BeatRoute Magazine AB Edition - November 2019

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a music monthly and website that also covers: fashion, film, travel, liquor and cannabis all through the lens of a music fan. Distributed in British Columbia and Alberta, and Ontario edition. BeatRoute’s Alberta edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton, Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

NOVEMBER 2019 • FREE

VAGABON:

LAETITIA TAMKO IS

TEACHING INDIE

ROCK WHAT IT

MEANS TO BE

RESILIENT

+

City And

Colour

Jeff

Goldblum

Rich

Aucoin

High

on Fire

TR/ST

Melo.Nade

Manila

Grey

Louise

Burns


sponsored by


Contents

BEATROUTE

BEATROUTE

BEAT

ROUTE

BR

BRLIVE

BRYYZ

Music

4

7

21

23

29

The Guide

City and Colour gets out

of his head on A Pill for

Loneliness.

Artist Features

Louise Burns, Jazzy Jeff,

Rich Aucoin, Melo-Nade,

Manila Grey and more.

The Playlist

All the singles we can’t stop

listening to this month.

Album Reviews

TR/ST, Corridor, Woolworm,

Sudan Archives, The Dreadnoughts,

Little Scream,

Cursive, Leif Vollebekk,

Mount Eerie, Pelada, Beat

Happening.

Live Reviews

Thrush Hermit brought their

rollicking nostalgia to the

Palace Theatre in Calgary.

Cover Story

16

VAGABON:

LAETITIA TAMKO IS

TEACHING INDIE

ROCK WHAT IT

MEANS TO BE

RESILIENT

City And

Colour

Jeff

Goldblum

Rich

Aucoin

Jidenna

Sorry

Girls

High

on Fire

TR/ST

Tyla

Yaweh

NOVEMBER 2019 • FREE

+

Vagabon

Indie Rock songwriter

Laetitia Tamko finds strength

in vulnerability as Vagabon.

Screen Time

30 Edward Norton channels some

of the jazz greats for his latest

role in Motherless Brooklyn.

LifeStyle

32

36

Style

Music and fashion merge

explosively in King Of Hearts’

vivid designs.

Travel

We bask in the warm glow of

the hot Arizona sun during the

action-packed HOCO festival.

Dear Rouge

Play It Loud:

Style page 32

PUP, October 11, 2019 at MacEwan

Hall in Calgary. Read this review

and more online at beatroute.ca.

YYC

39

40

41

42

43

45

GIRAF

Independent animation festival

rings in 15 years of wild and

imaginative dreams.

CUFF.Docs

Quentin Tarantino doc among

stacked lineup for this year’s

underground documentary fest.

AEMCON

Ambitious electronic music

festival descends once again on

Calgary with biggest lineup yet.

Woodhawk

Calgary heavy riff rockers talk the

talk and walk the walk on latest

release.

Femme Wave

Feminist festival leads the way in

Calgary on their fifth and biggest

year.

Cheat Sheet

BeatRoute’s guide to the best

shows in Calgary this month.

JESSE GILETT

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 3


RENÉE RODENKIRCHEN

UpFront

NOVEMBER

City and Colour's large-scale

intimate experience By CODY CAETANO

D

espite the unknown cold snaps,

seasonal affective disorders,

and other come-what-mays

that usher in the first dark days

of winter, City and Colour’s sixth LP, A

Pill for Loneliness, is a dose of insight

for our changing times.

From the opening Fruit-Rollup

licks and spacey riffs of “Living with

Lightning” and the apocalyptic parade

into a “Difficult Love” to the uncanny

keys that prop up “Lay Me Down,”

the album offers 53 minutes of Dallas

Green’s company.

“It’s about trying to find a way in

this clouded 24/7, 365-day-a-year

world where you don’t need to shut

things off if you don’t want to,” Green

says of the album, speaking to BeatRoute

before soundcheck for his

first of two shows in New York. “It’s

nice to be with just your thoughts

sometimes,” he says.

APFL is currently the number one

record in Canada on the Canadian Albums

Chart and Green is twenty days

into his North American Tour with

Ben Rogers, Ruby Waters, and Jacob

Banks. Despite his high profile and

success, he still squares with those

original intentions from his Sometimes

years.

“When I first started writing, I realized

I could write to get myself out of

my own head and into a melody, and

then maybe into a song that somebody

else might be able to take something

from,” he reflects on his early

days. “That’s all I have ever wanted

and still want to do. And whether it

led me to where it led me today, or it

led me to just singing and playing in

coffee shops in St. Catherines, I would

still be doing it.”

Saturday, Nov. 9 // Pacific Coliseum (Van)

Tuesday, Nov. 12 //Scotiabank Saddledome (Cgy)

Friday, Nov. 22 // Scotiabank Arena (Tor)

BEATROUTE

Publisher

Julia Rambeau Smith


@beatroutemedia

Editor in Chief

Glenn Alderson

Associate Editor

Brad Simm

Creative Director

Troy Beyer

Managing Editors

Josephine Cruz

Melissa Vincent

Contributing Editors

Sebastian Buzzalino

Dayna Mahannah

Contributors

Ben Boddez • Dora Boras

Cody Caetano • Lauren Donnelly

Alessia Dowhaniuk •

Fraser Hamilton

Courtney Heffernan

Albert Hoang • Brendan Lee

Cam Lindsay • Dave MacIntyre

Maggie McPhee • Pat Mullen

Sean Orr • Jibril Osman

Adam Piotrowicz • Lamar Ramos

Yasmine Shemesh • Sumiko Wilson

Drew Yorke • Aurora Zboch

Contributing Photographers

Lance Bang • Lindsey Blane

Baron S. Cameron

Renée Rodenkirchen

Pamela Evelyn • Maria Govea

Noa Grayevky • Anna Maria Lopez

Scott Munn • Thomas Neukum

Lara Olanick • Sela Sheloni

Reto Sterchi • Mel Yap

Joseph Yarmush

Coordinator (Live Music)

Darrole Palmer

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Distribution

BeatRoute is distributed in

Vancouver, Victoria, Calgary,

Edmonton, Winnipeg,

Saskatoon and Toronto

Contact Us

26 Duncan Street, Suite 500,

Toronto ON,

M5V 2B9

e-mail: editor@beatroute.ca


@beatroutemedia


beatroutemedia

beatroute.ca


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6 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


MUSiC

It’s such a great

moment for pop

music. I’m just really

excited by all of the

songwriting and

production I’m

hearing.

LOUISE

BURNS

RETURNS

TO HER POP

ROOTS

By CAM LINDSAY

W

hen a musician says they’re

returning to their roots, it’s

rarely in reference to a teenage

pop group that was signed by

Madonna and released a music

video starring peak period Lindsay Lohan.

But this is the life of Vancouver’s Louise

Burns.

“It sounds kinda cheesy. When most

people say that they mean folk or punk or

DIY, but for me it means corporate pop,”

she says with a laugh. “I’ve been embracing

all of the lessons I learned from when I

started out as a kid in Lillix. I was like, ‘Fuck

it. I’m just gonna write the most saccharine

melodies I can and say some really emotional

things.” Because I’ve never really

been that open before with my lyrics.”

Since leaving Lillix, Burns has made

music on her own terms. Her first three

solo albums were all well-received collections

of synth-y indie pop, but when it

came time to record number four, Burns

felt a change needed to be made. She

wanted to make unapologetic pop

music again.

“It’s such a great moment for pop

music,” Burns says. “I’m just really

excited by all of the songwriting and

production I’m hearing. I think I was

getting a bit bored of myself. I think

CONTINUED ON PG. 8 k

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 7

DUSTIN CONDREN


MUSiC ARTIST INTERVIEW

LOUISE

BURNS

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

that happens to a lot of people. I definitely

honour what I did in the past, it’s been very

good to me. But a lot of these new sounds

have come from me being more open to

embracing my pop side, especially in the

world of electronic music.”

Album number four, Portraits, feels like

a giant creative leap forward for Burns in

all respects. With its slinky rhythms, neon

synths, raw lyrical admissions and breezy

sax solos (Burns is a massive Roxy Music

fan), she has entered that mature pop

niche, alongside artists like Christine and

the Queens, Shura and Carly Rae Jepsen

that she always seemed destined for. A big

part of this process was letting down her

guard and exploring her emotions through

lyrics.

“This record I did focus more on my

lyrics, which I think is a huge part of pop

music right now,” Burns admits. “As a

non-emotional person, I found it to be a

pretty crazy exercise to actually explore

that side of my writing, rather than just hide

behind a wall of reverb, lots of guitars or

crazy drums. I was just trying to put myself

into this position of, almost discomfort, so I

could try and grow.”

One way in which she found the courage

to do this was in returning to the city where

it all started for her: Los Angeles, where

she lived during the Lillix years.

“A lot of it was closure for me,” she

explains. “There have been some weird

wounds I’ve had since that time, which goes

with being a teenager I think. Everyone has

their shit that they hold on to throughout

their adulthood. But for me a lot of the insecurities

and neuroses were really put under

a microscope in LA when I was a teenager

and I still had the same perspective in a lot

of ways ever since. So I figured I’d go back

to that city where I began my career and

make amends with it, to see if I could move

forward and have a healthy relationship

with my past instead of trying to hide it or

be so self-deprecating.”

It was also there in Los Angeles where

Burns connected with producer Damian

Taylor (Arcade Fire, Björk), who previously

worked on her 2017 album, Young Mopes.

This time, however, Burns invited Taylor

into her songwriting process, another first

for her.

“Damian is amazing. I call him my guru,”

she says avidly. “He knows how to push

me and get the best work out of me. The

way we talk about music, I just always learn

from him. I’m so lucky that this was my first

real collaborative experience because he

paved the way for it to be a positive thing

for me. This record wouldn’t have existed

if it weren’t for him. I feel like with him, I put

more work into my songwriting, getting the

sounds I wanted, and deciding what I want

to do as an artist.” ,

8 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


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MUSiC ARTIST INTERVIEW

JAZZY

JEFF

Jeff Goldblum cut his teeth as a

pianist in Pittsburg before hitting

the silver screen By LAUREN DONNELLY

SELA SHELONI

J

eff Goldblum

is calling from

a “luxuriously

roomy little

closet” inside

his home in Los

Angeles. He only

has 15 minutes

for an interview, but he’ll spend

at least five of those minutes

singing jazz songs. Sometimes

the music says it best.

Asked about his first

memories of jazz, he sings

the trumpet line from Herb

Alpert’s instrumental 1965

album, Whipped Cream and

Other Delights. Considering

the relevance of jazz in an era

of distrust and corruption, he

reprises a moment from an appearance

on The Colbert Show,

talk-singing Irving Berlin’s “Let’s

Face the Music and Dance” in

his velvet voice.

“Soon we’ll be without the

moon, humming a different

tune, and then there may be

teardrops to shed,” he rushystop

sings. “But while there’s

moonlight, music, and love and

romance, let’s face the music

and dance.”

He ends the song doing both

vocal parts in crescendo. He

takes a breath, letting the lyrics

sink in.

“I think that has something to

do with our time,” he concludes.

“That gives me a little lift — it

gives me a lift and chills too. It’s

a chilling time we live in.”

The father, husband, legendary

charmer, and gregarious

character best known for iconic

acting performances in films

like Jurassic Park, The Big Chill,

The Fly, and The Life Aquatic, is

also a passionate jazz pianist. I

Shouldn’t Be Telling You This is

Goldblum’s sophomore album

with his band the Mildred

Snitzer Orchestra.

Nostalgic and fun, the album

features a mix of renditions of

classics like “Let’s Face the

Music and Dance,” and delightful

mashups of standards like

“Sidewinder” with the Sonny

and Cher hit, “The Beat Goes

On.”

These aren’t stale covers

of the same classics. Goldblum’s

music is as enigmatic

and enthusiastic as his acting

performances. Looking back,

he says that as an actor he

sometimes over-prepared to

get to the right emotional place

for the scene. But music was

different.

“As you started to play it,

whether it was a sad song, or a

happy song, [the music] sort of

provided,” Goldblum explains.

“Trying to render the song and

the story, and communicating

it somehow gave you all the

feeling that you needed.”

Music came before acting

success did. He cut his teeth

as a pianist growing up in

Pittsburgh. Though he wasn’t

educated at a jazz institution,

he took lessons, learning

chords and exercising his improvisational

muscles with the

standards in fake books. That

set his course.

After years of playing weekly

gigs in L.A., Goldblum and

the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

released their live album debut

in 2018. The Capitol Studio

Sessions topped the charts

in the UK, U.S., Germany and

Australia, and received a warm

critical welcome. It was only a

matter of time before a sequel

was in the making.

Skills that make Goldblum a

captivating actor—improvisation,

curiosity, and generosity

towards —also serve him well

as a jazz musician.

After making his film debut

45 years ago, Goldblum has

captured Hollywood’s elusive

holy grail: longevity. Duets on

I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This

feature a diverse range of collaborators

from Gregory Porter

and Miley Cyrus, to Fiona Apple

and Sharon Van Etten. A contagious

sense of joy is palpable

throughout the record. Transposing

songs from bygone

eras, Goldblum’s album serves

a powerful counterpoint to the

foreboding doom of the current

political climate.

It’s not surprising that people

are still clamoring to work with

him given his joie de vivre, but

where does he draw his enthusiasm

from?

“Any time where general stupidity

and backwardness and

darkness can befall us, music

of all sorts can lift our spirits,”

he says. “[It can] be relevant to

our healing and an upliftment

toward our better angels. But

on this album specifically...”

He’s mid-sentence when

something strikes him.

“Ooooh,” he rumbles in his

excited, somewhat sinister-sounding

baritone. “Ooooh,

wait a minute, wait a minute,

well...”

He starts singing again.

“Make someone happy —

make just one someone happy,

then you’ll be happy too,” that

Gregory Porter sings [on the

new album]. “Ooooh, that has

something to do with a nice

credo, you know?”

I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This is

released globally on November 1,

2019. ,

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 11


MUSiC CONCERT PREVIEWS

GET

RICH

QUICK

Rich Aucoin made an album

about death by celebrating life

By COURTNEY HEFFERNAN

SCOTT MUNN


B

est known for his vibrant

electronic albums and

confetti-filled live shows,

Rich Aucoin’s fascination

with death seems

incongruous. However,

reconciling these ideas

is central to the Halifax-based

musician’s

creative process.

His upcoming Death

Tour this fall will be a celebration

of life and his dazzling new album,

Release, is a colourful exploration of

ideas around existence and mortality.

“I knew I wanted to make a record

on death,” says Aucoin, matter-of-factly,

as he sits back in his

chair in a bright café in downtown

Toronto. “And I wanted a lot of colour

so it wasn’t this dark connotation of

death and was more in line with my

view of the celebration of life until it’s

over.”

To talk to Aucoin is to understand

how seemingly disparate interests

come to cohesion. In conversation,

Aucoin is animated and engaging;

he smiles and laughs a lot, using his

hands when he talks. He speaks as

passionately about the art he creates

with friends and collaborators as he

does about existential philosophy.

“The whole album is about looking

at how we build our foundations for

viewing existence,” says Aucoin. He

talks about philosophical concepts

with a warmth that makes even the

most obscure ideas accessible.

Release was inspired by Aucoin’s

reading of The Denial of Death by Ernest

Becker, a psychological text that

harkens back to Aucoin’s philosophy

and contemporary studies in university.

One of the themes from Aucoin’s

reading that resonates through the album

is the idea of being present. “And

presence being fuelled by a healthy

awareness of death,” he says.

It’s a fitting topic for Release,

which is the last in a trilogy of albums

rounded out by We’re All Dying to Live

(2011) and Ephemeral (2014). Aucoin’s

Death Tour marks an end to a creative

trajectory that was nearly 10 years in

the making. Though the albums are

thematically connected, Aucoin acknowledges,

“I didn’t have it planned

out so much. They all just seemed to

focus around death in different ways.

Now that I’ve fully made the record I

know this is a trilogy and it’s over.”

On album opener “The Base,”

Aucoin uses audio from Sam Harris’

talk, Death in the Present Moment. “I

thought it was a nice way to start the

mindfulness of the record I was trying

to make,” he says. “It really puts in

perspective how quickly the mind can

be racing towards

future

anxieties.”

He intends

to promote

mindfulness

through his

live show by

interspersing

his performance

with

RICH AUCOIN

Friday, Nov. 1

Queens (Nanaimo)

Saturday, Nov. 2

Lucky Bar (Victoria)

Saturday, Nov. 30

Commonwealth Bar &

Stage (Calgary)

Tix:$14.50-$20, eventbrite.ca

ideas from philosophers, further

expanding on the ideas of each song.

“I want to have the show be almost a

meditation through the themes of the

record,” he says.

Injecting a heady dose of colour to

otherwise dark themes around death

and dying, Aucoin is synchronizing his

Release live shows to Disney’s Alice in

Wonderland. The dreamlike imagery,

as well as the concept of Wonderland,

resonates with Aucoin.

“Wonderland is a metaphor for our

own ideas and beliefs of the world,”

Aucoin says. “Alice is just going

deeper inside her own beliefs until it’s

the end of her. That’s our journey too,

to keep figuring out how we want to

view everything and redefining our

foundations of beliefs.”

Aucoin equates the process of

shaping and defining our beliefs to

a game of Jenga. “When we’re kids,

it’s just as simple as setting up the

pieces,” he says. “In order to grow,

you need to keep taking pieces out

and adding more – even if it makes

your whole foundation of the way you

view existence teeter back and forth.

Nevertheless, you have to keep going

if you want to keep growing.”

Though existentialism is an intense

subject, it certainly isn’t Aucoin’s

intention to bring the mood down.

When asked how he wants his audience

to feel after one of his shows,

he says, “Really stoked on life,” insisting

that his Death Tour will still offer

the party atmosphere that has made

Aucoin’s live shows renowned.

In a lot of ways, Aucoin has created

an immersive “choose your own

adventure” experience, where he

brings together philosophical themes

nurtured throughout the trilogy of

albums while making his audience

feel like they’re part of a celebratory

community.

“Some people really enjoy thinking

about philosophy, some enjoy the

celebration of joy and the communal

aspect of the party,” Aucoin says.

While he’s content with an audience

that just wants to feel the vibe,

he admits, “I’m happy if people take

away the philosophy that’s been

laboured over as part of the show as

well.” ,

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MELO.NADE

CALGARY PRODUCER

SPEAKS UP ABOUT

HOW MUSIC

SAVED HIS LIFE

By KASIA GORSKI

Artist to Watch

Y

ou wouldn’t realize it to

talk to him, with readiness

and lucidity shining in his

eyes, but ten months ago,

local electronic music producer Navin Huq,

aka Melo.Nade, suffered a brain injury.

Severely concussed after being

rear-ended, he describes the first few

months of recovery as a scary time, where

he knew little about what was happening to

him. He is still on his path to recovery, but is

now confident talking about how music has

saved his life.

Classically trained in piano, music was

a big part of Melo.Nade’s childhood. He

recalls playing his dad’s records — everything

from Beethoven to The Beatles —

over muted Saturday morning cartoons.

“I’d eat my cereal and watch TV, but not

actually watch it,” he says with a laugh.

As the classic story goes, Melo.Nade

went to his first Shambhala in 2005, which

got him hooked on electronic music. He

began experimenting with his own tracks

and spinning records at local venues,

eventually getting booked at the beloved

Salmo, BC festival. Originally immersed in

the breakbeats scene, he found his true

love in an uplifting subgenre of trap, which

he lovingly dubs, Heavy Chill, brimming with

a spiritual, light-heartedness.

“It’s cutting edge, but different. I like stuff

that’s melodic, even psychedelic, but with a

weight to it,” he says.

Melo.Nade’s creative process includes

achieving a particular flow state, “where I’m

not thinking about the past or the future,”

he explains. “Producing music is about

losing all those things in your mind that

you worry about — it’s where you’re really

present.”

Through his sets, he loves to tell stories,

finding a solid beginning and preparing a

crate of tracks to guide where the adventure

will go. “I want to give the audience

an audible hug,” he laughs. “I love getting

people into that special vibe.”

But since his accident, the role of music

has changed for Melo.Nade, working through

the recovery process and learning how to

slow down and treat his health as a priority.

“It’s so important to ensure your body has

fuel before your tank is empty. And you have

to let yourself chill sometimes!”

Still suffering from the occasional migraine

as a result of his injuries, Melo.Nade

feels his good days are becoming more

consistent. “When you’re in it for the long

game, taking self-care time isn’t going to

set you back as much as you think.”

Melo.Nade plays on November 2

at the #1 Legion.

CONCERT SOCKS

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 15


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VAGAB

LAETITIA VAGAB

LAETITIA VAGAB

TAMKO

IS BORN

AGAIN ASVAGAB

AGAIN ASVAGAB


the release of

her sophomore album,

the Cameroon-born,

ONWith

Brooklyn-based indie

artist reflects on finding

identity in an alias and

how this album served

as the soundtrack to

her self-discovery

By SUMIKO WILSON

I

n many ways, it’s not a stretch to compare

creating an album to giving birth:

the conception, the waiting, the pain, and

the fear of haow your creation will fare

in the world. On the day Laetitia Tamko

released her self-titled sophomore album

as Vagabon, that fear was eclipsed by excitement

anchored with a sense of calm.

“Because it’s my second album, release

day is exciting but it’s really about the year.” she

explains in a phone conversation with BeatRoute

CONTINUED ON PG. 18 k


VAGABON

k CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

initially came from a place of pain,

Tamko now sees them as “songs of

triumph.” “In their conception they

were powerful in the freedom I felt

being that vulnerable. Now, they’re

powerful because they remind me of

what I’ve learned through performing

them,” she elaborates.

On Vagabon, Laetitia Tamko stepping

into herself is multifaceted. In

addition to handling all of the production

on the album, there’s another

subtle difference in the liner

notes. Vagabon is being distributed

under a self-titled LLC: an independent

imprint through which she will

take greater responsibility over the

album’s commercial distribution, but

also reap the rewards more abundantly.

In essence, this serves as a

sign that Tamko is inching towards

ultimate artistic independence, befrom

Los Angeles, days before joining

Angel Olsen on the North American

leg of her upcoming tour.

Her tone is soft-spoken, but

self-assured, and she stretches the

word “year” to reflect the long-game

that awaits. “I’m not worked up or

anything,” she continues. “I just feel

glad that it’s available. I think that’s

the most exciting part — seeing what

kind of life this child of mine will

make for itself.”

At 13, Tamko migrated to New

York City from Cameroon, speaking

limited English. She got her start as

a multi-instrumentalist when her

parents gifted her a guitar from Costco

in her teens. After high school,

Tamko opted for a full-time career in

computer and electrical engineering

while gestating her artistic alter-ego,

Vagabon, through playing DIY indie

shows in Brooklyn after work.

When she eventually made the

decision to leave her engineering career

and make music full-time, Vagabon

was born. Since then, she has

released three critically-acclaimed

projects, toured internationally with

indie icons like Courtney Barnett and

Tegan and Sara, and headlined a Tiny

Desk concert that has amassed nearly

100,000 views.

Where the face of indie rock so

rarely deviates from its norm, Tamko

offers a refreshing take on the genre

beyond face-value.

Over the phone Tamko’s confidence

bleeds into her tone, which

echoes her singing voice; strong and

steady, but never ascending to a roar.

Clocking in at just under 40 minutes,

over Vagabon’s ten tracks, Tamko delivers

an evolved sound that is more

revelatory and honest than ever.

She opens up about an overwhelming

love on “Flood” (“I know even if

I run from it I’m still in it/I know I’ll

hold you so close”) and addresses

her position as an indie outlier on

“Wits About You” (“I was invited to

the party/ They won’t let my people

in/Well then never mind, never mind,

never mind/We don’t wanna go to

your function/I want it all for my

own”).

On tracks like “Every Woman” and

“In a Bind,” Tamko leans into her

indie roots, pairing gently ascending

strings, rising tension, and a straightforward

song structure, similar to Bill

Callahan or Cat Power. “Water Me

Down” and “Flood,” depart from her

signature sound, and instead opt for

edgy, impossibly danceable synths, to

amplify the raw power of her vocals.

At moments, Vagabon plays like a

meditative sound bath, particularly

on “Home Soon.” Sonically, it flows

with the rest of the album by fusing

her airy vocals with disjointed, symphonic

instrumentals, but there is

no chorus, verse, beat or melody to

follow. This track transcends the

conventional song structure with no

apologies, just as Tamko rejects society’s

conventions and comes into her

own throughout the course of the LP.

While Tamko’s journey to self-realization

plays out over the course

of the album, it started while she

was touring her debut album Infinite

Worlds. She opened Infinite Worlds

with the punchy mid-tempo track

“The Embers,” where she sang about

being a small fish and getting gobbled

up by sharks. While touring her last

album, she recalls “being directly in

tune with the transformation from

songs deriving from feeling weak and

feeling tired.

Over time, her lyrics took on new

meaning and grew to be mantra-like,

setting the foundation for the growth

that would play out in her 2019 follow-up.

Rediscovering and redefining

her debut album prompted a comingof-age

for Tamko. “To perform these

songs over and over and over and

find such confidence in reiterating

this message to myself, the timeline,

everything in between, just reshaped

those songs for me.

“In turn,” Tamko says, “it reshaped

me.”

Though the songs on Infinite Worlds

Having the

record be self-titled

just felt appropriate.

It was really an act of

discovering ones-self

and discovering the

powers within me.

yond the bounds of expression.

This transition was by design. “I

want people to remember that I am

self-reliant. That’s most important

to me,” Tamko says. “I have

taught myself all these instruments,

I produced my own

record, and I engineered on

my record.”

On Vagabon, she accomplished

this goal. “I actually

found myself impressive at several

moments of this album-making

process.” She specifically cites

her work behind the boards as a feat

that has stuck with her.

“Making a song like ‘Water Me

Down’ is something where I sat back

at the end of it and thought ‘How the

fuck did I make that?’ Actually being

able to say nice things about my music

instead of downplaying it, or minimizing

myself.” Still, she is secure

enough to ask for help. “I just want to

be an all-encompassing well that can

still outsource help,” she says.

The self-titled debut project has

been a long-standing, cross-genre

tradition with roots so deep that

the concept’s origin is impossible

to peg. When Diana Ross split from

The Supremes and released her first

solo album in 1970, it was self-titled

to distinguish herself from her former

group. In 2013, when Beyoncé’s

self-titled her fifth solo album, it was

to herald a new era of creative independence.

Similarly, Vagabon used

her sophomore album title to assert

her identity under a self-appointed

alias.

“Having the record be self-titled

just felt appropriate for this [album],”

she explains. “It was really

an act of discovering ones-self and

discovering the powers within me.

So in that journey it felt right to reintroduce

myself. It was time to put a

face to the name.”

On one of the album’s standouts,

“Every Woman,” Tamko exudes affirming

security with lyrics like: “I

belong to no one” and “I won’t ask

permission from you. In a press

statement ahead of the album’s release,

Tamko referred to this track as

Vagabon’s “thesis.”

In her own words and on her own

terms, Tamko has shed the skin of

uncertainty and insecurity in order

to tell the story of her settling into

herself. On Vagabon, she is the story’s

narrator and its hero. In just two albums

and one EP, Tamko has solidified

her presence as an indie-rock

force and has truly lived up to her

name. ,

18 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


Wings $5/lb after 4pm with beverage purchase, gst not included, dine in only.

18+, legal ID required. this event is open to all SAIT students, staff, faculty,

alumni, members, and guests. please visit Saitsa.com for more information.

18+, Legal ID required. This event is open to all Sait students, staff, faculty, alumni, members, and guests. Please visit Saitsa.com for more information.

WHAT’S HAPPENING

FREE

TO PLAY

Sat. Nov. 2, 2019

Calgary Folk Music Festival Presents

TERRA LIGHTFOOT

+ A Day As Wolves & Poke The Bear

Wed. Nov. 20, 2019

The Gateway Presents

BEER & BUILD

Ginger Bread House

Tue. Dec. 10, 2019

The Gateway Presents

HOCKEY DAD +

DZ DEATHRAYS

+ Horror My Friend

WED, NOV. 6, 2019

Wed. Nov. 6, 2019

The Gateway Presents

WINGO

BINGO + WINGS! FREE TO PLAY!

Thu. Nov. 21, 2019

MRG Concerts Presents

RIA MAE

+ Matthew V Music

Wed. Dec. 11, 2019

The Gateway Presents

STAR WARS TRIVIA

FREE TO PLAY

$5/LB WINGS

5:00PM REGISTRATION | 5:30PM BINGO

Saitsa.com/Events

Fri. Nov. 8, 2019

Calgary Folk Music Festival Presents

THE EAST POINTERS

+ Special Guests

Fri. Nov. 22, 2019

The Gateway Presents

PROZZAK

Farewell Tour

Wed. Jan. 15, 2019

The Gateway Presents

DISNEY TRIVIA

FREE TO PLAY

Sat. Nov. 9, 2019

Calgary Folk Music Festival Presents

LEMON BUCKET

ORKESTRA + Special Guests

Sat. Nov. 23, 2019

The Gateway Presents

THEO AND THE THUGS

+ Not Inpublic, Fizzgigs, The Shiverettes

Tue. Jan. 21, 2020

The Gateway Presents

Jon Bryant

+ Special Guests

Wed. Nov. 13, 2019

The Gateway Presents

HARRY POTTER TRIVIA

FREE TO PLAY

Fri. Nov. 29, 2019

The Gateway Presents

ALTAMEDA

+ Special Guests

Wed. Jan. 22, 2020

The Gateway Presents

DIRTY BINGO

FREE TO PLAY

Thu. Nov. 14, 2019

StFX YYC Presents

SIGNAL HILL

Sat. Nov. 30, 2019

The Gateway Presents

HILLTOP HOODS

+ Adrian Eagle

Sold Out

DIRTY BINGO

Hosted by Felicia Bonée

SCANDALOUS

PRIZES and GIVEAWAYS!

WINGS $5/LB

+GST W/ purchase of beverage

DRAG QUEEN

PERFORMANCES

Sept. 18 2019

FREE TO PLAY • Registration 5 p.m. • Game 5:30 p.m.

THE GATEWAY V203 Campus Centre

Wed. Feb. 21, 2020

The Gateway Presents

Bedouin Soundclash

+ Special Guests

Fri. Nov. 15, 2019

The Gateway Presents

WANNABE

A Spice Girls Tribute

Sat. Dec. 7, 2019

Monster Energy Presents

ONE BAD SON

Free Tickets via Universe.com

For a list of all upcoming events visit GatewayYYC.com/Events

And make sure to follow us @gatewaybar to catch all the latest announcements!

18+, Legal ID required. This event is open to all Sait students, staff, faculty, alumni, members, and guests.

Please visit Saitsa.com for more information.

GatewayYYC.com


Artist to Watch

MANILA

GREY'S

FILIPINO PRIDE IS

TAKING THEM

AROUND THE

WORLD

By JOSEPHINE CRUZ

I

t’s been ten years MANILA GREY biggest tour yet, The

since childhood Friday, Nov. 15 Silver Skies Tour, which

friends Neeko Commonwealth (Calgary) will take them to 10

and Soliven

Friday, Nov. 22 cities across Asia and

first started

Fortune Sound Club

Canada.

experimenting (Vancouver)

The decade of

with making their own

music, and three since

they officially formed

Manila Grey and decided

Friday, Nov. 29

Toybox Nightclub

(Toronto)

preparation is evident in

their output, which is as

polished as any other

mainstream R&B or

to make a serious go at their

career. Since then their journey

has resulted in a number of big

wins, including streaming numbers

well into the tens of millions

and a handful of overseas shows.

Now, the Vancouver-based duo

are about to embark on their

hip-hop and sounds perfectly at

home on a playlist alongside other

top-tier talent like The Weeknd,

Bryson Tiller, 6lack and others.

But it’s the way Manila Grey incorporate

their Filipino heritage into

their music and brand that’s set

them apart, and now it’s propel-

ling them onto the global stage.

Pay close attention and you’ll

notice references in their lyrics, imagery

in their videos, and even the

inclusion of an indigenous Tagalog

script Baybayin in some of their

graphics. It’s subtle enough that

it doesn’t feel like a gimmick, and

yet prominent enough to make a

statement. For Filipinos around the

world, it’s the type of genuine

representation they’ve craved—

and frankly, deserved—for

years, and Manila Grey is here

to deliver.

AN ONSLAUGHT OF DANK DEATH METAL

AND STONER HORROR THAT WIELDS RIFFS

LIKE WEAPONS. THIS IS ANOTHER NEW

HIGH FOR CANNABIS CORPSE.

COMING NOV. 1 ON DIGIPAK CD, LTD.

LP, DIGITALLY & MORE.

1349 are back with ‘The Infernal

Pathway,’ their latest offering of aural

hellfire that is sure to set you ablaze with

a fiery collection of true Norwegian

black metal.

Out now on Deluxe CD box, Digipak

CD, Ltd. 2LP, digitally & more.

NECRONOMICON

UNUS

Vicious, ultramodern death metal

that harnesses the dark magick of

their name.

See them on tour now with

SUFFOCATION & BELPHEGOR

Out now!

CLOAK

THE BURNING DAWN

'The Burning Dawn' melds the

gothic nuance of its predecessor

with a more aggressive and

vehement spirit.

Out now!

VOYAGER

COLOURS IN THE SUN

A vivid, uplifting, and

exhilarating album of their

self-pro claimed “epic electro

progressive power pop metal”!

Coming Nov. 1

20 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


The Playlist:

BEATROUTE

1

BEATROUTE

BEAT

ROUTE

BR

BRLIVE

BRYYZ

5

3

7

10 songs in heavy rotation at the BR offices right now

1 Caribou

Home

Indietronica veteran Dan Snaith

returns for the first time since 2015

with a jazzy track heavy on live

percussion that weaves around

an old-school soul sample from

Gloria Barnes. A melting pot of

genres that moves through about

four different acts in two and a half

minutes, it’s all centred by Snaith’s

calming falsetto.

2 Pusha T

Puppet (Ft. Nicholas Britell)

In one of the unlikeliest teamups

of the year, Pusha T links up

with Academy Award-nominated

film composer Nicholas Britell

(Moonlight, 12 Years a Slave) for

a short but hard-hitting track for

the new HBO show Succession.

Like always, King Push makes

every syllable count as he offers

short bursts of flow, the orchestra

behind him a worthy match for his

dramatics.

3

Bishop Briggs

Jekyll & Hide

Bishop Briggs’ fusion of driving

rock and roll instrumentals and

powerful vocals coming straight

from a background in gospel

music always makes for something

intriguing, and she returns with

a track that’s just as eerie as the

story that lent it its name. Based

around a clever play on words,

Briggs’ quickly whispered vocals

explode into a distorted instrumental

chorus.

Travis Scott

4 Highest In The Room

Has Travis Scott suddenly

become the world’s

biggest rapper before

our eyes? This sounds

like a track that would

have fit right in on

his monster album

Astroworld, and it’s recent

debut at #1 on the

Billboard Hot 100 shows

that Scott’s woozy,

psychedelic

trap sound is

the current

cultural zeitgeist.

Writing

another

smash hit is

simple for

him.

4

6

5

Jessie Reyez

Remember To Breathe

One of the most unique and immediately

recognizable singing voices

out there right now, the Canadian

rising star dials up the production

value, letting her sharper tones sink

into some warm piano chords instead

of being the main focus. But

don’t worry, her refreshingly blunt

lyricism hasn’t gone anywhere.

6

Sturgill Simpson

Show Me Love

Outlaw country and southern rock

artist Sturgill Simpson’s latest

album’s artwork depicts a

car driving away from a

massive explosion. That’s

just about how cool the

bassline groove of this

track makes you feel, as

he seemingly sings about

calming yourself down to

successfully pull off some

sort of crime. This is one

for dark shades and latenight

joyrides.

8 9

7

The Damned

Black Is The Night

Who says you can’t still be punk

in your 60s? Nearly 40 years

into a storied career, the UK

legends keep on rolling with the

gothic material they’re known for.

Frontman Dave Vanian’s deep and

resonant voice is perfect for the

spooky fall season as he sings of

ghosts emerging from their crypts

at twilight.

10

Wolf Parade

8 Against The Day

Montreal group Wolf Parade, now

a trio, offer the first taste of their

upcoming fifth album with a buzzy

synth-rock jam session that sees

the band’s two vocalists both

singing on the track for the first

time in over a decade. Anchored by

a catchy synth line, it’s driven home

when it’s answered by the guitar

playing the same riff.

9

Summer Walker

Playing Games

(Ft. Bryson Tiller)

The year’s biggest breakout star

in the world of R&B offers her own

spin on a classic, flipping Destiny’s

Child’s “Say My Name” into a

modern, laid-back groove calling

out commitment-adverse dudes …

before Bryson Tiller hops on the

back end of the track and offers his

side of the story.

10

Free Nationals

Eternal Light

(Ft. Chronixx)

Anderson .Paak’s longtime backing

band continues to step into

their own spotlight with another

high-profile single release, infusing

their usual funky rhythms with

some syncopated reggae flavour

from Chronixx. An ode to “positive

vibes,” this track makes you envision

beach weather in November.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 21


Reviews

ALBUM

TR/ST

The Destroyer - Part 2

Grouch/ House Arrest

Arriving as the twin flame to The Destroyer

released earlier this year, The

Destroyer - Part 2 is the second album

of 2019 by Toronto darkwave outfit TR/

ST and functions as its necessary sequel.

In the five years since the release

of 2014’s Joyland, the project’s anchoring

member Robert Alfons has taken

inventory of himself by deconstructing

the concept of shame, and addressing

it head on.

The result is an exploration into

interiority, emotion and memory told

through lo-fi vocals with an emphasis

on atmosphere. The Destroyer - Part 2

establishes a new landscape from its

predecessor by masterfully emphasizing

ambiance and control. It’s a collection

of contemplative, energetic, and

sometimes sparse tracks that unfold

like micro vignettes.

Though consistent, the album features

similar thematic audio cues, like

the repetitive use of slow, echoing, and

hypnotic keys. “Enduring Chill” serves

as an overture to the album, and exists

as a wash of sound hinting at the peaks

and troughs of the album’s sonic ambition.

Elsewhere, “Darling” is dark and

beautifully harrowing, providing lyrical

robustness, and a spirit of experimentation.

The slow-moving interlude “Cor”

is held together with an almost-idiosyncratic

melody.

“Iris,” however, is the album’s

electro-pop standout. Executed as a

hopeful, multi-layered track, it’s fitted

with plenty of spacey synth lines that

burst with energy and glimmer like

confetti. You want to dance, but maybe

by yourself.

The dynamic range of tracks on

the album feels intentional. Together,

they offer a vivid lens to understand

the complexities of the album’s titular

theme and contrasting emotions. On

Part 2, Alfons refuses to shy away from

the reality of these experiences, but

attempts to explore how they often

function together.

Best Track: Iris

Dora Boras


24 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 25


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

Interview

CORRIDOR TAKE

UNPRECEDENTED LEAP

OF FAITH ON JUNIOR

CORRIDOR

Junior

Bonsound/Sub Pop

The rapid rise of Montreal-based

quartet Corridor can be likened

to contemporary rock folklore,

even if the story is a familiar one.

After the band’s tour agent sent

the iconic Seattle label Sub Pop

their four-song demo, representatives

who attended their

show in New York a month later

promptly sent them a record deal

within days of the performance.

It’s an impressive trajectory.

The four-piece consisting of

Dominic Berthiaume (vocals/bass),

Jonathan Robert (vocals/synth/

guitar), Julian Perreault (guitar) and

Julien Bakvis (drums) are the first

francophone band to sign with Sub

Pop, and the first Montreal band

since Wolf Parade in 2004.

Chatting to BeatRoute over

drinks at Notre Dame Des Quilles a

quaint, cozy cocktail bar in Montreal’s

Little Italy district, Berthiaume

says their third album and Sub Pop

debut, Junior, maintains the songwriting

approach its predecessor,

Supermercado (2017), while dialing

up the production.

“Our first EP and the first two

records sounded more lo-fi,” he

says. “Junior still has this warmth

and analog feel, but it feels like a

bigger production.”

Berthiaume explains that the

album focuses more on how songs

feel rather than what sonic category

they fall under. “All of the songs

came out of jams and improvisation,

and then we structure it. We

don’t think about genre or anything,

because this is where you restrict

yourself.”

“I think one of the things that

we have [throughout] our three

albums is a unity in the songs, but

it’s really diverse too. That Corridor

signature has to be somewhere,

but the point is, if it’s a good song,

it’s a good song. We don’t mind the

rest.”

While the band took their time

constructing previous albums, Le

voyage éternel (2015) and Supermercado

(2017), they had no such

luxury with Junior.

In January, Sub Pop told them

that they needed to submit their

masters by mid-May if they wanted

a fall release. By March, they had

begun writing and recording the album’s

six remaining songs, finishing

by late April. Berthiaume describes

the sessions as “intense,” spending

a month and a half recording six

days a week. “For every song, we

kept it really simple: one, two or

three riffs,” he explains of the process.

“[We] just keep on repeating

them, adding layers and creating

something more hypnotic,” he says.

“Our producer and engineer

would never bounce anything off

in the studio, so we never listened

at home to what we were doing,”

he continues. “Every day, we did

something new, and never

looked back. It was exciting,

but at the same time, it was

weird doing that at such a quick

pace.”

The result is carefully crafted

melage of indie rock, post-punk,

shoegaze and even dance-punk

sprinkled throughout — plus

plenty of reverb, lush harmonies

and call-and-response vocals.

By the end of 2019, the

band will tour throughout

North America and in Europe.

Although the language they sing

in is a hotter topic with media

outlets in Quebec and France,

Berthiaume says that their audiences

in English markets don’t

tend to focus on language as

much, instead letting the music

speak for itself.

“When we go to the U.S., or

the U.K., or even Germany, it’s

not really a subject. They’re

more focused on music than

anything else,” he says. “We

put effort in writing lyrics, but

the most important thing is just

that we play music, and we’re a

band.”

Best Track: Agent Double

Dave MacIntyre

WOOLWORM

Awe

Mint Records

Woolworm is Icarus. The Vancouver

quartet soar so close to

the boundaries of Brit-Pop tinged

shoegaze and hardcore infected

power pop they almost get burned.

Awe, the band’s third LP, is a

terrifying balancing act between

hopeful and heavy, cool and kitsch,

merry and morose. The result is

a delicate tension of sensible vox

anchored to the ground by earth

angering rhythm. It’s a palpable

tension as they fly neither too high

nor too low.

Nowhere on the album is this

tension more prevalent than

on “Hold the Bow,” the album’s

first single. Inspired by Marina

Abramović’s performance art piece,

Rest Energy, where Abramović’s

partner holds a bow with an arrow

pointing at her heart for four whole

minutes. It’s a perfect visual metaphor

for the songs message of

total trust and unconditional love.

It’s clear Woolworm has carved

out a unique space for themselves,

one that simultaneously lands them

gigs with Orville Peck and hardcore

legends, Integrity. Perhaps that’s

why Awe seems to find the band

more open-minded and impulsive,

more varied and less symmetrical,

and even more playful. Maybe it’s

that same restless hubris that led

Icarus too close to the sun.

Best Track: Hold the Bow

Sean Orr

26 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


SUDAN ARCHIVES

Athena

Stones Throw Records

THE DREADNOUGHTS

Into the North

Stomp Records

LITTLE SCREAM

Speed Queen

Dine Alone

CURSIVE

Get Fixed

15 Passenger

LEIF VOLLEBEKK

New Ways

Secret City Records

On her debut full-length, themes of

duality break open Brittney Parks’

(AKA Sudan Archives) lyrical prowess.

The unearthly Athena embodies

everything the rising violinist/

songwriter stands for: understated

feminism, electric sexuality, and rebellious

vulnerability are delivered

by her sultry voice.

Parks harnesses her full power

as an artist with skill and spontaneity,

dancing from acoustic soul to

sensual R&B to experimental hiphop,

all wrapped generously in her

hypnotizing violin loops and West

African-inspired rhythms.

Unfolding like a cinematic score,

Athena is celestial yet relatable,

hitting universal notes on the

complexities and dichotomies of

being human. Lo-fi acoustics and

smooth vocals tempt on “Did You

Know?” “Confessions” swoops in

with ecstatic Sudanese-centric

fiddle beats and robust lyrics about

the compromises of following

a dream. The album swells with

orchestral-like elements and slips

into glitchy electronic riffs as Parks’

voice takes on a spooky tone, like

in “Green Eyes.”

The dramatic Athena rounds off

in moody jazz ensconced with a

voice of liquid gold dripping onto

sun-baked earth.

Parks pulls us from one side of

the coin to the other, both soothing

and energizing us all the while.

Best Track: Confessions

Dayna Mahannah

Gather round the table and hold

yer frothy drink up high, the Dreadnoughts

are back with their most

vigorous, heartfelt album yet. The

15-song collection of modernized

sea-shanties speaks to a different

time, where it’s often forgotten that

something as simple as a strong

accordion-backed harmony can fill

a room to the brim.

Based out of Vancouver’s Downtown

Eastside, the six-piece ragtag

crew of folk-punkers continue to

carry the torch for a genre that celebrates

the misfit. After dedicating

their previous album to World War I,

Into the North feels less focused in

one direction and more tapped into

what the band does best: gathering

folks together to drink, dance, and

be merry at all costs. More often

than not, the songs start stripped,

leading with singer, Nicholas

Smith’s deep, echoing vocals, leaving

the flute, accordion, and violin

no choice but to follow suit.

The album varies throughout,

ranging from cheerful to somber

and all notes in between, yet

boasts a substantial weight at its

center. With Into the North, the

Dreadnoughts continue sailing, no

matter the height of the waves, all

the while singing their jaunty song.

Best Track: Northwest Passage

Brendan Lee

Montreal-based singer, songwriter

and multi-instrumentalist Laurel

Sprengelmey returns with her

third studio album, Speed Queen,

picking up where she left off with

Cult Following and The Golden

Album to propel her dancy rock into

new thematic realms of justice and

geopolitics.

The album’s name refers

to a washing machine, which

Sprengelmey describes as the

ultimate token of the american

dream — “you know you’ve made

it if you’ve got your own washing

machine,” she says.

On hyper-political opener “Dear

Leader” she addresses climate

change, the migrant crisis and the

prison industrial complex, flitting

from subject to subject like a social

media newsfeed. Sprengelmey

matches the scope of content

covered with an impressive range

of instruments, from horns, to violin,

to synth, accordion, xylophone and

even a gong.

Little Scream tackles complex

compositions with confidence

amidst masterfully crafted orchestration.

The crisp percussion and lush

instrumentation redeem the record,

building rhythms with the same

heart-racing excitement as Arcade

Fire at their most anthemic while

Sprengelmey’s electric guitar hits

with ferocity.

Little Scream’s optimistic rockpop

ultimately sparkles like an 80s

prom night, nostalgic and wistful

and Pepto-Bismol pink.

Best Track: One Lost Time

Maggie McPhee

Cursive have always stood tall

among their emo rock peers since

emerging from the depths of Omaha,

NB in the early 2000s.

Following the critically acclaimed,

The Ugly Organ (2003),

vocalist Tim Kasher and a rotating

cast of comrades were keeping a

notably low profile until their 2018

comeback offering, Vitriola, which

showed the band reinvigorated and

ready to fight. That momentum continues

on Get Fixed, an album as

sharp and cutting as the scissors

dawning the album art.

As on Vitriola, Kasher continues

full force with his blunt views on

society, clearly frustrated with the

state of his America today.

Songs like “Marigold” and title

track “Get fixed” sound like a haunting

orchestra musical, while “Horror

is a Human being” and “Content

Conman” bring back their post

hardcore roots with its distortion

and tantrum filled drumming.

Cursive have a way of presenting

both ugly and beautiful at the same

time, while offering plenty of food

for thought. Even if you don’t fully

vibe with its dark subject matters,

Get Fixed retains a unique charm

in Kasher’s jaded vocal delivery on

top of playful and inventive musical

arrangements.

Best Track: What’s Gotten into You?

Lamar Ramos

If Leif Vollebekk’s record Twin

Solitudes in 2017 was a personal,

self-reflective journey tinged with

heartbreak and an existential

yearning for meaning, New Ways is

distinctively more tender, still personal—

but now for someone else.

The Montreal songwriter creates

scenes, poetic memories, and

whispered conversations that

depict moments and stories that

we are not a part of but listening to

as they unfold.

Vollebekk’s reverent attention to

the small details has always been

the softly shining star of his work,

and here they not only bring his

lyrics to technicolour vibrancy, they

also equally share the stage with

the figures of his songs.

“Lightning evening in the holy

highlands/Down in the hall up

against the wall/I know you’re

struggling what to call it/Why you

gotta call it anything at all?” he observes

during a quiet conversation

in “Hot Tears,” making the setting

just as significant as the dialogue.

As he sings about past experiences

with longing and affection,

pain and joy, his words are warm.

There are no traces of bitterness

in his soulful voice. In “Never Be

Back,” he is no jilted lover, only

wistfully honest: “She’s my woman

and she loved me so fine/She’ll

never be back.”

Much like the record’s namesake,

Vollebekk remembers these

moments and sees them differently,

“looking at the sun through my

eyelids.” He’s sees them in new

ways.

Best Track: Never Be Back

Albert Hoang

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 27


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

MOUNT EERIE

Lost Wisdom pt. 2

P.W. Elverum & Sun

On Lost Wisdom pt. 2, Mount Eerie

is looking towards the future and

the world around him. Whether it’s

bleak, warm or a mix of the two,

he’s looking forward nonetheless.

Songwriter Phil Elverum’s latest

album is a sequel to an earlier

collaboration with Canadian singer

Julie Doiron titled Lost Wisdom.

Part 2 focuses mainly on Elverum’s

tumultuous past year, still recovering

from the death of his wife,

his remarriage, and subsequent

divorce from actress Michelle

Williams.

Like his lyrics, Lost Wisdom Part

2’s production is mostly simple, quiet

and far from frivolous. Backed by

mainly just an acoustic guitar and

piano, it’s the words we’re needing

to focus on here. What follows is

a heartbreaking yet somewhat

hopeful collection of songs that

confirm how effective Mount Eerie

is at confessional songwriting.

Doiron’s accompanying vocals

provide a shoulder of support

to these confessions. You can

almost imagine them holding hands

throughout the recording of the album.

“I believed in love and I still do.

I’m not going to seal up my heart”

they both sing together in “Belief

pt. 2”. It’s nice to know that together,

they’re still looking forward.

Best Track: Belief

Fraser Hamilton

PELADA

Movimiento Para Cambio

PAN102

Known for its tendency to draw

attention to some of the most

unconventional sounds in contemporary

music, Bill Kouglias’

decision to release Movimiento Par

Cambino, the debut album by Montréal-based

duo Pelada is far from

a surprise. It’s a natural addition to

his eclectic and impeccably-curated

Berlin-based PAN imprint.

The playful interaction of vocalist

Chris Vargas and producer Tobias

Rochmann throughout the album’s

10 dancefloor-ready tracks flows

seamlessly between house, techno,

hip hop, Latin dance music, gabber,

UK bass, rave music and IDM

without getting bogged down in a

singular aesthetic.

Vargas’ vocal delivery ranges

from gentle singing and spoken

word to barking yells and grunts

bearing a distinctly hardcore punk

energy. And the lyrics, delivered

in an urgent Spanish, deconstruct

notions of privacy, gender and

sexuality against a backdrop of

state surveillance and “big data”

information practices by global

corporations.

Producer/multi-instrumentalist

Tobias Rochmann constructs a

positively globetrotting rhythmic

accompaniment to Vargas’ chant

that invokes the spirit of classic

electronic label Raster Noton as

much as it does the cumbia music

of Columbia. Elsewhere, icey

synths and decisive kicks complemented

by flavourful rhythmic

diversity that bounces between

genres with every track while remaining

universally accessible.

Hard-house-future-flex-funk-club

is the vibe —DJs take note.

Best track: Ajetreo


Adam Piotrowicz

THEY ARE

BEAT HAPPENING

B

eat Happening have always

been the score for outsider

punks.

Maybe it’s the way Calvin

Johnson’s voice rolls in with that

first “yeeeeaaaah” on “I Dig You;”

how the song becomes, all-atonce,

a groovy ode to every crush

you’ve ever had, and a droning

backing track to many solo bedroom

dances. It makes sense that

all the weirder, funkier punks were

identifying with a band who, in

essence, rejected the abject aggro

notions and aesthetics of hardcore,

but who still expertly claimed

and interpreted the underground.

After playing their first gigs in

Japan, Olympia’s Beat Happening

later toured the UK, fostering an

alliance to kindred spirits alongside

groups like The Vaselines

and The Pastels, and shocking

fans when they toured with iconic

Washington D.C. punk outfit Fugazi.

Percussionist Heather Lewis

notably borrowed drums at gigs,

and oftentimes created makeshift

drum sets out of any bangable

materials at hand.

With a stripped-down sound and

a gentler DIY ethos, Beat Happening,

consisting of Johnson, Heather

Lewis and Bret Lunsford, created a

space in punk scenes everywhere

for a larger scope of identities,

presentations, and overall weirdo-types

to feel like they belonged

in underground music communities.

“At the time, there was no one to

do it for you. So you just did it yourself,”

Johnson says over the phone.

“The whole concept of punk,

from the beginning, was to be

original and express yourself in

your own unique way. In that sense

I just felt like I was following in the

tradition of iconoclastic artists,” he

continues referring to Patti Smith

and Television.

The much-anticipated reissue

of their entire catalogue, We Are

Beat Happening, will be released

on Nov. 29 on Domino and arrives

during a period where DIY, though

still meaningful, means something

largely different. Given that

millennial musicians have access

to SoundCloud and GarageBand,

interacting with analog media is a

stylistic choice rather than a community

necessity. And underground

music lovers of today are used to

exploring bands in a less catalogued

way.

Type “Beat Happening” into

YouTube and you receive a less

cohesive experience of the band,

with each song or album re-uploaded

separately and sporadically.

You can pick and choose what you

want to hear instead of playing a

tape or EP all the way through. It

doesn’t negate the experience of

experiencing underground music.

But it’s certainly different.

The reissue, which features seven

LPs, was remastered at Abbey

Road Studios by Frank Arkwright.

It’s the first time in a decade

that all of their work has been in

one place, including their 1985

self-titled debut, which Johnson

describes as their “ultimate statement”

as a band, and feels like

the most “potent” representation

of their work. It serves as both an

accessible journey through Beat

Happening’s evolution, and categorical

relic of the underground.

There is something about Beat

Happening’s anarchic approach

to humour, tenderness and punk

that’s outlived its expiry date. Their

ability to weave homemade percussion

and sparing guitar chords

into a longing, innocent narrative

of adoration is easy to love.

Johnson notes that the band

always had a clear idea about their

sound.

“We were attempting to write

classic pop songs. Hopefully we

were successful.” When asked

if timelessness was always the

intention for the band’s sound, he

affirms with the same casual drawl

he’s made his signature, “mhm.”

Best Track: Fourteen

Alessia Dowhaniuk

We Are Beat Happening is available

Nov. 29 via Domino Recording Co.

LANCE BANG

28 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


Live

MUSiC

Calgary

THRUSH

HERMIT

October 12, 2019

The Palace Theatre

It was a packed night full of nostalgia

and old friends at the Palace Theatre

for Thrush Hermit’s long-awaited

show in Calgary. The iconic Haligonian

90s alt-rock outfit cemented their

place in so many contemporary indie

bands’ imaginations on the strength

of their seminal 1999 release, Clayton

Park.

That energy, their wild unpredictability

and straight up eagerness

for the riff, were on full display on

stage at the Palace as Thrush Hermit

seemingly forgot that it’s not 1999

anymore and put on a show that felt

as youthful and essential as ever.

Led by Joel Plaskett, who worked the

spotlight and crowd like the seasoned

ringleader he is, Thrush Hermit

elevated their set from mere reunion

show to something vital enough that

everyone in the near-capacity room

hoped would carry on all night.

Shotgun Jimmie, Canada’s modern

day answer to Pavement, opened up

the night with his trademark bashful

wit and endless charm. His quirky

presence and delightful songs filled

the room despite him being alone

on stage, singing, strumming and

drumming all at the same time. On the

heels of his latest release, Transistor

Sister 2, Shotgun Jimmie continues to

position himself as one of Canada’s

most underrated songwriters.

Sebastian Buzzalino

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 29


SCREEN

TIME

JAZZING

IT UP: THE

MUSIC OF

MOTHERLESS

BROOKLYN

In conversation with Edward

Norton about how jazz is

the backbone of his new film

Motherless Brooklyn

By PAT MULLEN

E

dward

Norton juggles riffs and

rhythms as actor, writer, and director

of Motherless Brooklyn. The film, a

passion project 20 years in the making,

stars Norton as Lionel Essrog, a

detective with Tourette syndrome navigating

the criminal underworld of 1950s Brooklyn.

Motherless Brooklyn adapts Jonathan Lethem’s

novel of the same name as Lionel uncovers

a case of racial discrimination in the city’s

housing market, touring through jazz clubs

and political rallies while investigating the

death of his mentor and falling in love with

an activist named Laura (Gugu Mbatha-Raw).

Fuelled by the jazzy rhythms of the city, the

film is a symphony of racial tensions and altered

scales.

Norton, speaking with BeatRoute at Toronto

International Film Festival, says he adapted

Lethem’s 1990s-set novel for the 50s to

increase the audience’s empathy for Lionel.

“The novel is really about the experience of

being inside this character’s brain, knowing

him, and feeling empathy as you watch him

navigate this painful and funny affliction,”

says Norton.

The beat and syntax of Jazz help put the

audience inside Lionel’s head. “One of the arguments

for acting and directing was knowing

I could experiment with the condition,

but also sculpt the balance of the performance

in the editing room,” explains Norton.

The rhythms of jazz lend Lionel’s spastic tics

a certain musicality as Norton’s performance

evokes a musician riffing on the scales and

echoes the drum beats and trumpet toots of

Daniel Pemberton’s score.

The film makes the connection

between jazz and Tourette’s explicit

when Lionel encounters a

trumpet player at a club. “I feel

about Lionel the way the trumpet

player communicates

to him saying, ‘I know that

headspace.’ It’s a gift, but

it’s a brain affliction just the

same,” explains Norton.

“Lionel says back

to the trumpet

player, ‘But you

have a way to

push it out

and make it

sound pretty.’

If I laugh lots of times, I feel lucky to have

a vehicle for it. If the dial got turned up a little

bit, it could be a paralyzing mental state.”

Norton’s empathetic performance draws

upon Lionel’s unavoidable awkwardness

without making light of it.

Motherless Brooklyn further evokes Lionel’s

struggle through an original song, “Daily Battles”

by Thom Yorke. “Thom expresses this

duality of longing in the heart, but also psychic

terror, fracture, and dissonance,” says

Norton. “Musically, he expresses Lionel’s

headspace perfectly for me.”

“Daily Battles” echoes throughout the

soundtrack with classic and contemporary

variations, including one by

Pulitzer Prize-winning trumpeter

Wynton Marsalis, who

“You have to pick yourself

up and out of your personal

struggles and engage

with the bigger fights.”

curated the jazz selections in the club scenes.

“When Laura reaches out and is so empathetic

to Lionel, senses his distress, and helps

calm him down, I was nervous about using

a known jazz ballad,” explains Norton. “The

last thing you want to do is take people out

of that moment if they recognize the song or

get distracted. Wynton did this beautiful arrangement

of Thom’s song and played it like

a Miles Davis ballad from the Birth of the Cool

era.”

Norton says that Yorke’s ballad captured

the essence of the story so strongly that it inspired

a revision to the script. “I put it in the

scene when Lionel complains about his condition

and Laura says, ‘We all have our daily

battles.’

“Laura is a Black woman who’s a lawyer in

the 50s and everyone only sees her as a secretary,”

explains Norton. “You have to pick

yourself up and out of your personal struggles

and engage with the bigger fights.” ,

30 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


BEATROUTE.CA

Get even closer

to the music.

Visit the all-new

beatroute.ca

Photo : Darrole Palmer

TERRA LIGHTFOOT

w/ SAM WEBER

NOV 8

NOV 2

THE EAST POINTERS

w/ LINDSAY LOU

NOV 14

FORTUNATE ONES

w/ SHERMAN DOWNEY

NOV 15

ALEX CUBA

NOV 7

THE YOUNG’UNS

NOV 9

LEMON BUCKET ORKESTRA

w/ TOTAL GADJOS

NOV 30

CHARLIE BROWN’S CHRISTMAS

w/ JERRY GRANELLI

TICKETS & DETAILS AT

CALGARYFOLKFEST.COM

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 31


Style

PLAY IT LOUD


Music and Fashion

Merge Explosively

In King Of Hearts’

Vivid Designs

Amber Mariel lives life in full saturation

and the young designer’s fashion line,

King Of Hearts, screams it from every

colour-soaked seam.

England born-and-bred, Mariel

infuses deliciously impractical yet

soulfully necessary pieces with the

musical subcultures of her British

heritage. As she says, “Who would the

Mods have been without The Kinks?”

It’s no wonder, then, that Mariel’s

loud and proud designs (boasting an

undeniable performative calibre) are

finding their way onto the bodies and

into the hearts of intrepid musicians.

Danielle McTaggart of Vancouver rock

duo Dear Rouge has performed in

numerous KOH outfits. “I don’t like to

be shy about style,” McTaggart says.

“People come to see an honest expression

of you and your music. Loud

is me and that’s what I try to wear.”

Learning to sew from a mother who

encouraged her at a young age to

alter clothing from local shop’s sales

sections in order to fit her (and the

family budget) ignited Mariel’s ardour

for design.

Later, despite years of experience

in the creative industry, she was

unqualified to attend a fashion course

at a prestigious university. She tucked

her dream away. But when Mariel unearthed

her sewing machine to make a

costume for Pride festivities one year,

people gushed. Ambition stirred anew;

King of Hearts was born.

The fashion line is a celebration

of expression and, less obviously, of

health. Depicting King Charles VII’s

descent into ‘madness’, the playing

card of choice represents a battle with

mental illness — something personal

for Mariel, an advocate of mental

health awareness. The heart imagery

reflects ideals of environmental and

ethical consciousness, as well as

shape and gender inclusivity.

Most importantly, King Of Hearts

embodies fun. “There’s always

a tongue-in-cheek aspect to my

designs,” Mariel says, who takes

seemingly dull or overlooked subjects

to alter how they are perceived,

and combines a love of satire with

“neck-breaking, eye-popping prints

and colour!”

By DAYNA MAHANNAH

Photos by LINDSEY BLANE

RHINESTONE

COWBOY

This canary yellow-andblue

sequin-and-rhinestone

suit is an uncanny nod to

the work of Nudie Cohen,

creator of the “Rhinestone

Cowboy.” With over 300

rhinestones hand-applied

to the two-piece ensemble,

Dani rocked this eye-popping

outfit during Dear

Rouge’s performance at the

Calgary Stampede.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 33


Style

PLAY IT LOUD

CROCODILLY

BLUES

Hand-picked on Dani’s travels,

this lustrous blue crocodile

print fabric was brought to life

by Mariel. The retro-mod crop

top and coordinating dress

shorts express versatility and

noticeability. Worn separately,

they amp up an outfit. Together,

they are unstoppable.


BOBBY

DAZZLER

Inspired by the strategic

‘dazzle camouflage’ used

in WWI on battleships to

disorient enemy ships, the

Bobby Dazzler print throws

passers-by off-balance and

may cause lost-train-ofthought

syndrome. Custom

created in collaboration

with graphic designer

Adam Gaucher, the draped

sleeves and cape-like

shape give the wearer

superhero confidence.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 35


TRAVEL

TUCSON, ARIZONA

EXPLORING THE VIBRANCY

OF THE SUN-BAKED

SONORAN DESERT

By MELISSA VINCENT

ALL PHOTOS: JEANINNE KAUFER

I

f you’ve never encountered

the hyper-specific experience

of inhaling Arizona’s

infamous dry heat, it’s

difficult to describe to Canadians

accustomed to life

on the periphery of great

bodies of water. In short, it’s clear,

oxidizing, and a blunt reminder

you’re now in cowboy country, so

buckle up.

In so many ways Tucson is

an example of a city in flux with

unique interest in the weird and

spectacular. Initially the ancestral

home to many nations of indigenous

people, including the Tohono

O’Odham and Pascua Yaqui, the

city experienced its first big boom

in the early 20th century when, for

a split second, it was larger than

Phoenix.

Due to its shape shifting identity,

in 2019 Tucson is a bunch

of things at once: It’s moderate

climate finds it reaching to be an

international conference hub; and

its stunning landscape, vibrant

art scene, and affordable housing

makes it attractive for both new

artists, and young locals who

have made their way around the

world before deciding to land back

home.

Each February, Tucson plays

host to the Gem, Mineral, and Fossil

showcase, one of the biggest in

the world. And for the last several

years, HOCO Festival has brought


How Sweet It Was

424 E 6th St.

Founded in 1974, How Sweet It Was

Vintage has curated its selection

for around a single mission: imagine

the way specifically found items can

have “meaning, soul, and a story.”

With racks organized by both era

and style, expect a blend of timeless

ready-to-wear finds, single-wear

show-stoppers pulled from America’s

sun-baked west, and matching

sets with prints inspired from just

south of the Mexican border.

Owl’s Club

236 S Scott Ave.

When this 86-year-old funeral

home was remodelled to make way

for the Owl’s Club, the idea was

to retain the glamour of the early

20th century. Walking up the super

lush, palm tree-lined corridor to

the doorstep of Owl’s Club feels

like an apt reflection of their menu

of “complex original” cocktails and

“Old world” wines. But don’t let

Owl’s swanky interior fool you, one

night during HOCO Festival this

year saw Deaf Kids and Vancouver

noise destroyers Minimal Violence

take the stage at the location of

the former pulpit and shake the

venue to its core.

ANDI BERLIN

Taqueria Pico De Gallo

2618 S 6th Ave.

Ordering from the takeout counter,

the menu is concise and, with most

tacos priced less than $2, the

menu is equally cost-conscious.

But what really makes these tacos

stand out are the tortilla shells,

thick and viscous rolled from a ball

of corn masa flour, and the sweet

and salty tamarind raspados.

The Boxyard

238 N 4th Ave.

Possibly one of Tucson’s most

unique local dining spots, the 10

intentionally painted shipping

containers feature four restaurants,

two bars and a courtyard to

connect everything together. From

Bronx-inspired BBQ to Vietnamese

fare, this dog-friendly new addition

to the city’s downtown strip boasts

dynamic open-air seating, capable

of withstanding Arizona’s many

changing climates.

RECORD STORES

Odds and Ends/ Don’t Forget This

some of the most forward-thinking

artists on the continent

including Dean Blunt, S.H.I.T.,

Bbymutha, and Omar Apollo to

the historic Hotel Congress.

But Tucson is much more than

a college town, or a sleepy place

to retire. It’s a community with an

underdog spirit, wrestling with its

newest period of development

while also making itself amenable

to inviting guests from outside,

squarely on their own terms.

DESTINATIONS

Hotel Congress

311 Congress St.

The folklore around the Hotel

Congress is largely derived from its

proximity to a crucial part of American

western history, and a tangled

relationship with supernatural.

Built in 1918, the Hotel Congress

first rose to national attention

when it became the site of capture

for the infamous criminal John

Dillinger, and almost 60 years later

when it acquired an in-house ghost

as a result of a death by suicide on

the premises in the early 90s.

Now named as a federally recognized

historic building, the Hotel

boasts an award-winning music

venue, Club Congress; two dining

spots, The Cup Cafe and Maynards;

and an impressive roster of

year-round programming including

as home base for HOCO fest.

Tucson Museum of Art

140 N Main Ave.

Located in the city’s Presido district,

the Tucson Museum of Art is

more than an impressive showcase

for Latin, Western, and Contemporary

art, it’s become a crucial

cultural epicenter of the ongoing

redevelopment of Downtown

Tucson. Comprised of an entire

74,000-square-feet historic block,

what sets the museum apart is its

clearly considered social mission

reflected in both the programming

and the structure of the space.

Throughout the year they offer

public lectures on the subject of

border politics and indigeneity, and

while the museum is undergoing

construction, they’re offering a pay

what you can model for all patrons.

Gates Pass

You can’t say you’ve been to

Tucson if you haven’t visited the

mountains that frame the Sonoran

Desert. Featuring a unique blend

of flora and fauna found nowhere

else in the world, from a distance,

the hills seem covered in grass

until you move closer and realize

that towering Saguaro cactus

populate the mountain’s highest

peaks. Walk, don’t run, or you’ll

miss it.

EATS AND DRINKS

Boca’s Tacos

533 N 4th Ave.

Recognizable by a puckering set

of lips adorned on both outside

the restaurant and on every menu,

Boca’s Tacos have been celebrated

by the New York Times and

the Food Network. Both open

late and conveniently located on

the historic and artsy 4th Avenue,

expect the usuals like pulled pork

and camaron tacos executed at

the highest level, their trademark

tri-colour tortilla chips, and truly

imaginative creations like the AM

taco topped with a hash brown

and fried egg.

Exo Roast Co.

403 N 6th Ave.

Bustling, laptop-ridden, co-working

cafe space by day, and smoky, live

music bar by night, Exo Roast. Co

is housed in a repurposed warehouse

with massive floor to ceiling

windows and mismatched rustic

furniture. But calling Exo a coffee

shop would do a disservice to

their ambitious event roster, which

includes Wednesday hatha yoga

classes on the patio, and Mezcal

tastings followed by traditional

cumbia and Mexican ballads on

Thursday.

NIGHTLIFE

191 Toole

What was once Skrappy’s, a

DIY-music scene devoted to

uplifting Tucson’s at-risk youth, was

renamed 191 Toole in 2013 with a

renewed effort to exist as one of

the few places in the city to regularly

host all-ages shows. A weirdly

angled venue, the stage is actually

on a diagonal, providing fantastic

sightlines for artists as diverse as

Cass McCombs and Gatecreeper,

to Chastity Belt and Maxo Kream.

Che’s Lounge

350 N 4th Ave.

Che’s states that they’ve been

located in Tucson since “forever,”

which seems hard to argue with

since its open from 12 pm to 2 am

every day of the year. From the

well-stocked bar stationed in the

centre of the room, to a gorgeous

back patio featuring live music and

the tallest and cheapest pour of

whisky on ice, this is your spot to

come early and stay late.

Wooden Tooth Records

426 E 7th St.

Depending on the night, Wooden

Tooth might be the place where

you stumble across a new Boris reissue,

or bear witness to a wild and

riotous in-store performance by

any of the city’s impressive group

of rising local artists. This year, the

record store levels up its ambition

as one of the city’s newest and

best record stores by hosting the

first annual Woodenstock, which is

exactly what it sounds like.

YOGA Annex

439 N 6th Ave.

When it comes to taking a yoga

class in a new city, comfort is key.

Newly opened, YOGA Annex is

the place where “the music goes

up and the lights go down.” The

vinyasa flow class we attended led

by Gabriela Pintado, featured live

electro-acoustic drumming by local

multi-disciplinary artist Quiahuitl,

and an intentionally malleable set

of poses. Both heart-pumping,

deliberately gentle and ultimately

restorative, the class was a necessary

reprieve from the hot desert

sun.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 37


YYC

11.19

GIRAF:

CALGARY’S

ANIMATION

EXTRAVAGANZA

CELEBRATES

15 YEARS

By BRAD SIMM

T

he limits of animation begin and

end with imagination.

Now in its 15 th year, the Giant Incandescent

Resonating Animation

Festival (GIRAF) is a celebration

of independent animation in every form possible.

“From putting a spotlight on local artists

to work from all around the world pushing

animation in different directions,” says Peter

Hemminger, director of Calgary’s Quickdraw

Animation Society.

One artist Hemminger is excited to have

involved this year is local indie-rock luminary,

Chad VanGaalen, who’s also a talented illustrator

and created the promotional materials for

the fest.

“As much as he’s known as a musician, his

visual sense and playful animations in all these

weird sci-fi worlds are strongly associated with

him. It’s a really nice connection because some

of the very first experiences Chad had with

animation were through classes at Quickdraw.”

Over the past year and a half, Quickdraw has

been doing a series of screenings and working

on a publication that explores queer contributions

to animation. For the festival’s opening

gala they’ll launch the full book, which contains

all of the collected essays. Sonya Reynolds and

Lauren Hortie create shadow puppet animation

of under-appreciated Toronto queer history

and will be the feature artists in attendance.

In the world of stop-motion animation and

visual effects, “few figures stand taller than

Phil Tippet.” Hemminger proclaims, “He’s an

absolute legend who did major special-effects

work on Star Wars, Jurassic Park, Robocop

and Starship Troopers, all these classics from

the 70s to 90s.” Tippet will be speaking and

showing the dark adventures of his Mad God

sci-fi animation trilogy.

GIRAF // Nov. 21 – 24 // various locations //

giraffest.ca

Chad VanGaalen

CALGARY’S ESSENTIAL NOVEMBER HAPPENINGSk

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 39

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO


11.19YYCAGENDA

NOV. 2

SKYDIGGERS

QT8:

Quentin

Tarantino

Doc Highlights

Two Decades

Of The Good,

The Bad, And

The Ugly

NOV. 11

REMEMBRANCE DAY CONCERT

KANTOREI “AFTER THE WAR”

NOV. 17

CALGARY YOUTH ORCHESTRA

NOV. 22

HAWKSLEY WORKMAN

AT THE BELLA

TAYLORCENTRE.CA

By BRAD SIMM

W

hen the reviews for

Once Upon A Time In

Hollywood started rolling

in, film critics sharpened

their pencils and went in

for a volley of deep, multi-layered analyses.

Not only does the internet give writers infinite

space to spew away, but some well-known

publications took numerous kicks at the can

to get their ya-yas out on director Quentin

Tarantino’s latest cultural exploration.

While the praise largely favoured Tarantino

doing a fantastic job, criticism also fell that

he reinforced male heroism with the lead

characters (both men), didn’t elevate Sharon

Tate’s role (played by Margot Robbie) that’s

central to the tragic storyline, stereotypes

the 60s (those damn hippies), and still uses

far too much violence.

QT8: The First Eight documents 21 years

of Tarantino producing hip Hollywood cinema

while addressing his artistic maneuvers. To

do so, filmmaker/director Tara Wood teases

out playful, smart and heartfelt interviews

with a wide cross-section of collaborators

close to Tarantino who reveal much about the

man and his unconventional craft. Tarantino

himself, however, doesn’t make an appearance,

which is how Wood also approached

her documentary on Texas filmmaker Richard

Linklater (Slacker, Dazed and Confused).

“We don’t interview directors,” she says.

“It’s more interesting to hear about them

through other people, rather than hear somebody

talking about themselves. It kind of

chooses different paths when you go down

that way, which I think kind of opened it up.”

Wood adds, “That’s what Quentin loved

about the Linklater doc and why he and his

team supported the film. But he also said,

‘Yes, I’ll tell everyone to show up (to the interviews),

but you and I are not going to meet

until this is complete.”

Consequently, QT8 is a very open, honest,

unfiltered account of people who know, trust

and respect Tarantino and his work. In it,

Kurt Russell talks about crushing the male

macho stereotype, supreme stuntwoman

Zoe Bell discusses at length roles where she

plays herself or filled in for Uma Thurman,

redefining female characters as strong and

dominant, and Jamie Foxx and Samuel Jackson

speak towards how Tarantino takes an

anti-racist stand.

Of course, there’s the elephant in the

room, Tarantino’s former boss, Harvey

Weinstein. Wood also confronts that extreme

complication midway and at the end of the

film, and not causally.

“On the darker side,” says Wood, pausing

for a moment. “It was very interesting to learn

all these things about Quinten, then learn

what we learned about Harvey and how that

could possibly exist together. Wow, you just

can’t imagine these two people working in the

same room, on the same planet together.”

The 7th annual CUFF.Docs runs Nov. 27 to Dec 1

at Globe Cinema.

40 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


11.19YYCMUSIC

ALBERTA

ELECTRONIC

MUSIC

CONFERENCE:

Ambitious

Programming

Brings Global

Electronic Music

Culture To Calgary

By KASIA GORSKI

The fourth annual Alberta Electronic Music

Conference (AEMCON) descends on Calgary’s

world-class music museum, the National Music

Centre (NMC) this month with an exciting

program for local electronic music producers,

selectors, and fans. The information-packed day

schedule gives pass-holders access to 60+ technical

workshops, showcases, panels, mixers, and

artist talks, while the nightlife is filled with fun and

dancing at a dozen or so venues around town.

More than 150 artists and speakers will share

their ideas and talent during the week-long

electronic music smorgasbord. This year, a new

flagship brand for the National Music Centre,

NMC: ON, intersects with AEMCON to bring

global electronic music to Calgary via special

performances and artist talks focused on digging

deep into the art and culture of the wide-ranging

DJ world.

To make sense of the sprawling conference

schedule, BeatRoute has highlighted five of the

hottest tickets during AEMCON to check out.

Friday, Nov. 15

NMC ON: After Hours

Tix: $40 or included with AEMCON pass

Location: Studio Bell (850 4 St SE)

Headlined by Los Angeles beatmaker

Daedelus, and joined by Montreal

multi-instrumentalist Ouri, eclectic

house and disco selector Dane, Toronto-based

experimental electronic

performer Korea Town Acid, and The

Funk Hunters’ Nick Middleton as The

Outlier, After Hours is a favourite

nightlife event at AEMCON that kicks

off the weekend festivities of the festival.

The entire National Music Centre

will be transformed from museum

to club with multiple stages, bars, and

vibes spread over five floors.

Read our

full interview

with Daedelus

online at

beatroute.ca

Saturday, Nov. 16

NMC ON: Buchla Masterclass with Suzanne

Ciani

Tix: Included with admission to Studio Bell or AEM-

CON Pass

Location: Studio Bell (850 4 St SE)

Suzanne Ciani shares her intimate knowledge

of the Buchla 200 synthesizer in an in-depth

lecture on the instrument. The workshop will

include quadraphonic demonstration, which involves

four independent signals channelled from

speakers in surround sound. A ground-breaking

composer, musician and sound designer for

the better part of half a century, Ciani has been

referred to as the “Diva of the Diode” and a

synth hero.

Saturday, Nov. 16

AEMCON: LongWalkShortDock and RIM

Visuals presented by Oscill8 and Bass

Turtle Productions

Tix: $20 early bird, $25 advance or included

with AEMCON Pass

Location: Junction (628 8 Ave SW)

Attending a performance by LongWalk-

ShortDock is a little like watching a mad

scientist in his evil lair through a keyhole

in the door. His eclectic combination of

stacked melodies, aggressive synths

and heavy drums speaks to his unique

approach to sound design and penchant

for invigorating live performance. Peel back

the wires with LWSD in a not-to-be-missed

workshop prior to the show.

Saturday, Nov. 16

403DNB & AEMCON present BREAK

(UK/Symmetry Recordings)

Tix: $20 early bird, $25 advance or included

with AEMCON Pass

Location: Dickens Pub (1000 9 Ave SW)

The long-awaited Calgary debut for UK

producer Break offers an easy style of

Drum ‘n’ Bass that can be enjoyed by

anyone, from mild dabblers to hardcore

junglists alike. With crisp, clean melodies

layered over hard-hitting bass, laced with

mood-lifting vocals, Break is one of the

genre’s most prolific DJs.

Sunday, Nov. 17

AEMCON: Join The Future book launch

Tix: Free

Location: Central Library (800 3 St SE )

Longtime writer for Knowledge Magazine,

Colin Steven has launched Velocity Press

to specialize in non-fiction publications

about the culture of electronic music. The

debut publication is Join The Future by

author Matt Anniss. Join Steven and Anniss

in a discussion about bleep techno and

the previously untold story of British dance

music’s first sub-bass revolution.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 41


TREVOR HATTER

11.19YYCMUSIC

LOCAL ARTIST

SPOTLIGHT

WOODHAWK

RIFFS THEIR WAY TO

SELF-REFLECTION

By CHRISTINE LEONARD

I

t’s a long way to the top if

you want to rock and roll

and, according to Turner

Midzain, lead vocalist/guitarist

for the Calgary-based

stoner riff rock outfit, Woodhawk, the

shortcuts to the summit aren’t even

worth taking.

“I think the journey is the most important

part. You won’t get to your destination

without taking it,” says Midzain

of Woodhawk’s path to recording their

sophomore album, Violent Nature. “You

don’t always end up where you wanted,

but you wind up where you have to go.”

In Woodhawk’s case, that landing

place turned out to be Vancouver’s Rain

City Recorders, the same facility that

yielded their scorching full-length debut,

Beyond the Sun, back in 2017. There

normally freewheelin’ trio (once again)

entrusted producer Jesse Gander with

translating their emotionally weighty new

material into an electrifying, but cohesive

new album.

“To get where we are, we went through

unexpected trauma and had so much

going on behind the scenes that I don’t

think Woodhawk would be the same band

if it didn’t happen. Everything that went

wrong went wrong for all the right reasons.

But you didn’t see it at the time.”

Armed with the perspective they’ve

acquired in the two years that have

elapsed since their previous release, the

flourishing songwriter, Midzain, and his

bandmates, bassist/vocalist Mike Badmington

and drummer Kevin Nelson have

endeavoured to bring a heightened level

of personal authenticity and meaning to

their strikingly compositions.

“It was our outlet. It was a place that

the three of us could go and find a humbling,

therapeutic ground that we all felt

connected to. It helped us through whatever

demons we were battling. Whatever

we were going throu gh, playing together

was the one thing that consistently allowed

us to voice our concerns and talk

about matters that usually weren’t talked

about,” he explains. “It’s okay to say that

you’re not okay.”

Cutting straight to the heart of the

matter, Violent Nature doesn’t sacrifice

style for substance as Woodhawk’s

famous knack for turning out anthemic

riffs and contagious rhythms endures.

Still, there is a newfound sense of

vulnerability and self-reflection that

permeates and illuminates the dense

metaphorical mirrors of Violent Nature.

Thankfully so. The cracks are where the

light gets in.

Woodhawk celebrate the release of Violent

Nature on Nov. 8 at the Palomino (Calgary)

and Nov. 9 at Temple (Edmonton).

42 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


FEMME

WAVE

FEMINIST MUSIC

AND ARTS FESTIVAL

DREAMS BIG FOR

YEAR FIVE

By JESS ARC

F

emme

Wave is Calgary’s only feminist arts festival

and this year, for their five-year anniversary,

they’re celebrating big and dreaming even bigger.

A successful fundraiser at the Globe in September

raised $8,000 for the festival, which, along

with the announcement of its biggest and most diverse lineup,

it’s clear Femme Wave has cemented its spot in Calgary’s

packed festival schedule.

Co-directors Kaely Cormack and Hayley Muir are not

strangers when it comes to the DIY femme-punk scene. Muir

and Cormack, both founding members of Calgary punk band

The Shiverettes. As they started playing regular shows and

becoming more involved in the community, they noticed a

trend that they were not happy with: the lack of femme representation

on the stage.

“Hayley and I felt that there were barely any women on

stage. We would play shows and it was just men everywhere

and men booking the shows and running sound, but where

were all the women?” says Cormack.

“In the early days, we’d say, ‘This sucks, there’s no girls

anymore,’ but then The Shiverettes played a show and we

were like, ‘Wait a minute, we’re on an almost all female bill,

not even on purpose.’ We know a bunch of these bands and

these people who are doing these things, but why don’t we

ever see more of them?” says Muir.

From that moment on, it was Muir and Cormack’s mission

to create a safe and inclusive platform that celebrated women

and non-binary musicians.

What initially started as a one-off event quickly evolved into

a four-day festival. They continued to expand its programming

into visual arts, music, comedy, film, spoken word, workshops

and, this year, the addition of a “wild card” programming

— think clothing and plant swaps, drag and burlesque

shows, astrology, all done through a feminist lens.

Muir and Cormack stress that the festival is not about

being a victim. It’s about reclaiming artistic spaces and embracing

them in a positive, empowering way with the people

whose aims are to build one another up.

“The arts community is for you. If you go to a show or

opening night in the arts community, maybe you feel like it’s

not quite your space or that you’re not quite supposed to be

there, but I hope at Femme Wave people feel like they absolutely

should be here — and not just at Femme Wave, but in

all of those spaces,” says Cormack.

Muir adds, “Femme Wave started going hard on making

safer spaces, trying to normalize that by making it a huge

priority and demanding that of places. We didn’t invent this

type of work, but when people start to make noise about it, it

starts to spread and becomes the normal and if we can push

these boundaries and raise these bars, the whole community

grows and gets better.”

Hua Li

Traditional and unceded territory of

the Kanien’keha:ka, Montréal, QC

Classically trained, self-identified queer

and biracial musician Hua Li defies

genre boundaries, combining jazz, R&B,

and experimental hip hop that is dancey

and emotionally charged. Her debut

album, Dynasty, dropped in September

and projects a deep-level of self

awareness that is bound to connect

with many.

The Pack A.D

Unceded traditional lands of the

Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh,

Vancouver, BC

Blending indie rock with electric blues,

The Pack A.D have been a mainstay

in Canada for 15 years. Pivotal players

in the mid-2000s garage rock revival

scene, they offer a refreshing, insightful

perspective to the genre that gets

better with each year.

Haviah Mighty

The Dish With One Spoon Territory,

Toronto, ON

Haviah Mighty made history this year

when she became the first black woman

and hip-hop artist to win the coveted

Polaris Prize. She raps about her struggles

struggles with racism, classism and

sexism, bringing a new level of wokeness

to the Canadian hip hop scene. Her

headlining set at Femme Wave will be her

Calgary debut.

Kimmortal

Unceded traditional lands of the

Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh,

Vancouver, BC

Femme Wave has a history of bringing

in artists that are on the brink of hitting

a massive wave of popularity and

Kimmortal is no exception. Recently

long-listed for the 2019 Polaris Music

Prize, queer and Filipinx rap musician,

Kimmortal, needs to stay on your radar.

With tracks that should be household

anthems, like “Sad Femme Club,”

Kimmortal’s commanding bars will leave

you feeling empowered.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 43


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HIGHLIGHTING SOME OF THE MOST

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NOVEMBER 22

COPPERHEAD

Anchored by lead singer Liz Stevens' smoky,

spine-tingling contralto, Copperhead blends R&B,

swaggering rock ‘n’ roll, and folk with a rusty edge.

DETAILS AND TICKETS AT STUDIOBELL.CA/WHATS-ON

Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre | 850 4 Street SE Calgary, AB

studiobell.ca @nmc_canada #StudioBell

44 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


11.19YYCMUSIC

The Cheat Sheet BR PICKS THE 5 ESSENTIAL LIVE MUSIC SHOWS

INDIE

FOLK

HEAVY

EDM

POP

1

DANNY LAJ & THE LOOKS

Friday, Nov. 15 at The Palomino

Perfect power-pop blasts, courtesy

of Montreal’s long-running Danny

Laj & the Looks.

2

SCENIC ROUTE

TO ALASKA

Saturday, Nov. 16 at The Palomin

Golden hooks and twee harmonies

abound in the Edmonton power trio’s

danceable set. With support from

locals Thomas Thomas and The

Northern Coast.

3 COPPERHEAD

Friday, Nov. 22 at Studio Bell

This sprawling five-piece features

expansive soundscapes that blend

lo-fi noise, R&B and minor-key

murder ballads into one seamless

package.

4 ALTAMEDA

Friday, Nov. 29 at SAIT’s The Gateway

Edmonton heartland rockers return

to Calgary after a successful Germany

tour in support of their latest

album, Time Hasn’t Changed You.

5

RICH AUCOIN

Saturday, Nov. 30 at Commonwealth

An East Coast staple, the party-starting

madman returns for

another night of ebullient anthems

and super-catchy hooks from his

new album, Death.

ROOTS

KIM CHURCHILL

Wednesday, Nov. 13 at Commonwealth

1

The Australian guitarist, songwriter

and multi-instrumentalist stands tall

with his bouncing, uplifting night of

adult-contemporary inspo-folk.

2

ALEX CUBA

Friday, Nov. 15 at Festival Hall

Latin music traditions are turned on

their head with sugarcane-sweet

melodies, pop-soul hooks and

powerful guitar riffs that keep the

fire burning all night.

3

FORTUNATE ONES

Saturday, Nov. 16 at Festival Hall

Anthemic melodies and effortless,

soaring hooks transform the

award-winning duo’s folk and country

roots into something more than

beautiful the sum of its part.

4

THE FOLK PODCAST

(PRESENTATION AND

PERFORMANCE)

Thurs, Oct. 24 at Lee’s Palace

Folk-scholar-turned-podcaster,

Mike Tod, dives deep into the

lesser-known stories and histories

of folk and roots music across

Canada.

5

OLD MAN LUEDECKE

Friday, Nov. 29 at King Eddy

The two-time Juno winner showcases

his easy East Coast charm

and lilting banjo arrangements for a

night of extraordinary storytelling.

1 BAPTISTS

Friday, Nov. 8 at Broken City

The iconic indie venue celebrates

15 years with a stacked weekend of

shows to celebrate, including Vancouver

hardcore punks, Baptists,

alongside Fall City Fall, Mortality

Rate and Trench.

2 WOODHAWK

Friday, Nov. 8 at The Palomino

Howling riffs and psych anthems

will be on full display at Woodhawk’s

album release for a stacked

night with Gone Cosmic and

Flashbac

3 ALESTORM

Thursday, Nov. 14 at Dickens Pub

Bring out your tankards, eye

patches and peg legs and prepare

to weather the heaviest storms

on the seven seas with Scotland’s

pirate-themed party machine.

4

IN FLAMES

Tuesday, Nov. 19 at The Palace Theatre

The fathers of Gothenburg-style

melodic death metal return for a

huge, punishing show that promises

to be louder than hell.

5

THE PRIMALS

Saturday, Nov. 23 at The Palomino

Fuzzy punk with a heavy edge, this

Los Angeles outfit bring the grungy

bop to Calgary for the first time,

joined by Paradise and Act Natural.

RAP

HAVIAH MIGHTY

Thursday, Nov. 7 at #1 Legion

1

Femme Wave presents: The Ontario

native made history this year

when she became the first hip-hop

artist and black woman to win the

Polaris Prize

2

HANNAH WANTS

Sunday, Nov. 10 at Commonwealth

From the clubs in London and Ibiza

to sweaty rooms in North America,

this rising, ultra-focused house DJ

will get any dancefloor moviong.

3

DNB GIRLS SHOWCASE

Friday, Nov. 15 at Broken City

Presented by AEMCON, this

stacked lineup features some of

the best talent in Calgary drum

and bass, including Molly Fi,

Missfudge, Distinct, Droplet, Lotus

Queen, Crystal Fresh and Ninjette.

4

MANILA GREY

Friday, Nov. 15 at Commonwealth

Part of Commonwealth’s 8-year

anniversary week, these Vancouver-based

hip-hop newcomers are

blowing up, blending their Filipino

culture with confident beats and

rhymes.

5

NMC ON: AFTER HOUSE

WITH DAEDELUS

Friday, Nov. 15 at Studio Bell

NMC’s popular late-night series

returns with this Los Angeles

beatmaker, joined by Ouri, Dane

MacDonald, KOREA TOWN ACID,

The Outlier and locals DJ SON-

IDEF and DJ BLKFT.

1

ELLEN DOTY X

MONOGRAM COFFEE

Thursday, Nov. 7 at Monogram Coffee (Fih

Ave Place)

Indie jazz singer Ellen Doty teams

up with local songwriter Kate Stevens

to release “Next to the Fire,”

raising money for The Mustard

Seed.

2 bülow

Friday, Nov. 8 at Commonwealth

Themes of meeting people for the

first time, figuring out commitments

and poignant tracks about boys all

belie the young, rising pop artist’s

age as she sings over synth-saturated,

bouncy beats.

3

JEREMY DUTCHER

Friday, Nov. 8 at Jack Singer

Concert Hall

The Toronto-based classically

trained Indigenous tenor, musicologist

and activist performs his 2018

Polaris Prize winning music for a

moving, inspirational night.

4

RIA MAE

Thursday, Nov. 21 at SAIT’s The

Gateway

From Halifax, the activist pop

singer has worked closely with

Classified, who produced her

self-titled debut and helped propel

her into the upper echelons of

Canadian R&B

5

PROZZÄK FAREWELL TOUR

Friday, Nov. 22 at SAIT’s The Gate

The iconic pop duo are calling it

quits after more than 20 years of

hits. Come for the 90s nostalgia,

stay for the all-night dance party.

NOVEMBER 2019 BEATROUTE 45


Savage Love

BY DAN SAVAGE

Quickies

My little dick has always held me

back. I didn’t date in high school

because I couldn’t stand the

thought of girls discussing my tiny

manhood. That said, I’ve adapted

fairly well and become skilled with

my tongue and hands. The biggest

problem is that my dick is just

small enough that the head pokes

straight forward and can be seen

through my pants. I never tuck in

a shirt because of it. Because I am

always in oversize shirts that hang

past my waist, I never look professional.

I’ve tried stuffing with socks

and it didn’t work. Do you know of

anything that can mask a pathetic

johnson? I’d love to move up in the

world.s.

Physically Embarrassing

Nub Isn’t Sufficient

Have you considered packing?

Trans men, drag kings, butch dykes,

and even straight cis women experimenting

with gender expression

will sometimes pack—that is, wear

“packing dildos” that create the

appearance of a masculine bulge.

Packers are modeled on soft cocks,

not hard cocks, and they come in a

range of sizes and colors. And so

long as you don’t engage in false

advertising, PENIS—so long as

you make it clear to new partners

that the bulge in your pants is not

a prologue—there’s no reason why

you couldn’t pack, just as there’s no

reason why you and other guys with

small dicks can’t strap on a regular

dildo when your partner wants a

deep dicking.

I’m a mid-20s straight woman,

and there’s a pattern in my life

that I’m trying to break: Since high

school, I’ve repeatedly ended up

being friends with wonderful men

who I shared an obvious sexual

tension with at the start of our

“friendships.” (Our mutual friends

often noted the sexual tension.)

Not a single one has ever turned

into more than a one-off drunken

kiss. Maybe it’s who I’m picking,

but I’m starting to think that I’m the

problem. An ex of mine (who I met

on Bumble) told me that I give off

“don’t touch me” vibes. Looking

back, I can see that all my relationships

started in settings where romantic

interest was implied—apps,

blind dates, etc. I’ve been spending

a lot of time with a classmate of

mine. We get along well, and he’s

hot and single. How do I (for lack of

a better term) seduce him?

Dreading The

Friend Zone

Don’t seduce, ask. Don’t put the

moves on someone, use your

words—or think of your words as

your move, DTFZ. Since you give off

“don’t touch me” vibes (that’s some

valuable feedback from an ex!), and

since we’ve asked men to do a better

job of perceiving and respecting

a woman’s “don’t touch me” vibes,

you will have to make your interest

clear and unambiguous: “Hey, classmate,

we’ve been spending a lot of

time together, and I was wondering

if you might be interested in going

on a date sometime.”

I am a public-school teacher in the

United States. I love teaching, and

I want to teach for the rest of my

career. I am very good at it, but

unfortunately that doesn’t affect

my pay in the slightest. After 10

years of poverty, I’m getting tired

of going without. I thought perhaps

I could do some sex work on

the side to help pay off my student

loans and get some more money

for classroom supplies. Thanks

to de facto segregation, all of my

students are one specific ethnicity

and very poor, so I think I could

easily avoid accidentally servicing

a parent or relative of a student.

But how on earth does someone

safely and discreetly embark on

sex work as a side hustle?

Need a Second Job

That Actually Pays

Someone you work with, someone

you went to school with,

someone you used to date, someone

who lives in your apartment

building—it’s not just parents and

relatives of your students you

need to worry about, NASJTAP.

Vindictive exes and small-minded,

sex-negative busybodies

of all stripes can be a problem

for sex workers. And since the

consequences of being outed as

a sex worker are always swift and

severe for someone who works

with children, you’ll want to find

another side hustle. You should

also get out there and support—

we should all get out there and

support—Democratic presidential

candidates who are calling

I have had a very hot, sexy bodybuilder

friend with benefits for

many, many years. He’s Dominant

and into really intense bondage and

SM, and it’s fantastic. The harder

he goes on me, the more aroused

he gets. Sometimes he comes

three times in one session, always

with me in superintense and painful

bondage positions. It turns him on

so much—and it turns me on, too.

The thing is, he hates my dick. We

have so much fun during our sessions,

but he won’t touch my dick

and won’t let me touch it, either.

Bodybuilder Is

Neglecting Dick

Ignoring your dick and not letting

you come and then seeing you

crawl back for more abuse is most

likely part of the power trip that

turns your hot, sexy friend on, BIND,

and he’s unlikely to start lavishing

attention on your dick on my orders.

And since it sounds like he gives

you plenty of hot JO material for

after your bondage sessions, it’s not

like there isn’t something in it for

you, right?

to forgive or cancel student-loan

debt, like Elizabeth Warren and/

or Bernie Sanders. And, yes, it’s

possible to support more than

one candidate at this stage of the

political process.

IMy girlfriend and I have been going

strong for almost 10 months. She

told me that in the past she dated

only older men—her teachers, her

boss, a police officer, and other

older men who were, in her own

words, “flat-out wrong for me” (two

of them were married). I am interested

in your take on why she is

dating me now. I’m a couple of years

younger than she is—she is 30, and

I am 28. She says she sees a future

with me and I’m unlike anyone she’s

ever met. Can what someone likes

change in this way?


The Younger Man

You may be the exception—the

rare younger man your girlfriend

finds attractive—or it could be that

she was never attracted exclusively

to older men. Just because

someone dated a string of one type

of person (older, younger, taller,

shorter, maler, femaler), it doesn’t

follow that someone isn’t interested

in other types, too. Someone realizing

they’re attracted to more types

of people or acting on long-standing

attractions to other types of people

doesn’t mean they’ve changed, TYM,

it means they’ve grown.

On the Lovecast, Dan enlists

straight-boy help from Michael

Ian Black: savagelovecast.com.

46 BEATROUTE NOVEMBER 2019


new album includes “strangers” & “astronaut”

out now

canadian tour

11.08 — victoria, bc @ save on foods memorial centre

11.09 — vancouver, bc @ pacific coliseum

11.10 — kelowna, bc @ prospera place

11.12 — calgary, ab @ scotiabank saddledome

11.13 — edmonton, ab @ rogers place

11.15 — regina, sk @ brandt centre

11.16 — winnipeg, mb @ bell mts place

11.19 — sudbury, on @ sudbury arena

11.20 — windsor, on @ the colosseum at caesars windsor

11.22 — toronto, on @ scotiabank arena

11.25 — ottawa, on @ canadian tire centre

11.26 — kingston, on @ leon’s centre

11.28 — moncton, nb @ molson canadian centre at casino new bruswick

11.29 — halifax, ns @ scotiabank centre

each ticket purchased online includes a CD or digital copy of the new album

$1 from each ticket will be donated to MusiCounts & Indspire cityandcolour.com


CANADA’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT CONCERT PROMOTER

UPCOMING SHOWS

JAY PARK

Nov 8 - MacEwan Hall

SEAWAY

& SPECIAL GUESTS

Nov 2 - Dickens Pub

JOHN JOSEPH

OF CRO-MAGS

Nov 7 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

BÜLOW

Nov 8 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

Nov 9 - The Starlite Room

HANNAH WANTS

& SPECIAL GUESTS

Nov 10 - Union Hall

IN FLAMES

Nov 19 - The Palace Theatre

Nov 20 - Union Hall

RIA MAE

Nov 20 - The Starlite Room

Nov 21 - The Gateway

RICH AUCOIN

& SPECIAL GUESTS

Nov 30 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

HELLYEAH

Dec 5 - The Palace Theatre

Dec 6 - Union Hall

KACY & CLAYTON

Dec 12 - Commonwealth Bar & Stage

Dec 13 - Temple

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT MRGCONCERTS.COM

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