strong>The</strong>y know<br />

the subject inside<br />

out. That includes<br />

other major players<br />

— Powdr (Killington<br />

and Pico’s parent<br />

company) and Boyne<br />

Resorts, and the former Peak Resorts<br />

—which are covered in respective chapters.<br />

From SKI Inc. to SKI Inc. 2020<br />

Diamond’s memoir SKI Inc. launched in December<br />

2016, subtitled “My journey through four decades<br />

in the ski-resort business, from the founding entrepreneurs<br />

to mega-companies,” is a book that offered<br />

an “insider’s” view of the ski industry.<br />

Beyond sharing the workings of the ski industry<br />

and personal insights, the book included a look at<br />

the major conglomerates, trends and challenges, and<br />

Diamond’s thoughts about the future.<br />

Most notable was the chapter on Vail Resorts and a<br />

prediction: “Vail Resorts will also certainly find a way<br />

to enter the Northeastern market, regardless of the<br />

weather vagaries and the challenges of providing the<br />

‘Experience of a Lifetime’ under those conditions.”<br />

While the latter came true with acquisitions of<br />

Stowe <strong>Mountain</strong> Resort (2016), Okemo and Mount<br />

Sunapee (2018) and recent September purchase of<br />

Peak Resorts 17 properties (including Mount Snow<br />

and other eastern areas), Diamond acknowledges<br />

that he never foresaw the rise of a new company that<br />

would challenge Vail Resorts’ supremacy.<br />

But in early 2017, a new partnership of KSL Capital<br />

Partners, owner of Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows,<br />

and Henry Crown and Company, owners of<br />

Aspen, purchased Intrawest’s resorts.<br />

In Jan. 2018 they<br />

formed Alterra<br />

<strong>Mountain</strong> Company, a<br />

private company that<br />

would eventually own<br />

15 resorts; they also<br />

partnered with another<br />

25-plus resorts and<br />

launched the Ikon Pass<br />

for 2018-19.<br />

Diamond traces the<br />

story behind Alterra’s<br />

rise and challenge to Vail<br />

Resorts (NYSE:MTN), the<br />

world’s largest ski company<br />

which went public in<br />

February 1997.<br />

He also includes a very<br />

thorough chapter on Vail<br />

Resorts, which went on its<br />

own buying spree.<br />

<strong>The</strong> significance of Vail<br />

Resorts and Alterra is that<br />

about half the annual U.S.<br />

skier visits are now done by<br />

these two mega ski companies<br />

and their pass partners.<br />

“<strong>The</strong> ski resort business has<br />

been radically and disruptively<br />

yet positively transformed,”<br />

Diamond observes.<br />

But he doesn’t just document<br />

this change, he also takes a look at the next two<br />

biggies Powdr and Boyne Resorts. Both are privately<br />

owned by families interested in maintaining their<br />

ownerships and growing their own resorts.<br />

<strong>The</strong> chapter on Powdr is a must-read for Killington<br />

aficionados who will appreciate the insights on<br />

the Killington acquisition and goal to transform the<br />

area with “a lot of tough love, time, and investment”<br />

as well as the admission by Powdr chairman John<br />

Cumming that there were some mistakes made in the<br />

beginning.<br />

Diamond’s observations<br />

Diamond started his ski career as an assistant to<br />

the president of Killington in 1972, learning the ski<br />

business from area founder Preston Leete Smith,<br />

legendary marketing director Foster T. Chandler,<br />

and finance gurus Martel D. Wilson and Joseph D.<br />

Sargent.<br />

After Mount Snow was acquired (1977), he became<br />

SKI Inc. > 39<br />

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38 • REAL ESTATE<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

www.HighridgeE1.com<br />

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Bear <strong>Mountain</strong>, this fully updated ski<br />

and vacation 3BR/2BA home offers both<br />

convenience and privacy. <strong>The</strong> interior offers<br />

three complete levels of living space, including<br />

a generous 20x11 loft and full basement w/<br />

family room, workshop w/ski tuning benches<br />

and walkout level doors - $389,000<br />

Killington - Attractively appointed<br />

2BR/2BA condo w/lockout. Upgraded and<br />

new throughout assuring maintenancefree<br />

living for years to come, and<br />

the special assessment for window<br />

replacement has been paid. Exclusive<br />

use of the Highridge Sports Center, w/<br />

indoor pool, cardio room, sauna, updated<br />

locker rooms and the unique Highridge<br />

clover-leaf outdoor hot tub. Offered fully<br />

furnished and equipped - $235,000<br />

www.2841East<strong>Mountain</strong>Road.com<br />

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WEST PARK ROAD<br />

• 4BR/3BA, 4,200 Sq.ft.<br />

• Hot Tub Rm+bar area<br />

• Stainless appliances<br />

• Laundry rm, sauna<br />

• Large deck<br />

• Easy access $599K<br />

SKI OR BIKE HOME - SHUTTLE<br />

HIGHRIDGE<br />

• 1BR/1BA: $124,900<br />

• 2BR/2BA: $219,900<br />

• 2BR/2BA: $235K & $255K<br />

• woodburning fireplace<br />

• Indoor pool/outdoor whirlpool<br />

* furnished & equipped<br />

SINGLE FAMILY - PITTSFIELD<br />

• 3BR/1.5BA, 1.8 Ac<br />

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• Wood stove<br />

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• $205K<br />

Celebrating<br />

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• 1-LVL 3BR/3BA, Furnished &<br />

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• Gas fplc, gas range, gas heat<br />

• Mud-entry w/ cubbies+bench<br />

• Double vanity, jet tub,<br />

• Common: Indr pool $<strong>44</strong>9K<br />

KILLINGTON CTR INN & SUITES<br />

• Completely Renovated 2BR/3BA<br />

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• Stone-faced gas f/plc, W/Dryer<br />

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PITTSFIELD – JUST LIKE NEW!<br />

• 3BR/4BA, 2-car garage w/loft<br />

• Southern exposure, yr-rd views<br />

• Recreation rm + home office rm<br />

• Exercise room + laundry room<br />

• Furnished & equipped $459K<br />

Killington - Featured on This Old House,<br />

this Bensonwood custom 4BR/4BA<br />

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Estates features 3500 square feet of<br />

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structural materials and finishes are<br />

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home, including the mechanicals -<br />

$1,150,000<br />

KILLINGTON GATEWAY- TOP/END UNIT<br />

• 2BR/1BA, 974 sf, on one level<br />

• gas heat & fplc, tiled kitch &BA flrs<br />

• Cath ceiling w/ sky lt, open flr plan<br />

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• Covered deck, private ski locker<br />

• furnished & equipped $125,000<br />

LOCATION & TRAIL VIEWS<br />

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Minutes to Killington or Woodstock. $349K


<strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong> REAL ESTATE • 39<br />

Sept. property transfers in Killington<br />

Seller Buyer Address Property Location Sale Price Closed<br />

3C8, LLC 905 Killington Road 61, LLC PO Box 1050, Killington, VT 05751 <strong>Mountain</strong> Green, IIIC8 109,500.00 9/12/<strong>2019</strong><br />

794 E <strong>Mountain</strong> Road LLC Schutz, Thomas J 79 Hill St, Topsfield, MA 01983 Fall Line, G8 277,500.00 9/19/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Briffa, Phillip & Rivera, Richard Hauswirth Jr, Robert 79 Llewellyn St, Lowell, MA 01850 Fall Line, B5 135,000.00 9/6/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Couture, Estate of Suzanne Briffa, Phillip & Rivera, Richard 167-15 12th Ave, #3A, Whitestone, NY 11357 Woods, V42 129,000.00 9/6/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Fers, Robert S & Dorene A L&K Mutchler, Inc 66 Peddler Hill Rd, Monroe, NY 10950 Woods, V09 140,000.00 9/20/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Gauthier, Terrence G Northeast Passage LLC <strong>44</strong>1 Lombard Hill Rd, Killington, VT 05751 <strong>44</strong>1 Lombard Hill Road <strong>30</strong>0,000.00 9/27/<strong>2019</strong><br />

& Diane F<br />

Geisler, Joel R & Barbara K; Riva, Elles II, William R 8474 Rte 4, Killington, VT 05751 Village Sq @ Pico, E<strong>30</strong>5 133,690.00 9/6/<strong>2019</strong><br />

William & Darlene<br />

& Smith, Elizabeth K<br />

Hanley 2017 Irrevocable Trust Desino, Andrew & Heather 16 Glen Ridge Rd, Greenwich, CT 06831 1.24 Ac, Truman’s Trek 120,000.00 9/16/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Jennings, Harvey, Dennis, Williamson, Scott F 227 Weyman Ave, New Rochelle, NY 10805 784 Alpine Drive 201,760.00 9/12/<strong>2019</strong><br />

& Jacqueline S<br />

Brian & William<br />

Keenan, Sarah F Powers, Rosalyn & Aaron 601 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019 Village Sq @ Pico, D<strong>30</strong>4 93,000.00 8/29/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Martel, Timothy & Susan Cannella, Justin & Megan 49 Combs Hollow Rd, Mendham, NJ 07945 296 Roaring Brook Road 618,000.00 9/13/<strong>2019</strong><br />

McFadden, Robert & Dolores Keegan, Christopher 25 Merriam Ave, Bronxville, NY 10708 Woods, D4 289,000.00 9/20/<strong>2019</strong><br />

& McGonnigal, AnneMarie<br />

Sheppard, Ralph & Tint Blackburn, Jason W & Michelle L 63 Laurel Wood Rd, Woodbury, CT 06798 115 Barts Hill Road 298,000.00 9/20/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Sheppard, Ralph & Tint Fracalossi, Ryan W 333 Schermerhorn St, #22F, Brooklyn, NY 11217 117 Bart’s Hill Road 310,000.00 9/27/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Strada, Michael Mannion Jr, Francis W & Beth E <strong>48</strong> Grove St, Mt Kisco, NY 10549 Glazebrook, G5 315,000.00 8/<strong>30</strong>/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Taboada, Paul E Peschel, Jamison & Courtney 16 Lorena Rd, Winchester, MA 01890 Topridge, #34A 620,000.00 9/6/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Tadger de Moskona, Neli, Harrison Family Trust, K123 Rockwell Rd, Killington, VT 05751 123 Rockwell Road 150,000.00 8/27/<strong>2019</strong><br />

Tadger Simantov Moskona<br />

Harrison Trustee,<br />

& Eliahu Moskona<br />

Zegelstein, Howard & Robin Barber, Brian & Kimberly 94 Greenacres Ave, Scarsdale, NY 10583 294 West Park Road 572,000.00 9/13/<strong>2019</strong><br />

SKI Inc.: Industry veteran explains landscape of beneficial disruption<br />

from page 37<br />

VP and GM there until being named its<br />

president in 1989.<br />

From 1994 to 1996 he served as the<br />

vice president for business development<br />

and president of the Vermont<br />

resorts for S-K-I Ltd., Killington and<br />

Mount Snow’s corporate parent. With<br />

SKI’s sale to ASC and ASC’s acquisition<br />

of Steamboat, Diamond became<br />

president of<br />

Steamboat in<br />

1999, retiring<br />

June <strong>30</strong>, 2015<br />

when he turned<br />

his attention<br />

to the first “SKI<br />

Inc.”<br />

That book<br />

stemmed from<br />

a realization that he had worked for the<br />

nation’s first three big ski companies,<br />

starting with Sherburne Corp./S-K-I<br />

Ltd., then ASC, and finally Intrawest,<br />

which had purchased Steamboat as the<br />

result of ASC’s demise.<br />

In “SKI Inc. 2020,” Diamond helps us<br />

keep track of the consolidation trend<br />

with chapters and appendix that enumerate<br />

which ones existed and owned<br />

which areas when and who the current<br />

players are that own them now.<br />

Perhaps most importantly, he<br />

analyzes the mega company season<br />

passes, which offer tremendous value<br />

and opportunities for skiers, yet whose<br />

pricing presents major challenges for<br />

the independently owned resorts trying<br />

to keep up and compete.<br />

“Ingenuity and innovation at smalland<br />

medium-sized resorts — many are<br />

chronicled in the book — have led to<br />

successes at those areas run by their<br />

passionate owners. <strong>The</strong>y can survive<br />

and even thrive in the drastically<br />

changed ski business environment,”<br />

Diamond<br />

notes.<br />

<strong>The</strong> daunting<br />

challenges<br />

to the entire<br />

ski industry<br />

are not ignored<br />

— climate<br />

change<br />

and sluggish<br />

participation trends are at the top of<br />

the disrupter list, Diamond says. But he<br />

also argues that the future is “brighter<br />

than ever.”<br />

That makes for interesting reading<br />

for any skier who wants to understand<br />

or work in the ski industry.<br />

Published by Diamond Publishing<br />

and distributed by West Margin Press,<br />

the 240-page book, which includes<br />

a color photo section, is available at<br />

select bookstores. <strong>The</strong> Book Nook in<br />

Ludlow already has the book on order<br />

and other local shops can order if it’s<br />

not on the shelf. (<strong>The</strong> book is also available<br />

on Amazon in both hardcover and<br />

as an e-book).<br />

“<strong>The</strong> ski resort business has<br />

been radically and disruptively<br />

yet positively transformed,”<br />

Diamond observes.<br />

><br />

72 Windrift Ridge Road, Killington $ 575,000<br />

This unique, 3 bdrm , 3 bath, modern home, situated<br />

on a wooded lot overlooking nearby Pico <strong>Mountain</strong><br />

Ski area, offers unexpected privacy and stunning<br />

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4552 VT Route 107, Stockbridge $129,000<br />

Many opportunities for this home located minutes to I-89<br />

and 20 min drive to Killington. Excellent rental history,<br />

recently renovated improvements including a new<br />

standing seam metal roof, windows, doors, and more.<br />

Grow Your Life in Killington<br />

KILLINGTON VALLEY REAL ESTATE<br />

Bret Williamson, Broker, Owner<br />

Tanglewood 298 Prior Drive, Drive, Killington Killington $ 1,2000,000 $539,000<br />

Fully This 4934 furnished square 4BR, foot, 3-bath exquisitely home features detailed a large Tudor open style floor<br />

plan, home entertainment is a class oriented by itself. kitchen/living A five bedroom area home, w/ gas fireplace<br />

surrounded & large deck. by the Lower grandeur level features of the green 3BR & mountains. 2-BA, washer/<br />

dryer, large entry & a newly constructed 4-car heated garage.<br />

MOTIVATED<br />

SELLER<br />

Cricket Hill, $<br />

River Road, Killington 555,000 $358,000<br />

Charming This 4-bedroom, Killington 4-bath 4-BR home farmhouse with inground on 3+ pool acres. is a<br />

Updated ten minute kitchen, drive from wide-board Killington Resort floors, with 2 FPs, stunning 3 baths,<br />

office, views of formal Pico <strong>Mountain</strong>. dining room <strong>The</strong> & competitively barn-shed. priced Includes home, an<br />

extra is being 3+ sold acre furnished. lot w/5-BR in-ground septic permit.<br />

View all properties @killingtonvalleyrealestate.com<br />

Office 802-422-3610 ext 206 Cell 802-236-1092 bret@killingtonvalleyrealestate.com


40 • <strong>The</strong> <strong>Mountain</strong> <strong>Times</strong> • <strong>Oct</strong>. <strong>30</strong> - <strong>Nov</strong>. 5, <strong>2019</strong><br />

THE WOBBLY BARN<br />

STEAKHOUSE & NIGHTCLUB<br />

HALLOWEEN<br />

PARTY<br />

<strong>The</strong> Wobbly Barn World Famous Costume Party<br />

Thursday, <strong>Oct</strong>ober 31, <strong>2019</strong>.<br />

Doors open at 9:00 p.m., Costumes required.<br />

Prizes for best individual, couple and group<br />

costume including a Killington Season Pass.<br />

Door proceeds benefit the Killington Fire Department<br />

Music presented by Bud Light

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