HO_111419

22ndcenturymedia

HO_111419

Homer Glen’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper HomerHorizonDaily.com • November 14, 2019 • Vol. 14 No. 42 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

For veterans

Veterans Day ceremony

salutes service

members at Konow’s

Corn Maze, Page 5

Vehicle crash

and ‘warning

shot’ Person flees

their vehicle after

driving into pole,

homeowner fires bullet

into ground after they

go on his property,

Page 7

Mike Hike 5K supports veterans, continues to grow in its ninth year, Page 3

The 2019 Mike Hike 5K Run/Walk runners begin the 3.1-mile course on Nov. 9, a brisk yet beautiful Saturday morning in Homer Glen.

Laurie Fanelli/ 22nd Century Media

Getting going

Shorewood Home

& Auto celebrates

ceremonial

groundbreaking,

Page 7


2 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon calendar

homerhorizondaily.com

In this week’s

Horizon

Sound Off.....................13

Faith Briefs....................16

Dining Out....................19

Puzzles..........................20

Home of the Week.........23

Classifieds................ 24-34

Sports...................... 35-40

The Homer

Horizon

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

Thomas Czaja, x12

tom@homerhorizon.com

Assistant editor

Abhinanda Datta, x15

a.datta@22ndcenturymedia.com

Sales director

Julie McDermed, x21

j.mcdermed@22ndcenturymedia.com

real estate sales

Courtney Masinter ext 47

c.masinter@22ndcenturymedia.com

classifieds/Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

bill@opprairie.com

president

Andrew Nicks

a.nicks@22ndcenturymedia.com

EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

n.burgan@22ndcenturymedia.com

22 nd Century Media

11516 West 183rd Street

Unit SW Office Condo #3

Orland Park, IL 60467

www.HomerHorizon.com

Chemical- free printing on

30% recycled paper

circulation inquiries

circulation@22ndcenturymedia.com

The Homer Horizon

(USPS #25577)

is published weekly by

22nd Century Media, LLC,

11516 W. 183rd Pl.

Unit SW, Office Condo #3

Orland Park, IL 60467

and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER, Send changes to:

The Homer Horizon

11516 W. 183rd Pl.

Unit SW, Office Condo #3

Orland Park, IL 60467

Published by

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Abhinanda Datta

Assistant Editor

Saturday

Code Ninjas - Grand

Opening Celebration

10 a.m. Nov. 16, 14236

S. Bell Road, Homer Glen.

After months of planning

and anticipation, Code

Ninjas will be celebrating

the official opening of its

center and they want you

to be there. Bring your

family and friends for a

fun-filled day of gamebuilding

sessions, robotics,

STEM activities,

treats, prizes, airbrush tattoos,

and more. To RSVP,

visit cognitoforms.com/

CodeNinjas27/

Monday

Six Wives of Henry VIII

7-8 p.m. Monday, Nov.

18, Homer Township

Public Library, 14320 W.

151st St., Homer Glen.

Six women and six stories.

These fascinating women

led equally fascinating

lives, apart from the manner

in which they ended.

Educational entertainer

Martina Mathisen artfully

interweaves tales of power,

personality, and politics.

Do these six famous

wives deserve their popular

labels? Meet the six

wives and decide for yourself.

For more information,

call (708) 301-7908.

Tuesday

Cold Blooded Creatures

6:30 p.m. Tuesday,

Nov. 19, Homer Township

Public Library, 14320

W. 151st St., Homer Glen.

See and touch alligators,

snakes, lizards and a tortoise.

Come explore the

world of reptiles with Jim

Nesci. Learn the latest information

and hear some

funny stories about Jim’s

adventures with reptiles.

The reptiles, brought to

this one of a kind hands-on

experience, are all userfriendly.

No registration

required. For more information,

call (708) 301-

7908.

UPCOMING

22CM’s 10th Annual

Cheers to Charity

6-10 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.

26, Rock Bottom Restaurant

& Brewery, 16156

S. LaGrange Road, Orland

Park. Bring a new,

unwrapped toy for Toy

Box Connection or three

canned food items for Orland

Township Food Pantry

and get $5 off the bill

through Dec. 20 or order a

glass of Rudolph the Prairie

Red and 25 cents will

benefit he Orland Township

Food Pantry. The

pantry also is to receive

10 percent of all sales on

Nov. 26 from 6-10 p.m.

For more information, call

(708) 226-0021.

It’s Christmas Time In

The City: Chicago and Its

Yule Contributions and

Traditions

2-3 p.m. Friday, Dec.

6, Homer Township Public

Library, Community

Meeting Room, 14320

W. 151st St. One of Chicago’s

earliest industries

was Christmas trees and

wreaths, and Chicagoans

have contributed some of

the most beloved holiday

songs. These tidbits only

scratch the surface when

it comes to Chicago’s

role in all things Yule. To

learn more, join Clarence

Goodman at this event.

For more information and

to register, visit homerlibrary.org

or call (708)

301-7908.

Christmas on the Prairie

2-6 p.m. Saturday, Dec.

7, Annunciation Byzantine

Catholic Church, 14610

S. Will Cook Road. At

Annunciation Byzantine

Catholic Church, the celebration

of the feast of St.

Nicholas — which occurs

on Dec. 6 each year — is

a venerable tradition. Attendees

will have an opportunity

to learn about

the true story of the original

St. Nicholas and what

Christmas on the prairie

might have been like for

the early settlers. The indoor/outdoor

event will

take place on Annunciation’s

rolling 10 acres of

restored prairie. There will

be frontier era Christmas

crafts for children, homemade

Christmas bake sale

items and a visit with St.

Nicholas where attendees

can get a ride on his horsedrawn

carriage. Those who

attend will experience the

mystical beauty of a Byzantine

Church. For more

information, visit byzan

tinecatholic. com or call

(708) 645-0241.

Homer For The Holidays

4:30-7:30 p.m. Saturday,

Dec. 7, Homer Glen Village

Hall, 14240 W. 151st

St. The Village of Homer

Glen hosts its Christmas

tree lighting ceremony and

more. There will be photos

with Santa Claus, holiday

crafts, a new light display,

live music, seasonal refreshments

and a chance to

enter to win the Dress Your

Pet Holiday Costume Contest.

For more information,

visit homerglenil.org, or

call (708) 301-0632.

Second Santa Paws Craft

and Vendor Show

10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday,

Dec. 8, Orchard Valley

Golf Course, 2411 W. Illinois

Ave., Aurora. There

will be a craft a vendor

show, along with a raffle

that will have its proceeds

go toward TLC Animal

Shelter in Homer Glen.

The event is free admission

and pet friendly. For

more information, visit tl

canimalshelter.org.

Seasonal Celebration

4-5:30 p.m. Sunday,

Dec. 8, Homer Township

Public Library, 14320

W. 151st St. Guests can

dress in their holiday finest

to join for this family

event. There will be

crafts, games, prize wheel,

snack station, Santa, Snow

White and Ollie the Snow.

Attendees are encouraged

to bring their cameras for

photos. The event is all

ages; ages 6 and under

must be accompanied with

an adult. For more information,

visit homerlibrary.

org or call (708) 301-7908.

Winter Band Concert

7-8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec.

10, Homer Jr. High, 15711

S. Bell Road. The sixthgrade

Concert and Symphonic

Bands will perform

LIST IT YOURSELF

Reach out to thousands of daily

users by submitting your event at

HomerHorizon.com/calendar

For just print*, email all information to

a.datta@22ndcenturymedia.com

*Deadline for print is 5 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication.

their winter concert in the

gym.

“The Grinch” Holiday

Movie and Craft

11-11:30 a.m. Saturday,

Dec. 14, Homer Township

Public Library, 14320

W. 151st St. Enjoy light

refreshments and make a

craft while watching the

animated “The Grinch

Who Stole Christmas”

movie. Runtime is 26

minutes. There is no registration

for the event but

a limit of 30 guests. For

more information, visit

homerlibrary.org or call

(708) 301-7908.

ONGOING

Flag Drop-Off

Through Nov. 15, Michelle

Kerfin State Farm

Office, 14051 S. Bell

Road, Homer Glen. Drop

off your old and worn

American flags, and they

will be disposed off with

the respect they deserve.

For more information,

email ekerfin@comcast.

net.

Art Display Presented by

Prairie Art Studio

8:30 a.m.-9 p.m.

Through Nov. 27, Homer

Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St., Homer

Glen. All are invited to

a special art exhibition

with student art pieces.

For more information on

the display, call (708) 301-

7908.


homerhorizondaily.com news

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 3

Participants run/walk for vets at 2019 Mike Hike 5K

3

Money raised to

honor local heroes

with landmarks

Laurie Fanelli

Freelance Reporter

Veterans Day weekend

is a perfect time to reflect

on the service and sacrifice

of past and present

members of the military.

While running or walking

a 3.1-mile course on

the morning of Saturday,

Nov. 9, approximately 300

participants of the Mike

Hike 5K Run/Walk —

named after local soldier

Michael C. Olivieri, who

lost his life while serving

in Iraq in 2011 — had ample

time to put themselves

in the shoes of veterans.

The event not only provided

this unique experience;

it also raised money

for the Homer Glen Foundation

and its mission to

honor local heroes with a

variety of monuments and

landmarks.

“The renderings for

Veterans Memorial Plaza

at Heritage Park are being

put together now, and we

are hopeful that the proceeds

from the Mike Hike

will help sponsor that memorial

in the park,” Homer

Glen Foundation President

Kathy Young said. “I

love this event, first and

foremost, because we’re

remembering and honoring

Michael Olivieri. His

family is very involved.

They’re here, they’re part

of the Homer Glen Foundation

and they help organize

this from start to

finish.”

Along with volunteers

from the Homer Glen Junior

Woman’s Club and

the Homer Glen Foundation,

members of Pfc. Michael

C. Olivieri American

Legion Post 2011

— Homer Glen’s first

American Legion which

was established earlier

this year — were there to

support the Mike Hike and

its mission. Matt Ziska,

one of the event’s organizers

and a childhood friend

of Olivieri, expressed his

gratitude for the group’s

involvement.

“We have Post 2011 —

who just opened a new

American Legion Post

at Marian Village — out

here today. They helped

sponsor the event, and

we’re really excited to

have them involved. It’s

great to have a presence

of veterans here,” Ziska

said. “We could not be

more thankful and grateful

to have them come out

here and spend their time

with us.”

Neighbors also came out

in droves to either participate

in the 5K or to cheer

on runners and walkers

as they made their way

through the streets Olivieri

used to run growing up in

Homer Glen.

“It’s amazing,” Ziska

said. “Every year, we see

new faces, and it’s a great

turnout. It shows the support

our community has

not only for Mike and the

sacrifices he made, but for

all of our veterans. This

community is so strong,

and it’s incredible to see

how they’ve come together

to throw their support

behind this event.”

Homer Glen resident

Jesse Wright and his

9-year-old son, Jackson,

were among the newcomers

to this year’s race.

“We live in the neighborhood

here, and we want

to support the Mike Hike,”

Jesse said.

The Lockport AFJROTC presents the colors during the Mike Hike 5K Run/Walk opening

ceremony Saturday, Nov. 9, in Homer Glen. Photos by Laurie Fanelli/ 22nd Century Media

First-place male finisher Connor Williams makes his way down Heroes Trail near the

end of the Mike’s Hike 5K Run/Walk.

Jackson added, “It’s my

first 5K, but I’ve run before,

a Color Run thing

that was so long.”

Prior to the step-off of

the 5K, which started and

finished on the Michael C.

Olivieri Trail near St. Bernard’s

Catholic Church,

event organizers hosted

an opening ceremony. The

Lockport AFJROTC presented

the colors, and Bob

Russell of American Legion

Post 2011 and Congressman

Dan Lipinski,

who also ran the course,

joined Ziska and Young

in making a few remarks.

The ceremony concluded

with a round of cheers and

applause for all the veterans

in attendance.

“Gratitude is my attitude

this morning,” Young

said from the stage. Earlier,

she explained that

she was thankful for the

support of so many community

groups, sponsors

and everyone who

helped to make the event a

success.

“We’ve got several new

sponsors, and our benchmark

classic sponsors.

The best thing about this is

we’ve got our core people,

but we always bring in

new sponsors. It’s exciting

for them, too, because they

haven’t experienced the

Mike Hike,” Young said.

“Also, this year especially,

I want to thank the Homer

Glen Foundation Board

and the volunteers that

help support and put this

together. It’s a big process.

We start this in June, and to

see it all come together is

great. I really want to call

out and thank the members

of the Homer Glen

Foundation Board and the

volunteers that make this

happen.”

Following the 5K, a ceremony

was held awarding

first-place male finisher,

Connor Williams, firstplace

female finisher, Lauren

Williams and the winners

of all the categories.

Looking out at all the

smiling faces, Young explained

that she is already

looking forward to the

2020 Mike Hike.

“I’m grateful for the

community that lifts us up,

and hopefully everyone

comes out for the 10th year

next year,” Young said.

For information about

supporting the Homer

Glen Foundation, visit

homerglenfoundation.

com.


4 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon homer glen

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homerhorizondaily.com news

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 5

Those who served honored at Veterans Day ceremony at Konow’s

Mary Compton

Freelance Reporter

As the Will County

Sheriff’s Office color

guard walked down the

middle aisle of a tent at

Konow’s Corn Maze in

Homer Glen, 93-year-old

Wade J. Krohn stood up

and saluted.

The World War II veteran

was not going to miss

this day.

“So many served in

WWII and never came

back,” Krohn said. “I had

several friends that never

came home. It’s hard to

explain.”

Krohn was one of the

many veterans at the local

farm on Sunday, Nov.

10, a day ahead of Veterans

Day at the event meant

to honor and recognize all

who have served.

“I served on one of the

biggest islands near Japan,”

Krohn said. “There’s

not many of us left today.

I’m happy to be here. This

is the land of the proud.

We’re all Americans.”

While the Will County

Sheriff’s color guard finished

posting the colors,

an empty table sat nearby.

It was a missing person

table representing the men

and women who did not

return home from service.

Michael Meyers, commander

of the Lockport

American Legion Post

18, welcomed everyone.

The Marines veteran stood

proud as he looked at the

nearly 300 people who attended

the event.

“Today was a joint venture

with the [Veterans of

Foreign Wars Post 5788],

the Village of Homer Glen

and Konow’s,” Meyers explained.

“Everyone came

out today to make sure we

let the veterans know they

are appreciated.”

Standing next to Meyers

was EJ Errico, a member

of the Lockport VFW Post

5788 who is quartermaster

and a past commander.

Both Meyers and Errico

have sons who served in

the military.

“My son is in Fort Hood

now,” Errico said. “I just

wish my dad could be here

today. He served in the Air

Force. Every time we have

this, we have a lot of veterans

that show up, as well

as the Boy Scouts. It’s our

day.”

“You look out and see

when these men and women

were 17 or 18 years old,

they raised their right hand

and wrote a blank check to

the country,” Meyers added.

“I’m proud of every

one of them.”

At one point in the ceremony,

Homer Glen Mayor

George Yukich thanked

the veterans, as well.

“This is very big today,”

Yukich said. “... You can’t

ask for better people. Every

day, they’re giving

their lives for us. I thank

God every day for veterans.”

As the service came to

an end, lunch was served.

There were also cards left

on the tables for attendees

to sign. Each card would

be sent to a member of

military personnel serving.

Keith Carberry, commander

of VFW Post

Wade J. Krohn, a 93-year-old World War II veteran,

applauds other veterans during the Veterans Day

ceremony held Sunday, Nov. 10, at Konow’s Corn Maze

in Homer Glen. Mary Compton/22nd Century Media

5788, walked around and

thanked veterans for their

service.

“I served in the Marine

Corps.,” Carberry said.

“Every day, we wake up

with freedoms that most

2

countries never had. It’s

our veterans that provided

that. There still doing that

today, whether it’s here or

abroad. It’s a fight that we

are constantly committed

to.”


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homerhorizondaily.com

Former LTHS teacher’s daughter featured in American Girl catalog

Sean Hastings

Contributing Editor

Four-year-old Ivy Kimble

may not know it yet,

but her being featured in

the October American Girl

catalog has sparked an international

conversation

about inclusion.

She sees herself in

the magazine and says

“oh, wow,” and tells her

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teacher, that she remembers

the photo shoot. But

like most 4-year-olds, she

is one activity to the next.

Ivy has Down syndrome.

And to make her magazine

feature more special

— October is Down Syndrome

Awareness Month.

And before her celeb debut,

Ivy has always been

one to light up a room with

her magnetic personality.

Anyone who meets her

has an instant connection,

Kristin said.

Kristin has been overwhelmed

by the support

and love her family has

received.

“For me, it just goes to

show you that anyone can

do anything, and anyone

can be anything,” she said.

“Look at Ivy at 4 years old

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and what she has started.”

And back in April and

May when the process

started, Kristin did not

think much about what

the possibility of having

a child with Down syndrome

in the magazine

would do. Just like the

countless number of other

parents who sent in photos

of their children, then the

hundreds of others who

were asked back to the

casting call, she thought it

would just be a great experience

for her daughters.

Kristin heard about the

opportunity through a

group she is a part of called

Gigi’s Playhouse. She and

her husband, Chris, served

on the board.

Ivy has two older sisters,

Lyla, 9, and Ruby, 8,

who also went to the Chicago

casting call. Ivy has a

younger sister, Violet, who

is 10 months.

Lyla and Ruby, though

they were not selected to

be featured in the magazine,

could not be happier

and more supportive of

their “baby,” Kristin said.

“My girls are very

close,” she said. “... They

adore her, and they are very

protective of her, so they

are very excited about it.

“They’re kind of always

on the defense with Ivy,

kind of waiting for someone

to say something negative.

Not to say that always

happens, but I think

they’re always waiting to

spin in positively and teach

their school friends about

it. October is Down Syndrome

Awareness Month.

My oldest always reads

a book to her classmates

about Down syndrome

and teaches them about it

because that is what she

wants to do.”

She added her girls were

going nuts about it and

bringing the magazine

Ivy Kimble (right), 4, sits with another American Girl

model for October’s issue. October is Down Syndrome

Awareness Month. Photo Submitted

to school to show their

friends.

Even at 9 and 8, the two

are keeping the conversation

about inclusion going.

Something Kristin hopes

that will not require any

effort to have soon.

“It’s awesome that companies

are making the effort

to do it, but I think we need

to work toward where it is

not an effort anymore,” she

said. “We’re seeing it everywhere

where we don’t

have to celebrate it so much.

That’s the goal, for sure.”

And the conversation

will not stop there, as Ivy

will be on the cover of

the November catalog of

American Girl.

“It’s just super exciting,”

Kristin said. “I can’t

imagine how much further

this is going to go. I didn’t

even think it would go this

far. It just keeps getting

better and better.”

Aside from Ivy being

featured in American Girl

and sparking conversation

about inclusion with Down

syndrome, Kristin said it is

important for everyone to

be seen in the world.

“Anyone with unique

qualities needs to be a part

of our society, especially

with kids growing up,” she

said. “Even with my other

girls, it’s just as important

for them to see Ivy out

there as it is for Ivy.”

And after spreading

word and raising awareness

through Gigi’s Playhouse,

this has given the

Kimbles a new platform

to continue to do so with

“endless possibilities.”

For the entire family,

this whole experience has

been “full circle.”

When Ivy was about 10

days old, she became sick

and got put in the hospital

and had a Respiratory Syncytial

Virus and had a hard

time breathing.

She got transferred to

Lurie Children’s Hospital.

And at 5 and 4 years old,

Lyla and Ruby missed

their mom and sister, who

were gone for a little bit

too long for their liking.

Kristin’s mother took

the two girls to American

Girl to cheer them up.

“It was funny because

in Ivy’s hospital room,

we could see Water Tower

Place, we could see American

Girl,” Kristin said. “I

was happy that they were

going and getting cheered

up, but I was also sad because

I wish Ivy could go,

too. I said, ‘One day, we’ll

go to the store and you can

get a doll.’ It’s cheesy, but

that’s what we thought.

And now, she’s in the magazine.

It’s kind of just full

circle.”


homerhorizondaily.com news

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 7

Homeowner reportedly

fires ‘warning shot’ at

driver who fled into his

yard after auto crash

Thomas Czaja, Editor

7

A local homeowner fired

a “warning shot” to scare

off a driver fleeing a crash

who had run into his backyard

where his children

were playing on Nov. 5,

according to a press release

issued Thursday,

Nov. 7, by Will County

Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman

Kathy Hoffmeyer.

Deputies reportedly responded

around 4 p.m.

to a personal injury crash

and learned en route shots

were fired in the area of

151st Street and Hillary

Lane in Homer Glen.

When they arrived, fire

personnel were with two

injured people, a 16-yearold

girl and 19-year-old

man, who were taken to

AMITA Health Adventist

Medical Center in Bolingbrook

to be treated for injuries

described as not lifethreatening.

The deputies also found

a 2017 Nissan Sentra at the

crash site that had struck a

ComEd pole and cracked

it, police said.

Multiple witnesses told

police they were driving

on 151st Street when they

saw the Sentra speeding

erratically while improperly

passing other vehicles.

The witnesses also

reportedly saw the driver

lose control of the vehicle,

which left the roadway,

struck a culvert, went airborne

and struck the utility

pole. They then watched

the driver flee the crash on

foot.

Deputies established a

perimeter of the area and

sent out K9s to try to find

the driver but were unsuccessful,

according to the

press release.

During their search,

deputies spoke to a homeowner

on the 15000 block

of 151st Street, who told

them while he was in

his garage, the Nissan

crashed into the pole,

which is near his yard,

police said. The homeowner

went to see if the

passengers in the car

were OK when the driver

ran out of the vehicle into

the backyard, where the

homeowner’s young children

were playing.

Fearing the safety of his

children, the homeowner

allegedly fired his handgun

into the ground near

his feet as a warning to the

driver, who then took off

running.

Sheriff’s deputies went

to the hospital and spoke

with the two injured passengers,

and the case remains

under investigation,

per the release.

Hoffmeyer did not return

a request for further

comment.

For more on this and other

Breaking News, visit Homer

HorizonDaily.com.

Shorewood Home & Auto has groundbreaking

Thomas Czaja, Editor

Shorewood Home &

Auto has come a long way

from when it first opened

as a hardware store in

1974.

From their original

Shorewood location, they

opened up a second spot

in Crete in 2008 before

acquiring Circle Tractor

this past January in Homer

Glen, which was a John

Deere dealership. After

arriving in Homer, they

realized the space they

acquired was not right for

their vision.

“Our brand is a lot of

display, a nice big service

shop area, so we decided

that building would not

work for us there and decided

to look for land or

a building,” co-owner Kaj

Moyer said.

As a result, they found

their spot for a new

27,000-square-foot facility

at 13639 159th St. that

they celebrated with a ceremonial

groundbreaking

on Oct. 30 with Village of

Homer Glen officials. The

plan is for the new building

to be ready this coming

July or August.

“I think what we are

most looking forward to

is being able to show our

whole portfolio of items,”

Moyer said of the business,

which over the years

evolved into selling lawn

mowers, power equipment,

utility vehicles,

snowblowers, ATVs, trailers

and more, with John

Deere still one of its biggest

brands.

Moyer is confident when

open that the new store

will be “an experience a

customer can’t really get

elsewhere,” from all the

things available, plus the

service and parts departments.

Moyer added the full

The Moyer family, owners of Shorewood Home & Auto, join with Village of Homer

Glen officials on Oct. 30 for a ceremonial groundbreaking for where the business is

slated to open next summer in town. Thomas Czaja/22nd Century Media

service department will

have factory trained technicians,

and that they will

service everything they

sell. Even things they do

not sell customers can inquire

about to see if they

will work on them.

“The big thing was

there was an existing John

Deere dealership,” Moyer

said of their decision

to initially come to the

Please see shorewood, 8

Get in before Boo-Boo

needs to go out.

Ride Metra to work and play, and you can rest easy, knowing our 95%

on-time performance will get you home right when you want.See

whyMetra ismade for families (with and without fur) at metrarail.com.


8 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon news

homerhorizondaily.com

Pop Up Show features a mixture of art at Countryside Bank

Arts Guild of Homer

Glen still searches

for its permanent

home in village

Mary Compton

Freelance Reporter

Barbara Iovinelli,

branch manager from

Countryside Bank, has

always gotten involved

in the Homer Glen community.

So, it was no surprise

when they offered to

host and sponsor the Arts

Guild of Homer Glen Pop

Up Show.

“Events like this help

our business grow,”

Iovinelli said. “We open

up our bank to the community.

Tonight, we

opened up the bank to

the Arts Guild of Homer

Glen. We always try and

take part in the Homer

Glen community so

they get to know who

we are.”

The Oct. 25 show included

eight artists, from

photography to a fairy

house and oil paints in between.

Sandra Harney, president

of the Arts Guild of

Homer Glen, gave an update

on what is new in the

guild.

“We haven’t found a

permanent home yet,”

Harney said. “We’re looking

for sponsorships and

grants to help achieve

that.”

Harney said they are

looking for area businesses

to help with pop

up nights where art is

brought in and the public

is invited to view and meet

the artists, just like the

show Countryside Bank

hosted.

“Tonight, we’re in a

borrowed space, which is

our bank,” Harney said.

“We’re after hours, where

most of the art pieces are

for sale. We have a mosaic

artist, ceramic artist,

a jewelry artist, an

abstract painter and two

photographers and two

painters.”

One of the most popular

pieces was a fairy house

made from recycled items

which was made by jewelry

artist Judy Prunty, from

Homer Glen.

“This is a mixed media

piece with found and recycled

objects,” Harney

said. “This is so imaginative;

she made all the

characters with polymer

clay.”

While guests surrounded

her art pieces

and fairy house, Prunty

was surprised with all

the attention. The new

member of Arts Guild of

Homer Glen is meeting

many friends and is in

collaboration with a photographer

to design other

pieces.

“The fairy house started

with a liter bottle of

Coke and cardboard,”

Prunty laughed. “I just

started cutting it out and

putting tape on it until it

became the structure that

it is. The more I worked

with it, I added the moss.

If you were to imagine

being a fairy and what

a fairy would find in

the woods, it was made

out of natural materials

as much as I could. I

work as the spirit moves

me.”

For first-time artist

Beata Nowak, from Homer

Glen, she brought her

works of abstract intuitive

paintings.

“I just joined Arts Guild

of Homer Glen in September,”

Nowak said. “I’ve

drawn for as long as I can

remember. I’m enjoying

seeing everyone else’s

work and meeting all the

other artists.”

As the bank lobby filled

up with several artists and

friends of artists, Cheryl

McGugan, from Homer

Glen, noticed all ages

talking about art.

“Art brings generations

together,” McGugan

said. “Everybody

needs creativity in their

life.”

For more information

on the Arts Guild

of Homer Glen, visit

artsguildofhomerglen.org.

RIGHT: Tyler Harney,

a Homer Glen resident

and a member of the

Arts Guild of Homer

Glen, shows off one of

his works during the

show. Behind Harney are

original photographs he

brought for the event.

Judy Prunty (right), of Homer Glen, and a new member of the Arts Guild of Homer

Glen, shows her fairy house to Mike and Judy Jamrisko during a Pop Up Show/sale

held Oct. 25 at Countryside Bank in Homer Glen. Prunty made the fairy house from

recycled materials. Photos by Mary Compton/22nd Century Media

shorewood

From Page 7

community. “We pegged

the Homer Glen location

as a viable location to kind

of complete the triangle,

I guess you could say, of

Will County and the South

Side of Chicago to have a

full range of dealerships all

along the south suburbs.”

Something that will be

new at the Homer Glen

store not at their other two

locations will be a covered

area outside the building for

their service department, so

if there is inclement weather,

customers will be able

to pull up and unload what

they need worked on out of

the elements.

Shorewood Home &

Auto has come a long way

from the original hardware

store — which still exists

in Shorewood — that was

originally opened by Kaj’s

father, Marc. Whether

customers come in to buy

Stihl, Honda Power Equipment

and Echo products

or something from their

smaller lines, the Moyers

eagerly anticipate seeing

the new store in action

once ready.

“We try to stock every

single model on the floor

so customers can come

in, sit on them, have areas

where you can test them,

drive them,” Moyer said.

“We’re looking forward

to the new building, for

sure. It’s the first time we

ever really built a building

around power equipment.”

For more information on

Shorewood Home & Auto,

visit shorewoodhomeand

auto.com.


homerhorizondaily.com homer glen

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 9

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10 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon homer glen

homerhorizondaily.com

Mistletoe

Market

PRESENTED BY

22ND CENTURY MEDIA

AND COLLEEN MCLAUGHLIN,

THE MCLAUGHLIN TEAM,

COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

4–8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5,

Orland Park Crossing,

14225 95th Ave. Orland Park

Former Charming Charlie's

space (North Pole)

Former The Dailey Method

space (South Pole)

FREE ADMISSION

FAMILIES WELCOME

Vendors Include

This event will feature:

• 70+ vendor booths to finish your holiday shopping!

• Santa, Mrs. Claus and an elf - bring your camera

(4-8 p.m.) - North Pole

• Live reindeer (5-8 p.m.) - North Pole

• Live Ice Carving with Chef Michael McGreal

of Joliet Junior College Culinary Arts

(5:30 p.m.) - South Pole

• Sandburg Chamber Singers (5:30-6:30 p.m.)

• Enter to win a chance to see Andy Grammar

LIVE at WeishFest, or Broadway in Chicago tickets!

• Bring a new, unwrapped toy for our Toy Drive!

• Free tote bag to first 200 people, courtesy of

Artistic Med Spa!

• Paint your own ornament with DIY Sign Party ($5-$8)

• Holiday makeovers with Von Maur!

• 22nd Century Media

• 3B’s Mobile Boutique

• A-N-D Bedding

• ARMOR Video & Photo

• Artistic Med Spa

• Avon

• Bare Scrubs by Mary

O’Connor

• Beautycounter

• Between Me, You, and

The Wall

• Brannigan Chiropractic

• ChoVonne Accessories

• Colleen McLaughlin, The

McLaughlin Team, Coldwell

Banker Residential

Sponsors

• Coldwell Banker Residential

Brokerage & Neighborhood

Loans

• Color Street - Tracy

Swanson, independent stylist

• Comfy Threads Boutique

• Crafts by Rosemary

• DIY Sign Party

• doTERRA

• Dykstra Home Services

• Eagle Sports Range

• Elements by The Odyssey

• Fabulously Sweet Creations

• Four 12 Photography

• Fred Astaire Mokena

• Gemzisle

• Gift Basket by Occasion

• GorJus Whips Body Butter

• Gracie Pie Apothecary

• Hemp Heals Body Shop

• Huaywasi: Handmade in Peru

• Imperfect Produce

• Infinity Scarves by Nancy

• Inspirational Lula Ladies

Tiffany & Sheri (LuLaRoe)

• Inspire Studio Gallery

• Irish Greens

• Jean Lachat Photography

• Jewels 2 U

• Juicy Luzy Sangria

• Just a Spoonful

• Laurie's Fudgelicious

• L’BRI PURE n’ NATURAL

Skin Care

• LegalShield

• Madewithalittlelove

• Mary Kay Cosmetics

• Matilda Jane Clothing

• Mrs. Banton’s Cookies

• NEW YOU CBD

• Norwex

• Nothing Bundt Cake

• Nuturing through Nature

• Oberweis Dairy Home Delivery

• Paparazzi (Glamour Bijoux)

• Parker James Boutique

• Porter Place Memory Care

• Premier Designs Jewelry

• Rock's #1 Gals Jewelry

• RockNmom Art

• Smart Cake Creations

• Sterk Family Law Group, P.C.

• Surprise Parties

• Tastefully Simple

• The Little Red Donut Truck

• Total Life Changes (TLC)

• Totes & Taggies by Melinda

• Usborne Books & More

• Virtue Cider

• Von Maur

• Wakaya Perfection/CBD/KETO

• Wicks & Wax

• Wine, Spirit, Butterbeer Mixes

• Women’s Healthcare of Illinois

• Young Living Essential Oils

(Oily University)

• Younique

AND MORE TO COME!

For more information, call (708) 326-9170 ext. 16 or

visit 22ndCenturyMedia.com/mistletoe


homerhorizondaily.com community

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 11

Photo Op

tm

RECYCLE ONLY THESE ITEMS

Homer Glen resident Jimmy T. Roberson II shared this photo of a “beautiful

October sky over the boys of fall.”

“Lockport Porters getting better every day. #godisgreat #itsgotime,” he wrote with

the photograph submission.

Aluminum, Tin

& Metal Cans


& Containers


& Jars

Have you captured something unique, interesting, beautiful or just plain fun on camera? Submit

a photo for “Photo Op” by emailing it to tom@homerhorizon.com, or mailing it to 11516 W.

183rd St., Office Condo 3 Unit SW, Orland Park, IL, 60467.

Cartons - Milk, Juice,

Broth, Soup & Other

Junk Mail, Glossy

Paper, Magazines


Paper, Envelopes

Jill

TLC Animal Shelter

13016 W. 151st St.

Homer Glen, IL 60491

Jill is a 7-year-old

female beagle. She

is happy go lucky and

just loves people. She

is missing her right

eye, but that does not

bother her one bit.

She is housebroken.

Stop by to meet her

and see just how sweet she is.

Do you want to see your pet pictured as The Homer Horizon’s Pet of the Week? Send

your pet’s photo and a few sentences explaining why your pet is outstanding to Tom at

tom@homerhorizon.com or 11516 W. 183rd St., Office Condo 3, Suite SW, Orland Park,

IL 60467.

Paperboard Boxes -

Cereal, Tissue &

Frozen Food Boxes


Cardboard Boxes

Newspapers, Catalogs,

Phone Books,

Paper Bags

www.mydisposal.com/recycling-basics

YARD WASTE SEASON ENDS NOVEMBER 30.

Serving Chicagoland and NW Indiana for over 60 years

NuWay Disposal • Star Disposal • Kankakee Disposal


12 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon NEWS

homerhorizondaily.com

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Dentist leads Real Men

Wear Pink fundraising

campaign in the southern

suburbs

Whether breast cancer,

prostate cancer, lung cancer,

or any other type of

cancers, today, nearly everyone

has been impacted

by cancer in one way or

another.

For Dr. Ralph Ginn,

dentist at Tinley Park’s

My Care Dental, cancer

has been a part of his life

in many ways. Every day,

he looks for oral cancers

while examining his patients

and, like many others,

he has been called to

support loved ones who

received the diagnosis.

Although he spends

a lot of time educating

people about oral cancers,

Ginn knew he could do

more. Then last year, a

longtime patient educated

him about the American

Cancer Society’s Real

Men Wear Pink campaign,

which happens every year

during Breast Cancer

Awareness Month.

Throughout the month

of October, men who participate

in the Real Men

Wear Pink campaign commit

to wearing pink every

day of the month and raising

$2,500 to support the

American Cancer Society

and its programs.

This year, the south

suburban campaign has

a goal to raise a total

of $50,000. As of press

time, Ginn was leading

the pack, raising almost

$5,000 himself.

“I made sure that this

money stays close to Tinley

Park and helps families

in Tinley Park, because I

truthfully believe that if

you help your neighbor

next to you and hold their

hand, it’s a stronger bond

and it goes on and on from

there,” he said.

Reporting by Amanda Del

Buono, Freelance Reporter.

For more, visit TinleyJunc

tionDaily.com.

FROM THE ORLAND PARK

PRAIRIE

Orland Park man

advocates importance

of CPR after saving

stranger’s life

After saving the life of

a stranger who was in cardiac

arrest on a Swallow

Cliff Woods trail, Thomas

O’Brien, of Orland Park,

is raising awareness on

the importance of being

CPR certified.

Just over a year ago, on

Sept. 14, 2018, Thomas

and his wife, Deb, went

running on the Swallow

Cliff Woods trail at a time

they typically do not run.

During the run, Deb got

ahead of him. As Thomas

was running, he noticed

a man, who would later

be identified as Denis

Fellmann, also of Orland

Park, lying face down on

the trail.

“There was a man lying

face down on the trail,

and he wasn’t moving at

all, so I flipped him over,”

Thomas said. “He wasn’t

breathing and his eyes

weren’t open. He was in

big trouble.”

After rolling him over,

Thomas immediately performed

CPR. Realizing

the severity of the situation,

Thomas dialed 911,

and soon first responders

arrived and transported

Fellmann to the hospital.

Fellmann survived,

thanks in large part to

Thomas’ quick actions.

Since Denis went into

cardiac arrest, Thomas

has realized how important

it is to be CPR certified.

“Outside of the hospital,

cardiac arrest survival

is minimal,” Thomas said.

“Not enough people know

CPR, and it is my mission

to get more people to

know CPR.”

As a result, the

O’Briens’ church, All

Saints Lutheran in Orland

Park, has hosted a few

CPR classes.

Reporting by Alyssa Groh,

Freelance Reporter. For

more, visit OPPrairieDaily.

com.

FROM THE LOCKPORT LEGEND

Fairmont School gets

lesson from state

legislators

In preparation for the

Illinois constitution test,

students at Fairmont

School were given the ultimate

learning tool in the

form of a presentation by

State legislators.

The group of seventhand

eighth-grade students

gathered at noon on Nov.

1 to hear presentations

from State Sen. Jennifer

Bertino-Tarrant, U.S.

Rep. Dan Lipinski and

State Rep. John Connor

on topics of civics and the

process of passing laws.

Bertino-Tarrant opened

the discussion by quizzing

students on the three

branches of government,

the roles of senators and

representatives, and the

purpose of making laws.

Shortly after, Lipinski arrived

and detailed his experiences

on the job, his

trips to Washington, D.C,

and the differences between

creating State and

national laws.

Students were invited to

give suggestions for a law

they would like passed to

complete a scenario in a

“quick law scenario.” The

law chosen to implement

was a $1,000 fine for littering,

reflecting the garbage

service debate with

which residents of Fairmont

have dealt firsthand.

Bertino-Tarrant then

walked students through

the steps it would take to

draft the proposed law,

including getting approval

by Rep. Lipinski and

eventually handing it off

to the governor.

“It’s a complicated process,”

Lipinski explained

to the class, “But it’s set

up that way to get everyone

to agree on making

a new law. People have

lots of different needs and

opinions, and my job is to

find the best way of how

to help them.”

Reporting by Derek Swanson,

Editorial Intern. For

more, visit LockportLegend

Daily.com.

FROM THE MOKENA MESSENGER

Mokena’s own ‘Golden

Girls’ honored for 50

years of service

Three women — Carmen

Smallwood, Joan

Fleckenstein and Virginia

Backhus — attended their

first few meetings of the

then recently formed Mokena

Woman’s Club in

1969.

Fifty years later, at the

club’s Oct. 14 monthly

gathering, these Mokena

residents were recognized

in a surprise celebration

for their golden anniversaries.

“I was flabbergasted,”

Fleckenstein said of the

experience. “I did not expect

it.”

Smallwood had a similar

reaction.

“I was really totally

stunned,” she said. “I

thought, ‘How could they

have done all of this without

us knowing?’ It’s always

an honor when your

fellow club members recognize

you like that.”

Club historian Joann

Jeffers, who also is first

vice president and parliamentary

advisor, went

through many past club

photos and archives to

prepare a scrapbook for

each of the ladies as a

keepsake.

While the club’s future

projects will continue to

Please see NFYN, 13

POLICE REPORTS

Stolen vehicle reportedly found near owner’s home

6

Deputies were dispatched

at 3:30 a.m. on

Oct. 28 to the Pebble

Creek subdivision where

they saw a suspicious vehicle

at the intersection

of Birchdale Drive and

Sandstone Drive by the

14000 block of S. Boulder

Drive, according to

police. The vehicle was

reportedly unlocked, and

the key fob was on the

front seat.

The registered owner

was listed to live on S.

Boulder Drive, police said.

The owner was reportedly

not aware his vehicle was

stolen until deputies came

to his door.

Oct. 28

• Two people were seen

on surveillance stealing

a Toro standing lawn

mower from a storage lot

after entering the Beary

Landscaping property at

15001 W. 159th. St., police

said.

• An unlocked vehicle was

allegedly entered and had

an iPod stolen, as well as

a camera bag containing a

Nikon D500 digital camera

and camera lens in the

14000 block of W. Edinburgh

Court.

Oct. 25

• Stanley Strama, 47, of

10562 Oak Park Avenue

in Chicago Ridge, was

cited for driving while

having a suspended license

at Bell Road and

131st Street.

Oct. 22

• An unlocked vehicle was

reportedly entered and had

a driver’s license and $40

stolen from it in the 13000

block of W. Colt Drive.

Editor’s note: The Homer

Horizon’s police reports

come from the Will County

Sheriff’s Department’s

online news bulletin service.

Anyone listed in these

reports is considered to be

innocent of all charges until

proven guilty in a court of

law.


homerhorizondaily.com sound off

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 13

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

From HomerHorizonDaily.com from

Monday, Nov. 11.

1. UPDATE: Missing Tinley Park woman

found safe

2. The Dish: Trio of friends collaborate to

open Tavern in the Glen

3. Partners revitalize Megaplex, speak on

latest and upcoming offerings

4. Make-A-Wish celebrates first-grader at

Young School

5. Homeowner reportedly fires ‘warning

shot’ at driver who fled into his yard after

crash

Become a Horizon Plus member: homerhorizon.com/plus

“163rd Street Drainage Project is Complete!

Good Job Guys!”

Homer Township Road District, from Friday,

Nov. 8.

Like The Homer Horizon: facebook.com/homerhorizon

“What a day! Started at 8am in Homer Glen &

finished @ 10pm in Oak Brook. When you LOVE

what you do, you dont get tired. Your voice might

hurt & your body is sore but the kids willingness to

learn & want to GET BETTER fuels you. Thanks to

all the parents & players for a great day!”

@BreakawayBball, Breakaway Basketball, from

Nov. 3.

Follow The Homer Horizon: @homerhorizon

From the Editor

Honoring vets on Veterans Day and each day

Thomas Czaja

tom@homerhorizon.com

Each year, Veterans

Day is a specific

day allowing us to

focus on saluting and honoring

all those veterans in

our own lives, as well as

ones we encounter on our

paths.

Because no matter

whether a veteran is a

loved one or a stranger,

they made the same sacrifice,

giving years of their

life to protect us and the

freedoms and values which

we hold most dear. We

likely all have had at least

NFYN

From Page 12

serve the changing needs

of the times — especially

in the areas of education,

scholarships, politics and

charitable giving for the

community — the focus

will stay the same as it has

always been in the past.

“Our Mokena Woman’s

Club motto is, ‘Where

community service and

friendship meet,’ and we

really hold true to that,”

Jeffers said. “One person

can do a little, but a whole

group of people can do a

lot. Our focus has always

been service, and the reward

from that service is

the friendships that are

formed.”

one or two family members,

friends or acquaintances

who have served,

and they continue to

inspire us, not only while

they are active duty, but

from forever thereon.

It is nice to see the different

ways veterans get

recognized. In this issue,

we highlight the big two

events that took place in

the town on the weekend

before Veterans Day.

The first is the Mike

Hike 5K Run/Walk, which

can be found on our cover

and Page 3 of this issue.

The race continues to honor

Pfc. Michael Olivieri, a

Homer Glen man who died

while serving in Iraq in

2011. Continuing to honor

his memory, it is awesome

to see the event still going

strong and one people

enjoy going to, as it holds

special meaning more than

just your average 5K.

The other event is on

Page 5 of this issue, an

Reporting by Beth Krooswyk,

Freelance Reporter. For

more, visit MokenaMesseng

erDaily.com.

article on a Veterans Day

ceremony held at Konow’s

Corn Maze this

past Sunday that featured

the Will County Sheriff’s

Office Honor Guard, a

21-gun salute and more. It

was a chance for veterans

to come together to be

honored, meet and share

stories and remember those

who did not return home.

No matter in what way

or how long they served,

every veteran deserves

our continued thanks and

support. In a country that

is currently quite divided

based on political, religious

and other beliefs, it

is nice to come together

and realize we all support

those who have always

gave so much for us.

We may have different

opinions and viewpoints

on how to get things done,

but at the end of the day, I

hope Veterans Day is just

one of the rallying points

for us to come together as

Americans to support those

who so richly deserve our

praise.

Thank you to all those

who served, are currently

serving and will serve in

the future. We are here for

you, not only through the

aforementioned events of

Veterans Day, but each day

of the year.

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the opinions of the author. Pieces from

22nd Century Media are the thoughts of the company as a whole.

The Homer Horizon encourages readers to write letters to Sound

Off. All letters must be signed, and names and hometowns will be

published. We also ask that writers include their address and phone

number for verification, not publication. Letters should be limited

to 400 words. The Homer Horizon reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The Homer Horizon. Letters that are published

do not reflect the thoughts and views of The Homer Horizon.

Letters can be mailed to: The Homer Horizon, 11516 West 183rd

Street, Unit SW Office Condo #3, Orland Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax

letters to (708) 326-9179 or e-mail to tom@homerhorizon.com.

www.homerhorizon.com.


14 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon homer glen

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PERIOD.

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www.tinleycourt.com

Member of Tinley Park Chamber of Commerce Since 1994

2019 WINNER


Stirring things up

The Barrel Club aims to please lunchtime

diners, nightlife seekers and event crowds alike

at south suburban spot, Page 19

the Homer Horizon | November 14, 2019 | homerhorizondaily.com

Scanning the scene

Area nightlife and entertainment

highlighted, Page 20

Dial painters (left to right)

Kathryn Schaub, played

by Norah Gillogly; Irene

Rudolph, played by Charlotte

Vollmer; and Grace Fryer,

played by Natalie Mattson,

paint each other’s faces in a

cheerful but fateful moment

during a rehearsal of “Radium

Girls” Nov. 5 at LTHS.

Abhinanda Datta/22nd Century

Media

LTHS Theatre Porter Players put on ‘Radium Girls’ performance

inspired by a true story, Page 17


16 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon faith

homerhorizondaily.com

FAITH BRIEFS

Cross of Glory Lutheran Church

(14719 W. 163rd St., Homer Glen)

Community Blood Drive

3-7 p.m. Thursday, Nov.

14.

Christian Life Church

(15609 W. 159th St., Homer Glen)

Sunday Service

10 a.m.

EDGE Youth Service

7:30-9:30 p.m. Thursdays.

Our Mother of Good Counsel Parish

(16043 S. Bell Road, Homer Glen)

Council of Catholic Women

7 p.m. Second Tuesday

of the month.

Women of the parish

meet to discuss its needs.

The group also hosts a

monthly charity bake sale.

St. Bernard Parish

(13030 W. 143rd St., Homer Glen)

Happy Hours (Seniors)

11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Seniors meet monthly

for food, fun and

fellowship.

FUNERAL SERVICES DIRECTORY





2019 WINNER

"BEST FUNERAL

HOME"

Advertise your

Contact the


Annunciation Byzantine Catholic Church

(14610 S. Will Cook Road, Homer Glen)

Sunday Services

8:15 a.m. Orthros; 9:30

a.m. Divine Liturgy; 10

a.m. Sunday School. For

more information, call

(708) 645-0652.

Adult Bible Study

9-9:45 a.m., first and

third Sundays of the month

First United Methodist Church

(1000 Washington St., Lockport)

Christmas Market

It waseasyto

decide on cremation.

Now, what aboutthe

rest of thedecisions?

Colonial Chapel

Funeral Home

Private, On-site Crematory

15525 S. 73rd Ave.

(155th/Wheeler Dr. &Harlem)

Orland Park, Illinois

Family owned for 40 Years

colonialchapel.com

708-532-5400

The Cremation Experts.

10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday,

Nov. 16. Many

new vendors this year,

and Yeoman Hall will be

packed with wonderful

items.

Have something for Faith

Briefs? Contact Assistant

Editor Abhinanda Datta at

a.datta@22ndcenturymedia.

com or call (708) 326-9170

ext. 15. Information is due

by noon Thursday one week

prior to publication.

funeralservices.

708.326.9170


Pastor Column

The importance of

marriage and family

for civilization

THE REV. THOMAS J. LOYA

Annunciation Byzantine

Catholic Church

Nearly half of all

children born today

are born into

unmarried households.

This is a 700 percent

increase from the 1950s,

when only 6 percent of

children were born into

unmarried households.

This remarkable disparity

occurred because of the

so-called “sexual revolution”

that hit modern

Western culture in the

middle of the 1960s.

Actually, this was no

“sexual revolution” at

all. It was a narcissism

explosion which was a

diabolically clever and

effective part of a conspiracy

by the Evil One to

wipe marriage and family

from the Earth. Now,

modern Western culture

has attempted to redefine

marriage or just bypass it

altogether and live however

we want.

Civilization will rise or

fall by way of the family,

and family will go by way

of marriage. But marriage

is not just any type of

emotional bond between

people. We delude ourselves

in thinking that

we can call just anything

“marriage” or to just not

bother with marriage at

all.

Marriage and family

was actually the first

commandment Almighty

God gave to the human

creature. In the book

of Genesis, God commanded

Adam and Eve

to give themselves as a

gift to each other, become

one flesh together and

have children ... many

children.

Adam (manhood) was

to oversee God’s order

of creation and to protect

and provide for Eve because

through Eve (womanhood),

God ushered

into this world the entire

order of life and love.

That order needs protection

in order to thrive.

But just like today,

Adam (the man) fell

down on the job. Eve

(womanhood) became

vulnerable to the Evil

One, and then came

Original Sin, which is the

root of all of suffering

and chaos in the world.

Foreshadowed in

the Old Testament and

revealed fully in the New

Testament of the Bible,

God is Trinity — three

distinct persons but one

God — a union and communion

of persons in

an eternal perfect love.

God is relational within

himself. Since the Bible

Please see pastor, 19


homerhorizondaily.com life & arts

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 17

LTHS students portray challenging roles in ‘Radium Girls’

Abhinanda Datta

Assistant Editor

2

In a tense scene of “Radium Girls,” Dr. Knef (Noah

Davidson) addresses the board of the U.S. Radium

Corporation.

Hundreds of women had

flocked to work in clock

factories during World

War I, painting watch dials

with glowing radium

paint. But after their shifts,

they experienced horrifying

side effects, and that

started a monumental fight

for justice.

Madame Curie’s innovations

are celebrated,

and yet, the story of these

inspirational women have

been lost to posterity. To

teach students about this

important event in U.S.

history, Lockport Township

High School’s Porter

Players staged a production

of “Radium Girls”

from Nov. 7-10.

Based on DW Gregory’s

play, this is inspired

by the true story of Grace

Fryer, a dial painter, as she

fights for her day in court.

Her chief adversary is her

former employer, Arthur

Roeder, an idealistic man

who cannot bring himself

to believe that the same element

that shrinks tumors

could have anything to do

with the terrifying rash of

illnesses among his employees.

As the case goes on,

however, Grace finds herself

battling not just with

the U.S. Radium Corporation,

but with her own

family and friends who

fear that her campaign for

justice will backfire.

“My colleagues and I

have been talking about

this since last year, and we

decided to do it for our fall

production,” said Laura

Gilbert, director of “Radium

Girls.” “This event in

history is one that helped

workers to have rights and

be able to speak for themselves

and defend themselves

against an unfair

employer. It’s also a story

of young women finding

their voice and being

able to stand up for themselves.”

While Grace and Arthur

are the established protagonist

and antagonist of the

play, the narrative is more

complicated.

“The lives of those involved

are conflicted;

they are real people, living

through a real American

tragedy,” Gilbert said.

Despite the somber subject

matter, she said her

students “did a wonderful

job, and they were mature

enough to enjoy understanding

difficult situations.”

A display explaining the

history of the U.S. Radium

Corporation and the girls

was arranged in the lobby

outside the auditorium.

Junior Reilly Bresnahan

played the role of Mrs.

Diane Roeder, who was

caught between championing

her husband while

also sympathizing with the

girls.

“My character finds

herself in a strange situation

where she wants to

Photographer (Katie Oldaker) (left to right) and Sob Sister (Paige Svoboda) pester

Tom (Aidan Callahan), Grace (Natalie Mattson) and the bedridden Kathryn (Norah

Gillogly) in an intense hospital scene during a Nov. 5 rehearsal of “Radium Girls” at

Lockport Township High School. Photos by Abhinanda Datta/22nd Century Media

Dr. Knef, played by Noah Davidson, breaks the news to Grace, played by Natalie

Mattson, that her condition could become fatal, during a somber scene in

“Radium Girls.”

believe that her husband,

Arthur, is a good man

but is also hearing horrible

stories about how he

killed people,” Bresnahan

said. “This is very different

from anything I’ve

done before, because we

got to tell a true story that

is sad and meaningful, as

opposed to a light, funny

musical.”

Bresnahan also co-directed

the play, along with

fellow junior thespian Liam

Horan, who described the

show as “exploring uncharted

moral ground between

two parties.”

“This is my first time

directing, and it is great

because I got to coordinate

everything and made sure

things went according to

plan,” Horan said. “But I

enjoyed acting more, and

my character, Charlie Lee,

was one of the antagonists

who defended the company

to make more money.

It is just such a great story

and so sad to see how hard

it was for those girls to get

justice.”

While the actors deftly

portrayed the internal

struggles of the characters,

the production received an

added touch of authenticity

with the brilliantly designed

sets by the technical

crew.

Stage manager Maxwell

Eallonardo said the experience

was amazing but

stressful with “a lot of late

nights.”

“I love seeing the before

and after of the work that

we put in,” he said. “We

basically start with a

bunch of lumber, and then

get to see how they turned

out. This set was very

detailed, and some walls

had windows that could go

up and down.”

Gilbert said it was a

great learning process for

her.

“It is such a great experience

when I get to work

with such talented kids,”

she said. “Most of the actors

were from the junior

class, and they were ready

to take on some very large

roles.”

One of Gilbert’s favorite

professors in college

had said that “theater is

life made perfect,” and she

never forgot that.

“What he meant is that it

can be perfectly happy or

perfectly tragic, but it will

always be one of those

moments of perfection,”

she said. “For me, this is

what ‘Radium Girls’ was

about, and to think that

something so traumatic

can be so entertaining and

inspiring.”


18 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon homer glen

homerhorizondaily.com

“I subscribed for

the breaking local

news, (and) it is great to

see what is going on in our

area and local sports

coverage.”

— Ryan Johnson, of

Frankfort

“Love being kept

informed of local news

and events. The online

(version) is easy to read

and very informative.”

— Mary Smith, of

Lockport

“Get the latest

neighborhood news in

real time via email and can

share with other family/-

friends.”

— Rosemarie Melnik, of

Tinley Park

Here’s the good word

“I enjoy the

digital subscription

because the content is

very informational. … Keep

doing what you're doing!

— Tony Gugliuzza, of

New Lenox

“I get to read the

articles before the

newspaper arrives AND I

get to read all of the other

22nd Century Media

papers.”— MaryEllen

Smolinski,of

Mokena

“ I subscribed

because I feel it is

important to know what is

going on in and around my

community”

— Joan Pavlik, of

Homer Glen

“I like the

hyper-local aspect. ...

Also, the reporting seems

to be faster on breaking

stories than any other local

news sources.”

— Joseph Solek, of

Orland Park

Join thousands of your neighbors who get daily local news,

alerts and more with a digital subscription

Starting at just $3.25/month

Subscribe today at HomerHorizon.com/Plus

or scan the QR for a direct link


homerhorizondaily.com dining out

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 19

The Dish

Barrel Club more than the sum of its steaks, spirits and stogies

Oak Lawn eatery

switches vibes

from lunch to

dinner, gatherings

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

At a quick glance, The

Barrel Club looks on paper

like something of a throwback,

with a steak-heavy

dinner menu, a drinks list

that leans hard on bourbon

and a showcase of cigar

selections for the smokers.

Make no mistake: Spirits

are the star of the show

at The Barrel Club. From

the membership program

that for $39 monthly sends

customers home with different

bottles of the Barrel

Club’s spirits and accessories

— think branded shot

glasses, ice ball silicones

and rocks glasses — to a

list that rivals most city

establishments for whiskey

enthusiasts, drinks are

undoubtedly the No. 1 attraction

at the Oak Lawn

establishment.

But the facade of the

building on 111th Street

near Cicero Avenue is

enough to let passersby

know the offerings are

more than first meets the

eye. The modern confines

hint at the wines Barrel

Club also proudly offers.

A patio with a fire pit welcomes

musical acts and

outdoor loungers alike. The

event spaces are designed

to attract both corporate

meetings and small birthday

gatherings (ask to see

Oak Lawn’s Barrel Club offers sandwiches during

its lunch hours, including the pictured Barrel Dip

($14), featuring shaved rib-eye on a French roll, with

giardiniera, au jus and horseradish cream.

The Little Pub). And the

lunch menu caters to a family

crowd more than the

nightlife seekers one might

otherwise imagine.

Barrel Club strives to be

more than the typical suburban

eatery, and it strives

to please a lot of different

people in the process.

As Director of Operations

April Koerber, an

Orland Parker, puts it, “It’s

downtown dining on the

south side of Chicago. The

food looks like a masterpiece.”

Behind that food is executive

chef Carlos DeLeon,

who approaches an ingredient-focused

menu with a

“less is best on the plate”

philosophy.

“The products that we

use here are great,” he said.

They use Duke’s mayonnaise,

for instance, simply

because, DeLeon said,

“It’s delicious, the king of

mayos.”

The Barrel Club’s Traces of Buffalo whiskey flight ($22) is one of 10 that offer guests

tastes of three different spirits — in this case W.L. Weller Special Reserve, E.H.

Taylor Small Batch and George Stagg Jr. — alongside optional bitters. Photos by Bill

Jones/22nd Century Media

Diners will find that

on the lobster roll ($16),

which Koerber cites as a

favorite for the simplicity

of its Maine lobster, mayo,

Old Bay and brioche.

The kitchen at Barrel

Club also takes the time to

make its own creme fraiche

— a three-day process. And

the roasted chicken (for 2,

$29) — which is sliced in

front of customers — goes

through a 48-hour process.

“What you get out of it

is a crisp, seasoned-all-theway-through

chicken,” De-

Leon said.

Among the sandwich

standouts for the lunch

crowd is the Cuban ($13),

featuring pork carnitas,

smoked ham, Chihuahua

cheese, dill pickle and mustard

on a telera roll.

“Its not a traditional Cuban,

but it’s damn close,”

DeLeon said.

The restaurant also has

some fun mixing influences

with items like the

potato and cheese pierogies

($9), which feature

Yukon Gold potatoes and

Chihuahua cheese for a

combination that is part

Polish, part Mexican, according

to DeLeon. Giardiniera

finds its way into

Barrel Club’s chopped

salad ($13) for a distinct

Chicago tweak to the classic.

And gluten-free and vegetarians

diners are not forgotten,

with options for both

highlighted on the menus.

“You just try to keep it

balanced for people with

allergies,” DeLeon said.

The Barrel Club maintains

membership with the

Orland Park Area Chamber

of Commerce, and

Koerber, who previously

worked with several businesses

in Orland Park, said

she made the jump for a

new opportunity to work

with a restaurant that does

a spirits club. It also gives

her the opportunity to continue

to organize events,

including benefits for local

organizations Barrel Club

has done since opening.

Koerber said she has enjoyed

the new role because

Barrel Club tries to create

a “wow factor” for its customers,

whether that’s an

elderly group doing an early

lunch, whiskey fanatics

working their way through

the spirits selection or executives

looking to impress

clients.

“It’s really personal,” she

said. “And they want that

personalized touch.”

The Barrel Club

4910 W. 111th St. in

Oak Lawn

Kitchen Hours

• Lunch: 11 a.m.-2:30

p.m. Monday-Friday

• Brunch: 11 a.m.-

2:30 p.m. Saturday-

Sunday

• Dinner: 4-10 p.m.

daily

Bar Hours

• 10 a.m.-midnight

Sunday-Thursday

• 10 a.m.-2 a.m.

Friday-Saturday

For more information ...

Web: barrelclubillinois.

com

Phone: (708) 581-

3357

pastor

From Page 16

tells us that God made us

in his “image and likeness,”

then we, too, are

relational beings with a

fundamental desire for life

and love stamped into the

very language or theology

of our body — persons

precisely in their maleness

and femaleness.

Intimacy is the one

thing we human beings

cannot live well without,

and we will seek intimacy

even in perverted ways

if we cannot find it in

appropriate ways. Marriage

is the ultimate venue

in which two people can

achieve intimacy and from

that fruitfulness — new

life.

As the commercial

world urges us to hurry

and get shopping for the

“gift-giving season,” the

rediscovery and renewal

of marriage would be the

best gift to give to our

spouse, our children, to

Homer Glen, to America

and ultimately to civilization

itself.

The opinions of this column

are that of the writer. They do

not necessarily reflect those

of The Homer Horizon.


20 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon puzzles

homerhorizondaily.com

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Some Brit. sports

cars

4. Trademarks, abbr.

7. Pandowdy, e.g.

10. Birchbark

13. ‘’__ a Lady’’ (Tom

Jones tune)

14. Epithet for the

Yankees

15. LTHS 2019 Jackson

Award winner,

technology teacher,

Jeff ____

16. Official doc.

17. Regal Norse name

18. At first light

19. Make ___ while the

sun shines

20. ___ gratias

21. Way back when

23. Lucy of “Charlie’s

Angels,” 2000

25. Human blood classification

28. __ Zeppelin

29. Abe Vigoda, in

“The Godfather”

30. Conservative

Justice

32. Railroad employee

35. Welcome rugs

39. Australian jumper,

for short

40. Fund-raising suffix

41. Jealous

44. Tyrant

45. Dig in

47. Do-say link

50. Wore away

51. Land of opportunity

53. “____ into Lockport”

- classic car

event

55. The tone “G”

57. Van Gogh: “___

Cypresses”

59. Gets licked

60. The Adamsons’ cat

62. Border on

63. Mindless

64. Epitome of redness

65. Flower receptacle

66. Do watercolors

67. Some degs.

68. UFO crew

69. Vegas opener

Down

1. 1990s-2000s TV

attorney

2. Car storage locale

3. Wheezed

4. “___-Team”

5. Actress Streep

6. Jet that was retired

in 2003

7. Northern California

city

8. Personal statement

intro

9. Post delivery:

Abbr.

11. Certain hooters

12. Ethereal singer,

and namesakes

13. Academic types

14. Defendant called

John

20. Silver coin

22. Chipper

24. Practice suffix

26. “Très ___!”

27. Dinghy propeller

31. Fireplace remains

33. Money to the

bottom line, abbr.

34. Pigeon pen

35. Bubbly name

36. Estimates value

37. Coffee stirrer

38. Capital of South

Korea

41. Handheld

42. Ave. crossers

43. Musical talent

46. Holland export

47. Attack

48. Reddish brown

49. Atlas features

52. Chance for a hit

54. College in New

Rochelle, New York

56. Cereal grain

58. Weak one

60. Go down

61. Meadow (Brit.)

62. 5th ___

ORLAND PARK

Traverso’s Restaurant

(15601 S Harlem Ave,

Orland Park; (708) 532-

2220)

■5-7 ■ p.m. Mondays:

Free bar bingo

Murphy’s on the Green

(13100 Southwst

Highway, Orland Park;

(708) 448-650

■6-8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free Bar Bingo and

Cash Jackpot

TINLEY PARK

350 Brewing

(7144 W. 183rd St.,

Tinley Park (708) 825-

7339)

■6:30 ■ p.m. First

Thursday of each

month: Laugh Riot.

Cost is $25 and

includes dinner,

two beers and

a comedy show.

For tickets, email

todd@350brewing.

com.

Tribes Beer Company

(9501 W. 171st St.,

Tinley Park (708) 966-

2051)

■Noon-2 ■ p.m. Sundays:

Sunday Bloody

Funday

■7 ■ p.m. Mondays:

Open Bluegrass Jam

Session

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Trivia night

LOCKPORT

Port Noir

(900 S. State St.,

Lockport; (815) 834-

9463)

■6p.m. ■ - 12 a.m.

Thursdays: Comedy

Bingo

■6p.m. ■ - 12 a.m. Fridays

and Saturdays:

Live Band

■6p.m. ■ - 12 a.m.

Sundays: Open Mic

Night

HOMER GLEN

Front Row

(14903 S. Bell Road,

Homer Glen; (708) 645-

7000)

■7 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Trivia

To place an event in The

Scene, email a.datta@

22ndcenturymedia.com.

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids

of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle, each row,

column and box must contain each of the

numbers 1-9.

LEVEL: Medium

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


homerhorizondaily.com local living

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 21

If you are looking for the perfect ranch home

at a great price, look no more. Ranch Villas at

Keating Point, in the Village of Channahon,

offers ranch homes that are both beautiful and

maintenance-free.

These unique, detached townhomes feature

two bedrooms and two baths in 1,308 to 1,621

square feet. Each comes equipped with a full

basement, two-car attached garage, brick fronts,

and central air.

These Ranch Villas start in the $230’s and

boast an association fee of just $140 per month.

We offer five floorplans for you to choose from.

Do you long for a little more time to yourself?

For more family moments, too?

Luxury Ranch Detached Townhomes

Immediate Move-Ins. • Maintenance-Free Living

Starting from the $230’s

Maintenance-free living at The Ranch Villas at

Keating Pointe is our solution to your problem.

In one of our ranch townhomes, you can finally

wave goodbye to the chores that gobble up your

precious time. All exterior and landscaping

maintenance is done for you, including snow

removal. If you’ve had enough of cleaning

gutters, mowing the lawn, and shoveling the

driveway, you’re ready to take the next step.

The photos in this article feature The Roma,

one of the floorplans you can choose from for

your new ranch home. This 1,467 sq. ft. design

features two bedrooms and two baths. Plus,

you’ll get a flex room to use as you see fit.

Office? Guest room?You tell us. The Roma also

features ceilings that reach nine feet high and a

large kitchen with included appliances. You’ll

enjoy an impressively roomy feel, bounty of

spaceforentertaining,andultimateconvenience.

Speaking of convenience, a basement, two-car

attached garage, and patio are included. The

Roma starts in the low $240’s, delivering quality

in its construction and price tag.

Looking to move into a new home sometime

soon? Our ranch homes also feature quick

delivery homes. These quick delivery homes

have move-in dates as early as this fall.

To learn more about our detached ranch

townhomes, give us a call at (815) 290-5303 or

go to homesbycore.com.

Immediate Move-Ins • Maintenance-Free Living


22 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon local living

homerhorizondaily.com


homerhorizondaily.com real estate

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 23

The Homer Horizon’s

sponsored content

of the

WEEK

This stunning, custombuilt

home is surrounded

by the natural beauty of

gorgeous Homer Glen.

What: Four-bedroom,

three-and-a-half bathroom

ranch in Glenview Walk

Estates.

Where: 14301 James

Lane, Homer Glen

Amenities: This one-of-a-kind home features an open kitchen with granite

countertops, custom-made cabinets and island seating. The impressive living

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by the brick fireplace. There is an additional wood-burning fireplace in the

expansive, full-finished basement. The large bedrooms boast an abundance of

closet space, and the master bedroom features walk-in closets

and a whirlpool tub. Oh, and the backyard. It is beautifully

landscaped, fenced-in and has an in-ground pool. Such an

extraordinary home.

Listing Price:

$689,900

Listing Agents:

Rick Pulciani,

rickpulciani@kw.com,

(708) 200-7758

Agent Brokerage:

Keller Williams Preferred

Realty

Want to know how to become Home of the Week? Contact Courtney at (708) 326-9170 ext. 47.

Sept. 11

• 14365 Mallard Drive, Homer Glen, 604919260 Robert A. Anderson to

Tomasz Zurek, Anna A. Zurek, $316,000

Sept. 13

• 15515 Jeanne Lane, Homer Glen, 604917944 Jeffrey E. Zych to Ahmad

Abuzir, $675,000

The Going Rate is provided by Record Information Services, Inc. For more information,

visit www.public-record.com or call (630) 557-1000.


24 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon classifieds

homerhorizondaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

School Bus Drivers Wanted

Homer School District 33C

seeks quality individuals

to join our family of

school bus drivers.

$17.42/hr. + full benefits

available

Training provided.

Call (708) 226-7625

or visit homerschools.org

employment tab

Hiring Desk Clerk

(must be flexible w/ shifts)

& Housekeeping

(Morning)

Needed at Super 8 Motel

Apply within:

9485 W. 191st St, Mokena

No Phone Calls

Village of Tinley Park

has opening for Part-Time

CDL Bus Driver.

See www.tinleypark.org

for info and application.

Production Worker

No Experience Necessary

No Evenings or Weekends

Located in Mokena

ctoenterprises.com/now-hiring/

Help

Wanted

1003 Help Wanted

Cashiers Wanted for

Microsoft Computer Registers

$10.00/hr to start, 6 week raise

Paid vacation, Winter bonus

15% employee discount

Never work past 9:00pm!

Must be 18 years and older

No phone calls! Apply in store:

Sox Outlet 6220 W. 159th St.

Oak Forest, IL

Van-Go Transportation

Looking for Drivers and

One-on-One Aids

for Special Needs Van

Bus Driver permit a plus,

but will train

Great part-time job with

great pay: $14-$18/hour

(815) 931-2880

Medical Office in

Orland Park seeks P/T,

licensed medical X-ray

technician for 1 day/wk.

Fax resume to 708.460.9254

or email datkenson@aol.com

Alvernia Manor Senior Living

is now hiring 3 positions

- CNA to work all shifts

- Activity aide, part-time

Call to apply: 630-257-7721

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

1021 Lost &

Found

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

1027 Arts and Craft Fairs

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

1023 Caregiver

Heaven Sent Caregivers

Professional caregiving

service. 24 hr or hourly

services; shower or bath

visits. Licensed & bonded.

Try the best! 708.638.0641

1037 Prayer / Novena

Prayer to the Blessed Virgin

Oh, most beautiful flower of

Mt. Carmel, fruitful vine,

splendor of Heaven, Blessed

Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate

Virgin, assist me in

my necessity. Oh, Star of the

Sea, help me and show me,

herein you are my mother. Oh,

Holy Mary, Mother of God,

Queen of Heaven and Earth!

I humbly beseech you from

the bottom of my heart to succor

me in this necessity. There

are none that can withstand

your power. Oh show me

herein you are my mother. Oh

Mary, conceived without sin,

pray for us who have recourse

to thee (3x). Holy Mother, I

place this cause in your hands.

Miraculous Prayer

Dear heart of Jesus in the past

I have asked for favors.

This time I ask you for this

very special one (mention

Favor). Take it dear Jesus and

place it within your own

broken heart where your father

sees it then in your merciful

eyes it will become your favor

not mine. Amen. - Tom

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

1042 Pets Wanted

Looking for young, adult

Schnauzer. Housebroken, preferably

male. Can guarantee a

loving home! Contact afternoons

only 708-590-6243

Automotive

1069 Antique

Cars

1948 Plymouth Deluxe

4-Door Sedan

Radio, Spotlight,

Shop-Manual Included

Last Driven 1985

Garage Kept

Asking for $2000

(708) 532-4117

1074 Auto for

Sale

1995 Honda Del Sol

New tires, 103k miles

$2250 OBO

708-301-4953

1996 Chevrolet Suburban

Custom Lights

Engine/Trans/Brakes Great.

Pull Any Trailer.

160K mileage. $2000

Call (815) 464-8866

1077 Tractor for

Sale

For Sale to Good Home or

Collector: Antique tractor,

1938 Allis Chalmers

Model WC. Runs great,

have to see to appreciate!

$1,200 708-821-7311

Advertise

your

RENTAL

PROPERTY

in the

newspaper

people turn

to first CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

1090 House for

Sale

Beautiful Custom

Home in

Silo Ridge Estates

$975,000 call Whitney

Wang 312-857-4658

Whitney@whitneyig.com

Prospect Equities Real Estate

1091 Condo for

Sale

Mokena, Condo FSBO

2bd/1ba, $99,900

Excellent conidtion! new

carpeting, electric heat,

wall ac, carpet/tile,

shower/tub, dishwasher,

parking in lot, For

info/pics call 708-479-9655

Rental

1225 Apartments

for Rent

Mokena/Weber

Wills Apartments

1 Bedroom apt. $ 850

2 Bedroom apt. $ 980

CLOSE TO METRA AND 1-80

708-479-2448

1226 Townhouses

for Rent

3 bed/2bath townhouse with

garage completed remodeled

in 2011, hardwoods

downstairs new appliances

Pheseant Ridge Mokena

1st/last, plus deposit $1,250

month 630-660-4889


homerhorizondaily.com classifieds

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 25

OCAL REALTOR

DIRECTORY

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

2003 Appliance Repair

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

Business Directory

Kennedy Connection Realtors

SELLER incentives & DISCOUNTS!

708-689-1001

kennedyconnection.com

Average 10 Sales

Per Month!

EXPERIENCE MATTERS

YOUCAN COUNT ONKENNEDY!

Jim Kennedy • Managing Broker/Owner

jim.kennedy@kennedyconnection.com

QUALITY

APPLIANCE

REPAIR, Inc.

• Air Conditioning • Furnaces

Refrigeration • Dishwashers

Stoves & Ovens • Microwaves

Garbage Disposals

Washers&Dryers

Family Owned &Operatedsince 1986

Someone you can TRUST

All work GUARANTEED

BEST price in town!

708-712-1392

2004 Asphalt Paving/Seal Coating

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

2006 Basement Waterproofing

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS

Contact Classified Department

to Advertise in this Directory

708.326.9170

Eileen Hord

708.278.4700

LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

Mary Jean Andersen

708.860.4041

AndersenHord.com.

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170


26 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon classifieds

homerhorizondaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

2025 Concrete Work

2080 Firewood

Ideal

Firewood

Seasoned Mixed

Hardwoods

$120.00 per FC

Free Stacking &

Delivery

708 856 5422

A+

2032 Decking

Sturdy

Deck & Fence

Repair, Rebuild or

Replace

Make It Safe - Make it Sturdy

708 479 9035

2070 Electrical

EXPERIENCED

ELECTRICIAN

R E A S O N A B L E

D E P E N D A B L E

SMALL JOBS

CALL ANYTIME

(708) 478-8269

2090 Flooring

GroundsKeeper

Landscape Services!

Get Your Firewood

Early This Year

FREE Local Delivery

Contact us at

708.301.7441

or

Visit our website

www.groundskpr.com

2060 Drywall

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

2017 Cleaning Services

Barb’s Cleaning

Service

We clean your home the

way YOU want it

cleaned! Good

Quality, Professional,

Reliable, and

Experienced.

Please call for

estimate.

708-663-1789

Calling all












Buy

It!

SELL

It!

FIND

It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

2080 Firewood

2110 Gutter Systems

...to place

your

Classified Ad!

CALL

708.326.9170

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170


homerhorizondaily.com classifieds

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 27

2120 Handyman

2120 Handyman

2132 Home Improvement

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

2130 Heating/Cooling

2132 Home Improvement

BEECHY’S

Handyman Service

Custom Painting

Drywall & Plaster Repair

Carpentry Work

Trim & General

Tile & Laminated Flooring

Light Plumbing & Electrical

Remodeling, Kitchen & Bath

Install StormWindows/Doors

Clean Gutters

Wash Siding & Windows

Call Vern for Free Estimate!

708 714 7549

815 838 4347


28 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon classifieds

homerhorizondaily.com

2135 Insulation

2150 Paint & Decorating

orlandpainting@gmail.com

www.orlandpainting.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

2170 Plumbing

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

2140 Landscaping

MARTY’S

PAINTING

Interior / Exterior

Fast, Neat Painting

Drywall

Wallpaper Removal

Staining

Free Estimates

20% Off with this ad

708-606-3926

Buy

It!

SELL

It!

FIND

It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

2170 Plumbing

2150 Paint & Decorating

2200 Roofing

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170


homerhorizondaily.com classifieds

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 29

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

2200 Roofing 2200 Roofing

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2276 Tuckpointing/Masonry

2294 Window Cleaning

2224 Snow Blower Repair

P.K.WINDOW

CLEANING CO.

Window Cleaning

Gutter Cleaning

Power Washing

Office Cleaning

call and get $40.00 off

708 974-8044

www.pkwindowcleaning.co4

Buy

It!

SELL

It!

FIND

It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

Professional

Directory

2390 Computer Services/Repair

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOORWITH A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

Call Us Today 708.326.9170

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170


30 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon classifieds

homerhorizondaily.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2391 Custom Apparel

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

2420 Piano Tuning

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

Directory

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Calling all

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers



2489 Merchandise Wanted

2394 Debt Relief

Metal Wanted

Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

Snowmobiles,

Appliances, Etc.

ANYTHING METAL!

Call 815-210-8819

Free pickup!

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

Buy It!

FIND It!

SELL It!

in the CLASSIFIEDS

708.326.9170


homerhorizondaily.com classifieds

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 31

2701 Property for

Sale

2701 Property for

Sale

2701 Property for

Sale

2703 Legal

Notices

2703 Legal

Notices

2703 Legal

Notices

COMMON AD - REAL ESTATE

SECTION

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 15426 Purley Ct, Homer Glen, IL

60491 (Residential). On the 5th day of

December, 2019 to be held at 12:00

noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201,

Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: NewRez

LLC, F/K/A New Penn Financial,

LLC, D/B/A Shellpoint Mortgage

Servicing Plaintiff V. John Kohut; et.

al. Defendant.

Case No. 18 CH 1064 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

COMMON AD - REAL ESTATE

SECTION

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 13532 S Janas Pkwy, Homer Glen

AKA Lockport, IL 60441 (Single Family

Home). On the 21stday of November,

2019 to be held at 12:00 noon, at

the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57

N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL

60432, under Case Title: The Bank of

New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of

New York, successor-in-interest to

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association,

successor-in-interest to

Bank One, National Association as

Trustee for CSFB Mortgage-Backed

Pass-Through Certificates, Series

2003-23 Plaintiff V. Mark Iacoponi;

et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 18 CH 1607 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

COMMON AD - REAL ESTATE

SECTION

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 14359 SElizabeth Ln, Homer Glen,

IL 60491 (Single Family Home). On the

5th day of December, 2019 to be held

at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street,

Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: PHH Mortgage Corporation

Plaintiff V. Ted D. Manikas; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 19 CH 0172 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS

)

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL

)

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

NewRez LLC, F/K/A New Penn Financial,

LLC, D/B/A Shellpoint Mortgage

Servicing

Plaintiff,

vs.

John Kohut; et. al.

Defendant.

No. 18 CH 1064

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 28th day of August, 2019,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

5th day of December, 2019 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 34, IN FOXLEY ACRES, BE-

ING A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION

5, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE

11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI-

PAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO

THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED

OCTOBER 3, 1988 AS DOCUMENT

NO. R88-46865, AND CERTIFI-

CATE OF CORRECTION RE-

CORDED DECEMBER 13, 1988 AS

DOCUMENT NO. R88-59806, IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as:

15426 Purley Ct, Homer Glen, IL

60491

Description of Improvements:

Residential

P.I.N.:

16-05-05-205-016-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following applica-

tion ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS

)

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL

)

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

The Bank ofNew York Mellon, f/k/a

The Bank of New York,

successor-in-interest to JPMorgan

Chase Bank, National Association, successor-in-interest

toBank One, National

Association asTrustee for CSFB Mortgage-Backed

Pass-Through Certificates,

Series 2003-23

Plaintiff,

vs.

Mark Iacoponi; et. al.

Defendant.

No. 18 CH 1607

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 14th day of August, 2019,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

21st day of November, 2019 , commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the

Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N.

Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL

60432, sell at public auction tothe highest

and best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 27IN FOXLEY ACRES, BE-

ING A SUBDIVISION INSECTION

5, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE

11 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI-

PAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO

THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED

OCTOBER 3, 1988, AS DOCUMENT

R8846865, IN WILL COUNTY, IL-

LINOIS.

Commonly known as:

13532 S Janas Pkwy, Homer Glen

AKA Lockport, IL 60441

Description of Improvements:

Single Family Home

P.I.N.:

16-05-05-204-009-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS

)

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL

)

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

PHH Mortgage Corporation

Plaintiff,

vs.

Ted D. Manikas; et. al.

Defendant.

No. 19 CH 0172

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 10th day of July, 2019,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

5th day of December, 2019 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 7INMARILYN'S ACRES, BE-

ING A SUBDIVISION OF THE

NORTH 1320 FEET OF THE EAST

165 FEET OF THE EAST 1/2 OF

THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-

TION 10, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH,

RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD

PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AC-

CORDING TO THE PLAT

THEREOF RECORDED JULY 19,

1977, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER

R77-25362, AND CERTIFICATE OF

CORRECTION RECORDED

AUGUST 31, 1978 AS DOCUMENT

NUMBER R78-34384, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as:

14359 SElizabeth Ln, Homer Glen,

IL 60491

Description of Improvements:

Single Family Home

P.I.N.:

16-05-10-103-007-0000

Terms ofSale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

Notice is hereby given that on or

after 12/2/2019 at or after 10:00

am at 15935 S Parker Road,

Homer Glen, IL 60491, Parker

Self Storage will sell by public

auction the miscellaneous personal

property stored in units, A09 Jason

Strylowski, E36 John Martos, L08

Williams, Jennifer, L12 Elizabeth

Rollins, M13 Beth Pergande, X02

Tina Lucchimi.

Notice is hereby given that on

12/2/19 at or after 10:00 am at

15935 SParker Rd, Homer Glen,

IL 60491, Parker Self Storage will

sell by public auction a Boat &

Trailer stored in parking spot Y26

by Eric Ortiz. The Boat isdescribed

as a 1985 Lund 14 foot

Row Boat (UIN:LUNE0351A585),

Boat Tr ailer (VIN #

1YR0010086EH001277). Boat and

Trailer will be sold as is with no title

for parts.

...to

place

your

Classified

Ad!

708.326.9170


32 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon classifieds

homerhorizondaily.com

2703 Legal Notices 2703 Legal Notices

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2019

Copies of the detailed Annual Statement ofAffairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2019 will be available for public inspection inthe school

district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, annually. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact:

Homer CCSD 33C 15733 Bell Road 708-226-7600 8 am to 4 pm

School District/Joint Agreement Name Address Telephone Office

Also by January 15 annually the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2019, will be posted on the Illinois State

Board of Education's website@ www.isbe.net.

SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement ofAffairs Summary that isrequired tobe published bythe school district/joint agreement for the

past fiscal year.

Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2019

Educational Operations & Debt Transportation Municipal Capital Working Tort Fire

Maintenance Services Retirement/ Projects Cash Prevention

Social Security & Safety

Local Sources 1000 37,217,698 5,717,6539 10,307 1,429,433 1,900,110 527,035 152,714 240,922 0

Flow-Through Receipts

/Revenues from One

District to Another

District 2000 0 0 0 0

State Sources 3000 3,234,818 400,000 0 1,099,428 0 0 0 0 0

Federal Sources 4000 1,124,509 25,761 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Direct Receipts

/Revenues 41,577,025 6,143,414 10,307 2,528,861 1,900,110 527,035 152,714 240,922 0

Total Direct

Disbursement

/Expenditures 37,751,329 4,685,711 406,389 3,562,498 1,847,097 3,903,250 260,622 0

Other Sources

/Uses of Funds 0 0 400,203 0 0 0 0 0 0

Beginning Fund

Balances - July 1, 2018 14,075,812 3,974,706 39,863 4,608,584 1,236,850 10,864,536 7,177,759 114,929 0

Other Changes in

Fund Balances 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Ending Fund Balances

June 30, 2019 17,901,508 5,432,409 43,984 3,574,947 1,289,863 7,488,321 7,330,473 95,229 0

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL

Salary Range: Less Than $25,000

Alvarado, Deborah Lee; Beglen, Sarah Jane; Bogdan, Michele L;Decker, Keith Michael; Deuser, August Robert; Dierkes, Melissa Eleanor; Enright,

Christina Georgette; Fako, Maureen Elizabeth; Fiffles, Catherine L; Forst, Renata Monique; Gallagher, Jill Marie; Harris, Meghan Fitzgerald; Heeney,

Kerrie Marie; Jager, Cynthia L;Kibbons, Megan Marie; Klimson, Candice D; Kraynak, Karen; Lowman, Amy E; Malvestuto, Gail Marie; Matt, Timothy

M;Miller, Mary C;Mudroch, Jeannette; O'Callaghan, Sandra Nancy; Parus, Sandra M; Rarick, Leah D; Ryan, Kelly M; Salcik, Yvette A; Santo,

Colleen M; Shea, Susan A; Shea, Tammy Marie; Stakenas, Karen L; Wall, Lauren E; Wirtz, Jennifer R; Ziegler, Carol M

Salary Range: $25,000 - $39,999

Adolf, Angela Dawn; Ashworth, Emily Jean; Barton, Aimee Lynn; Bentivenga, Rachel Nicole; Benton, Melissa Kay; Bevering, Kati Roxanne; Biciste,

Michelle Rose; Bumbarovska Zaharieva, Vesna; Coniglio, Kimberly Ann; Feeley, Gloria A; Flavin baecher, Bridget G; Gestaut, Alexis Ann; Grady,

Brianna Mary; Hoffman, Mary Lynn; Jeffries, Jennifer L;Jirik, Gina Michele; Klotz, Danielle Lynn; Kreten, Katelyn Jo; Lewandowski, Kathleen Margaret;

Mccarthy, Andrea Lauren; Merlo, Kelli M;Michalik, Kendra C; Mitra, Paulina L;Monahan, Amanda L; Riley, Michele Marie; Sansone, Mary;

Christan Elizabeth; Schroeder, Denise M; Strouf, Keela Rae; Sylvester, Malorie Nicole; Vondra, Jennifer Lynn

Salary Range: $40,000 - $59,999

Airola, Kathryn A; Ball, Rachel Ashley; Bard, Kristen M;Barnes, Kate Elizabeth; Bazant, Mallory K;Benavides, Amy Kristine; Binder, Brooke

Regine; Boyce, Nichole Lynn; Brainerd, Amie M; Brandon, Michelle Rae; Bricker, Susann M; Brown, Kathleen D;Brusokas, Sarah Lynn; Cabral, Jamie

Eileen; Cannon, Leighann; Clarida, Cari A; Clarke-sigel, Jacqueline Marie; Collins, Laura Christine; Collins, Sarah Elizabeth; Connolly, Allison

Marie; Day, Julianne Elizabeth; Defilippis-holba, Kaleen Francis; Devenney, Sara Lynn; Dornbos, Amy Victoria; Dragisic, Jennifer L; Ducharme,

Amanda J; Dzielska, Emilia; Estes, Lisa M;Failing, Jacqueline Nicole; Farthing, Kathleen E; Fazio, Nicole M; Ferrucci, Jennifer Alexis; Fink, Susan E;

Fisch, Theresa A;Fiske, Erin L;Fitzgerald, Meghan M;Flemming, Tina Marie; Garrison, Eileen R; Gentile, Shannon C; Gesiakowski, Jennifer Marie;

Giantomasso, Janina R;Gilbert, Daniel C; Giroux, Laurie Lynn; Gorecki, Kathleen Ann; Grill, Rachel Alane; Guska, Kristin M;Gyrion, Kimberly A;

Haglund, Lisa Michelle; Hansen, Katherine A;Heintz, Megan M;Hiss, Elyse M; Huffman, Joel D; Hull, Matthew Michael; Huntley, Megan M; Janssen,

Christine R;Johnson, Brittany E;Johnson, Kristen M;Keasler, William Nathan; Ketelaar, Taylor Amanda; Klosak, Kelly M;Konsoer, Brittany R;Krzebiot,

Tricia M; Lane, Michele M; Larson, Manda R; Lepper, Amy Rose; Letizia, Jordana Meryl; Love, Christine Ann; Lowrance, Janice Lynn; Lozano,

Veronica K; Lynn, Joanne Elizabeth; Madison, Kimberly A;Malley, Eyad N;Marrone, Carrie L;Martello, Heather Kristin; Mautz, Bonnie L; Maze,

Jennifer Nicole; Mccann, Allison Rae; Mccarthy, Jared John; Mcdougall, Michelle Lynn; Mclenighan, Sylvia M;Mcnulty, Michelle M;Miller, Amy

Camille; Misch, Michelle Lynn; Mitchell, Jennifer Jean; Mitchell, Kelly A;Mitchell, Michael Wayne; Moore, Elizabeth Mary; Moore, Shannon M;

Mrotek, Cynthia Ann; Muehlnickel, Shannon Therese; Muenchow, Mary Lange; Muir, Matthew R;Murphy, Christine A;Nelson, Ashley Rachel; Olson,

Kari; Ondreja, Megan F; Orelove, Abel S; Parnitzke, Colleen T; Passarelli, Jessica A; Pavlis, Sarah T; Pavlovich, Maxine Dawn; Pearson, Stephanie S;

Pecci, Karissa Mary;Pekala, Beth A; Pekol, Sean M; Peters, Janet; Peters, Jeannine M; Poteracki, Kathryn J; Pozdal, Cortny Kristine;Pulak,Rebecca A;

Purpura, Raquel M.; Reiniche, Julianne E; Rekruciak, Kristen L;Risum, Caroline G;Ryan, Kristin Louise; Sagon, Erin Margaret; Sanchez, Alexis

Emily; Schlueter, Amy K; Schmeckpeper, Stacey Elizabeth; Schury, Mary T; Schwab, Renee Nicole; Sheehan, Sarah Elizabeth; Sisk, Jaclyn Ellen;

Sisto, Katherine; Smith, Margaret A; Stasik, Dorota; Sumner, Joellyn Aileen; Tengstrand, Eric J; Tews, Brittany Kim; Theissing, Jennifer N;Van alst,

Meghan Lynn; Walker, Dianna Lynn; Walsh, Kathryn Lois; Wentz, Lisa K;Woods, Jennifer Teresa; Yahl, Alexandria Elizabeth; Zeimetz, Kenneth Edward;

Zenawick, Jason Robert

Salary Range: 60,000 - $89,999

Ackland, Philip B; Baar, Jane E; Baldwin, Nathan E; Barnes, Brian J; Bernar, Julie M; Bhattacharyya, Andrea L; Bickelman, Cynthia A; Blackburn,

Janet L; Blaskey, Diane L; Bordenaro, Jodi L; Brace, Kenton S; Browning, Megan Eileen; Bruin, Wendy L; Brumfield, Jerilyn A; Buckley, Ellen M;

Bumber, Rosaline A;Burns, Jamie L; Button, Joel L; Callan, Jaime L; Carlson, Christopher M;Cernak iv, Frank J;Clayton, Catherine J; Coopman,

Kathleen M; Corcoran, Annmarie; Crafton, Craig M;Davis, Lisa M;Detloff, Lara C;Dicksen, Carol A; Dole, Andrew M;Domke, Maureen D; Donahue,

Jennifer E;Dul, Erin E;Durbin, Andrea M;Dyal, Jarid T;Ebel, Tammie R; Evans, Danielle; Farmer, Valerie D; Fencl, John; Ferguson, Mary Ellen;

Fleming, Deborah L;Flentge, Sarah A; Fojtik, Jane A;Gabrielow, Christine H;Gage, Jacob R;Gallagher, Sharon M; Gasa, Candis M;Geraghty,

Alesa Beth; Gray, Laura Marie; Grill, Jonathan J; Gritzman, Donna L; Hall, Kimberly S;Hayes, Anne P; Hesek, Jennifer T;Hetfleisch, Kimberly A;

Hoak, Carmel Mary; Hughes, Natalie S; Jaber, Sawsan; Jagust, Susan F;Jermolowicz, Carrie A; Johnson, Mary Ann; Johnson, Melody L; Jokubauskas,

Vanda B;Jonaitis, Jeffrey A;Jung, Annette L; Karalus, Renee Lynn; Kardas, Kelly Ann; Karr, Kristin M; Kaufman, Kathleen M; Kay, Kirstin M; Kocanda,

Lora C;Kosiak, Jennifer A;Krengiel, Patty L; Kuhny, Deborah G; Lara, Angelica; Leitelt, Rosalie M; Littel, Erin J; Matriciano, Lorie L;

Mcenery, Katie L;Mcgowan, Kathleen A;Mcnabb, Karen L;Mekhiel, David E; Mezydlo, Elizabeth A; Mickelson, Gail Lynette; Moore, Stephanie F;

Murphy, Jennifer A;Murr, Deborah C;Nagle, Marie T;Neil, Alisha M;Nice, Laura M; Novak, Tracy A; Odom, Holly R; Oess, Timothy L;Ohotzke,

Tasha N; Onesto, Melissa J;Pangrazio, Wendy L; Pellizzari, Terri L; Pikus, Alison R;Piper, Stephanie J;Poremba, Michael J;Pullara, Diane C;Rupsis,

Celeste Marie; Rush, David C; Russell, Beth Nicole; Ryan, Vickie T; Salvatori, Linda M; Schroeder, Shannon O'neal; Schultz, Jane E; Schultz, Michelle

Y; Schulz, Eileen G; Sierros, Penny; Skube, Jason T;Smith, Amy Katherine; Stark, Tiffani L; Storck, Nichole C;Strahanoski, Shelly A; Tellor, Carrie

L; Tellor, Teddy A; Thompson, Jason E; Thompson, Kristin R; Toland, Karen Lynn; Walsh, Laura Marie; Weathers, Jeff M; Whitmire, Chantal E;

Wierenga, Stephanie M; Wilkins, Scott A; Zurales, Gregory J; Zurek, Kelly M

Salary Range: $90,000 and over

CHRISTIE, ANN M; BALDWIN NATHAN; FOJTIK, JANE A; GASA, CANDIS M; GRAEFEN, CHRISTINE; KIRKUS ALEKSAS; LEIPART

MARK; LITTMANN, KIMBERLY M; MITCHELL, TROY A; O'HARA, COLLEEN E; ONESTO, MELISSA J; PORTWOOD, MICHAEL S;

RIMSNIDER, SHAWNAE M; ROUNSAVILLE, ROBERT; RYAN, VICKIE T; SCHOPPE CRAIG; SCHROEDER, KRISTEN A; SHANNON, ERIN;

SZOPINSKI JR, MICHAEL R

GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFIED PERSONNEL

Salary Range: Less Than $25,000

Ahmad, Esmeralda Sara; Amin, Ibrahim; Beissel, Nancy; Bobak, Jeanette Mary; Burke, Deborah L; Campins, Leslie Ann; Carroll, Dianne Mary; Chord,

Sylvia J; Costello, Joann; Cwik, Joyce M; De boer, Henry W;Dempsey, Brittany Lauren; Dolan, Debra L;Drake, Manda Joy; Erickson, Sylvia M; Ficek,

Mark E; Flynn, Robert Patrick; Foster, Jean M; Gajdorus, Christy Lynn; Garcia, German Geovanni; Giertuga, Krista Liane; Giroux, Joan E; Gorczak,

Helena; Greenwalt, Shannon M; Hauck, Sherie L; Hoak, Frances Mary; Holle, Jennifer A; Jeszke, Lisa Dean; Johnson, Lisa; Kadlub, Jaimie Lynn;

Kazmierczak, Douglas John; Keating, Maureen Frances; Kocielko, Juliann; Kolada, Elizabeth Ann; Kozor, Brenna Denise; Kula, Susan; Lamparelli jr.,;

Todd Orlando; Larson, Jennifer; Lavvas, Anastasia; Leonard, Terese A; Lopez, Marisa; Mallo, Gregory A; Masen, Scott A; Mccarthy, Angela G; Merenda,

Nelida; Micetic, Anne Marie; Miller, Sherry L; Mitcheff, Tari Lee; Motto jr, Ralph J; Neylon, Cheryl A; Nissen, Kelly Marie; O'callaghan, Catherine

Marie; Oldendorf, Mary Kay; Orwat, Beverly E; Osterkorn, Barbara A; Pahl, Annette Marie; Parchem, Debra L; Paukstis, Susan M; Pedigo, Mark

W; Platt, Heather C;Poia, Terrence W;Potempa, Pamela Ann; Primozic, Debra R;Reed, Maryellen W; Ringwald, Curtis; Robinson, Tina M;Romeli,

Richard H; Ruzella, Phyllis G; Serwecinski, Patricia; Sides, Janet L;Smietanski, Victoria Elizabeth; Solorsano, Melissa Jo; Spiller, Denise M;Stapleton,

Vivienne M; Strzelczyk, Kathleen Ann; Sullivan, Mary P; Tanguay, Julie Ann; Taveggia, Debra M;Thompson, Marsha A;Urba, Aldona; Walsh, Jill

Marie; Winistorfer, Julieann F

Salary Range: $25,000 - $39,999

Anderson, Katherine B;Andrulis, Julie M; Barker, Penny L; Barton, Therese J;Bergmark, David Bruce; Biciste, Laura A; Bowling, Theresa Ann;

Bumba, Patricia A; Carey, Donna L;Carlson, Carrie A;Conklin, Annette Lynn; Creedon, Loraine M;Curry, Linda C; Czarnik, Malgorzata B;Daggett,;

Doris Gail; Delgado, Frank J;Demauro, Tammy E; Engel, Colleen Marie; Francis, Therese A;Franzen, Darlene A;Fuller, Christina L;Galvin, Deirdre

M; Georgiou, Laura J; Grasser, Donna J; Haehnlein, Michael J; Hansen, Cheryl L; Hearne, Bridie M; Hiller, Susan M; Hine, Beverly; Hoinacki, Kimberly

A; Hoinacki, Samuel Matthew; Hueckstaedt, Julie M;Kadow, Tina A;Kapusta, Stella A; Keppner, Donna C;Kocanda, Teresa M;Kolacki, Eileen

M; Kosmowski, Christine M; Kowalski, Gregory A; Kozubowski, Janine M;Krupa, Bonnie L; Kryl, Joan J; Lefko, Joseph J; Lewis, Donna M; Logsdon,

Barbara A;Lukas, Michael Steven; Madonia, Charlene R; Maka, Helen; Malacina, Cynthia M;Marciniak, Linda S; Martin, Patricia A;Matthiesen,

Patricia L; Mcmaster, Kristine M;Meadows, Michael W;Miller, Debra A; Miller, Diana D; Morandi, Katarina; Moskal, Bernice; Muellerschoen, Julie

C; Muellerschoen, Wendy S; Mussay, Cari A; Nassar, Suzanne M; Negrete, Kathleen M; Nickel, April S; Nicosia, Glenna F; Norville, Karen L; Orlowski,

Maria M; Piasecki, Catherine R; Piwowar, Pamela J; Plebanek, Bonnie L; Rachan, Sharon A; Reifel, Giuseppina; Remijas, Mary H;Risum, Mih

l A l Gilb hd Ali S l d d S h id h Sh id S h i S i i A Si k

pp j y

chael A; Rosales, Gilberto; Roth-dean, Alice M; Scanland, Lynda R;Schmidt, Zachary J;Schneider, Samantha Marie; Serpico, Louise A; Simko, James

J; Stevens, Kimberly A; Tucker, Jane C; Weinrick, Maria; Wolak, Jill M; Yaeger, Denise M; Yaeger, Keith E

Salary Range: $40,000 - $59,999

Bernat, Boguslawa; Brown, Walter G; Carpenter, James E; Cerda, Mario E; Cobbett, Benjamin; Crimmins, Kelly A;Dagenais, Amiee Elizabeth; Denton,

Cindy A; Drews, Michael J; Duda, Victoria C; Duda, Zofia; Emmel, Donald W; Ferrin, Cheryl A; Fiedor, Jane A; Flounders, Patricia L; Fricilone,

Barbara A; Gritzenbach, Kelli A; Gutka, Dennis E; Johnsten, Deanna Louise; Kaczmarek, Linda A; Kocanda, William; Kornas, Janina E; Kulak, Patricia

Jean; Lopez, Steven A; Lozano, Karen L;Lukasik, Daniel; Novotny, Rusty A;O'connor, William P; Packo, Beth A; Pearson, Sharon L; Peceniak,

Mary B; Pedigo, Tod William; Sutton, Jeanne M; Waterman, Pamela Joy; Zink, Kelly Nadine

Salary Range: $60,000 - $999,999

Baud, Brian M; Colburn, James S; Conrad, Julie K; Ernst, Audrey; Esposito, Frank V; Haehnlein, Michael A; Kimzey, Mary Lou; Koniewicz, Catherine

S; Langert, Lorri A; Lynn, Michael A; Nye, Jill A; Rounsaville, Robert; Schmidt, Russell C; Siefert, Arlene A; Studholme, Antoinette; Wysong, Glen D

Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries.

Scope Shoppe, Inc.2519; National Board Resource Center 2534.35; Renee Lynn Karalus 2540.83; Literacy Resources, Inc. 2579.66; Flinn Scientific Inc.

2582.61; Judith KStewart Shervino 2585.28; US Games 2594; Western Psychological Services 2614.7; Beverly AMccarthy 2627.6; Nichole Lynn

Boyce2656.95; Janice L Burke 2680.6; Lesson Study Alliance 2690; Donald RFudala 2698; Patricia A Weber 2698; Zaner-Bloser 2701.32; William V.

MacGill &Company 2719.78; Stericycle, Inc. 2725.04; Minooka Ccsd #201 2726.5; Midwest Principals' Center Inc. 2730; Central Contracting Service,

Inc. 2778.5; Lexia Learning Systems 2800; School Outfitters 2844.5; Ken-Rich Concrete Lifting 2850; Demco, Inc. 2882.98; Cintas Corporation #344

2889.57; Perimeter Access System Services 2910.88; Andrea Kojder 2931.2; Nelco 2936.95; Sertoma Speech And Hearing Center 2940; Phoenix Consulting

Services Group L 2950; News 2You Inc. 2970.65; ABeep, LLC 2981.95; Dreambox Learning, Inc 3000; Anne Antanaitis 3023.89; Gopher

3142.44; Butler Activity Fund 3143.5; Thyssenkrupp Elevator Corporation 3158.56; Conley Excavating &Construction 3200; Discovery Education

3200; Thomson Reuters-West 3210; DONNA T MURPHY 3212.5; Illinois ASBO 3245; Parent Petroleum Inc. 3246.75; William Young School Activity

Fund 3254.5; Waterlogic Americas, Llc 3264.68; Transworld Systems, Inc. 3277.5; Speedway Gas Station 3283; Michelle MHarmatys 3320; Rochester

100 Inc. 3331.55; Regional Truck Equipment Co. Inc. 3355.41; Commercial Electronic System, Inc. 3371; Illinois Principals Association 3421;

School Nurse Supply Inc. 3459.27; Kully Supply Inc. 3465.28; Don Johnston Inc. 3530.64; B&JTowing &Auto Repair, Inc. 3558; Georgantas Detective

Agency Inc. 3566; Tobii Dynavox 2100 3582; Mary Ann Pratt 3659.55; Digital Paper Solutions Inc. 3667; Scenario Learning, Llc 3679; Raptor

3770; Renaissance 3790; Lightspeed Technologies Inc. 3791.31; Bianet Gaztambide 3839; Best Buy Online 3893.86; Wentworth Tire 3953.17; Mystery

Science, Inc 3996; Katie SLee 4000; Praxis Engaging Ideas 4090.58; Acco Brands USA, LLC 4150.9; Cross Points Sales, Inc. 4200; ISU Conference

Services 4235.75; Carol JBialon 4269.46; R&GConsultants 4347.43; Will County Regional Office of Educ 4423.75; H-O-H- Water Technology

4443.08; Chicago Backflow, Inc. 4480; Amy KSchlueter 4500; Kristen LRekruciak 4500; Mary Christan Elizabeth Sansone 4500; Christine RJanssen

4526; Amy Kristine Benavides 4550; Elizabeth Mary Moore 4550; Mahoney's Graduation Services 4664; Williams Scotsman, Inc. 4704.54; Telesolutions

Consultants, LLC 4800; Iasa 4865.86; Glen Oaks Therapeutic Day School 4868.5; Hadley Activity Fund 4913.75; Homer Tree Care Inc. 4930; Filotto

Construction, Inc. 4940; MARYTHERESE R SAJDAK 5001.53; David HTrella 5029.3; Dave's Appliance Repair Inc. 5210.9; Walmart 5319.92;

Perma Bound 5335.78; Benefit Resource, Inc. 5336; Safety-Kleen Systems, Inc. 5380.67; Premier Agendas Inc. 5462; Lawrence AKosiara 5551.73;

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Frontline Technologies Group, LLC 19325.89; S.E.A.L. South Inc. 19604.03; Seesaw Learning, Inc.; 19723.5; Learning A-Z, L.L.C. 20031.52; Iasb

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Insurance Company 49286.31; Power School Group LLC 50412.8; Teacher's Retirement System 54385.48; Ace Relocation Systems, Inc 58189.87;

Amazon/Synchrony Bank 58380.02; Midland Paper Company 59968.75; Homer District 33-C Support Staff C61906.76; Comcast 65760.47; D&J

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162806.58; Al Warren Oil Company, Inc. 171127.69; Guiding Light Academy 175754.18; Homer Health HMO IL 208304.62; Homer Council AFT Local

604 210051.62; IL Counties Risk Mgmt Trust 229560; R.L.Sohol General Contractors Inc. 253823.56; Building Automation Solutions 377094.4;

Bank of New York Mellon 400203.33; Teachers Health Insurance System 446333.96; Homer Dental 465691.52; BMO Harris P-Cards 475160.4; Canals

&Trails Credit Union 547115.96; Constellation New Energy, Inc 578507.69; Santander Leasing, LLC 644239; Tria Architecture, Inc. 681231.81; Lincoln-Way

Area Special Education 692932.06; 403(b) 758483.87; Quest Management Services, Inc. 903861.58; Illinois Dept of Revenue 1181411.91; Illinois

Municipal Retirement 1395659.27; Teacher's Retirement System 2027383.28; Frontier Construction, Inc. 2162866.94; Homer Health HMO BA

2829823.17; Federal Deposit 4008816.27; Homer Health PPO 5630227.17

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the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 33

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alum. blade $10, 20” wide

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$15 Call 708-460-8308

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hard floor cleaner FH40165,

like new with box $100 Call

708-912-4234

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773-552-7850

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100% wool, excellent condition

$20 Call 708-444-8535

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cup holders $90 Call

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$25 ea, Black free standing

tri-fold picture holder holds 15

8x10 pictures $25, Electric

wall dart baseball game $25

Call 815-806-9094

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&very comfortable $75 OBO

Call 708-921-8505

New deluxe 5piece barbecue

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homerhorizondaily.com sports

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 35

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Ray Bufka

Ray Bufka is a senior at

Lockport Township and

enters his fourth season

on the varsity bowling

team.

You are one of three

returning bowlers

from last season’s

state squad. What are

your expectations for

this season?

We’re going to have a

lot of power. There’s a lot

to improve on, but we are

going to have a good season.

How long have you

been bowling?

I started in the fifth

grade, so eight years ago.

One of my friends, Adam

Kowalik who went to

Providence and is now a

freshman bowling at St.

Ambrose University, got

me started in it. He needed

another guy for the

team and asked me. Then,

I fell in love with it.

Do you play any other

sports?

I used to play baseball,

but never at Lockport. I

played on various travel

teams throughout the area.

But then I gave it up after

eighth grade to focus on

bowling.

What is it about

bowling that makes it

the sports for you?

The community. Everyone

around me are really

good people. I love the

competition of bowling,

and it’s fun to win as a

team.

Have you ever bowled

a 300?

No, I have not. I’ve

bowled a 279 numerous

times. I just can’t get that

last strike.

What have you

learned from Lockport

boys bowling coach

Ron Davis?

I’ve learned so much in

the past four years. He’s

taught me to have consistency

and to be levelheaded.

He’s taught me

that bowling is more of

a mental game, and he’s

taught me a lot of life lessons,

too.

What do you do to

pump yourself up

before a bowling

meet?

I definitely listen to

music. It helps me keep

in the zone. I listen to a

lot of rock and roll. Stuff

like AC/DC, which my

dad [John] passed on to

me. But I like to stop listening

to music a good

amount of time before the

match so I can mesh with

everybody.

If you could be a

superhero, who would

you be and why?

Batman. I always

thought his cool gadgets

Photo submitted

put him above every other

superhero. So, it would be

fun to be him.

Do you plan to bowl in

college?

Probably not. I considered

it, but I’d rather go

for academics. I’m not

committed to a college yet,

but I’m really hoping to

get into Loyola University

and study forensic science.

They have one of the better

programs.

What is the best thing

about being an athlete

at Lockport?

The support. A lot of

my friends who aren’t in

bowling are interested in

what we do. The whole

community also supports

you, too.

Interview by Freelance Reporter

Randy Whalen

Boys Bowling

Lockport looks for lineup

to grow as season goes on

Randy Whalen

Freelance Reporter

Since boys bowling became

an official sport for

the 2002-2003 school season,

the Lockport Township

team has always been

among the top in the state.

After missing out on a

team trip to state in two

seasons ago, the Porters

returned to the state finals

last year. That was their

11th trip as a team in the 17

years the sport has existed.

That is tied for third-most

all-time.

While Lockport placed

11th overall, just missing

its 10th Top 10 state finish,

which would have tied Harlem

for the most all-time, it

was still a return trip for the

program that missed out in

the 2017-2018 season.

But five of the eight

bowlers from last season’s

state team graduated. So,

can the Porters return to

that level again when the

state finals roll around on

Friday, Jan. 31, and Saturday,

Feb. 1, at St. Clair

Bowl in O’Fallon?

“I’ve got five guys with

a lot of potential, but I

don’t know how much

they can retain right now,”

Lockport coach Ron Davis

said. “One of those is Jason

Laba, a freshman who

had the highest average of

everyone in tryouts with a

218.”

Laba, who was 10th in

the state as an individual

in the Illinois Elementary

School Association as a

seventh-grader and helped

the Homer Jr. High team to

a fourth-place finish both

that season and this past

one, too, is just one of some

new guys that want to keep

Lockport rolling.

“We’ve got some sophomores

vying for varsity,

too,” Davis said. “There’s

a lot of potential. We just

have to see who wants it.”

Ray Bufka, a four-year

varsity veteran, is one of

two returning seniors. He

will be looked to to provide

leadership, and so will

senior state returner, Tim

Hoak.

“I believe we will be a

strong team,” Hoak said.

“Especially heading to the

playoffs at the end of the

season. We have a lot of

young guys that can score.

The coaches help a lot with

that. They teach you how to

throw with consistency and

the right way.

In addition to Davis, who

is entering his sixth season

as Porters coach, assistant

coaches Alan Bean and

Roger McDaniel are on

hand to provide many years

of experience.

Hoak also knows no matter

who ends up in the starting

lineup, the Porters will

make some noise, literally.

“Some of the kids on

other teams don’t like

bowling against us,” Hoak

said. “We get loud, but we

are always polite. It’s always

a fun time.”

Junior Jim Kontos knows

that. He enters his third

varsity season and was the

Porters’ best bowler at state

by average last season. He

had a 208.8 average in 10

games.

“I think we will do

pretty good,” Kontos said.

“We have a lot of new

people, but I think this

team can be a little better

than last year. I feel this

team has its own potential.

“I know I can be a good

help to the team but we all

help each other out. We

will see how we do, but I

think we’ve got it.”

The big question is, who

else will step up and be

“it?”

“There’s a lot off opportunities;

it’s what the guys

want to do with it,” Davis

said. “We start matches

now, and boom, before you

know, it’s over.

“The whole team won’t

present itself until sometime

in December. It might

take that long to figure out

the lineup.”

Lockport was one of

three SouthWest Surban

Conference teams, along

with Lincoln-Way Central

and Lincoln-Way West, to

advance to state last season.

The Porters hope to contend

for the SWSC Blue title

again this season. Since

the conference formed in

2005-2006, they have won

more league titles (9) than

any other team, the last one

coming with a combined

title two years ago.

The Porters opened the

season this past Saturday,

Nov. 9, in the Naperville

Central Baker Kickoff

Challenge at Lisle Lanes.

There, they were second

in the qualifying round out

of 26 teams with a total of

3,191, trailing only Plainfield

South.

They were part of the

Top 9 teams that made the

gold bracket, where they

lost in the second round.

The dual meet schedule

started this past Monday,

Nov. 11, with a home match

against Plainfield Central at

Strike N Spare II.


36 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon sports

homerhorizondaily.com

Girls Volleyball

6

Loss to JCA ends Providence’s best run since 2005

Steve Millar, Sports Editor

Providence was playing

its best volleyball of

the year at the right time,

storming through its first

three playoff matches with

ease.

The Celtics won all three

in straight sets, and never

let an opponent reach 20

points.

That included a 25-19,

25-18 stomping of Marian

Catholic in the Class 3A

Joliet Catholic Sectional

semifinal Nov. 4, an especially

impressive result

considering Marian’s history

of success the last decade,

including a 3A state

championship in 2016.

The Spartans also beat

Providence earlier in the

season.

“We’ve been really on

lately, and I think it’s because

we know we’ve put

in all this work,” junior

Gillian Peterson said after

the Marian win. “We know

we can come out here and

beat any of these teams if

we play our ‘A’ game.”

Providence earned its

way into a sectional final

for the first time since 2005.

But the Celtics ran into Joliet

Catholic in its own gym

in the championship match,

and the Angels’ postseason

experience and homecourt

advantage proved too much

to overcome.

Joliet Catholic won its

11th sectional title in the

last 17 years with a 25-21,

25-20 victory over the Celtics

on Nov. 6.

Providence has still not

won a sectional championship

since 2001.

“I think the crowd really

made a difference,” Providence

senior Izabela Gorys

said. “It was just a lot of

mental things for us. We

played our hearts out, and

I’m really proud of every

single one of our girls.”

Peterson had seven kills

to lead the Celtics (23-17).

Juliana Warfield added six

and Gorys had five.

After dropping the opening

set, Providence stormed

out to a 12-4 lead in the second,

behind three kills from

Warfield and strong serving

from Abby Lab, Gorys and

Kailey Labuda.

Joliet Catholic (24-14),

though, countered with an

11-2 run to take a 15-14

lead. After the stunning

Providence’s Izabela Gorys goes up for a spike during the Celtics’ loss to the host

Angels on Nov. 6 in the Class 3A Joliet Catholic Sectional final. Steve Millar/22nd

Century Media

swing, Providence never

led again.

The Angels were without

their top player in outside

hitter Emily Wilson — who

was injured in the sectional

semifinal win over Lemont

— but got a big game from

Jillian Gray, who had seven

kills.

Despite the result, Gorys

was still proud. Providence

had lost in the sectional

semifinal round each of the

last four seasons and had

lost five straight times at

that stage, overall, including

a defeat in 2010.

“We trained hard this

year,” she said. “We really

wanted to get past the

sectional [semifinal] round

that we always get stuck at.

I’m proud of us for making

it this far. We really

fought.”

In the win over Marian,

Gorys and Warfield led

with eight kills each, Peterson

had six kills, Labuda

and Vittoria Conte added

11 digs each, and Lab had

10 assists.

“The girls came in ready

to roll and played great the

whole game,” Providence

coach Jean Phelps said of

the sectional semifinal win.

“I’m really proud of them.”

Gorys, who has committed

to play beach volleyball

at Eckerd College in Florida,

will be a big loss. But

Providence had just four

seniors on the roster, also

including Labuda, Sarah

Kerfin and Tori Quinlan.

With the bulk of the team

expected back in 2020,

Gorys plans to hear about

some major accomplishments

when she follows

the Celtics’ progress from

Florida.

“I expect big things from

every single one of them,”

she said. “I know they’re

all talented, and they’re going

to have great seasons

upcoming in the future.”

This Week In...

Porters Varsity

Athletics

Boys Bowling

■Nov. ■ 14 host Andrew,

4:30 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 18 at Naperville

Central, 4:30 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 19 at Sandburg,

4:30 p.m.

Girls Swimming

■Nov. ■ 15 at IHSA Sectional,

TBA

■Nov. ■ 16 at IHSA Sectional,

TBA

Boys Basketball

■Nov. ■ 16 host varsity

scrimmage, 7:45 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 19 host Romeoville,

6:30 p.m.

Celtics Varsity

Athletics

Boys Bowling

■Nov. ■ 16 Catholic League

North vs. South at Hillside

Bowl, 11:30 a.m.

■Nov. ■ 20 Brother Rice at

AMF Forest Lanes, 4 p.m.

Dance

■Nov. ■ 16 at Andrew Invite,

9 a.m.

Football

■Nov. ■ 15/16 IHSA

quarterfinal, TBD

Boys Hockey

■Nov. ■ 15 host St. Ignatius

at Arctic Ice Arena,

8:30 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 17 host Hinsdale

Central at Arctic Ice Arena,

5:15 p.m.


homerhorizondaily.com sports

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 37

Girls Volleyball

Lockport battles in sectional semi against Sandburg

Randy Whalen

Freelance Reporter

It was a season to remember

for the Lockport

Township girls volleyball

team.

With a second-straight

regional championship,

and going down to the wire

in the conference championship

race, the Porters

gave everything they had

this season.

But, in the end, they fell

just short in a three-set battle

with eventual sectional

champion Sandburg. That

was on Nov. 4, where the

Eagles emerged with a 25-

23, 21-25, 25-13 victory

in the opening semifinal

of the Class 4A Sandburg

Sectional.

The Eagles then defeated

District 230 rival Andrew

25-17, 25-17 on Nov. 6 in

the sectional title match.

Sandburg (34-5 thorough

Nov. 6) played two-time

defending Class 4A state

champion Marist on Friday,

Nov. 8, at the Eisenhower

Supersectional.

Lockport (26-12) wondered

what could have

been but still had a great

season.

“In 2018, we finished

with a record of 28-10

and won our first regional

championship since 2011,”

Lockport coach Nick Mraz

said. “We did that all with

only two seniors, so I

knew we had the potential

to be dangerous this year. I

made our schedule tougher

for 2019, so although we

finished 26-12, it wasn’t

like we didn’t perform as

well as 2018.

“In fact, there were moments

during the season

where I said to myself,

‘This is the best a Lockport

team has played since

I’ve been here.”

Lockport’s Morgan Schmutzler competes during the opening semifinal Nov. 4 against Sandburg at the Class 4A Sandburg Sectional.

Jeff Vorva/22nd Century Media

Senior outside hitter

Taylor Morgan, a threeyear

varsity veteran,

agreed.

“There’s so much to remember,”

Morgan said.

“The connections with the

girls and everything. We

had a rewarding season. It

was just great being a part

of our growth.”

Morgan did her part

in her final high school

match, as she had nine

kills. Junior oppositeside

hitter Nadia Goich

also added nine kills and

nine digs. Sophomore setter

Dovile Gorys was her

steady self with 18 assists,

14 digs and a pair of aces.

Sandburg was paced

by junior right-side hitter

Keegan Carey (10 kills),

four-year libero Rachel

Krasowski (25 digs) and

senior setter Hailey Farrell.

It was the Eagles’ third

victory over Lockport this

season. The others were by

the scores of 25-21, 25-23

on Aug. 31 in the quarterfinal

of the Plinfield North

Invite, and then 25-21, 25-

20 on Oct. 16 in the teams’

SouthWeast Suburban

Conference Blue Division

matchup in Orland Park.

“It’s tough to beat a good

team three times,” Sandburg

coach David Vales

said. “It was a big battle

that went three sets. Give

the Porters credit. But we

were able to make adjustments

on the fly.”

With the Eagles up 11-8

in the third set, Carey had

two kills and a block in a

5-0 run which put them

ahead 16-8. That was it,

as Sandburg coasted to the

victory.

The ending was anticlimactic

compared to the

first two sets. Lockport led

the opener 19-15, but the

Eagles rallied for a 5-0 run

behind senior outside hitter

Shelby Stefanon to take

the lead. Then, the Porters

forged a tie at 23-23 but

had a net violation and a

hit out of bounds.

The second set was

tied at 16-16. Then, the

Porters, who finished the

season with a 5-6 record

in three-set matches after

losing their first four of

that length, pulled away,

as Sandburg made some

hitting errors.

“I feel we were playing

well and connecting,”

Morgan said of the Porters

in the match. “Everyone

was giving 100 percent.

Between the second and

third set, we knew we

could do it. Our mindset

was that we were ready to

go. But [the Eagles] just

stepped up at the end.

“It was intense playing

on their court with all the

people there. That was the

largest crowd that I played

against.”

Lockport graduates

eight seniors. They are

Leena Ajibola, Emily

DeBlecourt, Nora Dykstra,

Hannah Knippenberg,

Morgan, Becca Oldendorf,

Kaitlyn Sadler and Morgan

Schmutzler.

“I still think the team

will be very good next

year,” Morgan said. “They

will still have a lot of

height and a lot of skilled

players. Plus, they will

have a lot of good incoming

players.”

Mraz, who is a 2007

Sandburg graduate, completed

his fifth season as

the Porters girls coach. He

is also the boys coach at the

school, and the girls completed

their fourth-straight

season of 20 wins or more.

With a lot of lower-level

talent, that streak of success

should continue next fall.

“Taking down Joliet

West for the regional championship

was a match I will

never forget,” Mraz said of

the Porters’ 25-15, 14-25,

30-28 win on Oct. 31 at

home. “That gave us backto-back

regional championships

for the first time

since 2005/2006. We had

a wonderful group of girls

who were always willing

to listen and work hard. We

will miss our eight seniors

but still have high expectations

going into next year

with our returning varsity

girls joining an undefeated

SWSC JV squad.”


38 | November 14, 2019 | the homer horizon sports

homerhorizondaily.com

Porters thrilled to finish in Top 10 at Detweiller Park

Girls cross country

team set up well

for the future

Jeff DeGraw

Freelance Reporter

The Lockport girls cross

country program is back.

The tradition for the

Porters team is a special

one, as they have qualified

as a team for the finals

every year since 1987, except

for the 2008 season.

But this year, there was a

mission to not let recent

history repeat itself.

This past Saturday, Nov.

9, at the IHSA state cross

country championships on

the famed Detweiller Park

course, the Porters placed

10th in 3A, and it was their

first Top 10 finish since a

fifth in 2014.

The past four years have

been a disappointment at

the state finals, as the Porters

finished 22nd in 2018,

23rd in 2017 and 17th in

both 2016 and 2015.

Everyone knew within

the program that this year

may be different after taking

the Top 6 places at the

regional meet and finishing

in a tie for third at the

sectional meet. The team

was running well at the

right time of the year.

“This is so awesome,”

a very happy Porter coach

Regan Cronholm said. “To

be the 10th-best team in

the state is pretty cool.”

Lockport finished with a

team total of 298, only two

points behind ninth-place

Minooka, and with the Top

7 comprised of four freshmen

and a junior, the future

certainly looks bright.

The Porters were led by

the 34th-place finish of junior

Josephine Bober, who

covered the three-mile

course in 17 minutes, 35

seconds. She was followed

by freshman Kayla Shea

(17:58) in 59th, senior Abbey

Kozak (18:08) 78th,

freshmen Monica Skibicki

(18:11) 83rd and Caroline

Turner (18:42) in 130th to

round out the Top 5 scorers.

Senior Madison Polinski

(19:01) and freshman Hannah

Miller (19:13) were the

sixth and seventh runners.

Bober finished just nine

places out of All-State

honors, as the Top 25 in

the race achieve a state

medal.

“We came in hoping to

be in the teens as a team

place,” Cronholm said.

“But these girls have

worked so hard, especially

over the summer, to get

ready for the season. They

stayed together as a team,

and all the work paid off.

“I didn’t run cross country

in high school, and I

always worry [if] I’m doing

it right. Our girls made

some adjustments over

the summer as far as their

practice, worked at everything

I ask of them, and

this validates what we are

doing and the progression

that we are making. I’m

so happy right now, and I

know every one of these

girls are. And it’s about

everyone on this team, not

just the ones who ran today.

They all contributed

to this today.”

“We are really happy

with our 10th-place finish,”

Polinski said. “This is

a huge improvement over

the last couple of years, but

the key was that we learned

things from the past, and

we all wanted to be better.”

With the weather being

picture perfect, the

Porters got out strong and

stayed with their plan during

the race.

“We had a great mix of

teammates this year, and

we all helped each other,

especially with the great

group of freshmen we had,”

Kozak said. “With Madison

[Polinski], Josephine

[Bober] and myself back

from last year, we didn’t

want that disappointment

again. We have ran here before,

so we knew what was

coming, and the freshmen

handled it so well. This is a

great way for the seniors to

end their Porter cross country

careers.”

The Porter boys had one

participant in the finals,

as senior Ross Cronholm

finished 131st, running

15:38 in a race that saw

the iconic course record of

13:50, set in 1972 by Craig

Virgin of Lebanon, broken

by Hersey high school senior

Josh Methner, who

ran 13:49.

“We just had too many

little injuries during the

season and could never really

get everyone together

at the same time,” Porter

coach Tom Razo said.

“I’m glad Ross got to run,

especially being a senior.”

Monica Skibicki, a Lockport freshman, finished with

a time of 18:11 at the Illinois High School Association

Class 3A state cross country finals held on Saturday,

Nov. 9, at Detweiller Park in Peoria. Clark Brooks/

PhotoNews Media

3

Our staff’s predictions for the top games in the quarterfinals of the playoffs

There are still just two teams left from our area

– Providence and Lincoln-Way East. Could we

see two teams in the state title game in DeKalb

two days after belching up our Thanksgiving Day

meals? It is a possibility.

54-12

53-13

Thomas Czaja |

Editor

• LWE 27, Homewood-Flossmoor

24. Vikings will give Griffins their

closest game of the season in

rematch, but East handles them

again to advance.

• Providence 35, Chatham Glenwood

28. Celtics have proven time and

again to throw out the records this

time of year – they know how to

make a postseason run.

52-14

49-17

48-18

Sean Hastings |

Contributing Editor

• LW East 34, Homewood-Flossmoor

28. Griffins win battle of two area

powerhouses.

• Providence 24, Chatham Glenwood

14. Celtics utilize home-field

advantage.

46-20

GameS of the Week

• Homewood-Flossmoor (10-1) at LW East (11-0)

• Chatham Glenwood (11-0) at Providence (8-3)

Jeff Vorva |

Sports Editor

• LWE 35, Homewood-Flossmoor 14. A

rematch of the regular season Game

of the Century should receive plenty

of hype, but Griffs’ are refocused

after being shut out in second half

against Niles Notre Dame.

• Providence 28, Chatham Glenwood

23. Hay, Hay! Coach Dave Hay of

Glenwood brings in a spiffy 34-9 career

record but the Celtics should send

him home with double digit losses

after a fun game in New Lenox.

Steve Millar |

Sports Editor

• LWE 31, Homewood-Flossmoor 20.

East QB Kyle Quinn did not play

in the regular season win over the

Vikings. He will throw a couple of

TD passes in this one to get the

Griffins back into the semifinals.

• Providence 31, Chatham Glenwood

28. Beating undefeated teams in

back-to-back weeks is a tough task,

but if the Celtics offense keeps

rolling, they can pull it off.

Joe Coughlin |

Publisher

• LWE 24, Homewood-Flossmoor 14.

Griffins defense answers the call

against familiar foe.

• Providence 45, Chatham Glenwood

38. Celtics are on fire and outscore

another big-time opponent.

Heather Warthen |

Chief Marketing Officer

• LWE 24, Homewood-Flossmoor 21.

Griffins continue hot streak and

close out the Vikings’ season.

• Providence 28, Chatham Glenwood

21. Home-field advantage does the

Celtics good as they continue their

playoff march.


homerhorizondaily.com sports

the homer horizon | November 14, 2019 | 39

fastbreak

Football

Vaughn unstoppable as Providence ends Crete-Monee’s undefeated season

4

22nd Century Media File

Photo

1st and 3

LTHS girls cross

country ends Top 10

at state

1. Finding success

The Lockport girls

cross country team

ended the season

with a 10th-place

finish at the IHSA

Class 3A state

cross country finals

on Saturday, Nov.

9, at Detweiller

Park in Peoria.

2. Front of the pack

Lockport junior

Josephine Bober

(above) led her

team with a

34th-place finish,

completing the

three-mile course

in 17:35 at state

competition.

3. Also running

Ross Cronholm, the

lone representative

for the Lockport

boys cross country

team at state,

finished in 131st

place with a time

of 15:38.

Randy Whalen

Freelance Reporter

On Saturday, Aaron

Vaughn ran into some old

friends — and past them,

around them and through

them.

Providence’s sophomore

running back, who

is from Crete, ran wild

to help end the season of

Crete-Monee, which rostered

many of Vaughn’s

friends.

So, does he feel bad

about that?

“A little bit,” he said

before pausing. “Well, not

really. It’s business.”

Vaughn made sure the

host Celtics took care of

business, as he ran 26

times for 366 yards and

scored four touchdowns.

His career-best performance

helped Providence

pull away from the Warriors

for an unforgettable

61-37 victory in a Class

6A second-round playoff

game on Nov. 9 in New

Lenox.

There were nearly 900

combined yards of offense

in the game. The 61

points are the second most

in Providence postseason

history. The record is 68

in a shutout of Fenger in a

first-round playoff game in

2002.

The Celtics (8-3) are

now 19-1 in second-round

playoff games, including

9-0 at home, in the past

25 years. They will host

another undefeated team

– Glenwood (11-0), from

Providence’s Aaron Vaughn breaks off a big run as the

Celtics’ sideline cheers him on Saturday, Nov. 9, in New

Lenox. Vaughn ran for 366 yards and four touchdowns

in Providence’s 61-37 win. Bob Klein/22nd Century Media

downstate Chatham, in a

quarterfinal.

Crete-Monee (10-1), the

2018 6A state runner-up,

was hoping to make its

fourth state title game appearance

in the past eight

seasons. But Vaughn had

other ideas. Even if he was

anxious about them.

“I was nervous,” Vaughn

said. “I came out and felt

like I was going to puke.

These were the guys I grew

up with. I knew them, and

they knew me. I couldn’t

sleep [Friday] night. I

woke up at six [Saturday

morning], and I was going

to sleep until eight.”

Those nerves did not

matter much, as Vaughn

scored on runs of 3, 65,

42 and 33 yards. The final

two of those came in the

last 1:44 of the game, as

the Celtics capped it off by

scoring the final 21 points.

“Every time [the Warriors]

scored, I told our

guys, ‘That’s OK,” Vaughn

said. “We will just score

again and add to our stats.

We have the best offensive

line in the state, and they

showed that.”

Indeed, the all-senior offensive

line of Tre Allen,

Adam Banathy, Michael

Charnot, Oliver Cox and

Jake Renfro, along with

junior tight end Jameson

Geers, helped lead the

way, as 481 of the Celtics’

589 total yards came on

the ground.

But in a game where

Vaughn was the star, it was

a handoff by him that led

to the most important play

of the game.

Crete-Monee had cut

the Celtics’ lead to 40-37

with 8:48 to play on a 50-

yard TD run by Trayvon

Rudolph. It was the fourth

touchdown run of the

game by the senior quarterback

(23 carries, 201

yards; 12-of-19 passing,

Crete-Monee at Providence

1 2 3 4 F

Crete-Monee 3 13 8 13 37

Providence 7 17 10 27 61

THREE STARS OF THE GAME

1. Aaron Vaughn, Providence, sophomore running back: 26

carries - 366 yards, four TDs of 3, 65, 42 and 33 yards.

2. Trayvon Rudolph, Crete-Monee senior quarterback: 23

carries - 201 yards, four TDs of 38, 40, 1 and 50 yards.

Also 12-of-19 passing for 83 yards.

3. Kevin Conway, Providence, junior quarterback; 20 carries

- 96 yards, three TDs of 7, 1 and 1 yards. Also 4-of-6

passing for 108 yards, including a 66-yard TD pass to

Lucas Porto.

Up Next: Providence hosts Glenwood (11-0) in a Class 6A

quarterfinal.

83 yards) following earlier

ones of 38, 40 and 1 yard.

On the ensuing possession,

Providence had

a third-and-16 from its

own 49. To make matters

worse, junior quarterback

Kevin Conway had left

the game moments before

after taking a big hit. So,

Vaughn lined up at quarterback

in the Wildcat formation.

Vaughn handed it

off to Kevin Countryman,

who ran 18 yards for a first

down.

Countryman, a senior

defensive back who had

an interception earlier in

the game, was playing offense

for the first time this

season.

Conway came back in

and scored on a 1-yard run

with 3:53 remaining to up

the lead to 47-37.

Conway ran 20 times

for 96 yards, including TD

runs of 7, 1 and 1 yards.

He was also 4-of-6 passing

for 108 yards, including a

66-yard TD pass to senior

Lucas Porto.

“I came in with an injured

ankle, but on that

play, I got clobbered in

the ribs,” Conway said of

leaving the game. “I just

needed to take a play or

two off. No, I have never

played in a game like this.

But our tough schedule

prepared us for it.

“Still, it was insane. But

[Vaughn] did the greatest

job I’ve ever seen by a running

back.”

The Warriors never led.

They closed within 17-

16 on Rudolph’s 40-yard

run with 3:35 to play in

the second quarter. Conway

came right back and

hit Porto with the 66-yard

TD on the next play from

scrimmage, and that 24-16

advantage stood up as the

halftime score.

LISTEN UP

“We came in hoping to be in the teens as a team place. But these girls

have worked so hard, especially over the summer, to get ready for the

season. They stayed together as a team, and all the work paid off.”

Regan Cronholm — Porters girls cross country coach, on the team’s

end result at state

Tune In

Boys Bowling

At the home lanes — 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14,

vs. Andrew

• The Porters welcome the T-Bolts to town in an

early season matchup.

Index

36 - This Week In

35 - Athlete of the Week

FASTBREAK is compiled by Editor Thomas

Czaja, tom@homerhorizon.com.


homer glen’s Hometown Newspaper | November 14, 2019

On to the quarterfinals

Providence football knocks off

previously unbeaten Crete-Monee in

second round of playoffs, Page 39

Playing a rival LTHS

girls volleyball leaves it all out on

the court against Eagles in sectional

semifinal matchup, Page 37

LTHS girls

cross country

team runs to

10th place at

state in Peoria,

Page 38

Lockport’s Abbey

Kozak, a senior, runs

in the Illinois High

School Association

Class 3A state cross

country finals on

Saturday, Nov. 9, at

Detweiller Park in

Peoria. Clark Brooks/

PhotoNews Media

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