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Frankfort’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper FrankfortStationDaily.com • November 14, 2019 • Vol. 14 No. 24 • $1

A

,LLC

®

Publication

Hickory Creek Middle

School Symphonic Band

members Yui Nagashima

(left) and Madeline Clark

warm up before the

Veterans Day Concert on

Thursday, Nov. 7, at the

school. Laurie Fanelli/22nd

Century Media

Hickory Creek Veterans Day Concert honors past

and present servicemembers, Page 3

national spotlight

Daughter of Frankfort native appears in

American Girl catalog, Page 4

top marks

D210 given Exemplary status in

Illinois Report Card, Page 10

moving up

Eagle Scouts recognized at Court of Honor

ceremony, Page 8


2 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station calendar

frankfortstationdaily.com

In this week’s

station

Police Reports................13

Sound Off.....................17

Faith Briefs....................20

Puzzles..........................28

Home of the Week.........31

Classifieds................ 32-40

Sports...................... 41-48

The Frankfort

Station

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

Nuria Mathog, x14

nuria@frankfortstation.com

Sports Editor

Steve Millar

s.millar@22ndcm.com, x34

Sales director

Dana Anderson, x17

d.anderson@22ndcenturymedia.com

real estate sales

Courtney Masinter ext 47

c.masinter@22ndcenturymedia.com

classifieds/Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

bill@opprairie.com

president

Andrew Nicks

a.nicks@22ndcenturymedia.com

EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

n.burgan@22ndcenturymedia.com

22 nd Century Media

11516 West 183rd Street

Unit SW Office Condo #3

Orland Park, IL 60467

www.FrankfortStation.com

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Published by

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THURSDAY

Candy Collection for

Veterans

Deadline: Nov. 14. The

Frankfort Park District is

collecting bite-size Halloween

candy for the

residents at the Veterans

Home in Manteno. Bitesize

candy is the No. 1

item requested by the residents

at the home. Bring in

your leftover and excess

Halloween candy to be donated

to the retired veterans.

Candy can be dropped

off at the Frankfort Park

District’s Founders Community

Center, 140 Oak

St., Frankfort.

Yoga for Success

10 a.m. Nov. 14, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. How successful

you are in life simply

depends on how well

you can use your mind and

body. This session offers

simple, but powerful, yoga

postures designed to bring

stability and balance. No

prior experience with yoga

is necessary. Anyone ages

7 and up can attend. Please

bring a yoga mat or towel.

Call (815) 534-6173 to

register.

Feminist Book Club

7 p.m. Nov. 14, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. This

month we discuss “The

Mother of All Questions”

by Rebecca Solnit. The

subjects include women

who refuse to be silenced,

misogynistic violence, and

much more. Books are

available at the Circulation

Desk. Join the discussion.

FRIDAY

Thanks for Desserts

6:30-8:30 p.m. Nov.

15, Founders Community

Center, 140 Oak St.,

Frankfort. Did someone

say dessert? That’s what

everyone looks forward

to during this holiday season.

Come learn a new

dessert that can be made

for Thanksgiving. These

little bakers will be making

cake balls that look

like pumpkins! It’s so easy

to make, with just a few

little steps and some delicious

ingredients. They

will learn how to make it

and then of course sample

it too. A recipe will

go home with these little

bakers. The whole family

will be thankful for such

a delicious dessert. This

program is for children

ages 3-9. Fee is $24 for

residents and $29 for nonresidents.

Festive Flower Pots

6:30-8 p.m. Nov. 15,

Founders Community

Center, 140 Oak St.,

Frankfort. Want to transform

your summer and fall

flower arrangements into

something festive for winter

but don’t know where

to start? Come learn how

to coordinate colors, use

balance in a design, and

what materials to use to

create the look you want.

Examples will be demonstrated.

The instructor was

on the Roscoe Village Garden

Walk for many years

and has done freelance

work designing flower

pots and window boxes for

clients. For participants

18 and up. Fee is $15 for

residents and $20 for nonresidents.

SW

LIST

Leather Bracelet: Snaps,

Studs and Stamping

6:30-8:30 p.m. Nov.

15, Founders Community

Center, 140 Oak St.,

Frankfort. Learn the basic

leatherworking skills of

stamping, rivet setting, and

clasp attachments to create

a wearable work of art.

You’ll create two to three

bracelets from start to finish:

cut and prepare leather,

stamp a design then dye

the leather, set rivets and a

snap closure. All materials

and tools will be provided;

you will provide the creativity.

For participants

14 and up. Fee is $40 for

residents and $45 for nonresidents.

SATURDAY

Bond and Bake

10 a.m.-noon Nov. 16,

Founders Community

Center, 140 Oak St., Frankfort.

Adult/child teams will

spend a morning together

having a sweet time baking

cookies and cupcakes.

Each pair will bake their

own batches of cookies

and cupcakes. Time will

also be given to decorate

the cupcakes. Price includes

one adult and one

child. This program is for

children 5 and up with

a parent. Fee is $57 for

residents and $62 for nonresidents.

Local Author Laura

Magosky

2 p.m. Nov. 16, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Local

author Laura Magosky

and illustrator Linda Newman

share their new picture

book and talk about

how an idea in their heads

becomes a book in your

hands. Call (815) 534-

6173 to register.

SUNDAY

“Dreams Come True”

Opening Reception

1-3 p.m. Nov. 17, Frankfort

Arts Association Art

Gallery, 21 S. Ash Street,

Suite 7. The Frankfort

Arts Association has announced

the opening of its

art gallery in Downtown

Frankfort. The purpose of

the space will fulfill the

group’s mission to house

gallery exhibits and a

classroom for art classes,

workshops, and lectures.

“Dreams Come True,” the

organization’s first exhibit,

will run from Nov. 17

through Sunday, Dec. 21.

MONDAY

Mollie’s War: The Women

of WWII

7 p.m. Nov. 18, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Why

did an average American

woman become a WAC

(Women’s Army Corps)

during World War II and

place herself in peril?

Author Cyndee Schaffer

answers this question

and more in the book

“Mollie’s War,” a story

woven around the collection

of letters that Mollie

wrote home to her family

during WWII. “Mollie’s

War” documents the human

side of life during

the war. This presentation

provides a glimpse into

the life of a woman in

uniform during this crucial

time in history. Call

(815) 534-6173 to register.

LIST IT YOURSELF

Reach out to thousands of daily

users by submitting your event at

FrankfortStation.com/calendar

For just print*, email all information to

nuria@frankfortstation.com

*Deadline for print is 5 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication.

WEDNESDAY

A Plant-Based Diet: What

Is It & Why You Should

Try It

7 p.m. Nov. 20, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Join us

to hear integrative nutritionist

Nicole Green discuss

the health benefits

of plant-based nutrition.

After her 30-minute discussion,

Nicole will take

questions then share a few

creative, delicious, and nutritious

recipes to inspire

your seasonal cooking

and holiday parties. You’ll

even sample a fruitful appetizer

and a tempting dessert.

Call (815) 534-6173

to register.

UPCOMING

Thanks to Grandparents

6:30-8 p.m. Thursday,

Nov. 21, Founders

Community Center, 140

Oak St., Frankfort. Let’s

give thanks to grandparents

this holiday season.

Come enjoy a night out

with your grandparent and

show how thankful you

are to them. Spend some

precious time together

by making a memorable

craft that will be cherished

forever. A story and

a light snack will be included.

This program is

for children ages 3-9 with

a grandparent. Fee is $24

for residents and $29 for

non-residents.


frankfortstationdaily.com news

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 3

Student musicians salute veterans with patriotic program

6

Laurie Fanelli

Freelance Reporter

From the “Marches

of the Armed Forces”

to “The Star-Spangled

Banner,” beautifully performed

music can say

more than words when it

comes to saluting American

men and women in

uniform.

In honor of members

of the military past and

present, members of the

Hickory Creek Middle

School Symphonic Band,

Orchestra and Advanced

Strings shared a special

selection of music during

a Veterans Day Concert

on the evening of Thursday,

Nov. 7. The event

gave students, faculty

members, families and the

community a chance to

enjoy a patriotic program.

“I think it’s amazing,”

said Hickory Creek

Middle School Principal

Jason Crockett. “It’s a

great opportunity to have

our veterans and our community

members all come

together for a wonderful

event tonight. Any type

of tribute to all the men

and women who served

and fought for our country

– even a concert here at

our school on a Thursday

night – is a wonderful experience

for our students,

our families and our community.”

Doug Adams, Shannon

Shanahan and Alyson

Bauman directed

the sixth-, seventh- and

eighth-grade musicians

throughout the night,

Oak Forest residents Robert (left) and Mary Ann White

enjoy the pre-show performance by the Black Willow

Brass Quintet on Thursday, Nov. 7, at Hickory Creek

Middle School in Frankfort. Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century

Media

which marked the debut

of the full Hickory Creek

Orchestra. Adams explained

that the program

was designed to combine

patriotic music with select

compositions from the big

screen.

“Our Symphonic Band

is our top band at the

school, so we’re going

to be playing a lot of patriotic

music tonight:

‘America the Beautiful’

and a tribute to the Armed

Forces,” Adams said, adding

that the students – who

practice three mornings a

week and also attend sectional

competitions and

individual lessons – have

been working on the music

since late July. “We’re

going to do a little bit of

movie music too with

the ‘Theme from Jurassic

Park.’

“We have a group

where anybody can take

the melody and it’s going

to be amazing,” he said.

“I always say this is the

hardest working group

of kids in showbiz, and I

think that’s pretty true.”

Music was not the

only way members of

the military were honored

throughout the night.

Representatives from the

Band and Orchestra Music

Boosters greeted every

veteran by handing them a

medal of gratitude, as well

as a flag.

“All veterans get a medal

to say thank you – they

wear it around their neck

– and this year we’ve added

flags for their branch of

the military,” said Music

Boosters President Cori

Chojnacki. “During the

program, when the band

plays the ‘Marches of the

Armed Forces’ each veteran

from that branch stands

up and is acknowledged

by the crowd.”

The patriotic portion

of the program featured

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4 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station news

frankfortstationdaily.com

Frankfort native’s daughter featured

in October’s American Girl catalog

Sean Hastings, Editor

Four-year-old Ivy Kimble may

not know it yet, but her being featured

in the American Girl Holiday

catalog — October’s issue being

the first — has sparked an international

conversation about inclusion.

She sees herself in the magazine

and says “oh, wow,” and tells her

mother, Kristin, a former Lockport

Township High School special

education teacher, that she remembers

the photoshoot. But like most

4-year-olds, she is one activity to

the next.

Ivy has Down syndrome. And to

make her magazine feature more

special — October is Down Syndrome

Awareness Month. And before

her celeb debut, Ivy has always

been one to light up a room with

her magnetic personality. Anyone

who meets her has an instant connection,

Kristin said.

Kristin has been overwhelmed

by the support and love her family

has received.

“For me, it just goes to show

you that anyone can do anything

and anyone can be anything,” she

said. “Look at Ivy at 4 years old and

what she has started.”

And back in April and May when

the process started, Kristin did not

think much about what the possibility

of having a child with Down

Syndrome in the magazine would

do. Just like the countless number

of other parents who sent in photos

of their children, then the hundreds

of others who were asked back

to the casting call, she thought it

would just be a great experience for

her daughters.

Kristin heard about the opportunity

through a group she is a part

of called Gigi’s Playhouse. Her and

her husband, Chris, served on the

board.

Ivy has two older sisters, Lyla,

9, and Ruby, 8, who also went to

the Chicago casting call. Ivy has

a younger sister, Violet, who is 10

months.

Lyla and Ruby, though they were

not selected to be featured in the

Ivy Kimble (right), 4, sits with

another American Girl model for

October’s issue. October is Down

Syndrome Awareness Month.

Photo Submitted

magazine, could not be happier and

more supportive of their “baby,”

Kristin said.

“My girls are very close,” she

said. “...They adore her and they

are very protective of her, so they

are very excited about it.

“They’re kind of always on the

defense with Ivy, kind of waiting

for someone to say something

negative. Not to say that always

happens, but I think they’re always

waiting to spin in positively and

teach their school friends about

it. October is Down Syndrome

Awareness Month. My oldest always

reads a book to her classmates

about Down Syndrome and

teaches them about it because that

is what she wants to do.”

She added that her girls were going

nuts about it and bringing the

magazine to school to show their

friends.

Even at 9 and 8, the two are

keeping the conversation about inclusion

going. Something Kristin

hopes that will not require any effort

to have soon.

“It’s awesome that companies

are making the effort to do it, but

I think we need to work toward

where it is not an effort anymore,”

she said. “We’re seeing it everywhere

where we don’t have to celebrate

it so much. That’s the goal,

for sure.”

And the conversation will not

stop there as Ivy will be on the

cover of the November catalogue

of American Girl.

“It’s just super exciting,” Kristin

said. “I can’t imagine how much

further this is going to go. I didn’t

even think it would go this far. It

just keeps getting better and better.”

Aside from Ivy being featured

in American Girl and sparking a

conversation about inclusion with

Down syndrome, Kristin said it is

important for everyone to be seen

in the world.

“Anyone with unique qualities

needs to be a part of our society especially

with kids growing up,” she

said. “Even with my other girls, it’s

just as important for them to see Ivy

out there as it is for Ivy.”

And after spreading word and

raising awareness through Gigi’s

Playhouse, this has given the Kimbles

a new platform to continue to

do so with “endless possibilities.”

For the entire family, this whole

experience has been “full circle.”

When Ivy was about 10 days

old, she became sick and got put in

the hospital and had a Respiratory

Syncytial Virus and had a hard time

breathing.

She got transferred to Lurie

Children’s Hospital. And at 5 and

4 years old, Lyla and Ruby missed

their mom and sister who were

gone for a little bit too long for their

liking.

Kristin’s mother took the two

girls to American Girl to cheer

them up.

“It was funny because in Ivy’s

hospital room, we could see Water

Tower Place, we could see American

Girl,” Kristin said. “I was happy

that they were going and getting

cheered up, but I was also sad because

I wish Ivy could go too. I said

‘one day we’ll go to the store and

you can get a doll. It’s cheesy, but

that’s what we thought. And now

she’s in the magazine. It’s kind of

just full circle.”

Frankfort Village Board

Residents form group against casinos

Nuria Mathog, Editor

A group of concerned

Frankfort residents is pushing

back against a proposed Matteson

casino that would be located

adjacent to the boundaries

of the Village of Frankfort

In October, the Matteson

Village Board approved plans

for a casino that would be run

by the Choctaw Nation of

Oklahoma and constructed at

the corner of Lincoln Highway

and Harlem Avenue in

Matteson, across the street

from Frankfort. The project

cannot proceed without the

approval of the Illinois Gaming

Commission, which has

not yet made a decision on the

matter.

During the Nov. 4 Frankfort

Village Board of Trustees

meeting, Frankfort resident

Adam Widger announced

several residents had formed

a group called FACTS,

an acronym for Families

Against Casinos Taking the

Southland, to raise awareness

of the issue. The group

has launched a Facebook

page, which can be found

at www.facebook.com/fami

liesagainstcasinostakingth

esouthland.

Widger told told Frankfort

Mayor Jim Holland and the

Village trustees he had concerns

about how the proposed

casino would affect the quality

of schools and property values

in the area.

“We understand that a casino

is going to happen somewhere

in Cook County, but we

prefer it not to happen so close

to our homes,” Widger said.

“So, tonight I’m here just to

simply ask for your support

and to try to be as vocal about

this as possible. Let’s make

this a hard decision for the

gaming commission to put it

in Matteson and make it easier

to put it somewhere else.”

Joe Carlasare, another

Frankfort resident involved

with FACTS, cited a 2013

study conducted by the National

Association of Realtors

that found that casinos have

an “unambiguously negative”

effect on property values and

can lead to as much as a 10

percent decline in home property

values.

“I think a clear, nonbinding

resolution from this board that

it is not in favor of the casino

would go a long way as the

gaming board considers this,”

Carlasare said. “So, I would

ask you to consider it and do

your due diligence, as I know

you all will.”

He encouraged fellow residents

to sign up for the Village’s

email list about the casino by

subscribing online at villageof

frankfort.com/subscribe.

Round it up

A brief look at other items discussed at the Nov. 4

Frankfort Village Board of Trustees meeting

• Trustees approved a special use permit allowing

Jeep Connection to conduct automobile sales at 1010

Lambrecht Road.

• The board gave the green light to a special use permit

for light and heavy equipment sales at United Rentals,

located 24149 S. La Grange Road, and a final plat of

subdivision at 20929 and 20931 S. 80th Ave.

County law requires the Village’s approval for projects

within one and a half miles of the Village’s boundaries.

• Members of several Frankfort organizations discussed

the benefits of the Frankfort Fall Festival.


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6 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station news

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Woman allegedly groped

on Old Plank Road Trail

Nuria Mathog, Editor

The Frankfort Police

Department is requesting

the public’s assistance in

identifying a man who reportedly

grabbed a woman’s

buttocks the morning

of Nov. 6 on the Old Plank

Road Trail.

The woman told police

she saw an unknown man

dressed in a stocking cap,

a red and gray tight shirt

and black spandex pants

near the east side of the

LaGrange Road bridge at

around 9:45 a.m. and later

saw the same man ahead

of her on the path as she

headed eastbound on the

trail near the Prairie Park

pond. She described the

man as 5-foot-6 to 5-foot-

10 with an athletic build

and black.

The woman reported

that the man grabbed her

buttocks as she passed the

Indian Boundary passage

and then ran away through

Indian Boundary Park.

The description is similar

to a suspect described

in a similar incident previously

reported to the

Frankfort Police Department

on Oct. 23.

Anyone with information

in connection with

this incident or the man’s

identity is asked to contact

Frankfort police immediately

at (815) 469-9435.

Residents are reminded to

contact the police if they

see any suspicious individuals,

vehicles or incidents.

The Frankfort Police

Department plans to

continue to conduct trail

safety checks.

Koch, Moustis oppose Matteson casino location

Submitted by the Will

County Board

From Nov. 6

The Frankfort Police Department is asking for the

public’s help in identifying the pictured individual, who

is suspected of grabbing a woman on the Old Plank

Road Trail. Photo submitted

Will County Board

Members Amanda Koch

(D-Frankfort) and Jim

Moustis (R-Frankfort) released

the following joint

statement on Nov. 8:

“We oppose the proposed

casino in the village

of Matteson since its

impact has not yet been

carefully considered and

studied. The current proposed

site at the corner of

US 30 and Harlem Avenue

is 1,500 feet from a school

and only 400 feet from a

residential neighborhood.

While Will County has

no direct say in where a

Matteson casino would be

built, our residents will be

impacted. We urge the village

of Matteson to consider

their neighbors in

Will County and the quality

of life for our region as

a whole when deciding the

location of this casino.”


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8 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station news

frankfortstationdaily.com

Scouts celebrated with Eagle Court of Honor ceremony

Laurie Fanelli

Freelance Reporter

7

The members of Frankfort

Boy Scout Troop 270

are well-known throughout

the community. From

running the Frankfort Fall

Fest parking lot to hosting

Winter on the Green

events to coordinating

food drives for the Frankfort

Food Pantry, these

Scouts are always ready to

help in any way they can.

On Nov. 3, Michael

Clarkin, Alex Desjardins,

Rory Hanlon, Jake Leonard,

Matthew Lexow and

Justin Murray of Troop

270 participated in an

Eagle Court of Honor ceremony

commemorating

each young man’s achievement

of attaining Scouting’s

highest rank of Eagle

Scout.

Jim Hurley, who serves

as Scoutmaster of Troop

270 along with Arnaud

Desjardins, explained that

the event was a milestone

for the group.

“This past year, we

reached 100 Eagles, so

now we’re above 100,”

Hurley said, adding he was

grateful to all the adults

who help run the program.

“These boys have done a

fantastic job supporting

the community through

different service projects,

Eagle projects and food

drives. I’m really, really

proud of them.”

Troop 270 Committee

Chairman Chuck Rudy

said he was also proud of

the new Eagle Scouts especially

because only “3

percent of people who start

out as Scouts make it to the

Eagle rank nationally.”

He added, “You look at

the situation here where

we had five in the same

den – from Cub Scouts

Justin Murray smiles as his father, Jim Murray, shares

funny stories about his journey to becoming an Eagle

Scout.

on up – it’s very, very

unique.”

Along with participating

in group campouts,

volunteer projects and

earning all the required

merit badges, becoming

an Eagle Scout required

each young man to develop,

plan and execute his

very own service project.

Rudy explained that after

the project is approved by

various Scout leaders, the

real work begins.

“They have to plan it,

collect contributions, collect

materials, coordinate

the project with the troop

– to get volunteers from

the troop – and then actually

showing up the dayof,

directing everybody

and making sure the project

gets completed,” Rudy

said. “Afterwards, they

make sure the beneficiary

is happy with the project.

Each one of these Scouts

that are receiving the Eagle

recognition today did

their own project which all

benefit something in the

community.”

When he developed his

Eagle project, Michael

Clarkin wanted to give

back to his church, Frankfort

United Methodist.

“I built a fire pit for my

Frankfort Boy Scout Troop 270 members (left to right) Jake Leonard, Matthew Lexow,

Rory Hanlon, Alex Desjardins, Michael Clarkin and Justin Murray participate in the

Eagle Scout Court of Honor on Nov. 3 at Hickory Creek Middle School in Frankfort.

Photos by Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

Larry Hanlon (left), of Frankfort, places the Eagle Scout neckerchief on his son Rory

Hanlon.

church,” he said. “It was a

circular fire pit with four

benches around it. We also

installed a firewood rack

behind the back of the

church. I did this because

my church has brought me

so many good memories

throughout my childhood,

and I wanted to give back.

So, I thought it would be

nice to build them something.”

During the Eagle Court

of Honor ceremony – emceed

by Troop 270 member

Brad Rudy – each honoree

had a mentor speak about

their journey to become

Eagle Scouts. Many of the

Scouts’ fathers referenced

the great experiences their

sons had at Philmont Scout

Ranch, and newly named

Eagle Scout Jake Leonard

counts his adventures there

as some of his favorite

memories.

“It’s a camp, and they

basically send you off with

whatever supplies you

need for two weeks, and

you go off by yourself and

they see you back at the

end of two weeks,” Leonard

said. “The last trek we

did was a mountain one,

and we were able to climb

six of the peaks there.”

The ceremony also featured

a poem read by each

Eagle Scout’s mother, as

well as words from the

honorees themselves.

Scoutmaster Jim Hurley

led the presentation of Eagle

Awards and Pastor Joe

Rajdak delivered an opening

prayer.

The parents were also

honored during the ceremony

for the ways they

helped their children reach

this milestone. Bill Clarkin

– Michael Clarkin’s father

– was proud of his son and

all the Scouts for reaching

their goal of becoming

Eagles.

“It’s a culmination of

10 years of work,” Bill

Clarkin said. “Five of

these kids started as Bear

Scouts and Cub Scouts

and have been together

10 plus years. They’ve all

done countless campouts,

countless summer camps

and are really lifelong

friends. It’s been a great

experience for them. It really

teaches them lifelong

skills. An Eagle Scout is

something that you’ll put

on your resume for the rest

of your life.”


frankfortstationdaily.com frankfort

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 9

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10 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station news

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Report card shows D210 one of best in state

T.J. Kremer III

Contributing Editor

The grades are in, and

all three Lincoln-Way

Community High School

District 210 schools have

received “Exemplary” status,

according to the 2019

Illinois Report Card, an

annual assessment of the

state’s schools.

For the second year in a

row, all three LW schools

placed in the Top 10 percent

academically, with

some of the highlights being

graduation rates and

SAT scores.

Overall, the district

boasted a four-year graduation

rate of 95.5 percent,

compared with the state

average of 85.9 percent;

however, this number was

slightly down from its 2018

graduation rate of 96.8 percent,

compared with the

state average of 85.4 percent

from the same year.

The 2019 graduation rate

compared almost exactly

to data that showed that

ninth-graders in the district

were 95.6 were on track to

graduate, compared with

the state average of 86.6

percent.

Across the district, 17.8

percent of students earned

a Level 4 — which is designated

“Exceeds Standards,”

the highest level

attainable — on the ELA

portion of the SAT scores

and 13.5 percent in the

same category for math,

compared with the state’s

average of 10.6 percent and

9.1 percent, respectively.

Those numbers appear

to fair well for D210 students,

as approximately 83

percent of D210’s Class

of 2018 students were enrolled

in a two- or fouryear

college within 12-16

months of graduation,

compared with the state

average of approximately

3

73 percent.

Other data showed the

district’s student population

in decline, losing 87

students, down from 7,010

in 2018 to 6,923 in 2019.

The district is also operating

with fewer teachers in

2019, down from 404 in

2018 to 390 in 2019. Average

class sizes increased

from 20 in 2018, which

was also the state’s average

that year, to 26.4 in 2019,

compared with the state average

of 21.7.

Editorial Intern Carly Styka

contributed to this report.

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veterans

From Page 3

a few special guests as

the Lincoln-Way East

Air Force Junior ROTC

presented the colors and

Mayor Jim Holland narrated

the selections, taking

time out to share the

history of Veterans Day.

The Black Willow Brass

Quintet was also on-hand

providing pre-show music.

Before and after the

concert, Hickory Creek

students, boosters and

staff, including Tonia

Gatsios and Karen Ryan,

continued their year-long

mission to raise money

for Honor Flight Chicago

– which provides senior

war veterans with a

one-of-a-kind journey to

Washington, D.C. to tour

the memorials built in

their honor – with concession

sales.

“We’ve been generating

revenue through popsicle

sales, donations for

flags and penny wars that

we’ve had in our seventh

Hickory Creek Orchestra members Sohum Desai (left) and Claire Shanahan smile in

anticipation of the Veterans Day Concert. Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

grade, collecting money

to provide our veterans an

opportunity to go to D.C,”

Crockett explained. “A

lot of effort has been put

in, not only my our music

department, but also our

boosters and our community.

It has been fun.”

Hickory Creek Middle

School was set to continue

its Veterans Day tributes

with a special assembly

the following Monday.

Chojnacki explained

that as a parent of two

Hickory Creek musicians

– saxophonist Sierra Chojnacki

and trumpeter Griffin

Chojnacki – she appreciates

the music program

and the school’s dedication

to veterans.

“It’s amazing,” Chojnacki

said. “It teaches the

kids a lot about the people

who served our country

and it gives them a chance

to honor them which I

think is very important.”


frankfortstationdaily.com frankfort

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 11

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12 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station news

frankfortstationdaily.com

Eye care center introduces on-site cataract surgery

Nuria Mathog, Editor

Staff members at Multack Eye Care’s Frankfort location pose in front of the Laser and Cataract Institute, which offers on-site cataract surgery

for patients. Photos by Nuria Mathog/22nd Century Media

Multack Eye Care is taking

the next step forward

in expanding its services

by providing on-site cataract

surgery to patients at its

Frankfort location.

Since the business first

opened in Frankfort around

four years ago, it has grown

from five to approximately

30 employees. Today, the

practice serves roughly

28,000 patients between

its Frankfort and Olympia

Fields facilities and offers

three fully accredited surgical

suites in the Laser and

Cataract Institute downstairs,

Dr. Sam Multack

said.

“When you look at the

data for cataract surgery,

about 60 to 70 percent of

the time, people were hitting

the target they were

supposed to,” Multack said.

“That’s terrible, that that

was the standard. So our

goal was we want to be 95

percent or better. And it took

a lot of equipment, a lot of

investment, but we finally

got there, and that’s really

what sets us apart.”

By providing surgery

on-site, rather than having

patients undergo the procedure

at regional hospitals,

the eye care center aims to

bring prices down significantly

for patients, all while

providing them with a comfortable

experience, Multack

said.

“The way we do it is a

little bit different,” he said.

“We use no needles, no

injections, no stitches, no

patches. So, it’s painless.

You don’t see instruments,

you don’t feel instruments.

And it takes about 10 minutes.”

Multack, a current Frankfort

resident, comes from a

family passionate about eye

care: he is the son of an ophthalmologist

and the grandson

of an optometrist. His

office has invested heavily

in advanced diagnostic

technology and provides

multiple measurement modalities

— using different

machines to take measurements

of the length and curvature

of a patient’s eye —

to ensure that goals are met

and that patients receive a

high quality of care.

“You come in for cataract

surgery, in the operating

room, we can take a picture

of your eye that we can print

out for everyone,” Multack

said. “We bring in a surgical

microscope, and we can

treat astigmatism or abnormal

curvature with that machine.

There’s 17 of these in

the country, and we’re the

only one in Illinois with it.”

Lisa Tepper, director of

marketing and practice liaison,

said what sets Multack

Eye Care apart is its dedication

to striving for “perfection

for each patient,”

and much of the practice’s

growth has been through referrals

and word of mouth.

“We invest a lot back into

the business,” Tepper said.

“And so, we really try to

buy the best equipment for

patients and we always continually

put them first. It’s a

really different kind of practice.

I’ve been in the industry

for 15 years, and I saw

how different they were.

And so, I left my corporate

job to go and work for this

individual family practice.”

Tepper said the clinic

aims to provide an environment

in which patients feel

prioritized, and many of the

exam rooms feature large

Multack Eye Care doctors (left to right) Gary Yong, Athanasios Marneris and Sam

Multack stand in one of the operating rooms.

monitors that allow patients

to learn more about their

conditions or about the surgical

process.

“If you look through our

reviews, a lot of people talk

about how they’ve given the

time,” Tepper said. “They’re

not feeling rushed. They’re

given the time to answer

their questions. They feel

comfortable.”


frankfortstationdaily.com news

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 13

Police reports

Man accused of taking

vehicle from auto shop

A worker at an auto detailing

business in Frankfort

faces criminal charges after

allegedly taking a customer’s

Mercedes-Benz off the

business premises Oct. 27

and causing damage to the

vehicle, according to the

Frankfort Police Department.

Paulius Sventickas, 29,

of 1236 Woburn Drive in

Lemont, was charged with

felony possession of a stolen

vehicle and criminal

damage to property.

Frankfort Deputy Police

Chief Kevin Keegan said

officers on an unrelated

traffic stop saw a silver

Mecedes-Benz traveling

at a high rate of speed

on La Grange Road from

Bankview Drive. Keegan

said an officer attempted to

stop the vehicle but it fled,

and the officer was able to

obtain a license plate that

came back to a resident in

Frankfort.

The homeowner at the address

reportedly confirmed

ownership of the vehicle

and said the vehicle was being

worked on at Platinum

Detail in Frankfort. Officers

then contacted the owner of

the business, who reportedly

confirmed the vehicle

was being worked on by

Sventickas.

Keegan said the owner

was able to remotely view

video cameras from his

business to confirm Sventickas

entered the vehicle

and left the property, further

adding Sventickas was not

authorized to remove the

vehicle from the business

property.

While the officer was at

Platinum Detail, he saw the

vehicle return and placed

Sventickas in custody after

seeing him exit the driver’s

side, Keegan said.

The vehicle allegedly

had dents and scratches,

including damage to all

four tires and rims, with the

total damage estimated at

$10,000.

Nov. 2

• An unsecured vehicle

was reported stolen from a

residential driveway in the

8500 block of Stone Creek

Boulevard.

Oct. 30

• Miscellaneous items reportedly

were taken from

an unsecured vehicle in the

100 block of Pacific Street.

Oct. 27

• James K. Cortese, 31, of

220 Barr Elms St. in Joliet,

was cited in the area

of Center and Nebraska

roads for allegedly having

no insurance, no valid registration

and driving with a

suspended license.

Oct. 25

• Miscellaneous items were

reported missing from an

unsecured vehicle in the

100 block of Sycamore

Lane.

• Reno G. McMahan, 18,

of 10160 S. 84th Ave. in

Palos Hills, was charged

with two counts of class 3

felony burglary following

a traffic stop in the area of

Yankee Ridge Drive and

Lexington Lane. According

to Keegan, Frankfort officers

responded to the area

following a report of a man

in a dark-colored hoodie

and jeans who kept exiting

a gray Mazda and pulling

on door handles. An officer

checking the area identified

a gray Mazda traveling

eastbound on Williamsburg

Trail from Lexington Lane

and pulled over the vehicle.

The car reportedly contained

a small change purse,

several loose dollar bills

and a large amount of loose

change lying on the front

passenger’s seat. Keegan

said the officer learned that

the driver, identified as Mc-

Mahan, had entered several

vehicles and taken loose

change.

Oct. 24

• An unsecured vehicle

was reportedly entered in

a driveway in the 8600

block of Huckins Drive,

and an unsecured vehicle

was reported stolen from a

secured garage at the same

address. The vehicle was

recovered the same day by

the Riverdale Police Department.

• Miscellaneous items were

reported missing from an

unsecured vehicle in the

700 block of Spruce Road.

Oct. 23

• A vehicle reportedly was

entered in the 10500 block

of Tuppence Court. No

items were reported missing.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The

Frankfort Station’s Police Reports

are compiled from official

reports found online on

the Frankfort Police Department’s

website or releases

issued by the department and

other agencies. Individuals

named in these reports are

considered innocent of all

charges until proven guilty in

a court of law

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14 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station school

frankfortstationdaily.com

LWE students learn about batteries at Argonne

Submitted by Lincoln-Way

Community High School

D210

Lincoln-Way East students participate in a battery-building exercise on Oct. 30 at

Argonne National Laboratory. Photo submitted

On Oct. 30, 19 students

went to Argonne National

Laboratory in order to

build a better battery.

The group was divided

into teams of three. Each

team, with the guidance

of an Argonne facilitator,

developed a prototype battery

that will be used to

power a toy car. Near the

end of the visit, the teams

came back together to

share design approaches

and come up with a cohesive

design to see if their

battery would power the

car.

The students learned the

fundamental components

of a battery — metals,

membrane, and electrolyte

— and how they come

together to generate electricity.

From there, they researched

how the design of

a battery can be optimized

in order to meet the voltage

and current requirements

of the car’s motor.

The students used a

unique research strategy

called a “sprint” in which

small groups of three to

four students only had

about 15 minutes to investigate

a specific aspect of

the battery’s design. They

collected data, looked for

trends and reported back

to the team. The team reviewed

the small group’s

recommendations and,

through scientific argumentation,

came to a consensus

about that aspect

of the battery’s design.

Students repeated so that

further refinements can be

made.

“Thank you so much

for putting this together

and you giving us this

opportunity,” junior Erica

Strojny sasid. “It was

really fun to work with

other students to accomplish

one goal. I hope to

do something like this

again.”

Chemistry teachers

Shane Tucker, Beth

Swaney, and Carlie

Premo sponsored this

event.

Character Counts winners at Grand Prairie are

recognized for demonstrating respect, responsibility,

and caring. The students also pledged to make a new

friend during Red Ribbon Week, which celebrated

kindness. Photo submitted

Students at Grand Prairie

celebrate spirit of kindness

Submitted by Frankfort

School D157-C

Grand Prairie Elementary

School celebrated the

spirit of kindness all week

during Red Ribbon and

Bully Prevention Week,

held Oct. 21-25 at the

school.

The school has always

observed this special week

in October for years. New

this year, Tom Kress, of

Your Power Project, presented

to students about

being powerful and using

their voice to tell someone

if they are hurt. Also,

the school held its annual

Family School Partnership

Book Fair and

Family Night during the

week, themed “Kindness

is Cool”, featuring Arctic

animals.

At the Book Fair, Grand

Prairie teachers and staff

created a variety of activities

for students and their

families to enjoy. A very

popular activity was the

Kindness Tree, on which

attendees could write a

kind note to someone.

There was also a Kindness

Card area, where attendees

could make cards for their

friends, family members

and veterans. Cards made

for students and teachers

were delivered the next

day.

Two firefighters from

the Frankfort Fire Protection

District generously

volunteered at the Book

Fair to be mystery readers

for students.

“It was such a special

treat,” said Kirsten

Frankovich, principal at

Grand Prairie. “The students

were excited to see

some real life heroes reading

books to them. We

truly appreciate the fire

district reaching out to us

and becoming mystery

readers.”

Also at the event, the library

had a Kindness Corner,

where students could

read a book about kindness.

The Throw Kindness

Like Confetti area encouraged

families to play a

beanbag toss game with

beanbags that had kind

words on them.

Please see ribbon, 15


frankfortstationdaily.com news

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 15

ribbon

From Page 14

Additionally, Frankovich

and Assistant Principal

Barb Shanahan reviewed

the new standard-based

report card with parents.

A copy of the report card

presentation is available

on Grand Prairie’s website,

under the “For Parents” tab.

“We are so thankful for

the FSP and the Grand

Prairie staff members that

worked so hard to make a

fun night for our families,”

Frankovich said. “We are

grateful to have such a

supportive committee, and

hope our students and their

families had a fun night!”

Students also participated

in a variety of themed

days, like Pajama Day (“It’s

Our Dream to be Drug and

Bully Free”) and “Red-y

to Make Healthy Choices”

Day (during which students

wore red) around Red Ribbon

Week this week, which

focused on drug and bullying

prevention.

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16 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station community

frankfortstationdaily.com

Photo Op

Clyde

Lulu’s Locker Rescue

Clyde is an approximately 11-week-old male black

and white tuxedo domestic shorthair. He and his

sister Bonnie were discovered as young kittens

on the street and rescued from a Chicago shelter.

Cylde is a friendly, playful cat who enjoys playing

and exploring. He would do best in a home with

other animals who can keep him company and

keep him entertained. For more information, visit

luluslockerrescue.org/adoption/.

Want to see your pet featured as The Frankfort Station’s

Pet of the Week? Send your pet’s photo and a few sentences

explaining why your pet is outstanding to Editor Nuria

Mathog at nuria@frankfortstation.com or 11516 W. 183rd

St., Office Condo 3, Suite SW, Orland Park, IL 60467.

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Dentist leads Real Men

Wear Pink fundraising

campaign in the southern

suburbs

Whether breast cancer,

prostate cancer, lung cancer,

or any other type of cancers,

today, nearly everyone has

been impacted by cancer in

one way or another.

For Dr. Ralph Ginn, dentist

at Tinley Park’s My

Care Dental, cancer has

been a part of his life in

many ways. Every day, he

looks for oral cancers while

examining his patients and,

like many others, he has

been called to support loved

ones who received the diagnosis.

Although he spends a lot

of time educating people

about oral cancers, Ginn

knew he could do more.

Then last year, a longtime

patient educated him about

the American Cancer Society’s

Real Men Wear Pink

campaign, which happens

every year during Breast

Cancer Awareness Month.

Throughout the month

of October, men who participate

in the Real Men

Wear Pink campaign commit

to wearing pink every

day of the month and raising

$2,500 to support the

American Cancer Society

and its programs.

This year, the south suburban

campaign has a goal

to raise a total of $50,000.

As of press time, Ginn was

leading the pack, raising almost

$5,000 himself.

“I made sure that this

money stays close to Tinley

Park and helps families

in Tinley Park, because I

truthfully believe that if you

help your neighbor next to

you and hold their hand, it’s

a stronger bond and it goes

on and on from there,” he

said.

Reporting by Amanda Del

Buono, Freelance Reporter.

For more, visit TinleyJunction

Daily.com.

FROM THE ORLAND PARK PRAIRIE

Orland Park man advocates

importance of CPR after

saving stranger’s life

After saving the life of

a stranger who was in cardiac

arrest on a Swallow

Cliff Woods trail, Thomas

O’Brien, of Orland Park,

is raising awareness on the

importance of being CPR

certified.

Just over a year ago, on

Sept. 14, 2018, Thomas and

his wife, Deb, went running

on the Swallow Cliff

Woods trail at a time they

typically do not run. During

the run, Deb got ahead of

him. As Thomas was running,

he noticed a man, who

would later be identified as

Denis Fellmann, also of Orland

Park, lying face down

on the trail.

“There was a man lying

face down on the trail, and

he wasn’t moving at all, so I

flipped him over,” Thomas

said. “He wasn’t breathing

and his eyes weren’t open.

He was in big trouble.”

After rolling him over,

Thomas immediately performed

CPR. Realizing the

severity of the situation,

Please see nfyn, 17

This week’s Photo Op comes from Frankfort resident

Bill Boyles and features a squirrel devouring pumpkin

seeds in his backyard.

Have you captured something unique, interesting, beautiful

or just plain fun on camera? Submit a photo for “Photo Op”

by emailing it to nuria@frankfortstation.com, or mailing it

to 11516 W. 183rd St., Office Condo 3 Unit SW, Orland Park,

IL, 60467.

Announcements

Professional achievement

Bret Figura, son of

Frankfort residents

Bob and Boni Figura,

received the National

Council for Marketing

and Public Relations’

Rising Star award for

District 3. The award is

given to professionals

who exhibit special ability

and creativity in the

field and demonstrate a

promising future. Figura

was nominated for this

award by Clare Briner,

Moraine Valley Community

College marketing and

communications director.

He is one of seven finalists

for the national Rising

Star of the Year award,

which is scheduled to be

presented March 2020 in

Orlando.

Make a FREE announcement

in The Frankfort Station. We

will publish birth, birthday,

military, engagement, wedding

and anniversary announcements

free of charge.

Announcements are due the

Thursday before publication.

To make an announcement,

email nuria@frankfortsta

tion.com.


frankfortstationdaily.com sound off

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 17

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

From FrankfortStationDaily.com as of

Monday, Nov. 11

From the Editorial Intern

Don’t rush to Christmas

1. Football: Henning, defense help

Griffins overcome up-and-down

performance

2. Six Frankfort Scouts recognized at

Eagle Court of Honor ceremony

3. Woman allegedly groped on Old Plank

Road Trail

4. Local Scouts collect goods for one of

area’s largest food drives

5. Police reports: Items reported stolen

from vehicle

Become a member: FrankfortStation.com/plus

Carly Styka

Editorial Intern

Christmas is a big

deal for many

people. Sharing in

the holiday festivities with

family is one of the best

things about it. Despite

this, putting up decorations

and shopping for

gifts can be time-consuming

and even stressful. Not

to mention the difficult

transition from crisp fall

weather to brutally cold

temperatures and snow.

Why wouldn’t we want

to dwell on Thanksgiving

more?

Thanksgiving is a great

holiday to celebrate.

Events such as Turkey

Trots and parades are fun

ways to celebrate and bask

in the cool fall weather.

Don’t get me wrong; I

always look forward to

Christmas. Giving and receiving

presents is a great

way to bond with family

and friends. The only

problem is that it seems to

trump Thanksgiving.

Many retail stores begin

putting up their Christmas

displays right after

Halloween, some even as

early as September. Of

course, people want to get

good deals on decorations

and other holiday items,

but it would be nice if the

stores could hold off on

the Christmas trees just a

little bit.

Holiday sales, such as

Black Friday, have been

creeping up earlier each

year. Many stores are open

on Thanksgiving. Target

released its Black Friday

ad three weeks ahead of

time and some stores even

have pre-Black Friday

specials.

I’m not totally against

these sales. I have gone

shopping on Thanksgiving

in the past and gotten

some great deals. I have

also had to work on

holidays, and while it is

unfortunate, it is not the

worst thing in the world.

Although, having to listen

to Christmas music for

eight hours straight every

day in the months leading

up to Christmas can drive

anyone crazy.

It makes sense for retailers

to open their doors

and start their holiday

sales earlier if customers

are willing to spend their

money. This is how business

works.

Retailers must stay

competitive. If a store

is the only one in their

region that is not selling

holiday items, then they

are missing out on that

potential sale.

I am not a fan of

holidays being used for

profit many months ahead

of time. It’s overkill and

makes it seem like the

holidays exist solely for

the purpose of making

large corporations money.

It cheapens the meaning

of the holiday.

Whether you like it or

not, the early deals are

most likely here to stay.

We may even see Christmas

trees being sold as

early as July.

“Pirates, Day of the Dead Party and a jewelry

making class made for a busy Friday

night at the Founders Center! Check out all

the fun we had!”

— Frankfort Park District from Nov. 4

Like The Frankfort Station: facebook.com/

TheFrankfortStation

“Best of luck to the Boys Cross Country

Team and Girls Cross Country Runner @

kguderjan at the IHSA State Meet! Congrats

on a great season! Proud of you!!”

— @LWEastAthletics from Nov. 7

Follow The Frankfort Station: @FrankfrtStation

nfyn

From Page 16

Thomas dialed 911, and

soon first responders arrived

and transported Fellmann

to the hospital.

Fellmann survived,

thanks in large part to

Thomas’ quick actions.

Since Denis went into

cardiac arrest, Thomas has

realized how important it is

to be CPR certified.

Reporting by Alyssa Groh,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit OPPrairieDaily.com.

FROM THE LOCKPORT LEGEND

Fairmont School gets lesson

from state legislators

In preparation for the Illinois

constitution test, students

at Fairmont School

were given the ultimate

learning tool in the form of

a presentation by State legislators.

The group of seventhand

eighth-grade students

gathered at noon on Nov. 1

to hear presentations from

State Sen. Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant,

U.S. Rep. Dan

Lipinski and State Rep.

John Connor on topics of

civics and the process of

passing laws.

Bertino-Tarrant opened

the discussion by quizzing

students on the three

branches of government,

the roles of senators and

representatives, and the

purpose of making laws.

Shortly after, Lipinski arrived

and detailed his experiences

on the job, his

trips to Washington, D.C,

and the differences between

creating State and national

laws.

Students were invited to

give suggestions for a law

they would like passed to

complete a scenario in a

“quick law scenario.” The

law chosen to implement

was a $1,000 fine for littering,

reflecting the garbage

service debate with which

residents of Fairmont have

dealt firsthand. Bertino-Tarrant

then walked students

through the steps it would

take to draft the proposed

law, including getting approval

by Rep. Lipinski and

eventually handing it off to

the governor.

Reporting by Derek Swanson,

Editorial Intern. For more,

visit LockportLegendDaily.

com.

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company as

a whole. The Frankfort Station

encourages readers to write

letters to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to

400 words. The Frankfort Station

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

Frankfort Station. Letters that

are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Frankfort Station. Letters can be

mailed to: The Frankfort Station,

11516 West 183rd Street, Unit

SW Office Condo #3, Orland

Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax letters

to (708) 326-9179 or e-mail to

nuria@frankfortstation.com.

www.frankfortstation.com.


18 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station frankfort

frankfortstationdaily.com

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Stirring things up

The Barrel Club aims to please

lunchtime diners, nightlife

seekers and event crowds alike

at south suburban spot, Page 25

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | frankfortstationdaily.com

Pulling it off Trio of friends

chase dream of pub ownership with

Tavern in the Glen, Page 27

Mother Cabrini Celebration honors Franciscan values, Page 21

The Rev. Chuck Faso (left), of St. Peters Church in Chicago, speaks with Francesca Biondo, of Peotone, on Saturday, Nov. 9, during the Mother Cabrini

Celebration at St. Francis Woods in Frankfort. Mary Compton/22nd Century Media


20 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station faith

frankfortstationdaily.com

Faith Briefs

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (177

Luther Lane, Frankfort)

Divine Service

8 a.m. Sundays. Divine

service gets its name

from the fact that worship

is most importantly God

serving us. We come at his

invitation not to do God a

favor, but to receive from

Him what He alone has

to offer, after which we

respond in praise. Divine

service uses a variety of

rich, beautiful and often

ancient traditions of the

church found in the hymnal

accompanied by the

organ, as well as piano and

other various instruments

on special occasions.

Sunday Morning Adult

Bible Study

9:30-10:30 a.m. Sundays

in the fellowship hall.

Sunday Morning Adult

Bible Study will explore

the Gospel of Matthew

during this fall. The Gospel

of Matthew serves as

the “door” into the New

Testament. Come for refreshments

and join the

discussion on subjects

like parables, discipleship,

judgment day, heaven,

God’s promises, and so

much more.

10:46 Worship

10:46 a.m. Sundays.

10:46 Worship gets its

name from Acts 10:46,

where it mentions that the

apostles “heard the Gentiles

speaking in tongues

and praising God” – which

could well describe this

time of worship where

God is present and his people

are responding. 10:46

Worship blends the best of

both ancient tradition and

modern music and instruments

recognizing the ongoing,

present-day work of

the Holy Spirit in our lives.

Beginning at 10:46 a.m.

also suggests a more casual

worship where you’re

invited to come just as you

are.

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Weight Watchers

9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays.

Alcoholics Anonymous

10 a.m.-noon Saturdays.

Narcotics Anonymous

6:30-9 p.m. Tuesdays

American Islamic Association (8860 W. St.

Francis Road, Frankfort)

Daily Prayer Services

For service times, visit

www.AIAmasjid.org.

Jum’ah Prayer Services

Fridays. Sermon at 1:10

p.m. followed by prayers

at 1:30 p.m.

Heritage Baptist Church (21739 S. La

Grange Road, Frankfort)

Worship Services

10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Sundays. The church offers

a staffed nursery for

ages birth-two years, and

junior church for ages twofive.

Sunday School

9:30 a.m. Sunday school

for all ages.

Wednesday Night

7 p.m. Wednesdays.

Truth Trackers Bible Club

for children starting at age

four through sixth grade

(September-May), ALIVE

Teens for grades 7-12,

nursery for ages birth-two

years, and Bible Study and

prayer for adults.

Ladies Bible Study

9 a.m. Wednesdays

(September-May). We are

studying the book “Women

Who Met the Master”

by Carolyn Culver. Nursery

is provided during the

study.

Heritage Christian School

Heritage Christian

School is a ministry of the

Heritage Baptist Church,

serving students as young

as 4 and up to grade 12.

Call 815-464-9100 for

more information.

The Family Hearth (119 Kansas St.,

Frankfort)

Spiritual Direction

By appointment. Personal

spiritual direction

session for men or women

with a male/female spiritual

director who is fully

trained and experienced

with 15 years of experience.

Free will donation.

To register, call (708)

334-1988 or email fami

lyhearthfrankfort@gmail.

com.

Needlecraft Workshops

10 a.m.-non Wednesdays.

Learn cross stitch or

crochet or work on your

own projects. There will

be free refreshments and a

free-will donation. Stop by

for a while, and sit a spell.

For more information or to

inquire about the possibility

of evening workshops,

call (708) 334-1988 or

email familyhearthfrank

fort@gmail.com.

Scripture Study

10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mondays.

Join James Littleton,

national host of radio and

television series Forming

Faithful Families for this

scripture study, and find

hope and healing through

Scripture for your daily

walk with God. There will

be a free-will donation.

Endow Study

10 a.m.-noon Tuesdays

beginning Jan. 15. This

8-10 week class will focus

on educating on the nature

and dignity of women.

Cost is $35 and includes

refreshments. For more

information or to inquire

about the possibility of

evening workshops, call

(708) 334-1988 or email

familyhearthfrankfort@

gmail.com.

Please see faith, 24


frankfortstationdaily.com life & arts

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 21

Franciscan fraternities unite for celebration in Frankfort

3

Mary Compton

Freelance Reporter

Around 200 people came

together Saturday, Nov. 9, at

St. Francis Woods in Frankfort

to celebrate 100 years of

secular Franciscan life in the

United States.

Members of about 22

Franciscan fraternities and

other interested guests in

the Mother Cabrini Region

began the day with a mass

before taking part in discussions,

reflection and food

and listening to two dynamic

speakers.

“Deep within I will plant

my law, not on stone but

within your heart,” the Rev.

Ed Shea said as he addressed

the crowd.

Shea, a charismatic Franciscan

friar dressed in a

brown robe with a white

rope, encouraged the fraternities

with stories and scripture.

Shea is on staff at St. Peters

Cathedral in Chicago

and is very involved in the

Franciscan ministry. He was

ordained in 1987, serves as a

contributing writer to “Catholics

On Call” and also has

written a book.

On Saturday, he told the

story of St. Francis and the

wolf. St. Francis of Assisi is

the patron saint of animals

and the environment, and the

life of a Franciscan is a life

of simple living and humbleness.

“What do you do with anger?”

Shea asked the crowd.

“Don’t let it fester. Pray for

those you are angry with.

Harden not your hearts.”

Another Franciscan living

a humble life dedicated

to serving others is Sister

Marilyn Renninger, spiritual

assistant for three fraternities

in the Mother Cabrini region.

Renninger lives at the

Motherhouse at St. Francis

Sister Marilyn Renninger (left), of Frankfort, speaks with

attendee Sandra Kisel.

Woods in Frankfort.

“Every year we celebrate

our patron for this region,

who is Mother Cabrini,”

Renninger explained. “We

gather near her feast day,

which is Nov. 13. We’re here

to celebrate the 100th anniversary

of the secular Franciscans

in the United States.”

The Franciscan order began

with St. Francis of Assisi.

After hearing a homily

in 1209, St. Francis sold all

that he had and lived in poverty

from then on. St. Francis

founded the Secular Franciscans

in 1212 for those who

did not live in a religious

community, yet wanted to

follow the Franciscan way

of life.

“Today, we come together

to celebrate what we are all

about,” Renninger said.

There are three orders

of Franciscans. Renninger

is part of the Third Order.

Every day, she and others

live a life of prayer, serving

people in need and assisting

the poor and the elderly.

Saturday was a day to gather

together and celebrate that

way of life.

“We’re divided into clusters

in Illinois,” Renninger

said. “We are cluster two.

Today is very important as

Franciscans … We do works

of neighborly love and do

works for others, as well as

rebuild the church. Francis

got the mission from Jesus

to rebuild the church. We,

as followers of St. Francis of

Assisi, do what we can for

the church and to serve others.”

Frankfort resident Rosalie

Leitelt, of the Padre Pio

Fraternity and vice-leader

and secretary for the Mother

Cabrini Planning Committee,

dedicates her life to serving

as a Franciscan.

“This is so beautiful for all

of us to come together in unity

and celebrate sacred mass,

because that’s the heart of

our Catholic religion,” Leitelt

said. “It’s also the heart of

being Franciscan. I’m honored

to have a speaker today

like Father Shea, who is dynamic

and, as you can see,

engages the audience.”

Shea spoke in both English

and Spanish to include

two new Franciscan groups

from Joliet.

“The fact that he is bilingual

really speaks to his ability

to celebrate the diversity

within our fraternities,” Leitelt

said.

Recently, the fraternities

have donated food to a local

shelter and packed food for

the nonprofit organization

Feed My Starving Children.

“Living life as a Franciscan

is twofold,” Leitelt said.

“The most important part of

the Franciscan mission here

in Frankfort and throughout

the world is called JPIC,

which means Justice, Peace,

Integrity and Creation. We

make a profession as Franciscans

that we are going

to make every effort to embrace

the lepers and to help

our brothers and sisters who

are in need.

“As Franciscans, whenever

the need arises we step

up to the plate and help out,”

she added.

As Shea finished up his

presentation to the audience,

he left them with tips he

called the four commandments

of contentment: live

in the present, don’t be in a

hurry, don’t take yourself too

seriously and be grateful.

The Rev. Ed Shea, of St. Peters Church in Chicago,

speaks to a crowd of 22 Franciscan fraternities

Saturday, Nov. 9, at St. Francis Woods in Frankfort

during the Mother Cabrini Celebration. Photos by Mary

Compton/22nd Century Media


22 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station life & arts

frankfortstationdaily.com

Film shot in ‘haunted’ Frankfort home tells tale of local legend

3

Will O’Brien

Freelance Reporter

About six months after

giving birth to her daughter,

Eileah, and hearing

scores of compliments

about the little girl’s cute

qualities, Tinley Park

mother Stephanie Pyrzynski

started exploring acting

roles for the newborn.

Surprisingly, she almost

instantly found one in

Frankfort. The unplanned,

exhilarating brush with

show business taught the

family a bit about the industry

and a lot about an

historic, allegedly haunted

Frankfort home that

inspired and served as the

set for the movie, “Girl on

the Third Floor.”

“I was just playing

around with the idea,

wondering, ‘How do kids

wind up in commercials,’”

said Pyrzynski, who along

with her husband, Geoffrey

Pyrzynski, operates

Geoffresh Productions, a

Tinley Park-based digital

marketing firm.

It was fall 2018 and

Pyrzynski, who had started

interacting with a casting

agency through Facebook,

quickly learned

about the Frankfort shoot.

The Dark Sky Films division

of Orland Park-based

MPI Media Group is the

distributor of “Girl on

the Third Floor,” which

stars former professional

wrestler and Lockport native

Phil Brooks, aka CM

Punk.

“I thought, ‘Oh my

gosh, that’s so close,’”

Pyrzynski said, explaining

most opportunities

she saw were in the city.

“So, I figured, ‘Let me see

what we can do.’”

The mother-daughter

duo sprang into action,

promptly meeting a film

representative, signing the

requisite documents and

showing up to the set the

following day.

“Girl” tells the tale of

Brooks’ character, Don

Koch, renovating a suburban

home while his

pregnant wife, Liz Koch

— played by Trieste Kelly

Dunn — stays at an apartment

in the city.

Local legend has it that

the Frankfort residence

where the film was shot,

near the intersection of

Sauk Trail and Center

Road, is haunted by the

ghosts of two young girls

who died there decades

ago.

The ghosts play a sinister

role in “Third Floor,”

tempting Brooks into bad

behavior and ultimately

leading to his demise. One

of the ghosts is known to

sit and dangle her feet

from a third-floor window,

hence the movie’s

title.

Eileah, now 19 months

old, plays the role of the

couple’s child.

“The shoot was just one

day, and Eileah’s scene is

at the very end,” Pyrzynski

said.

Eileah’s brief-but-important

appearance in the

film was, in fact, captured

in a matter of minutes.

“The director got it in

one take,” Pyrzynski said,

explaining a second take

was recorded, just in case.

“He kneeled down in a

praying position near the

crib where she was laying

and was just like, ‘Thank

you. Thank you. That’s

it!’”

The role required little

of Eileah beyond laying,

smiling and looking in

certain directions — no

Tinley Park’s Stephanie (left), 19-month-old Eileah and Geoffrey Pyrzynski are pictured. Eileah is featured in a

newly released, locally produced horror movie called “Girl on the Third Floor.” Photo by Kat Haring

issue for the well-behaved

little girl, said Pyrzynski,

who watched over the

filming from an adjoining

room.

“She didn’t cry, she

paid attention to the things

they wanted,” she said. “It

was just very cool.”

Phil Bogdan, an assistant

director of the horror

flick, served as the

Pyrzynskis liaison that

day.

A veteran of the Chicago-area

cinematic scene,

Bogdan said the Frankfort

community embraced the

film crew, with neighbors

stopping by frequently to

tell stories about the home.

“Every in Frankfort

seems to know someone

who was a neighbor (of

the house), or knew someone

who knew someone,”

Bogdan said. “You do feel

kind of weird in it.”

Pyrzynski concurred,

describing the building as

“creepy.”

“Girl on the Third

Floor,” directed by Travis

Stevens, made its world

premiere in March at the

South by Southwest festival

in Austin, Texas.

It traveled to additional

fests — in Boston, Chattanooga,

Knoxville, Chicago,

Telluride and more

— and hit select screens

in late October and early

November.

The film is also available

through Amazon

Prime Video, Apple TV,

Sling TV and other channels.

Pyrzynski and her husband

have a copy of the

film and have watched it

several times.

Though Eileah hasn’t

done any additional acting

since — and the Pyrzynskis

are not actively seeking

it out — the family

Actress Sarah Brooks performs a scene in “Girl On the

Third Floor.” Photo by queensbury pictures

will always hold the cinematic

experience as a

fond, unique memory, she

said.

“I’d never been on a

film set or been involved

with something like that,”

Pyrzynski said. “To see

how many cameras are

involved, how many people

are involved, it’s just

amazing. I’m just very

proud of her. It’s not an

everyday occurrence.”


frankfortstationdaily.com life & arts

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 23

The Yacht Rockettes lead singers Dina DiCostanzo (left) and Christine Mild perform a

song. Photo courtesy of Rob Riddle

LW grad pursues passion for

yacht rock as band vocalist

Nuria Mathog, Editor

The concept for a female-fronted

yacht rock

band in Chicago came to

singer Dina DiCostanzo in

a dream.

“I woke up one day and

I thought, I really loved the

yacht rock genre, and in my

dream I dreamt of an all-female

yacht rock cover band

called The Yacht Rockettes,

which I thought was just a

funny name,” DiCostanzo

said. “So, it started off as a

funny name, and my husband

is a drummer, and he

said, ‘Let’s do it.”

Today, DiCostanzo, a

Chicago resident originally

from Palatine, fronts The

Yacht Rockettes along with

fellow Chicago resident

Christine Mild, a Lincoln-

Way High School graduate.

The group performs around

the Chicago area and has

upcoming shows scheduled

for 9-10:30 p.m. Friday,

Nov. 22, at the Chicago

Loop Sports Bar and Grill

in Streamwood and 7:30-9

p.m. Friday, Dec. 20, at the

Penny Road Pub in Barrington.

The two women had

known each other for nearly

two decades, but singing

in The Yacht Rockettes

marked the first time they

collaborated professionally.

DiCostanzo’s husband and

fellow band member, Jim

Barclay, is a drummer who

had previously performed

with Martin & Mild, an altcountry

duo composed of

Mild and guitarist Patrick

Martin.

“She’s an amazing vocalist,

so we of course

asked her to be part of it,”

DiCostanzo said.

Mild’s musical career

took shape at an early age,

and she began singing professionally

in Las Vegas

when she was just 7 years

old.

“I was part of a presentation

at my church for All

Saints’ Day, and an agent

approached my mom and

said, ‘I think your daughter

is talented, I’d like to meet

with her,’” Mild explained.

“So, I met with this agent,

and she suggested that

kids that sing can get more

work. I started taking singing

lessons, and I entered

a talent competition about

one week before I began,

and I was a finalist. And I

moved through my career

from there.”

The yacht rock genre

encompasses smooth rock

that was popular in the 70s

and 80s, and The Yacht

Rockettes aim to take

showgoers on a trip down

memory lane with a setlist

featuring singles from The

Doobie Brothers and Hall

& Oates, as well as music

from one-hit wonders like

Toto.

“This style of music,

yacht rock, is the music

that I grew up with,” Mild

said. “It’s the music that my

parents loved ... It’s all the

music I listened to as a kid.

I was born in ‘81, so a lot

of these songs have always

been in my consciousness.”

DiCostanzo said she

hopes the audience enjoys

the opportunity to relive the

songs from their past.

“It’s just a fun way to

reminisce, and everyone

knows all the songs,” she

said. “Once you hear them,

you know them. And it’s a

fun way to remember the

music of that time, and

they’re really fun and popular

tunes. And everyone can

sing along and just have a

good time and chill.”

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24 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station life & arts

frankfortstationdaily.com

Lincoln-Way Area Chorale ready to celebrate 25 years with performance

Lee Cruz, Freelance Reporter

The Lincoln-Way Area

Chorale is diligently preparing

for its annual holiday

concert, titled “Silver

Sounds of the Season” as

the organization is celebrating

its 25th anniversary

this year.

The chorale is comprised

of more than 80

members and is led under

the direction of Artistic

Director Elise Greene. On

certain selections at the

concert, the group will

be joined in song by the

children’s choirs from St.

Francis of Assisi Church

in Orland Park and St. Anthony’s

Church in Frankfort,

and will receive string

and wind instrument accompaniment

from band

members of the three Lincoln-Way

High Schools.

Some of the musical selections

will include “The

Christmas Song,” “I’ll

Be Home for Christmas,”

“It’s the Most Wonderful

Time of the Year,” “Joy to

the World,” “Shepherd’s

Pipe Carol,” “Angelic

Christmas Fanfare,” “Jingle

Bells,” “God Rest Ye

Merry Gentlemen,” “Canticle

of Winter,” “Christmas

Bells,” “Christmas

on Broadway,” “Winter

Members of the Lincoln-Way Chorale rehearse part of

their performance on Oct. 21 led by Elise’ Greene. The

group is preparing for its performance Nov. 17, which

will celebrate 25 years since being founded.

Lee Cruz/22nd Century Media

Wind,” “Have Yourself a

Merry Little Christmas,”

“O Holy Night,” and “Silent

Night.”

As Greene leads the

chorale through rehearsal,

one can easily recognize

the high level of enthusiasm

that she has for serving

in that role. She keeps

the members on task and

the session moving fluidly.

When she stops to improve

the group’s pronunciation

of a word, transition between

lines, or pace during

a portion of a song, she

shares clear examples that

help the members quickly

understand how to execute

those adjustments.

She is positive and encouraging

while aiding

the chorale in elevating

their skills, and she offers

affirmations when the

members produce good

results. She occasionally

reminds the group to demonstrate

good energy and

emotion through subtle facial

expressions and body

language, and she consistently

models that in the

way she carries herself

throughout the rehearsal.

She helps create a spirited

atmosphere by integrating

good-natured humor

throughout her instruction.

Her style generates a dynamic

that the chorale responds

to well and makes

the members eager to polish

their performance.

Representing more than

a dozen local towns, and

with an age range from

nearly 20 years old to nearly

90 years old, the chorale

has continually sustained a

healthy number of members

through the years

since its inception, and

participation is expected to

grow next year as several

community members have

expressed interest in joining

the group.

That is encouraging

news to Greene, who has

relished in her experience

directing the chorale.

Greene was selected as the

organization’s artistic director

last year after serving

as a music teacher for

38 years.

The position allows her

to continue involvement

in music and conducting,

which is one element that

she finds fulfilling. Moreover,

she considers the

relationships she builds

with the chorale members

extremely rewarding.

“I am really enjoying

getting to know so many

really beautiful people,”

she said. “The longer I’m

with them, the more I realize

how wonderful they

are. They’ve all come to

the group from a different

path or for a different reason,

and it’s really interesting

to hear their stories

of what led them here or

when they started to sing.”

Greene feels that a community

choir can provide

a meaningful experience

to its members beyond offering

an opportunity to

perform music. She noted

that, in today’s society,

many people do not know

their own neighbors well

or at all, so an organization

like a community choir at

least gives them a chance

to connect with others on a

weekly basis who reside in

the local area.

“They know each others’

lives, they know

each others’ families, and

they become such dear

friends,” she said. “They

share a love of music and a

love of singing. When you

go through a performance

experience with somebody,

there’s something

that bonds you together in

a really unique way. So,

besides the fact that it’s all

these people coming together

to create this beautiful

music and being really

satisfied on that level,

they’re also being satisfied

on a personal level with

involvement in this choir

community.”

With the whole chorale

rehearsing once a week

3

and the individual sections

of it practicing once

a month since mid-August,

the group has refined its

performance to produce a

high-quality holiday program.

Greene said the chorale’s

dedicated effort is

reflected in the audiences’

reactions to the performances.

“If they haven’t heard

us before, I think they’re

shocked,” Greene said.

“They’re not expecting

that kind of sound from

a community choir. It’s a

wonderful thing to hear.

Hopefully they’re very entertained.

To leave in a better

place than when they

came in, to leave feeling

uplifted, happy and joyful,

that’s what they should

feel when they leave a

concert.”

The “Silver Sounds of

the Season” concert is

scheduled for 3 p.m. Nov.

17 at Lincoln-Way East

High School Fine Arts

Auditorium, 201 Colorado

Ave. in Frankfort. Tickets

are $18 for adults, $16 for

seniors and students, and

at a special rate for groups

of 10 or more. To purchase

tickets, visit lwac.com,

or call (815) 469-1010 or

(708) 479-1863.

faith

From Page 20

Book Club

10 a.m.-noon on the first

and third Thursdays, and

6-8 p.m. on the second

and fourth Tuesdays. The

Frankfort Literary Tea and

Scone Society Book Club

was inspired by the popular

“Guernsey Literary and Potato

Peel Pie Society” book

and movie. A presentation

of a classic will be read out

loud followed by a lively

discussion each month. A

$10 per month donation includes

refreshments (book

not included), or $20 includes

the book cost.

St. Anthony Catholic Church (7659 Sauk

Trail, Frankfort)

Mass Service

4 p.m. Saturdays; 7:30

a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and

noon Sundays.

Reconciliation

3-3:50 p.m. Saturdays.

Knights of Columbus

Meetings

7:30 p.m. every second

and fourth Tuesday of the

month in St. Anthony Hall.

The Knights help at parish

functions such as the

church picnic and their annual

pancake breakfast.

Bereavement Support

7 p.m. once a month at

the Padua Center. For more

information, call (815)

469-3750.

Tuesday Morning Rosary

and Scripture Group

9:30 a.m. Tuesdays at the

Padua Center. To join, call

the Parish Office at (815)

469-3750.

St. Anthony Seniors

Wednesday afternoons

monthly. Seniors gather for

meetings, bingo and more.

For more information, contact

Pat Backus at (708)

720-9321.

Sew ‘n’ Sews

10 a.m. Tuesdays in

Memenas Hall. Attendees

make handmade crafts for

the church. For more information,

call (815) 469-

3750.

Holy Spirit Prayer Group

7 p.m. Tuesdays at the

Padua Center. Meetings are

open to anyone who would

like to join to grow spiritually

through praise, prayer,

scripture and music. For

more information, call

(815) 469-3750.

To have your church’s events

included in Faith Briefs,

email them to Editor Nuria

Mathog at nuria@frankfortstation.com

or call (708)

326-9170 ext. 14. Deadline

is noon Thursdays one week

prior to publication.


frankfortstationdaily.com dining out

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 25

The Dish

Barrel Club more than the sum of its steaks, spirits and stogies

Eatery switches

vibes from lunch to

dinner, focuses on

gatherings

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

At a quick glance, The

Barrel Club looks on paper

like something of a throwback,

with a steak-heavy

dinner menu, a drinks list

that leans hard on bourbon

and a showcase of cigar selections

for the smokers.

Make no mistake: Spirits

are the star of the show at

The Barrel Club. From the

membership program that

for $39 monthly sends customers

home with different

bottles of the Barrel Club’s

spirits and accessories —

think branded shot glasses,

ice ball silicones and rocks

glasses — to a list that rivals

most city establishments

for whiskey enthusiasts,

drinks are undoubtedly the

No. 1 attraction at the Oak

Lawn establishment.

But the facade of the

building on 111th Street

near Cicero Avenue is

enough to let passersby

know the offerings are

more than first meets the

eye. The modern confines

hint at the wines Barrel

Club also proudly offers.

A patio with a fire pit welcomes

musical acts and

outdoor loungers alike. The

event spaces are designed

to attract both corporate

meetings and small birthday

gatherings (ask to see

The Little Pub). And the

lunch menu caters to a family

crowd more than the

nightlife seekers one might

otherwise imagine.

Barrel Club strives to be

more than the typical suburban

eatery, and it strives

to please a lot of different

The beignets ($9) at Barrel Club are dusted in powdered

sugar, drizzled in chocolate and served warm with a

scoop of ice cream.

people in the process.

As Director of Operations

April Koerber, an

Orland Parker, puts it, “It’s

downtown dining on the

south side of Chicago. The

food looks like a masterpiece.”

Behind that food is executive

chef Carlos DeLeon,

who approaches an ingredient-focused

menu with a

“less is best on the plate”

philosophy.

“The products that we

use here are great,” he said.

They use Duke’s mayonnaise,

for instance, simply

because, DeLeon said,

“It’s delicious, the king of

mayos.”

Diners will find that on

the lobster roll ($16), which

Koerber cites as a favorite

for the simplicity of its

Maine lobster, mayo, Old

Bay and brioche.

The kitchen at Barrel

Club also takes the time to

make its own creme fraiche

— a three-day process. And

the roasted chicken (for 2,

$29) — which is sliced in

front of customers — goes

through a 48-hour process.

“What you get out of it

is a crisp, seasoned-all-theway-through

chicken,” De-

Leon said.

Among the sandwich

standouts for the lunch

The Barrel Club

4910 W. 111th St. in

Oak Lawn

Kitchen Hours

• Lunch: 11 a.m.-2:30

p.m. Monday-Friday

• Brunch: 11 a.m.-

2:30 p.m. Saturday-

Sunday

• Dinner: 4-10 p.m.

daily

Bar Hours

• 10 a.m.-midnight

Sunday-Thursday

• 10 a.m.-2 a.m.

Friday-Saturday

For more information ...

Web: barrelclubillinois.

com

Phone: (708) 581-

3357

crowd is the Cuban ($13),

featuring pork carnitas,

smoked ham, Chihuahua

cheese, dill pickle and mustard

on a telera roll.

“Its not a traditional Cuban,

but it’s damn close,”

DeLeon said.

The restaurant also has

some fun mixing influences

with items like the potato

and cheese pierogies ($9),

which feature Yukon Gold

potatoes and Chihuahua

cheese for a combination

that is part Polish, part

The Barrel Club’s Traces of Buffalo whiskey flight ($22) is one of 10 that offer guests

tastes of three different spirits — in this case W.L. Weller Special Reserve, E.H.

Taylor Small Batch and George Stagg Jr. — alongside optional bitters. Photos by Bill

Jones/22nd Century Media

Oak Lawn’s Barrel Club offers sandwiches during its lunch hours, including the

pictured Barrel Dip ($14), featuring shaved rib-eye on a French roll, with giardiniera,

au jus and horseradish cream.

Mexican, according to De-

Leon. Giardiniera finds

its way into Barrel Club’s

chopped salad ($13) for a

distinct Chicago tweak to

the classic.

And gluten-free and

vegetarians diners are not

forgotten, with options for

both highlighted on the

menus.

“You just try to keep it

balanced for people with

allergies,” DeLeon said.

The Barrel Club maintains

membership with the

Orland Park Area Chamber

of Commerce, and Koerber,

who previously worked

with several businesses in

Orland Park, said she made

the jump for a new opportunity

to work with a restaurant

that does a spirits

club. It also gives her the

opportunity to continue to

organize events, including

benefits for local organizations

Barrel Club has done

since its recent opening.

Koerber said she has enjoyed

the new role because

Barrel Club tries to create

a “wow factor” for its customers,

whether that’s an

elderly group doing an early

lunch, whiskey fanatics

working their way through

the spirits selection or executives

looking to impress

clients.

“It’s really personal,” she

said. “And they want that

personalized touch.”


26 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station frankfort

frankfortstationdaily.com

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• Live reindeer (5-8 p.m.) - North Pole

• Live Ice Carving with Chef Michael McGreal

of Joliet Junior College Culinary Arts

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• Sandburg Chamber Singers (5:30-6:30 p.m.)

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• Holiday makeovers with Von Maur!

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• Avon

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• Huaywasi: Handmade in Peru

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• Infinity Scarves by Nancy

• Inspirational Lula Ladies

Tiffany & Sheri (LuLaRoe)

• Inspire Studio Gallery

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• Jean Lachat Photography

• Jewels 2 U

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• Laurie's Fudgelicious

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Skin Care

• LegalShield

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• Mary Kay Cosmetics

• Matilda Jane Clothing

• Mrs. Banton’s Cookies

• NEW YOU CBD

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• Nothing Bundt Cake

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• Parker James Boutique

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• Premier Designs Jewelry

• Rock's #1 Gals Jewelry

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• Sterk Family Law Group, P.C.

• Surprise Parties

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• The Little Red Donut Truck

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• Totes & Taggies by Melinda

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• Virtue Cider

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For more information, call (708) 326-9170 ext. 16 or

visit 22ndCenturyMedia.com/mistletoe


frankfortstationdaily.com dining out

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 27

The Dish

Trio of friends collaborate to open Tavern in the Glen

Homer bar and

restaurant strives

to be a comfortable

neighborhood spot

Thomas Czaja, Editor

Three friends spoke increasingly

in recent years of

realizing their dream to open

a pub together.

These buddies — Jeff

Wood, Kevin Connolly and

Greg Stefanon — found the

right spot to make that goal a

reality, opening Tavern in the

Glen on Aug. 30 in Homer

Glen.

The trio of Orland Park

residents envisioned a comfortable

neighborhood gathering

place they could call

their own.

“I worked for a family

business that got bought out

four years ago that manufactured

mats; Kevin is an electrician;

and Greg is retired

from the FBI,” Wood said,

noting none have any prior

bar or restaurant experience.

“We talked for years wanting

to do this, and now seemed

like the time.”

With that mindset, they

learned the industry as they

developed Tavern in the

Glen, with Connolly using

his expertise as an electrician

and builder to completely

remodel the space. They increased

the size of the bar its

seating, upped the amount of

televisions from four to 18

and added a garage door that

opens near an adjacent door

to a new outdoor patio area.

There is one more interesting

new addition to Tavern

in the Glen.

“We have a church pew,”

Wood said of the long pew

stretching across several

tables — part of new seating

where the former entryway

and front windows to

the business are. “A church

closed in Milwaukee. We

bought [the [pew] online and

drove up there and brought it

back.”

While maximizing space

by adding to the bar and

creating more seating was

imperative, the main focus

of any bar and restaurant is

to provide quality food and

drinks. Occupying the space

that used to house Steamer’s

Hot Dogs and then At Ease

Craft Beer Pub, Tavern in the

Glen’s ownera are confident

they have the goods to stay.

Tavern in the Glen

15761 S. Bell Road in

Homer Glen

Hours

• 11 a.m.-midnight

Sunday-Thursday

• 11 a.m.-1 a.m.

Friday-Saturday

For more information ...

Web: tavernintheglen.

com

Phone: (708) 645-4763

“It’s a simple menu right

now,” Wood said. “Being

brand new, we didn’t want to

have too much on the menu.

We wanted to make a good,

small menu, and everybody

has been very happy about

it.”

The partners plan to grow

the menu as time goes on,

The Italian beef ($8) is one of the popular sandwiches at

Tavern in the Glen in Homer Glen. It is served on garlic

bread au jus. Peppers or cheese can be added for 50

cents each. Photos by Thomas Czaja/22nd Century Media

but one of the most popular

sandwiches so far is the

smash burger ($9), which

comes with a 6-ounce patty

served on a brioche bun

with cheese, lettuce, tomato

and onion. Diners have their

choice of American, pepper

Jack, cheddar, Swiss, mozzarella

or provolone, and all

sandwiches include one’s

choice of fries or coleslaw.

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28 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station puzzles

frankfortstationdaily.com

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Some Brit. sports

cars

4. Trademarks, abbr.

7. Pandowdy, e.g.

10. Birchbark

13. ‘’__ a Lady’’ (Tom

Jones tune)

14. Epithet for the

Yankees

15. LTHS 2019 Jackson

Award winner,

technology teacher,

Jeff ____

16. Official doc.

17. Regal Norse name

18. At first light

19. Make ___ while the

sun shines

20. ___ gratias

21. Way back when

23. Lucy of “Charlie’s

Angels,” 2000

25. Human blood classification

28. __ Zeppelin

29. Abe Vigoda, in

“The Godfather”

30. Conservative

Justice

32. Railroad employee

35. Welcome rugs

39. Australian jumper,

for short

40. Fund-raising suffix

41. Jealous

44. Tyrant

45. Dig in

47. Do-say link

50. Wore away

51. Land of opportunity

53. “____ into Lockport”

- classic car

event

55. The tone “G”

57. Van Gogh: “___

Cypresses”

59. Gets licked

60. The Adamsons’ cat

62. Border on

63. Mindless

64. Epitome of redness

65. Flower receptacle

66. Do watercolors

67. Some degs.

68. UFO crew

69. Vegas opener

Down

1. 1990s-2000s TV

attorney

2. Car storage locale

3. Wheezed

4. “___-Team”

5. Actress Streep

6. Jet that was retired

in 2003

7. Northern California

city

8. Personal statement

intro

9. Post delivery:

Abbr.

11. Certain hooters

12. Ethereal singer,

and namesakes

13. Academic types

14. Defendant called

John

20. Silver coin

22. Chipper

24. Practice suffix

26. “Très ___!”

27. Dinghy propeller

31. Fireplace remains

33. Money to the

bottom line, abbr.

34. Pigeon pen

35. Bubbly name

36. Estimates value

37. Coffee stirrer

38. Capital of South

Korea

41. Handheld

42. Ave. crossers

43. Musical talent

46. Holland export

47. Attack

48. Reddish brown

49. Atlas features

52. Chance for a hit

54. College in New

Rochelle, New York

56. Cereal grain

58. Weak one

60. Go down

61. Meadow (Brit.)

62. 5th ___

FRANKFORT

Pete Mitchell’s Bar & Grill

(21000 Frankfort

Square Road, Frankfort;

(815) 464-8100)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free N’ Fun Bar Game.

Free to play.

ORLAND PARK

Traverso’s Restaurant

(15601 S Harlem Ave,

Orland Park; (708) 532-

2220)

■5-7 ■ p.m. Mondays:

Free bar bingo

TINLEY PARK

Old Tinley Pub & Eatery

(17020 Oak Park Ave.,

Tinley Park; (708) 532-

4409)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Trivia

Night

■8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Movie Night

■8 ■ p.m. Thursdays:

Karaoke

LOCKPORT

Port Noir

(900 S. State St., Lockport;

(815) 834-9463)

■6p.m. ■ - 12 a.m. Thursdays:

Comedy Bingo

■6p.m. ■ - 12 a.m. Fridays

and Saturdays:

Live Band

■6p.m. ■ - 12 a.m. Sundays:

Open Mic Night

HOMER GLEN

Front Row

(14903 S. Bell Road,

Homer Glen; (708) 645-

7000)

■7 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Trivia

MOKENA

Fox’s Restaurant and Pub

(11247 W. 187th St.,

Mokena; (708) 478-

8888)

■6 ■ p.m. Thursdays,

Fridays and Saturdays:

Performance by Jerry

Eadie

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by Joe

To place an event

in The Scene, email

a.datta@22ndcenturymedia.

com.

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids

of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle, each row,

column and box must contain each of the

numbers 1-9.

LEVEL: Medium

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


frankfortstationdaily.com local living

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 29

If you are looking for the perfect ranch home

at a great price, look no more. Ranch Villas at

Keating Point, in the Village of Channahon,

offers ranch homes that are both beautiful and

maintenance-free.

These unique, detached townhomes feature

two bedrooms and two baths in 1,308 to 1,621

square feet. Each comes equipped with a full

basement, two-car attached garage, brick fronts,

and central air.

These Ranch Villas start in the $230’s and

boast an association fee of just $140 per month.

We offer five floorplans for you to choose from.

Do you long for a little more time to yourself?

For more family moments, too?

Luxury Ranch Detached Townhomes

Immediate Move-Ins. • Maintenance-Free Living

Starting from the $230’s

Maintenance-free living at The Ranch Villas at

Keating Pointe is our solution to your problem.

In one of our ranch townhomes, you can finally

wave goodbye to the chores that gobble up your

precious time. All exterior and landscaping

maintenance is done for you, including snow

removal. If you’ve had enough of cleaning

gutters, mowing the lawn, and shoveling the

driveway, you’re ready to take the next step.

The photos in this article feature The Roma,

one of the floorplans you can choose from for

your new ranch home. This 1,467 sq. ft. design

features two bedrooms and two baths. Plus,

you’ll get a flex room to use as you see fit.

Office? Guest room?You tell us. The Roma also

features ceilings that reach nine feet high and a

large kitchen with included appliances. You’ll

enjoy an impressively roomy feel, bounty of

spaceforentertaining,andultimateconvenience.

Speaking of convenience, a basement, two-car

attached garage, and patio are included. The

Roma starts in the low $240’s, delivering quality

in its construction and price tag.

Looking to move into a new home sometime

soon? Our ranch homes also feature quick

delivery homes. These quick delivery homes

have move-in dates as early as this fall.

To learn more about our detached ranch

townhomes, give us a call at (815) 290-5303 or

go to homesbycore.com.

Immediate Move-Ins • Maintenance-Free Living


30 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station local living

frankfortstationdaily.com


frankfortstationdaily.com real estate

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 31

The Frankfort Station’s

Sponsored content

of the

WEEK

This Frankfort two-story home

is nestled among beautiful,

mature trees on more than a

3/4 acre of property.

What: A home just under 3,000

square feet with four bedrooms,

two and a half bathrooms and

a finished basement in the

peaceful Prestwick subdivision.

Where: 960 Troon Trail in

Frankfort

Asking Price:

$329,900

Amenities: This home features quality craftsmanship throughout.

There is a gourmet eat-in kitchen, a family room with

a cozy fireplace and a master suite with a sitting area

and powder room. It also comes with a large walk-in

closet and features a laundry chute to the main-level

laundry. There is also a newer roof.

Listing Agent:

Gary Durish

For more information

call (815) 474-4447

or email uisell4@aol.com.

Listing Brokerage:

CRIS Realty

Want to know how to become “Home of the Week”? Call (708) 326-9170, ext. 47. For more,

visit FrankfortStation.com/realestate.

Aug. 30

• 11515 Myrrh Lane,

Frankfort, 60423-7809

— Scott Attar Trustee to

Daniel Ogean, Karen

Ogean, $399,000

Sept. 3

• 20146 S. Deerfield

Court A, Frankfort,

60423-6987 — Molly A.

Wade to Jereme Trezise,

$125,000

• 20248 S. Frankfort

Square Road, Frankfort,

60423-6918 — Matt

E. Pehr to Kyle T.

Southwick, $200,000

• 605 Vail Drive,

Frankfort, 60423-1324

— Laurie J. Powers

to Daniel J. Curran,

$295,000

Sept. 4

• 23051 Anna Lane,

Frankfort, 60423-9244

— Tsk Construction Inc

to Ryan M. Fillingim,

Danielle N. Miller,

$485,000

Sept. 5

• 7719 W. Galeview

Lane, Frankfort,

60423-6983 — Lsf11

Master Participation

Tru to Nicole Vaughn,

$105,000

• 20335 S. Rainford

Drive 2c, Frankfort,

60423-1794 — Michael

D. Sexton Sr to Charlotte

Sbotnik, $193,000

• 20065 S. Spruce

Drive, Frankfort, 60423-

6912 — Ih2 Property

Illinois Lp to Bryce M.

Freitag, $203,000

• 22995 Anna Lane,

Frankfort, 60423-9242

— Richard W. Evans Jr

to Ginger L. Schroers,

Michael Schroers,

$455,000

• 24244 S. Jos Plave,

Frankfort, 60423-6502

— Amy Haack to William

Cullen, $510,000

• 9410 W. Stuenkel

Road, Frankfort, 60423-

8323 — Haughton Trust

to Steven R. Suarez,

June Suarez, $533,000

• 1030 S. Butternut

Circle, Frankfort,

60423-2124 — Chicago

Title Land Trust Co Tr

to Michael W. Ford,

Jennifer L. Ford,

$557,500

• 22507 Swanstone

Court, Frankfort, 60423-

9023 — Jean Burns to

Mohammad A. Issa,

$699,000

Sept. 6

• 7722 W. Ivy Court,

Frankfort, 60423-6973

— Saleem Mohammed

to Jason Obrien,

$104,000

• 20713 S North Court,

Frankfort, 60423-9323

— William A. Berger

to Richard A. Moris,

Courtney M. Moris,

$228,000

• 21221 Lakeview

Court, Frankfort, 60423-

6608 — Keith Novak to

Scott Kolinski, Darlene

Kolinski, $345,000

• 311 Utah St.,

Frankfort, 60423-

1597 — Garth E Swaney

to Matthew Caruso,

Amanda Caruso,

$469,000

The Going Rate is provided

by Record Information

Services Inc. For more

information, visit www.

public-record.com or call

(630) 557-1000.


32 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstationdaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

School Bus Drivers Wanted

Homer School District 33C

seeks quality individuals

to join our family of

school bus drivers.

$17.42/hr. + full benefits

available

Training provided.

Call (708) 226-7625

or visit homerschools.org

employment tab

Hiring Desk Clerk

(must be flexible w/ shifts)

& Housekeeping

(Morning)

Needed at Super 8 Motel

Apply within:

9485 W. 191st St, Mokena

No Phone Calls

Village of Tinley Park

has opening for Part-Time

CDL Bus Driver.

See www.tinleypark.org

for info and application.

Production Worker

No Experience Necessary

No Evenings or Weekends

Located in Mokena

ctoenterprises.com/now-hiring/

Help

Wanted

1003 Help Wanted

Cashiers Wanted for

Microsoft Computer Registers

$10.00/hr to start, 6 week raise

Paid vacation, Winter bonus

15% employee discount

Never work past 9:00pm!

Must be 18 years and older

No phone calls! Apply in store:

Sox Outlet 6220 W. 159th St.

Oak Forest, IL

Van-Go Transportation

Looking for Drivers and

One-on-One Aids

for Special Needs Van

Bus Driver permit a plus,

but will train

Great part-time job with

great pay: $14-$18/hour

(815) 931-2880

Medical Office in

Orland Park seeks P/T,

licensed medical X-ray

technician for 1 day/wk.

Fax resume to 708.460.9254

or email datkenson@aol.com

Alvernia Manor Senior Living

is now hiring 3 positions

- CNA to work all shifts

- Activity aide, part-time

Call to apply: 630-257-7721

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

1021 Lost &

Found

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

1027 Arts and Craft Fairs

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

1023 Caregiver

Heaven Sent Caregivers

Professional caregiving

service. 24 hr or hourly

services; shower or bath

visits. Licensed & bonded.

Try the best! 708.638.0641

1037 Prayer / Novena

Prayer to the Blessed Virgin

Oh, most beautiful flower of

Mt. Carmel, fruitful vine,

splendor of Heaven, Blessed

Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate

Virgin, assist me in

my necessity. Oh, Star of the

Sea, help me and show me,

herein you are my mother. Oh,

Holy Mary, Mother of God,

Queen of Heaven and Earth!

I humbly beseech you from

the bottom of my heart to succor

me in this necessity. There

are none that can withstand

your power. Oh show me

herein you are my mother. Oh

Mary, conceived without sin,

pray for us who have recourse

to thee (3x). Holy Mother, I

place this cause in your hands.

Miraculous Prayer

Dear heart of Jesus in the past

I have asked for favors.

This time I ask you for this

very special one (mention

Favor). Take it dear Jesus and

place it within your own

broken heart where your father

sees it then in your merciful

eyes it will become your favor

not mine. Amen. - Tom

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

1042 Pets Wanted

Looking for young, adult

Schnauzer. Housebroken, preferably

male. Can guarantee a

loving home! Contact afternoons

only 708-590-6243

Automotive

1069 Antique

Cars

1948 Plymouth Deluxe

4-Door Sedan

Radio, Spotlight,

Shop-Manual Included

Last Driven 1985

Garage Kept

Asking for $2000

(708) 532-4117

1074 Auto for

Sale

1995 Honda Del Sol

New tires, 103k miles

$2250 OBO

708-301-4953

1996 Chevrolet Suburban

Custom Lights

Engine/Trans/Brakes Great.

Pull Any Trailer.

160K mileage. $2000

Call (815) 464-8866

1077 Tractor for

Sale

For Sale to Good Home or

Collector: Antique tractor,

1938 Allis Chalmers

Model WC. Runs great,

have to see to appreciate!

$1,200 708-821-7311

Advertise

your

RENTAL

PROPERTY

in the

newspaper

people turn

to first CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

1090 House for

Sale

Beautiful Custom

Home in

Silo Ridge Estates

$975,000 call Whitney

Wang 312-857-4658

Whitney@whitneyig.com

Prospect Equities Real Estate

1091 Condo for

Sale

Mokena, Condo FSBO

2bd/1ba, $99,900

Excellent conidtion! new

carpeting, electric heat,

wall ac, carpet/tile,

shower/tub, dishwasher,

parking in lot, For

info/pics call 708-479-9655

Rental

1225 Apartments

for Rent

Mokena/Weber

Wills Apartments

1 Bedroom apt. $ 850

2 Bedroom apt. $ 980

CLOSE TO METRA AND 1-80

708-479-2448

1226 Townhouses

for Rent

3 bed/2bath townhouse with

garage completed remodeled

in 2011, hardwoods

downstairs new appliances

Pheseant Ridge Mokena

1st/last, plus deposit $1,250

month 630-660-4889


frankfortstationdaily.com classifieds

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 33

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

Automotive

Help Wanted

Real Estate

Merchandise

per line

DEADLINE -

$52

$13

$50

$30

4 lines/

4 lines/

7 lines/

4 lines/

Friday at 3pm

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

LOCAL REALTOR

BUY, SELL ORRENT

Handling your entire Family’shousing needs for over 15 years.

• Your listing advertised on all major websites

• Instant feedback- weekly updates

• Professional photography- aerial shots too

• Discounts to all teachers, senior citizens,

veterans, 1st responders, doctors & nurses.

CALL TODAY-LISTED TOMORROW

Bob Haustein

Lincoln-Way Resident • Remax 1st Service

Call, Text or Email

708-822-3690

bobhaustein@yahoo.com

www.bobhaustein.com

DIRECTORY

Kennedy Connection Realtors

SELLER incentives & DISCOUNTS!

708-689-1001

kennedyconnection.com

Average 10 Sales

Per Month!

EXPERIENCE MATTERS

YOUCAN COUNT ONKENNEDY!

Jim Kennedy • Managing Broker/Owner

jim.kennedy@kennedyconnection.com

Contact Classified Department

to Advertise in this Directory

708.326.9170


34 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstationdaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Business Directory

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

2017 Cleaning Services

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2003 Appliance Repair

QUALITY

APPLIANCE

REPAIR, Inc.

• Air Conditioning • Furnaces

Refrigeration • Dishwashers

Stoves & Ovens • Microwaves

Garbage Disposals

Washers&Dryers

Family Owned &Operatedsince 1986

Someone you can TRUST

All work GUARANTEED

BEST price in town!

708-712-1392

2004 Asphalt Paving/Seal Coating

A+

2025 Concrete Work

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

2032 Decking

Sturdy

Deck & Fence

Repair, Rebuild or

Replace

Make It Safe - Make it Sturdy

708 479 9035

2070 Electrical

EXPERIENCED

ELECTRICIAN

R E A S O N A B L E

D E P E N D A B L E

SMALL JOBS

CALL ANYTIME

(708) 478-8269

2006 Basement Waterproofing

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

2017 Cleaning Services

Barb’s Cleaning

Service

We clean your home the

way YOU want it

cleaned! Good

Quality, Professional,

Reliable, and

Experienced.

Please call for

estimate.

708-663-1789

2060 Drywall

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

Buy

It!

SELL

It!

FIND

It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170


frankfortstationdaily.com classifieds

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 35

2080 Firewood

2120 Handyman

2120 Handyman

2090 Flooring

Ideal

Firewood

Seasoned Mixed

Hardwoods

$120.00 per FC

Free Stacking &

Delivery

708 856 5422

GroundsKeeper

Landscape Services!

Get Your Firewood

Early This Year

FREE Local Delivery

Contact us at

708.301.7441

or

Visit our website

www.groundskpr.com

2130 Heating/Cooling

2132 Home Improvement

2110 Gutter Systems

...to place

your

Classified Ad!

CALL

708.326.9170

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416


36 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstationdaily.com

2132 Home Improvement 2135 Insulation

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

2150 Paint & Decorating

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

2140 Landscaping

MARTY’S

PAINTING

Interior / Exterior

Fast, Neat Painting

Drywall

Wallpaper Removal

Staining

Free Estimates

20% Off with this ad

708-606-3926

Buy

It!

SELL

It!

FIND

It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

2170 Plumbing

2150 Paint & Decorating

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170


frankfortstationdaily.com classifieds

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 37

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2170 Plumbing

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

2200 Roofing 2200 Roofing

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2200 Roofing

2224 Snow Blower Repair

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOORWITH A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

Call Us Today 708.326.9170

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170


38 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstationdaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2276 Tuckpointing/Masonry

2391 Custom Apparel

2420 Piano Tuning

Merchandise

Directory

2489 Merchandise Wanted

2294 Window Cleaning

P.K.WINDOW

CLEANING CO.

Window Cleaning

Gutter Cleaning

Power Washing

Office Cleaning

call and get $40.00 off

708 974-8044

www.pkwindowcleaning.co4

Buy

It!

SELL

It!

FIND

It!

Professional

Directory

2390 Computer Services/Repair

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

2394 Debt Relief

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

Metal Wanted

Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

Snowmobiles,

Appliances, Etc.

ANYTHING METAL!

Call 815-210-8819

Free pickup!

Buy It!

FIND It!

SELL It!

in the CLASSIFIEDS

708.326.9170


frankfortstationdaily.com classifieds

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 39

2701 Property for

Sale

2701 Property for

Sale

2703 Legal

Notices

2703 Legal

Notices

2900 Merchandise

Under $100

2900 Merchandise

Under $100

COMMON AD - REAL ESTATE

SECTION

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 7649 WEST MOOREFIELD

DRIVE, FRANKFORT, IL 60423

(Brown vinyl siding, two story single

family home with attached garage). On

the 5th day of December, 2019 to be

held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County

Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street,

Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.

Plaintiff V. JENNIFER OBRZUT;

JASON BROWN Defendant.

Case No. 16 CH 2265 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County. Judgment amount is

$208,652.78 plus interest, cost and post

judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES

1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312-346-9088

F:

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

COMMON AD - REAL ESTATE

SECTION

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 7926 Pineview Lane, Frankfort, IL

60423 (Residential). On the 5th day of

December, 2019 to be held at 12:00

noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201,

Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: U.S.

BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,

AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR

REGISTERED HOLDERS OF

FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE

LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN

ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,

SERIES 2006-FF18, Plaintiff V. LEN-

NELL G. WILLIS; ANTOINETTE

WILLIS; NEW GRACE NEW

MERCY MINISTRIES, INC.;

COUNTRYSIDE BANK SUCCES-

SOR BY MERGER TO STATE

BANK OF COUNTRYSIDE; MORT-

GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-

TION SYSTEMS, INC., ASNOMI-

NEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN ADI-

VISION OF NATIONAL CITY

BANK; UNITED STATES OF

AMERICA; FRANKFORT TIM-

BERS EDGE SUBDIVISION

HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION

INC.; STATE OFILLINOIS; Defendant.

Case No. 19 CH 0286 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

JOHNSON, BLUMBERG AND AS-

SOCIATES

230 W. MONROE, SUITE 1125,

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60606

P: 312 541-9710

F: 312 541-9711

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS

)

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL

)

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.

Plaintiff,

vs.

JENNIFER OBRZUT; JASON

BROWN

Defendant.

No. 16 CH 2265

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 23rd day of August, 2019,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

5th day of December, 2019 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 1IN BLOCK 56 FRANKFORT

SQUARE UNIT 15, BEING A SUB-

DIVISION OF THAT PART OF

THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-

TION 13, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH,

RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD

PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, LYING

SOUTH OFTHE INDIAN BOUND-

ARY LINE, ACCORDING TOTHE

PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED

AUGUST 30, 1979 AS DOCUMENT

R79-32134, IN WILL COUNTY, IL-

LINOIS.

Commonly known as:

7649 WEST MOOREFIELD DRIVE,

FRANKFORT, IL 60423

Description of Improvements:

Brown vinyl siding, two story single

family home with attached garage

P.I.N.:

19-09-13-126-008-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County. Judgment amount is

$208,652.78 plus interest, cost and post

judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES

1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312-346-9088

F:

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS

)

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL

)

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-

TION, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR

REGISTERED HOLDERS OF FIRST

FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN

TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN

ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,

SERIES 2006-FF18,

Plaintiff,

vs.

LENNELL G. WILLIS; ANTOINETTE

WILLIS; NEW GRACE NEW MERCY

MINISTRIES, INC.; COUNTRYSIDE

BANK SUCCESSOR BY MERGER

TO STATE BANK OF COUNTRY-

SIDE; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC

;

REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS

NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN A

DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY

BANK; UNITED STATES OFAMER-

ICA; FRANKFORT TIMBERS EDGE

SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS AS-

SOCIATION INC.; STATE OF ILLI-

NOIS;

Defendant.

No. 19 CH 0286

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 26th day of August, 2019,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

5th day of December, 2019 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 53 TIMBERS EDGE PHASE

ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF

PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OFTHE

SOUTH 1/2 OF 640 ACRES RE-

SERVED FOR THE CHILDREN OF

JOSEPH LAFRAMBOISE, OTHER-

WISE KNOWN AND DESCRIBED

AS THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OFSEC-

TION 36, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH,

RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD

PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AC-

CORDING TO PLAT OF SUBDIVI-

SION THEREOF RECORDED ON

SEPTEMBER 10, 2003, AS DOCU-

MENT NO. R2003-224644, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as:

7926 Pineview Lane, Frankfort, IL

60423

Description of Improvements:

Residential

P.I.N.:

19-09-36-105-012-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

JOHNSON, BLUMBERG AND AS-

SOCIATES

230 W. MONROE, SUITE 1125,

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60606

P: 312 541-9710

F: 312 541-9711

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

5 medal cars $10 ea, Extention

cord on wheels $10, Like new

router on table $25 Call

708-479-0193

50pc screwdriving bit set

w/case $19, 7 1/2in circular

saw blade $4ea, 3in ratcheting

clamp $5, 45pc Hex key

wrench set w/case wts 3lbs $29

Call 708-460-8308

6’ artificial pre-lit Christmas

tree, never used $25 Call

815-838-6246

Beautiful 10’ Christmas tree

$50 Call 815-469-9023 Please

leave a message.

Mickey &Minnie cookie jars

$25 ea, Black free standing

tri-fold picture holder holds 15

8x10 pictures $25, Electric

wall dart baseball game $25

Call 815-806-9094

Motion Recliner, neutral color

&very comfortable $75 OBO

Call 708-921-8505

New deluxe 5piece barbecue

tool set stainless steel with

solid oak wood handles $30,

Antique vintage Geneva IL5

star #8 black flat cast iron $25,

New Legacy Rabbit corkscrew

wine bottle opener kit includes

case $25 Call 708-466-9907

Portable Sony CD boombox

$10 ea, Golf umbrellas $10 ea,

Tennis racquet $10, Sears electri

drill $20, Black &Decker

edger $10 Call 708-601-1997

Psylvania 13” TV color with

remote; one 13” Zeith color

TV with remote Palys VHS

tapes one JVC VHS

recorder/player; 25plus VHS

tapes ALL $15 Call

708-614-8541

Rubbermaid coolers: round, orange

and white sport drink or

water dispensers. One 5gal.

$8, one 10 gal. $15. Very

clean. Call 708-203-9272

Sale: was 100 for $100, now

100 predriven Titleist ProV’s

for $50 Call 708-597-2972

Small dorm size refrigerator,

clean $25 Call 708-479-6718

Toro 421 snowblower 2-stage,

self propelled, electric start

$100 Call 708-308-6835

Men’s rubber totes xxl $20,

Black/grey new jacket xl $15,

Bears xl blue/orange jacket

$35, Men’s dark pink 40R

sport jacket USA $35, Call

708-460-8308

Misc plants/bulbs: Asiatic lillies

bulbs pink & red plant now

dozen $39, potted red dogwood

shrub $17, potted burning bush

$20 Call 708-460-8308

Oak bar stools, very nice condition,

swivel seat. $25 each

Call 815-348-2884

Halloween new doormat $9,

New Ames bent handle snow

shovel $22, Used snow shovel

alum. blade $10, 20” wide

Christmas tree stand red new

$15 Call 708-460-8308

Hoover FloorMate Deluxe,

hard floor cleaner FH40165,

like new with box $100 Call

708-912-4234

Kryptonite bike cable HD steel

$12, 9004 Auto new headlight

$12, 4pk Rayovac alkaline D

batteries $5, 40W 2pk appliance

bulbs $4 Call

708-460-8308

Ladies long black coat w/hood

8P $25, Ladies hooded short

jacket XL $15, Wedding dress

petite $39, Snuggly extra long

sox red or pink $4 each Call

708-460-8308

Left handed golf complete set

like new w/bag & club covers

$75 black, Lrg 211/4” turkey

platter w/box $10 Gibson Call

773-552-7850

Long navy winter coat size 14,

100% wool, excellent condition

$20 Call 708-444-8535

Magnavox flat screen 40 in TV

great picture $95 Call

779-324-5208

Med brown love seat, seats recline

w/center console opens 2

cup holders $90 Call

815-838-0239

Men’s Sorel winter boots size

10 below zero -5-40 never

worn $45, 2life like animated

illuminated Christmas dolls

$25 each Call 708-478-8976

Mickey &Minnie cookie jars

$25 ea, Black free standing

tri-fold picture holder holds 15

8x10 pictures $25, Electric

wall dart baseball game $25

Call 815-806-9094

Motion Recliner, neutral color

&very comfortable $75 OBO

Call 708-921-8505

New deluxe 5piece barbecue

tool set stainless steel with

solid oak wood handles $30,

Antique vintage Geneva IL5

star #8 black flat cast iron $25,

New Legacy Rabbit corkscrew

wine bottle opener kit includes

case $25 Call 708-466-9907

Portable Sony CD boombox

$10 ea, Golf umbrellas $10 ea,

Tennis racquet $10, Sears electri

drill $20, Black &Decker

edger $10 Call 708-601-1997

Psylvania 13” TV color with

remote; one 13” Zeith color

TV with remote Palys VHS

tapes one JVC VHS

recorder/player; 25plus VHS

tapes ALL $15 Call

708-614-8541

Electric ice crusher $6, Howard

Miller chime table top

clock $40 Call 708-349-3228


40 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstationdaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

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DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

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$52

4 lines/

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frankfortstationdaily.com frankfort

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 41

FREE FREE FREE

CLASSIFIED MERCHANDISE ADS!!!

In this tough economy, we'll give you a free

merchandise ad totaling $100 or less.

· Write your FREE ad in 30 words or less.

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Free Merchandise Ad - All Seven Papers

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FAX: 708.326.9179


42 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station sports

frankfortstationdaily.com

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

3 3

Even in their 80s, Frankfort friends have

powerful voices to cheer Griffins football

with Tre Allen

Frankfort resident Tre Allen is a senior

center on the Providence football team.

How long have you been playing

football and how did you get

started?

I’ve been playing football since second

grade. It was kind of on a whim. Nobody

in my family played before, but I’d always

watch football with my dad and I

kind of wanted to get out there and try it.

What do you like so much about

the sport?

I love the brotherhood. I know I can

count on my teammates for anything.

They are my brothers.

Have you always played center?

No, I just started playing center freshman

year. In eighth grade, I was a noseguard

and a guard. Freshman year, we

needed a center and I kind of volunteered

to do it. That’s where I’ve been ever since.

Was that a tough transition to

playing center?

It did take some time to get used to it.

It took me a good month to get snapping

the ball down.

Playing center requires you to be a

leader, doesn’t it?

Yeah, I’ve got to call the offense, call

the defense every time. I tell my guards

if they’re double-teaming or if they’re

blocking down, just get all the linemen

on the same page and make sure everyone

knows what their assignment is.

What have you learned from coach

Mark Coglianese?

Teamwork, teamwork, teamwork.

I know that if we work as a team, we

can accomplish great things. If we

work as a team on offense, we can be

unstoppable.

Steve Millar/22nd Century Media

If you could be anybody else for

a day, who would you want to

be?

Tom Brady. He has a pretty cool life.

He’s the GOAT [greatest of all time],

man. He’s the greatest. We don’t get all

the glory as linemen, so it’d be fun to be a

quarterback once.

You’re stranded on a deserted

island and can have an endless

supply of one food. What do you

want?

Chick-fil-A, for sure. Chick-fil-A nuggets

with ranch or honey mustard.

Who would you pay to see in

concert?

They’re not really a band anymore,

but I’d love to see Pantera. I always blast

them out before games to get me ready,

get me focused.

If you could be any superhero,

which would you want to be?

Probably Superman. I’d like to be able

to fly, for sure.

Interview conducted by Sports Editor Steve

Millar.

STEVE MILLAR, Sports Editor

Lincoln-Way East fans (left to right) Thomas Trojniar,

Richard Anderson and Bill Pradzinski, known as the

“Who Let the Dogs Out? Guys”, lead cheers at the

Griffins’ first-round playoff game against Plainfield

South on Nov. 1. JULIE MCMANN/22ND CENTURY MEDIA

If you have been to a

Lincoln-Way East football

game over the last several

years, you have likely heard

the voices of Richard Anderson,

Bill Pradzinski and

Thomas Trojniar.

They are the three octogenarians

who are consistently

leading cheers from

the stands. The ones yelling,

‘Who let the dogs out?’ after

a big play by the Griffins.

Anderson, 85, Pradzinski,

80, and Trojniar, 82, are

Frankfort neighbors who

have known each other for

around 20 years. They do

not have any family members

on the Griffins, but they

have long been devoted fans

of their hometown team. Six

or seven years ago, they began

going to games together

and became the “Who Let

the Dogs Out? Guys.”

“We go out there expecting

them to win, and we do

what we can to get the crowd

going to inspire the team,”

Trojniar said. “The players

even told us that we’re the

good luck people.”

The friends usually sit

around midfield, about halfway

up the stands. At least

once a game, they come

down to the bottom of the

stands, lead cheers and

sometimes throw candy to

the student section.

Anderson said they used

to come down more often,

but it’s “harder to get up and

down those stands now.”

“Everyone is waiting for

us to yell, ‘Who let the dogs

out?’ so they can respond,”

Anderson said. “Then we

yell, ‘Let’s hear it for the

cheerleaders’ and stuff like

that. Everyone gets excited

and they get into it.”

Anderson brings a megaphone

to games to lead

cheers. Pradzinski says that

is not necessary for him.

“God gave me a good

voice,” Pradzinski said. “I

don’t need the megaphone. I

do all the cheering with my

voice. I yell and people love

it.”

The group has been embraced

by the East community.

They were invited

to the team dinner the night

before the 2017 state championship

game. They have

also been presented with jerseys

and hoodies by the East

administration.

“We went to the dinner

before the championship

game, and people were taking

pictures of us and everything,”

Pradzinski said. “It

was a lot of fun.”

Anderson and Trojniar

joke that their group was

almost down to two before

this season. Pradzinski took

last season’s state semifinal

loss to Loyola especially

hard and threatened not to

come back. But by the time

fall came around, he was

ready to go.

“I’m still not over that

game, though,” Pradzinski

said. “I’ll take that to my

grave.”

The three are often questioned

for their devotion

to the Griffins. Especially

around this time of the year,

when people wonder why

they want to sit out in the

freezing cold to watch a high

school football game.

“My wife has passed on

now, but she thought we

were nuts,” Anderson said.

“All our wives think we’re

nuts. But we do what we

want.”

For the longtime friends,

Friday nights - and some

Saturdays - in the fall are

always days to look forward

to.

“It keeps me young,”

Pradzinski said.

Anderson said the trio

will treasure the games they

spend together in the stands

for as long as they can.

“We’re getting older,”

he said. “We don’t know if

we’re going to be here next

year or not.

“But instead of sitting in

front of the television waiting

to die, we have fun.”


frankfortstationdaily.com sports

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 43

Local runner shares milestone marathon with his daughter

STEVE MILLAR, Sports Editor

For Mokena’s Mike Kenny, running

marathons has developed into a

passion that continually pushes him

to do more.

Kenny, who runs locally with

the Frankfort/New Lenox Running

Club and Yankee Runners, has ran

races all over the United States. As

he approached his 100th marathon,

though, there was still one thing high

on his bucket list that he had yet to

do: run one with one of his children.

That changed at the Chicago Marathon

on Oct. 13. Mike Kenny, 56,

ran his 24th straight Chicago Marathon

and his 100th marathon overall,

and his 26-year-old daughter Erin

ran alongside him for her first marathon.

“We had a fantastic race,” Mike

Kenny said. “We ran the whole thing

together, never had to walk the whole

way, so it was really a great race.

“It was phenomenal. Out of the

100 marathons i’ve run, this was by

far the best, because I had my daughter

with me.”

Erin Kenny has known for a long

time of her father’s desire to have

one of his kids run a marathon with

him, but she had never ran a race

longer than a 5K when she came up

with the idea to surprise Mike last

Christmas.

“Ever since me and my siblings

were younger, my dad wanted us to

run a marathon with him,” Erin said.

“All of us were not really runners,

and it was like, ‘That’s probably not

going to happen.’ But when I knew

he was going to be going for his

100th, I thought it would be a good

time to try to do it for him.”

It was a tremendous Christmas

present for Mike Kenny.

“I’ve been asking my kids to do it

with me for about 12 years,” he said.

“Erin surprised me on Christmas and

told me she entered the lottery for the

Chicago Marathon and got in. I’ve

been elated since then to have the

opportunity to run with her.”

Erin Kenny now lives in downtown

Chicago and is in nursing

school at the University of Chicago,

but she came home to Mokena to run

with her father as often as possible

while training for the marathon.

“He told me everything about it

Erin (left) and Mike Kenny ran the Chicago Marathon together Oct. 13. It

was the 100th marathon for Mike, a member of the Frankfort-New Lenox

Running Club, and the first for his daughter, Erin. Photo submitted

and completely prepared me for the

race,” Erin said.

Still, the mental aspects of the

marathon were even more challenging

than Erin expected.

“It was a surreal experience,” she

said. “It was difficult during the

race. You get to mile 16 or 17 and

it’s tough mentally to make yourself

run longer than that. You hit a wall.

But my dad helped me push through.

He usually runs faster than me, but

he stayed back with me so we could

go through the whole experience together.”

Erin ran with a small sign on her

shirt that said her dad was running in

his 100th marathon. Mike ran with

one that said his daughter was running

in her first.

“People would see the signs and

were congratulating him and he’d

say, ‘I’m living a dream because

I’m running with my daughter.’”

Erin said. “That just pushed me even

harder to finish.”

When the father and daughter

crossed the finish line together, both

had accomplished something they

once thought would be unattainable.

“This became a goal two or three

years ago, I started focusing on it,”

Mike Kenny said. “Last year in Chicago

was my 90th. I wanted to do my

100th at home, so I decided I’d make

this one my 100th, and I had to do

nine marathons in between.

“One hundred is a number that

when I started doing this, I never anticipated

getting to. So, to do it and

to get to do it with my daughter, it’s

just indescribable how good the feeling

was.”

Mike Kenny’s marathon journey

will certainly continue. He planned

to run the New York Marathon for

the first time on Sunday, Nov. 3.

Erin? Put her down as a maybe.

“Will I run one again? That’s the

question of the year now,” she said.

“I think I will, but I’m going to wait

until I finish school. So, maybe

2021.”

Either way, Erin helped fulfil one

of her father’s dreams, and the 2019

Chicago Marathon is one the Kenny

family will never forget.

“Running means so much to me

and out of my 100 races, none mean

more to me than this one,” Mike

Kenny said. “To be able to do it with

Erin, and to get the support I received

from my family and all my friends is

overwhelming.”

This Week In

GRIFFINS VARSITY

ATHLETICS

GIRLS BASKETBALL

■Nov. ■ 19 – hosts Maine

South, 6 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 20 – at Marist

Thanksgiving Tournament,

TBA

BOYS BOWLING

Sports Briefs

Opportunities increase for

Allegretti

Lincoln-Way East

graduate Nick Allegretti

stepped in at right guard

during the Kansas City

Chiefs’ 35-32 loss to the

Tennessee Titans on Sunday,

Nov. 10. Allegretti

got his opportunity to play

a significant number of

snaps after a pair of injuries

on the offensive line.

Fellow Chiefs lineman

Andrew Wylie said Allegretti

“had a gleam in his

eye,” according to Chiefs

Digest.

Loss to JCA ends

Providence volleyball’s

best run since 2005

Providence earned its

way into a sectional final

for the first time since

2005. But the Celtics ran

into Joliet Catholic in its

own gym in the championship

match, and the

Angels’ postseason experience

and homecourt advantage

proved too much

to overcome.

Joliet Catholic won its

11th sectional title in the

last 17 years with a 25-

21, 25-20 victory over the

Celtics on Nov. 6.

■Nov. ■ 14 – hosts Sandburg

at Thunder Bowl, 4:30 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 19 – hosts Stagg at

Thunder Bowl, 4:30 p.m.

FOOTBALL

■Nov. ■ 16 – hosts Class 8A

quarterfinal vs. H-F, 1 p.m.

GIRLS SWIMMING

■Nov. ■ 16 – at LW Central

Sectional, 9 a.m.

Providence has still not

won a sectional championship

since 2001.

Peterson had seven kills

to lead the Celtics (23-17).

Juliana Warfield added six

and Gorys had five.

Frankfort Park District to

host Holiday Turkey Shoot

basketball contest

The Frankfort Park

District will hold a Holiday

Turkey Shoot from

12:30 to 2 p.m. Nov. 26

at Founders Community

Center.

Teams will consist of

one adult and one child

age 6 to 14 and each

team member will shoot

10 free throws. The team

that makes the most free

throws in each division

will win. Divisions will be

determined by child’s age.

The event is free but

participants are asked to

donate one or more nonperishable

food items to

be given to the Frankfort

Food Pantry. Pre-registration

is required. Call (815)

469-9400 or visit www.

frankfortparks.org.

Sports Briefs are compiled

by Sports Editor Steve Millar,

s.millar@22ndcm.com.

visit us online at

www.frankfortstationdaily.com


44 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station sports

frankfortstationdaily.com

Football

Vaughn unstoppable as Providence ends Crete-Monee’s undefeated season

RANDY WHALEN

Freelance Reporter

On Saturday, Nov. 9, Aaron

Vaughn ran into some old

friends — and past them,

around them and through

them.

Providence’s sophomore

running back, who is from

Crete, ran wild to help end

the season of Crete-Monee,

which rostered many of

Vaughn’s friends.

So does he feel bad about

that?

“A little bit,” he said before

pausing. “Well, not really.

It’s business.”

Vaughn made sure the

host Celtics took care of

business as he ran 26 times

for 366 yards and scored

four touchdowns. His

career-best performance

helped Providence pull

away from the Warriors for

an unforgettable 61-37 victory

in a Class 6A secondround

playoff game in New

Lenox.

There were nearly 900

combined yards of offense

in the game. The 61 points

are the second most in Providence

postseason history.

The record is 68 in a shutout

of Fenger in a first-round

playoff game in 2002.

The Celtics (8-3) are now

19-1 in second-round playoff

games, including 9-0 at

home in the past 25 years.

They will host another undefeated

team – Glenwood

(11-0), from downstate Chatham,

in a quarterfinal.

Crete-Monee (10-1),

the 2018 6A state runnerup,

was hoping to make its

fourth state title game appearance

in the past eight

seasons. But Vaughn had

other ideas. Even if he was

anxious about them.

“I was nervous,” Vaughn

said. “I came out and felt

like I was going to puke.

These were the guys I grew

up with. I knew them and

they knew me. I couldn’t

sleep [Friday] night. I woke

up at six [Saturday morning]

and I was going to sleep until

eight.”

Those nerves didn’t matter

much as Vaughn scored

on runs of three, 65, 42 and

33 yards. The final two of

those came in the last 1:44

of the game as the Celtics

capped it off by scoring the

final 21 points.

Providence’s Aaron Vaughn breaks off a big run as the

Celtics’ sideline cheers him on Saturday, Nov. 9, in New

Lenox. Vaughn ran for 366 yards and four touchdowns

in Providence’s 61-37 win. BOB KLEIN/22ND CENTURY MEDIA

“Every time they [the

Warriors] scored I told our

guys, ‘That’s OK,” Vaughn

said. “We will just score

again and add to our stats.

We have the best offensive

line in the state and they

showed that.”

Indeed, the all-senior offensive

line of Tre Allen,

Adam Banathy, Michael

Charnot, Oliver Cox, and

Jake Renfro, along with

junior tight end Jameson

Geers, helped lead the way

as 481 of the Celtics 589

total yards came on the

ground.

But in a game where

Vaughn was the star, it was

a handoff by him that led to

the most important play of

the game.

Crete-Monee had cut the

Celtics’ lead to 40-37 with

8:48 to play on a 50-yard TD

run by Trayvon Rudolph.,

the quarterback’s fourth

touchdown run of the game.

On the ensuing possession,

Providence had a thirdand-16

from its own 49.

Junior quarterback Kevin

Conway had left the game

moments before after taking

a big hit. Vaughn lined up at

Crete-Monee At Providence

1 2 3 4 F

Crete-Monee 3 13 8 13 37

Providence 7 17 10 27 61

THREE STARS OF THE GAME

1. Aaron Vaughn, Providence, sophomore running back:

26 carries - 366 yards, four TD’s of 3, 65, 42 and 33

yards.

2. Trayvon Rudolph, Crete-Monee senior quarterback: 23

carries - 201 yards, four TD’s of 38, 40, 1 and 50

yards. Also 12-of-19 passing for 83 yards.

3. Kevin Conway, Providence, junior quarterback; 20 carries

- 96 yards, three TD’s of 7, 1 and 1 yards. Also 4-of-6

passing for 108 yards, including a 66-yard TD pass to

Lucas Porto.

Up Next: Providence hosts Glenwood (11-0) in a Class 6A

quarterfinal.

quarterback in the Wildcat

formation and handed it off

to Kevin Countryman, who

ran 18 yards for a first down.

Countryman, a senior

defensive back who had an

interception earlier in the

game, was playing offense

for the first time this season.

Conway came back in

and scored on a 1-yard run

with 3:53 remaining to up

the lead to 47-37.

Conway ran 20 times for

96 yards, including TD runs

of 7, 1 and 1 yards. He was

5

4-of-6 passing for 108 yards,

including a 66-yard TD pass

to senior Lucas Porto.

“I came in with an injured

ankle, but on that play

I got clobbered in the ribs,”

Conway said of leaving the

game. “I just needed to take

a play or two off. No, I have

never played in a game like

this. But our tough schedule

prepared us for it.

“Still, it was insane. But

[Vaughn] did the greatest

job I’ve ever seen by a running

back.”

Our staff’s predictions for the top games in the quarterfinals of the playoffs

There are still just two teams left from our area

– Providence and Lincoln-Way East. Could we

see two teams in the state title game in DeKalb

two days after belching up our Thanksgiving Day

meals? It is a possibility.

54-12

53-13

Thomas Czaja |

Editor

• LWE 27, Homewood-Flossmoor

24. Vikings will give Griffins their

closest game of the season in

rematch, but East handles them

again to advance.

• Providence 35, Chatham Glenwood

28. Celtics have proven time and

again to throw out the records this

time of year – they know how to

make a postseason run.

52-14

49-17

48-18

Sean Hastings |

Contributing Editor

• LW East 34, Homewood-Flossmoor

28. Griffins win battle of two area

powerhouses.

• Providence 24, Chatham Glenwood

14. Celtics utilize home-field

advantage.

46-20

GameS of the Week

• Homewood-Flossmoor (10-1) at LW East (11-0)

• Chatham Glenwood (11-0) at Providence (8-3)

Jeff Vorva |

Sports Editor

• LWE 35, Homewood-Flossmoor 14. A

rematch of the regular season Game

of the Century should receive plenty

of hype, but Griffs’ are refocused

after being shut out in second half

against Niles Notre Dame.

• Providence 28, Chatham Glenwood

23. Hay, Hay! Coach Dave Hay of

Glenwood brings in a spiffy 34-9 career

record but the Celtics should send

him home with double digit losses

after a fun game in New Lenox.

Steve Millar |

Sports Editor

• LWE 31, Homewood-Flossmoor 20.

East QB Kyle Quinn did not play

in the regular season win over the

Vikings. He will throw a couple of

TD passes in this one to get the

Griffins back into the semifinals.

• Providence 31, Chatham Glenwood

28. Beating undefeated teams in

back-to-back weeks is a tough task,

but if the Celtics offense keeps

rolling, they can pull it off.

Joe Coughlin |

Publisher

• LWE 24, Homewood-Flossmoor 14.

Griffins defense answers the call

against familiar foe.

• Providence 45, Chatham Glenwood

38. Celtics are on fire and outscore

another big-time opponent.

Heather Warthen |

Chief Marketing Officer

• LWE 24, Homewood-Flossmoor 21.

Griffins continue hot streak and

close out the Vikings’ season.

• Providence 28, Chatham Glenwood

21. Home-field advantage does the

Celtics good as they continue their

playoff march.


frankfortstationdaily.com sports

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 45

Cross Country

Injury sidelines Gardner as young Griffins soak up state experience

JEFF DEGRAW

Freelance Reporter

STEVE MILLAR, Sports Editor

Lincoln-Way East had to

compete at the state meet

without one of the best runners

in the state as senior

Brett Gardner could not run

because of a left leg injury.

After finishing second in

the sectional meet, Gardner

knew there was something

wrong.

“I felt something before

the race but didn’t think

much about it, but coach

[Ross Widinski] and I talked

and he just said run to

qualify. He told me during

the race that our team was

qualified, so I backed off,

but after the race I knew

something wasn’t right.

It was different than I had

ever felt before and runners

know their bodies well and

I knew this wasn’t good.

“I didn’t want anyone to

know until after the visit

to the doctor on Monday

and it was a stress reaction

in my lower leg. I feel bad

and it’s frustrating not to

run here, but I’d rather be

out four weeks than four

months.”

Without their senior

leader, the Griffins raced

an extremely young lineup

and finished 25th on Saturday,

Nov. 9, at Detweiller

Park in Peoria.

East was led by sophomore

Nolan Rogers in

153rd. He was followed

by junior Nolan Enright

(190th), and freshmen Justin

Falejczyk (193rd), Jack

Roberts (208th) and Gerry

Cushing (209th).

East coach Ross Widinski

was sad to see Gardner’s

Griffins cross country

career end this way.

“An MRI showed what

we feared, a stress reaction,”

Widinski said. “It

was significant enough

that any added stress could

lead to a complete fracture,

sidelining him for several

months. With the fourthfastest

time in the nation

for three miles this year, we

were hoping for a great result.

Fate had other plans.

We will now focus on track

and coming back even

stronger.”

If healthy, Gardner figures

to be a top contender

in the distance events for

track and field next spring.

The North Carolina State

recruit finished fourth in

the 3,200 meters at the

2019 state track meet.

At Detweiller, Gardner

took on a cheerleading and

coaching role.

“This entire weekend

I’ve been excited for our

team and I’m here to help

them anyway I can,” he

said. “It’s different and I’m

taking this entire experience

of being here from

a different perspective. I

know that if I get healthy

my hard work will pay off

down the road and hopefully

that will be [next spring]

in track.”

Gardner’s good friend

and chief rival, Lincoln-

Way Central’s Jared Kreis,

finished fifth as Hersey’s

Josh Methner broke Craig

Virgin’s course record of

13 minutes, 50 seconds

set in 1972, running 13:49.

A left leg injury kept Lincoln-Way East’s Brett Gardner

out of the state cross country meet. 22ND CENTURY MEDIA

FILE PHOTO

The record had a magical

connotation for many in the

sport.

Kreis, a senior who was in

second place the first half of

the race, was satisfied with

his effort and his fifth-place

finish, running 14:30.

It was the best finish ever

for a Central runner, topping

the sixth-place showing

from Mark Battista in

2006.

“I was really surprised

that Josh [Methner] took

it out so hard,” Kreis said.

“He went for the record and

it was really fast from the

start. But I have no regrets

because I went after it also.

It was fun and I can look

back and not have any what

ifs. It’s pretty good to finish

in fifth place.”

The Knights placed 23rd

as a team and Kreis, a Duke

recruit, was the only senior

among the five runners who

scored. Sophomore Caden

Simone finished 132nd,

freshman Nolan Sams

158th, freshman Connor

4

LeBeau 184th and junior

Jay Parker was 199th.

“Jared went out after it

and he knew what he had

to do because he is such a

great student of the sport,”

Knights coach John Taylor

said. “This team had a great

mix of guys this year and

we are young.

“Our younger guys

learned a lot today and they

ran well and when you do

that in the biggest meet of

the year that is all you can

ask.”

Lincoln-Way East

sophomore Kate Guderjan

placed 142nd but suffered

a fall in the first half-mile

of the race, according to

coach Wendy Hegarty.

Central placed 22nd as a

team in the girls race and

received a 45th-place finish

from junior Merrigan Allen

(17:45). Senior Rachel

Baumgartner followed in

75th (18:06). Junior Catherine

Ihrke (136th), junior

Colleen Erdman (174th)

and freshman Emma Olson

(186th) rounded out the

scorers.

Youth Sports

Locals run in IESA cross country state meet

STEVE MILLAR, Sports Editor

Several athletes from

local junior highs qualified

for the Illinois Elementary

School Association

state cross country

meet, which was held Oct.

19 at Maxwell Park in

Normal.

The girls team from

Hickory Creek Middle

School in Frankfort finished

ninth in Class 3A.

Hickory Creek’s runners

were Maura Hanrahan,

Ava Conway, Ellie Feigl,

Kylie Lamonto, Katie

O’Brien, Riley Drzewiecki

and Elyse Defrank.

Summit Hill Junior

High in Frankfort also had

three girls compete at state

in Mia Hedrick, Makayla

Kelly and Kara Waishwell.

Leading the way among

area runners was Mokena

Junior High eighth-grader

Vince Demma, who finished

sixth in the Class

2A boys race, finishing the

two-mile race in 10 minutes,

51.2 seconds.

“It was Vince’s best

race of the year,” Mokena

coach Rick West said. “It

was the first time he went

under 11 [minutes]. It was

definitely his best performance

at the right time.”

Mokena Junior High

qualified its boys team

to state for the first time

in seven years, and finished

22nd. In addition to

Demma, Mokena runners

included Sam Simone, Korey

Cagnolatti, Matthew

Bettenhausen, Braden

Meyer, Jackson Meyer and

Noah Sloane.

“It was nice to get the

whole boys team down

there,” West said. “It was

exciting, it’s tough to even

place at sectional. Our girls

almost made it, but we got

three down individually.

So we had 10 kids, it was

really nice.”

Gabriella Bush, Marissa

Culver and Taylor White

were the girls qualifiers

from Mokena.

Summit Hill Junior High cross country runners who

qualified for state were (from left) Makayla Kelly, Kara

Waishwell and Mia Hedrick. Photo submitted


46 | November 14, 2019 | the frankfort station sports

frankfortstationdaily.com

Henning, defense help Griffins overcome inconsistency

5

JON DEPAOLIS

Freelance Reporter

If onlookers had not

checked the scoreboard

minutes after Lincoln-

Way East’s 23-13 victory

over Niles Notre Dame in

a Class 8A second-round

game on Saturday, Nov. 9,

it could have easily looked

like the Griffins were lamenting

a loss.

But after a second half

that saw the Dons outscore

East 13-0, the players and

coaches in cobalt blue

openly took accountability

for the up-and-down performance.

“As well as we played in

the first half was as poorly

as we did in the second,”

East coach Rob Zvonar

said, while also giving

credit to Notre Dame for

the second-half performance.

“They could have

folded at halftime, but they

came back out and competed.

If you look at the box

score, we lost the second

half 13-0. Our guys know

that if that happens next

week, it’ll be the last week.

“We’ve got a lot of

things we have to look at

in the second half and kind

of figure out why that happened.

Hopefully, we’ll

figure it out, so history

doesn’t repeat itself.”

The Griffins (11-0) will

host SouthWest Suburban

rival Homewood-Flossmoor

(10-1) - a 38-23 winner

over Neuqua Valley - in

the quarterfinals. East beat

H-F 28-14 on Sept. 27.

East got out of the gate

hot against Notre Dame,

with the defense forcing

three straight three-andouts

for the Dons (8-3).

On that third Notre

Dame possession, the snap

on the punt was fumbled

and East’s Jalen Hacha fell

NOTRE DAME AT LW EAST, NOV. 9

1 2 3 4 F

Notre Dame 0 0 7 6 13

LW East 16 7 0 0 23

Three Stars of the Game:

1. AJ Henning, LW East, senior wide receiver – Eight

receptions, 100 yards, two touchdowns; 1-yard

rushing touchdown

2. Kyle Quinn, LW East, senior quarterback – 10-of-18

passing, 115 yards, two touchdowns

3. Jalen Hacha, LW East senior defensive back – fumble

recovery, punt block for a safety

Up Next: LW East will host Homewood-Flossmoor (10-1) in a

Class 8A quarterfinal. The Griffins beat the Vikings 28-14 on

Sept. 27.

on top of it to set the Griffins

up at the Dons’ 4-yard

line. A few plays later, senior

AJ Henning scored on

a 1-yard run.

“We practiced the hardest

we ever have [this] week,”

said Sean McLaughlin,

East senior defensive end

and captain. “Going into

this game, we knew they

were a good enough opponent

to beat us. So, we

just flipped a switch and we

were ready to go.”

After the defense forced

another three-and-out, the

Griffins’ special teams got

in on the action again as

Hacha blocked a punt. The

ball rolled backward and

out of the end zone for a

safety to make it 9-0 with

1:07 left in the opening

quarter.

On the ensuing offensive

possession, East quarterback

Kyle Quinn completed

four straight passes

of 10 yards or more – the

last of which was a 29-

yard touchdown strike to

Henning to make it 16-0

with 14 seconds left.

“It’s just not fair,”

McLaughlin said of Henning.

“I mean, that kid

is one of a kind. There is

nothing better than seeing

No. 3 running down the

sidelines. We know that

even when he doesn’t have

those crazy stat lines, he is

going to do something to

help us win. He’s got tremendous

blocking on the

outside, and he knows he

wants all of his other teammates

to succeed, so that’s

what he is going to do.”

The Griffins added on

late in the second quarter,

as defensive lineman

Owen Phaby recovered a

fumble by Dons running

back Julian Schurr. On the

next play, Quinn connected

with Henning on a 13-

yard catch-and-run touchdown

to make it 23-0.

However, on the extrapoint

attempt, East defensive

end Adrian Wilson

was hurt on the play and

would not return the rest

of the game.

On Notre Dame’s first

offensive possession of

the third quarter, the Dons

actively exploited the side

of the field where Wilson

would have been – culminating

in a long drive

that ended with a 1-yard

touchdown run by Schurr

with 2:06 remaining in the

quarter.

Then, late in the fourth

Lincoln-Way East’s Matt Kordas pulls down an interception in the end zone during

the Griffins’ 23-13 win over Notre Dame in a Class 8A second-round game Saturday,

Nov. 9, in Frankfort. Photos by Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

quarter, the Dons scored

on an 11-yard touchdown

pass from Anthony Sayles

to Nick Giamarusti. The

Dons’ two-point attempt

failed, however, making it

23-13 with 1:02 left in the

game.

East recovered the ensuing

onside kick to ice the

game.

Afterward, Zvonar refused

to blame injuries for

the second half shifting in

favor of Notre Dame.

“It had nothing to do

with personnel,” he said.

“It had to do with desire.

There was a lack of intensity

and a lack of intelligence

on some plays. We

just got whipped.

“Maybe it is a blessing

to guard against complacency.

If that is what happened,

I don’t know how

you can get complacent in

the second round of the 8A

playoffs. But maybe, unfortunately,

subconsciously or

whatever, we relaxed with

the big lead. They found

out the hard way that you

Lincoln-Way East’s AJ Henning celebrates after one

of his three touchdowns in the Griffins’ 23-13 win over

Notre Dame.

have to play all 48 minutes.

“We talk about that all the

time … and we only played

24 of them today. We’re

probably fortunate that we

made some special teams

plays early and scored right

at the end of the half, or

who knows what would

have been today.”

McLaughlin shared similar

thoughts.

“We definitely needed

to pick it up in the second

half and play a full 48,”

he said. “A lot of it depended

on what we did. I

don’t think we were ready

for the second half. I think

we needed to come out

stronger – basically, stick

the knife in deeper and

twist it. We just got to be

more feared. They came

out ready the second half.

We just have to come out

stronger.”

This is the fourth straight

year the Griffins have advanced

to the quarterfinals.


frankfortstationdaily.com sports

the frankfort station | November 14, 2019 | 47

fastbreak

Football

Hacha brothers continue family’s big-play legacy

4

steve millar/22nd century

media

1st-and-3

three notes on LW

EAST WINTER SPORTS

1. Boys basketball

It may take some

time for the Griffins

to be at full strength

as they wait for

football players like

Sean McLaughlin

(above) and Ty

Slager. Jhei-R Jones,

Nate Seputis and

Ryan Sierocki are

other leaders in an

experienced group.

2. Girls basketball

The Griffins must

replace some key

pieces from a 19-10

team in 2018-19.

Olivia Molnar and

Reilly Sheehan have

some experience at

guard. Senior Andie

Perch is an inside

presence at 6-foot-1.

3. Others to watch

The Griffins

cheerleaders are

defending state

champs. The girls

bowling and girls

gymnastics teams

are both coming off

state appearances.

STEVE MILLAR, Sports Editor

Lincoln-Way East seniors Jalen

and Jaron Hacha saw their older

brother, Jaden, star on the defensive

line for the Griffins, win a

state title in 2017, and go on to

currently play at Illinois State.

He was quite the role model.

“Jaden has really paved the

way,” Jalen Hacha said. “He’s

worked really hard. Jaron is following

in his footsteps, he works

his butt off every day in practice. I

look up to both of them.”

Unlike Jaden and Jaron, who

are both large defensive linemen,

Jalen is a slender, speedy defensive

back.

But he sure has the knack for

big plays that seems to run in the

family. Jalen made two of them on

special teams in the first quarter of

the Griffins’ 23-13 Class 8A second-round

win over Niles Notre

Dame on Saturday, Nov. 9.

First, after the Notre Dame

punter fumbled while attempting

to punt out of his own end zone,

Jalen hopped on the loose ball at

the Dons’ 4-yard line.

That set up a 1-yard touchdown

run by AJ Henning.

“Jake Kramer was in on it and

he got the punter scared,” Jalen

said. “He dropped it, I saw the ball

get knocked out of the end zone,

and I had to go get it.”

Just 33 seconds later, Notre

Dame tried to punt out of its

end zone again and Jalen Hacha

was there yet again. This time,

he blocked the punt and the ball

sailed out of the back of the end

zone for a safety.

It was his second blocked

punt of the season, adding to one

against Sandburg.

Lincoln-Way East defensive back Jalen Hacha defends against Notre

Dame on Saturday, Nov. 9. He blocked a punt for a safety and recovered

a fumble in the Griffins’ 23-13 win. JULIE MCMANN/22ND CENTURY MEDIA

Lincoln-Way East’s Jaron Hacha (97) makes a tackle against Bradley-

Bourbonnais earlier this season. 22ND CENTURY MEDIA FILE PHOTO

“That was fun,” Jalen said. “I

was untouched. Kramer was also

in on that one, too, and helped. I

just got there.

“We’ve got to help our offense

out. If we come out here and

make a big play, it gets everyone

pumped up and it encourages the

offense to go out and do what they

have to do.”

Jaron Hacha was sure excited

for his brother.

“I was on the sideline jumping

up and down,” Jaron said. “I love

my brother and I’m so proud of

him.”

The big special-teams plays

were a big spark for East.

“Those were huge,” East coach

Rob Zvonar said. “We went after

the punts, got one, they muffed

one, those added up to some big

points there.”

Jalen Hacha said the Griffins

are always sure to devote a good

amount of attention to special

teams in practice.

“You can make big plays and

change the whole game on special

teams, so we work really hard at

it and we came out here and executed,”

he said.

Jaron Hacha, meanwhile, was

a key cog in the defensive line as

the Griffins put together another

strong game on that side of the

ball. He had a key tackle for loss

in the fourth quarter.

All week long, the Griffins

heard how great the Notre Dame

defense was as the Dons came

in allowing just 11.8 points per

game. East wanted to show what it

can do on the defensive side.

“There was a lot of trash talk,

but we don’t like to do a lot of

talking back,” Jaron said. “We like

to talk with our pads on, face to

face.”

The Hachas hope to continue

to make big plays as the Griffins

charge deeper into the playoffs.

They know that they will always

have their brothers to support

them.

“We’ve all been pretty close,”

Jalen said. “We all have each other’s

backs, no matter what. We’re

always happy for each other.”

Listen Up

“It’s just not fair. I mean, that kid is one of a kind. There is nothing better than seeing

No. 3 running down the sidelines.”

Sean McLaughlin – LW East senior defensive end and Northwestern recruit, on

watching senior receiver and Michigan recruit AJ Henning

tunE in

Girls Swimming, 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 16

LW Central Sectional

• The Griffins, Knights and Warriors all compete

and each team should send several swimmers to

state.

Index

43 - This Week In

42 - Athlete of the Week

FASTBREAK is compiled by Sports Editor

Steve Millar, s.millar@22ndcm.com.


Frankfort’s Hometown Newspaper | November 14, 2019

SHOOTOUT WIN

Providence piles up points to

knock off Crete-Monee, Page 44

FRANKFORT FANATICS

Diehard LW East fans don’t let

age quiet their cheers, Page 42

Fast start helps Griffins overcome

sluggish finish in second-round win

over Notre Dame, Page 46

Lincoln-Way East offensive lineman Alec Ogarek lifts up AJ Henning after one of Henning’s three touchdowns in the Griffins’ 23-13 win over Notre Dame in a Class 8A

second-round game Saturday, Nov. 9, in Frankfort. JULIE MCMANN/22ND CENTURY MEDIA

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