December 2019 253 Lifestyle Magazine

livinglocal360

December 2019 253 Lifestyle Magazine

ISSUE NO. 12

DECEMBER 2019

L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E

TAFOYA

Q&A WITH THE FOUNDER

OF LADY 12 APPAREL

Merry Christmas!

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FIRST CROSS-COUNTRY AUTOMOBILE TRIP

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 1


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 5


MARKETING

WASHINGTON MARKETING DIRECTOR

Cassie Riendeau | 360.798.3061

cassie@livinglocal360.com

DIGITAL MARKETING DIRECTOR | Whitney Lebsock

SALES AND MARKETING ASSISTANT

Morgan Selenius | 360-865-6511

morgan@like-media.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR | CONTENT MANAGER

Jillian Chandler | jillian@livinglocal360.com

STAFF WRITER

Colin Anderson | colin@livinglocal360.com

OPERATIONS

MANAGING PARTNER | Kim Russo

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | Steve Russo

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS | Rachel Figgins

DESIGN

DESIGN DIRECTOR | Maddie Horton

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Donna Johnson

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Darbey Russo

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252 Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and

distributed freely throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements

do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the

publisher. 253 Lifestyle Magazine is not responsible

for omissions or information that has been

misrepresented to the magazine. 253 Lifestyle

Magazine is produced and published by Like Media,

and no part of this publication may be reproduced or

transmitted without the permission of the publisher.

6

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


• Legal

separation

and divorce

• Parenting plans

• Child support

• Prenuptial

agreements

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 7


PUBLISHER’S Picks

Steve Russo

Executive Director

Celebrate the Season

THE END OF THE YEAR IS ALWAYS ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING—

and anticipated—times of year. Tables were surrounded by loved ones,

both family and friends, sharing beautiful meals prepared with heart, as

Thanksgiving took to the stage. Now, as December has arrived, there are

the holidays of Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa that all look forward

to.

Celebrations of our cultures and beliefs, passed down from generation to

generation, are truly fulfilling in themselves. It is important to not focus

on the secular aspect of these holidays but the meaning behind each and

their importance to you and your family.

In this month’s issue of 253 Lifestyle Magazine, we are closing out our first

year with some great articles you’re sure to enjoy.

In late October, the Humane Society of Tacoma & Pierce County hosted

its inaugural Fur Ball, where more than 200 animal lovers gathered

for an evening of fundraising for these furry friends, raising more than

$147,000 for the cause!

Our feature story takes readers back to 1903, when the first successful

cross-country automobile trip was achieved by Horatio Jackson and his

co-driver and mechanic Sewall Crocker, a Tacoma native.

If you’re in search for that perfect Christmas tree, we’ve compiled a list of

trees to suit any taste—and size! It’s time to get out to that local tree farm

or lot, if you haven’t already.

You’ll want to take a look at our arts and entertainment calendar, as

you’re sure to find some wonderful activities taking place around the

community, filled with the season’s spirit. Attending one of these events

with friends or family is a great way to spend time together during the

holidays.

As this time of year can be joyful, albeit stressful, our travel story takes

you to warm and sunny Arizona—the perfect retreat from the cold and to

recoup from all the holiday excitement.

Happy Holidays to all of you from our 253 family. May blessings abound

not only this season but always.

28 16 36 22

Q&A WITH BRANDELYN

TAFOYA: FOUNDER

OF LADY 12

THE PERFECT

CHRISTMAS TREE

CELEBRATE AMERICA’S

LOVE AFFAIR WITH

AUTOMOBILES

MAKING HAPPY

HAPPEN

8

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 9


INSIDE

56

36

16

40

About the cover

2019 HAS BEEN AN EXCITING

YEAR FOR 253 LIFESTYLE

MAGAZINE, and we are proud

to feature Lady 12 entrepreneur

Brandelyn Tafoya on our

December cover of 253, our final

cover of 2019. The designer offers

stylish and flattering clothing for

all ages and sizes, and has gained

a massive following among

female Seahwks fan. She’s excited

to share her story with our readers

in this issue of 253!

COVER PHOTO BY SAMANTHA

ELISE TILLMAN.

10 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

HOME

Dreamy Bathroom Makeover:

Remodeling a bathroom with a

stunning shower enclosure

TRENDING

22

The Perfect Christmas Tree: Which

variety is right for you?

TACOMA

Making Happy Happen: Inaugural Fur

Ball raises nearly $150,000 for Humane

Society for Tacoma & Pierce County

Q&A

Brandelyn Tafoya: Founder of Lady 12

HEALTH

Tips and informational articles about

living a healthy, active lifestyle

12 PIN POINT

LeMay - America’s Car Museum:

Celebrate America’s love affair

with automobiles

16

22

28

32

FEATURED

Riding Shotgun: Tacoma man had frontrow

seat on first successful cross-country

automobile trip

ARTS &

ENTERTAINMENT

Discover your local art scene and never

miss an event near you!

TRAVEL

36

40

50

60

Arizona: A warm-weather winter getaway


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12 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Home

dreamy bathroom makeover

REMODELING A BATHROOM WITH A STUNNING SHOWER ENCLOSURE

BY JEREMY ANDERSON AND SHERYL BUSHAW

PHOTOS BY AAA KARTAK GLASS & CLOSET CORP

According to a survey from the National Association of Home Builders, bathroom remodels are the number one desired remodel

for homeowners. There are many great styles and choices that can be incorporated into a bathroom remodel, and with so many

options available, it can be tricky to know where to start or what to focus on. As a member of Master Builders Association Pierce

County (MBA Pierce), the experts at AAA KARTAK Glass & Closet Corp. share some tips on transforming your bathroom space

into the oasis you’ve always dreamed of.

“A popular choice for a bathroom remodel includes a shower enclosure,” says Jeremy Anderson. “In order to achieve this sleek yet functional

feature, we’d like to share some design tips you should know before you get started.”

Space

When designing your new shower enclosure, the first step is evaluating the space. Finding the right shower enclosure can complement both

small and large spaces. Ask yourself, is there enough room for a swing door that hinges inward and outward? Or do you need an option

that slides like a frameless barn door-style enclosure? Another option is a free-standing glass panel, which has the advantage of making the

bathroom feel open; a smart choice for smaller spaces.

One last consideration is aging in your home. If you have enough space, make your shower enclosure ADA compliant, which will increase

the resale value and add longevity to the utility of the bathroom while the large opening offers a very bold and stylish statement.

Proportion

Getting the right height and width of the enclosure is very important. If you have a high ceiling, you’ll need taller glass panels and doors so

the glass looks balanced. A short glass panel in a tall-ceiling bathroom can turn out looking awkward. Inversely, if you have a short ceiling,

you may need a shorter panel—otherwise it can feel too overbearing in your space. Also, consider the size of the door opening. The average

door opening width is 28 inches. If you have a larger space, you can opt for a wider door opening. However, if you have a small space, you

can go down to 24 inches. Smaller than 24 inches is not recommended.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 13


Type of Glass

Textured or clear? There are many types of glass to choose from for the shower enclosure.

It all comes down to personal style and priorities. With a textured glass like rain or satinetched,

the glass design becomes the feature. Also, it provides the privacy that many people

desire. However, clear glass is beautiful, clean and timeless. Clear glass is a great option if

you want to feature beautiful stone or tile work. If you’ve invested in unique tile, we suggest

showcasing it with the clear glass option. Clear glass also adds visual depth and makes your

bathroom feel larger.

Controls

When re-building the shower, if the shower head is on the back wall away from door,

consider putting controls by the door opening. This configuration is more practical as it

allows you to turn on the water without getting wet, and many clients are very appreciative

of this tip.

Cost

With any remodel, the first step is to determine your budget. Then decide what you would

like your dream shower enclosure to include. Some price distinctions to consider are framed,

semi-frameless or frameless heavy glass. If you’re on a tight budget, a framed enclosure is a

good solution. Another distinction is the thickness of the glass. Most homeowners gravitate

toward a heavy glass door for their bathroom remodel. Though sticking to the budget is

important, style and functionality are important too.

Before starting demo or construction, it is always best to consult with shower door

professionals like AAA KARTAK Glass & Closet to help answer questions and avoid any

costly mistakes. Professional design consultants can help the decision process by guiding

you through selection of the right hardware color, style of glass, size of door, and even

picking out the unique-style handle to make a statement. That way, at the end of the day,

you’ll have a highly functional bathroom that embodies your personal style.

MBA Pierce is an association of over 650 members that include contractors, designers,

landscapers and other industry-related businesses. Builder members are required to be

registered, bonded and insured. Visit MBAPierce.com for a free Buyer’s Guide and Directory.

14 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Happy Holidays

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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 15


Trending

THE PERFECT

CHRISTMAS

TREE

Which variety is right

for you?

By Colin Anderson

The focal point of just about any

indoor holiday decorating is the

Christmas tree. Most are put

up shortly after Thanksgiving

and don’t come down until right around

New Year’s Day. They can be pint sized for

apartments or grand spectacles in homes

with vaulted ceilings. How you decorate

says a lot about your family, and there is

truly no wrong way to do it. When picking

out the perfect tree there is more that goes

into it than how it looks on the lot. Take into

consideration the differences in some of the

most popular styles when it’s time to settle

on your family’s tree.

Scotch Pine

If vacuuming needles is your least favorite

part about having a tree in the home,

consider a Scotch or Scots Pine. This

common Christmas tree holds its needles

longer than most and is also sturdy enough

for heavy ornaments and long light strings.

Longer needles make hanging ornaments

easier.

16 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Search for a local scout group or

organization selling trees as a

fundraiser, or stop by some

of our favorite local spots and grab a

tree raised and cared for by a

community member.

Noble Fir

This tree grows especially well in the Northwest and can reach

heights of over 200 feet (if you have a really really big house).

The Noble Fir branches tend to rise upward and are sturdy,

again allowing for heavier ornaments without creating too

much of a sagging look. Evenly spaced branches and short

needles allow for the decorations to really stand out. Noble Firs

are also popular choices in making wreaths and garland due to

their strength.

Grand Fir

The Grand Fir has a few differences from its relatives, mostly

within the needle coloring—which tends to be more yellowgreen

instead of blue-green but also very shiny. Grand Firs

tend to run thicker than Noble Firs, but they also give off an

even stronger smell for longer than some of its counterparts.

Hanging heavy objects is also usually not a problem, and trunks

also tend to be very straight in this classic Christmas tree.

Douglas Fir

If allowed to grow, Douglas Firs can reach heights of over 300

feet! They grow well in many climates, making them one of

the most common varieties across the nation. The shape of a

Douglas is unique in that it is typically more uniform and can

even take up the appearance of a pyramid. It gives off one of

the strongest, albeit pleasant, scents of any tree, so if you enjoy

that fresh cut smell throughout the holiday, this is likely your

best bet.

Artificial

Many will scoff at this, myself included, but artificial trees

have come a long way since their inception. They are made to

mimic all the popular varieties of trees, and if you invest in a

quality product, many look exactly like the real thing—from

a distance. People use artificial if their tree is styled to match

a room while others simply enjoy the convenience of easy

setup and takedown. Those with sensitivity to smell or who are

18 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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unfortunately allergic to certain trees can also enjoy the holiday

spirit this way.

You can get your tree from a number of places including big box

stores. While there is convenience in this, we encourage you to

support local. Search for a local scout group or organization selling

trees as a fundraiser, or stop by some of our favorite local spots and

grab a tree raised and cared for by a community member.

Haul out the holly, fill up the

stockings ... for we need a little

Christmas ... right this very minute.

Bliss Manor Farm

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Gig Harbor, Washington

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The Wreath Works

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Port Orchard, Washington

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Five Springs Tree Farm

3263 SE Five Springs Lane

Olalla, Washington

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20 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


IS COMING TO ACM!

DECEMBER 14 - 15 & 21 - 22

11 am – 3 pm

Photos with Santa are FREE with admission.

Visit americascarmuseum.org for more information.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 21


Tacoma

MAKING HAPPY

HAPPEN

INAUGURAL FUR BALL RAISES NEARLY $150,000 FOR

HUMANE SOCIETY FOR TACOMA & PIERCE COUNT

By Anneli Haralson

Photos Courtesy of Van Gachnang Photography

The brown, matted, quivering ball of fur whimpered

quietly in the hands of its owner. Moving aside the

mess of knots, the Shih Tzu Terrier mix’s brown eyes

were barely visible. Three of her bottom teeth jutted out

below her upper lip and she smelled. Bad. Her name was Emily,

and her owner was standing in the lobby of the Humane Society

for Tacoma & Pierce County asking the staff to euthanize the tiny

dog.

Emily had an old injury. She was missing 19 teeth and had a

serious skin infection hiding underneath her matted coat. That’s

what was making her smell, but Emily’s owner was done trying to

care for her and thought the 8-year-old dog had no other options.

The staff at the shelter saw the situation differently.

“The team at the Society knew euthanasia was not the right choice

for Emily,” Victoria Gingrey, the Society’s communications

manager, recalls from that summer day earlier this year. “She had

plenty of life left.”

The staff was immediately taken with Emily’s sweet personality,

Victoria says, and the small dog was examined before receiving

a haircut and medical care for the skin infection on her neck and

rotten teeth. With daily treatment, the infection healed and, once

her hair grew back and eight more teeth were removed, Emily

looked like a new dog. She was fostered by a shelter volunteer

until she was fully healed. Then, this fall, she found a new home.

Emily was just one of the nearly 10,000 animals cared for this year

by the Humane Society for Tacoma & Pierce County. The Society

is Washington’s oldest and largest animal welfare agency and, as

a nonprofit open admission shelter, it does not turn away any

homeless, abused or abandoned animals that come through its

doors. “We will work with them to make sure they have the best

possible outcome,” Victoria says. Animals are never euthanized

for being there too long or if the shelter is too crowded.

Last year, the Society spent nearly $1.5 million on medical

services—25 percent of its total operating budget.

22 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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“The greatest expense is veterinary treatment,” Victoria says. “I always

tell people to think of the price of taking their dog to the vet and then

multiply that by 10,000.”

But the Society’s work goes beyond rehabilitating homeless and

surrendered pets for adoption. It also offers a number of community

resources including supporting affordable spay and neuter services,

microchipping, a pet food pantry for those in temporary need of no-cost

food, and a barn cat program for non-domesticated cats.

“We need all of that to work together in order to make happy happen,”

Victoria says.

None of this work is possible without funding. As a nonprofit

organization, the Society relies wholly on private donors, grants,

contracts and adoption fees to fund its work. In 2018, the shelter received

$6 million. It spent $5.9 million.

“We really are proud of the work that we’re doing,” Victoria says. “We’re

caring for lots of animals on a tight budget.”

But there’s more that needs to be done. In the Society’s 2018 annual

report, shelter CEO Stuart

Earley called for greater

veterinary care, the

development of educational

programs around animal

welfare, and the construction

THE SOCIETY

RELIES WHOLLY ON

of a new shelter and animal PRIVATE DONORS,

welfare campus to ensure

a sustainable future for the GRANTS, CONTRACTS

Society.

“Most importantly, we need

to put animals at the heart

of everything we do,” he

indicated in the report.

AND ADOPTION FEES

TO FUND ITS WORK.

IN 2018, THE SHELTER

RECEIVED $6

With Earley’s hopes for the

future in mind, the Humane

Society for Tacoma & Pierce

County held its inaugural

Fur Ball on October 25.

MILLION. IT SPENT

$5.9 MILLION.

More than 200 animal lovers

gathered at the Tacoma Yacht

Club for a night of drinks,

dancing and fundraising.

Through ticket sales, an auction and online paddle raise, the one-night

event raised over $147,000.

“We were overjoyed at the support of our community,” Victoria says. “The

intention was to celebrate another year of good work and raise money to

do it for more years to come.”

The Society has been in the animal life-saving business since 1888. In the

summer of that year, a drunken logger brought a bear cub to the corner

of 8th Street and Pacific Avenue and began kicking it to get it to perform

tricks. A group of citizens gathered and raised concerns over the welfare

of the cub. The logger was arrested and, later that week, a group of town

leaders met to form what was then called the Tacoma Humane Society—

only the fourth such organization of its kind in the nation.

“It was definitely revolutionary,” Victoria says. “Nothing like that had

existed prior.”

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 25


Initially, the shelter concentrated on protecting livestock, working

animals, and even children. When orphanages were established

and machinery took over farm work in the early 20th century, the

Society’s staff began focusing its energy on domestic pets. During

the ‘30s and ‘40s, the Society operated a shelter in the Oakland

neighborhood of Tacoma where it rescued animals, found homes

for strays and sponsored an annual Mutt Show. In the early 1950s,

the Society moved into a facility on Center Street. In 1997, a new

facility—the William Gazecki Animal Shelter—was built there and

remains today.

Those interested in helping the Humane Society continue its work

can do so in multiple ways:

• Volunteer: Those 16 years of age and older who can commit to

six hours of work each month for six months are invited to apply.

Applications are available online.

• Foster: Provide a nurturing home for a shelter pet for one night

or multiple months. Apply online.

• Donate items: From food to toys and collars, the Humane Society

is always in need of items to help care for their animals. Find a list

of needed items online at TheHumaneSociety.org/more-ways-todonate/donate-items.

• Become a Friend: Sign up to become a monthly donor.

• Donate money, stock or vehicles: Find out more online.

• Attend an event: The Society holds two annual events—the Doga-Thon

each June and the Fur Ball. Find more information at

TheHumaneSociety.org/events.

• Adopt a Pet: Adoption fees help to fund Society programs, and

the shelter regularly runs adoption specials. Follow them on

social media to find out about adoption events this coming year.

26 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Q&A

BRANDELYN

TAFOYA

FOUNDER OF LADY 12

BY MARGUERITE CLEVELAND | PHOTOS BY SAMANTHA ELISE TILLMAN

28 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Brandelyn Tafoya never dreamed a trip to Whole Foods would be the day

she met her future husband Joe Tafoya. She turned down his request for

lunch, but feeling bad she changed her mind and invited him to her barn

where he helped her shovel manure for two hours. She had no idea when

they met that he was a “famous” football player and had just moved to

Seattle a week prior to play for the Seahawks. The two are now married

with a 6-year-old son, Jaxon, who is obsessed with baseball, and an 8-yearold

daughter, Brooklyn, who is an accomplished equestrian.

30 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


DURING HER YEARS

AS A FOOTBALL WIFE,

BRANDELYN NOTICED

A LACK OF FOOTBALL

APPAREL FOR WOMEN.

THE ONLY PRODUCTS

ON THE MARKET WERE

NONDESCRIPT, SIZED

FOR MEN, AND JUST

WEREN’T CUTE!

During her years as a football wife, Brandelyn

noticed a lack of football apparel for women. The

only products on the market were nondescript,

sized for men, and just weren’t cute! She began

designing patterns and stylish clothes that would

flatter women. In 2013, she launched Lady 12, and

it was an immediate hit with female Seahawks

fans who loved her flattering tees, yoga pants and

accessories. Brandelyn designed items in mind that

you could wear for work or for game day but feels

everyone needs some sparkle in their life. Many of

her designs incorporate sequins that add a bit of

glitz.

In addition, she wanted to create a line that

was affordable. After her first year in business,

Brandelyn realized the plus-sized market was very

underserved when it came to fan clothing. Her line

is now carried in sizes XS through 4X.

It was during the NorthWest Women’s Show

in 2014 that stands out as one of her favorite

moments when it comes to Lady 12. “After a year

of trial and error, we were exhibiting, and a group

of women stopped at our booth,” recalls Brandelyn.

“They started looking through our Navy V-Neck

Sunday’s Finest tees when they stopped and pulled

out a shirt. Two of the ladies began whispering,

then one started crying! ‘Oh crap!’ I thought. Then

she said, ‘I can’t believe they have my size in this!

It’s so hard to find cute stuff.” She gave us a hug and

they each bought two.”

Brandelyn is excited for the new home of the Lady

12 Fan Cave at Paseo by the stadium for pre-game

brunch or after the game. “They are amazing and

doing lots of girl fan-inspired things!” she says. Joe,

who is the president of the official NFL Alumni

Association, meets with fellow alumni at Paseo,

their hub.

Q. You are a horse gal, but your business relates

to football. Have you become a fan?

A. I became a football fan when I met Joe! It was so

much fun to watch him play. Watching games got a

lot more boring after he retired, however, I do like

it more now that I can watch with him.

Q. What was it like to start your own business?

Any challenges?

A. Oh my goodness, it’s been extremely

challenging! Extremely rewarding as well though.

Pretty much a new hurdle to jump over every

day. I say to be an entrepreneur you must get

comfortable being uncomfortable. I’d have to say

we have gotten pretty good at that.

Q. You are a contributing member of your

community. Can you tell our readers a little bit

about your charity work?

A. Early on I noticed what an amazing platform

we had been given to support charities through

all of our events and community engagement. We

are rallying groups of super passionate women!

So, we like to direct that passion toward a good

cause while we have their attention. We have had

a different charity involved with every event since

the beginning.

We were so excited to bring our Fashion Show to

the South Sound in partnership with Mercedes-

Benz of Tacoma and to be able to support the

Humane Society for Tacoma Pierce County. It’s

been really amazing to be able to give back to so

many different causes!

Q. Your fan gal designs are super cute; do you

have a designer and what are your inspirations?

A. Thank you! I have been the designer for all

our clothes. It really has been a fun outlet for my

creative, perfectionist side. I personally am a huge

fan of sparkles, and that has played a big part in

my design process. It hasn’t made it the easiest, but

a girl must have her sparkles! We also are trying

hard to serve the underserved market of plus-sized

women! All of us want to feel beautiful and look

cute!

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 31


Health

HYPERPIGMENTATION AND MELASMA

DEFINITION, DIFFERENCE, AND HOW TO

DECREASE THE EFFECTS

BY KRISTIN CARLSON, MEDICAL ESTHETICIAN

S

unspots, age spots, liver spots, ruddy complexion,

pregnancy mask; all are terms used to describe any

darkening of the skin. It can appear on any part of

the body but is most common on the face and hands.

Hyperpigmentation and melasma are two conditions with this

characterization. They are similar in look yet can be caused by

different conditions, one even being a symptom of the other. Let’s

break them down and learn the ways to decrease and even eliminate

their effects.

Hyperpigmentation is when the body is triggered to produce

more melanin, thus causing the skin pigment to darken. It can

be caused by prolonged sun exposure, skin injuries, acne scars,

inflammation and some skin-care products or medications. Darker

skin tones are more prone to hyperpigmentation. It is harmless,

yet annoying to most people, even causing insecurities about

one’s appearance. Some aesthetic treatments—chemical peels,

laser treatments, microneedling and even some facials—can lead

to hyperpigmentation if the skin is not properly accessed. Your

skin-care provider will talk to you about your skin type and ethnic

background to determine what treatments are right for you.

This leads us to melasma. More commonly called the pregnancy

mask, it is defined as brown patches, larger than those caused by sun

damage, typically on the cheeks, forehead, nose, upper lip and chin.

It is believed to be caused by hormonal changes and sun exposure. It

is more common in women and appears for many during pregnancy

and when starting a new form of birth control. Hyperpigmentation

is a symptom of melasma. Melasma is a frustrating condition as its

causes are difficult to determine and avoid.

Hyperpigmentation and melasma can be treated, but it will require

some patience. Although some skin-care treatments pose a risk for

hyperpigmentation, if used properly, many of the same treatments

will lighten pigment over time. For example, a series of chemical

peels, microneedling with platelet-rich plasma or laser treatments,

along with a good home-care regimen and limited sun exposure,

can do wonders for lightening discolorations. Incorporating a

lightening agent into your routine will make a drastic difference!

Some lightening agents include hydroquinone, kojic acid, azelaic

acid, niacinamide, and bearberry extract.

Melasma often fades after pregnancy or when a woman switches her

birth control method. The same type of treatments and lightening

agents used to treat hyperpigmentation will also help with melasma.

Make sure you discuss any course of treatment with your healthcare

provider if you are nursing or become pregnant.

Minimizing your sun exposure and wearing a proper SPF daily is

your best bet for avoiding many skin conditions. Talk to your skincare

provider about how to avoid, minimize and treat your skin

discoloration, and remember to disclose all medications, previous

medical history and ethnic background when discussing any type of

skin-lightening treatment.

It is harmless, yet annoying to most

people, even causing insecurities about

one’s appearance

32 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Health

CHRONIC HEAD, FACE, JAW AND NECK PAIN

IS YOUR BITE PART OF THE PROBLEM?

BY RHONDA R. SAVAGE, DDS, UPTOWN DENTAL & WELLNESS CENTER

The last straw for Susan was after she was forced to stay

in bed all day with an ice pack on her head, unable to

go to work or play with her daughter. She took over-thecounter

medications and prescription medication when

the pain got really bad. She’d tried everything: massage, chiropractic

treatment and physical therapy. These treatments were somewhat

effective, but the headaches continued. Dealing with the headaches

was a constant struggle; she was starting to get depressed.

According to the National Headache Foundation, more than 45

million Americans endure recurring headaches; from this group,

23 million suffer from migraines. Research suggests that up to 80

percent of headaches result from dental force-related problems.

A staggering number of people don’t know why they’re in pain.

Many are unaware that dental force-related issues, either related

to their mouth or as a result of trauma (like a fall, sports injury or

whiplash) can be the root of their pain.

Using a computerized bite analysis, Dr. Rhonda Savage can evaluate

your range of motion and bite imbalances. Specialized tools and

techniques, such as ultrasound, micro-current technology, cold-laser

therapy and manual muscle massage, reduce pain and inflammation.

The treatment promotes healing of the muscles and nerves, then the

bite is balanced after inflammation is reduced.

Drug free, needle free and painless, the treatment is aimed at the

underlying causes of chronic headaches: the pain and discomfort

caused by improper muscle forces in the mouth, head and neck area.

Some people who live with constant headaches for years become

resigned to the condition. They give up, thinking, “I guess this is

how it’s going to be.” With a 92 to 93 percent success rate, Dr. Savage

can help cure the pain of migraine and other headaches, tinnitus,

TMJ and vertigo.

Many headaches are triggered by stress, are hormone-induced or

alcohol-induced. Nighttime headaches can also be triggered by a bite

imbalance, as well as lack of oxygen at nighttime. Sleep issues and

headaches are often tied together for many patients.

Chris suffered from headaches since a serious car accident.

Broadsided by another vehicle, he had major medical care but still

had headaches. After beginning treatment, he was amazed that

he was headache free. Chris said, “It’s such a simple, easy, painless

process.”

Dull, nagging, constant headaches: Do you wake up with these

daily? Headache and migraine pain has to do with the muscles of

the head, neck and jaw, and the way that teeth come together. Forces

imbalanced by the way the teeth come together send a biofeedback

loop to the brain that causes pain through the brain stem.

Working in conjunction with medical professionals, Dr. Rhonda

Savage can make a difference. Sarah said, “I didn’t realize how many

headaches I was having until I stopped having headaches!”

You can make an appointment today with Dr. Savage by calling

253.857.0835. UptownDentalGigHarbor.com

Research suggests that up to 80 percent of

headaches result from dental force-related problems

34 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 35


“For older generations, the

more than 300 vehicles

on display are likely to

send them on a trip down

memory lane.”

36 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


pinpoint

TACOMA, WA

CELEBRATE AMERICA’S LOVE AFFAIR

WITH AUTOMOBILES

LeMay - America’s Car Museum continues to bring history and

excitement to the community—and the world!

BY JILLIAN CHANDLER | PHOTOS BY PIKER PHOTO, OVER TACOMA

AND CHRIS CARINO

June 2, 2012, marked the day that Tacoma would begin to change history, as LeMay -

America’s Car Museum opened its doors to the community. The stunning 165,000-squarefoot

facility has since been recognized as one of MSN’s Best Automotive Museums

worldwide, USA Today’s 10 Best Museums in Seattle and KING’s Best Museum in

Western Washington.

Even if you are not a car enthusiast, there is something for everyone at America’s Car Museum.

Exhibits in the Showcase Gallery change approximately every six months, and they are always

changing out vehicles and/or updating their other galleries. Fun activities include the racing

simulators and slot cars in the Speed Zone, the interactive Family Zone that includes a

pinewood derby track, and short films in the State Farm Theater. They also recently opened

the hands-on educational Powering the Future Learning Lab.

“Kids will love the Family Zone, Speed Zone and the Powering the Future Learning Lab,” says

Megan Black, digital media coordinator. “For older generations, the more than 300 vehicles

on display are likely to send them on a trip down memory lane.

“Although we’re the largest automotive museum in North America, we are also more than

a museum,” says Megan. “We host public outdoor events and are an event rental space for

outdoor car shows, weddings and other events. We are also an educational space for adults,

schools and families, providing hands-on learning opportunities and educational programs

for all ages.”

As a nonprofit organization, ACM’s volunteers are instrumental to the Museum’s success, as it

relies on the hard work and dedication of their volunteers to preserve the unique collection of

automobiles, share information about the Museum to the public, support ACM’s many events

and provide tours.

LeMay - America’s Car Museum participates in the Giving a Break program, which provides

free tickets for under-privileged communities and schools through United Way of Pierce

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 37


County. This also includes offering educational scholarships

for community groups to visit and free or reduced event

rentals to nonprofits. In addition, they offer a variety of

educational programs including Preschool programs,

Scout programs, field trips for schools, summer education

programs, programs for educators, and the adult monthly

lecture series titled “If Cars Could Talk.”

They are currently working on an in-house restoration of a

Ford Model A Cabriolet and are in search of parts and/or

donations of cash or services, according to Megan. Anyone

who would like to be part of this project can learn more at

AmericasCarMuseum.org/modela. Membership is a great

way to support the Museum as well while receiving one year

of free admission. Membership starts at just $50, and there

are many levels to fit your needs. “For enthusiasts who love

to drive, Club Auto provides fun events regularly like driving

tours and private collection tours,” says Megan.

“From someone having happy memories upon seeing a car

they grew up in, to a non ‘car person’ learning about the

cultural or historic context of a vehicle, we hope visitors can

see that we’re a museum that’s more than just cars,” Megan

says. “We’re an institution that preserves the past, celebrates

the present and drives the future.”

December Events

December 1 - 24: Toy Drive benefiting Toy Rescue Mission

ACM will accept new or gently used unwrapped toys for

ages newborn through 15 years old in the Lobby daily. Items

for seniors in assisted living such as lap blankets, largeprint

books and puzzles, toiletries and stuffed animals are

also accepted. Visit ToyRescueMission.org/whattodonate.

html for a full list of items that Toy Rescue Mission accepts.

All visitors who donate will receive $2 off regular adult

ACM admission.

December 10: If Cars Could Talk: Story of the Historic

Liberty Cadillac | Join them on the second Tuesday of

each month, 11:30am to 12:30pm, and explore the story of

cars with Museum curators, staff or local personalities over

lunch. This event is free for ACM members and included

with Museum admission.

December 14, 15, 21 & 22: Santa at America’s Car Museum

From 11am to 3pm each day, join Santa for a photo op in

a 1906 Cadillac Model K Tulip Touring Car. Kids will also

receive a free slot car voucher for the ACM Speed Zone!

Santa photos are free for ACM members or included with

ACM admission as a digital download.

December 21: Family STEAM Day: Family Day Scavenger

Hunt | Join ACM noon to 4pm for a Family Day! Pick up a

scavenger hunt on your way into the galleries, and find the

“hidden” cars throughout the Museum. This event is free for

ACM members and included with Museum admission.

Find more events at AmericasCarMuseum.org.

LEMAY - AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM

2702 EAST D STREET

TACOMA, WASHINGTON 98421

253.779.8490

AMERICASCARMUSEUM.ORG

38 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 39


Riding

Shotgun

TACOMA MAN HAD FRONT-ROW SEAT ON FIRST

CROSS-COUNTRY AUTOMOBILE TRIP

BY DAN AZNOFF

40 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Feature

The concept of driving across the country today is no small undertaking. It can take

weeks of planning, stacks of road maps and an unquenchable thirst for the road.

The first passage by automobile more than a century ago—in 1903 to be exact—was a

challenge to both the vehicle and the brave individuals who tested the limits to travel

from sea to shining sea.

A bicycle racer who made his home in Tacoma, Washington, was half of the duo to successfully

make the first journey by motorcar across the country more than 115 years ago. His name and

the vehicle he and his partner drove have been featured in documentaries and honored with a

display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

But Sewall K. Crocker is almost unheard of in his adopted hometown.

Crocker was born in 1883 in Walla Walla, Washington, and lived in Tacoma until he was invited

to join doctor and businessman Horatio N. Jackson on the historic drive starting from San

Francisco on a transcontinental trek across the continent to New York.

The 29-year-old self-taught mechanic first met Jackson when the doctor approached him with

hopes of receiving instructions on how to drive a horseless carriage. The cross-country quest was

the result of a $50 wager ($1,200 today’s dollars) the doctor accepted after a lively conversation

with fellow members of the San Francisco Gentlemen’s Club. Jackson accepted the challenge to

traverse the expanse of America by automobile, in part, to prove the automobile was “more than

just a mere toy.”

The drive was only part of the challenge. The 31-year-old doctor was an auto enthusiast who did

not know how to drive and did not even own an automobile. Without any mechanical experience

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 41


of his own, Jackson was convinced to hire Crocker to serve as

his travel companion, mechanic and relief driver.

The doctor invested $8,000 of his own money in the venture,

the equivalent of more than $200,000 in today’s dollars.

The daring duo left the shores of the California coast on

May 23, 1903, in Jackson’s Winton, loaded down with coats,

rubber protective clothing, sleeping bags, blankets, canteens,

an axe, a shovel, a telescope, tools, spare parts, cans for extra

gasoline, a Kodak camera, a rifle, a shotgun and a pair of

pistols.

At the last minute, they wisely decided to stow a block and

tackle in the vehicle to use in the eventuality they had to pull

the automobile out of ruts and muddy spots along the way.

What they did not have with them were any maps to help

chart a proper route.

Without any published material to study and without any

qualified individuals to provide personal recommendations

to help Jackson and Crocker determine an actual route across

the vast continent, the mechanic advised his partner against

following a southern route for fear the pair may become

stranded or lost in the desert.

Jackson agreed to follow dirt roads and wagon trails that

paralleled trails, rivers, mountain passes and crossed alkali

flats on a course that roughly followed the route forged by the

Southern Pacific Railroad.

The two drivers planned to pass through the Sacramento

Valley and followed the Oregon Trail to avoid the highest

passes through the Rocky Mountains. Crocker was primarily

responsible for making the necessary repairs of the vehicle

during the trip, which broke down frequently, especially on

the harsh, unpaved roads of the West.

The Drive

The pair quickly became national celebrities as news of their

quest made the pages of newspapers across the country.

The trip got off to an ominous start when the Vermont, the

name given to the Winton by Jackson in honor of the state

where he was born, blew a tire only 15 miles after they had

off loaded from a ferry that carried them and their vehicle

on the first leg of the journey across the San Francisco Bay to

Oakland. Crocker replaced the tire with the only spare they

brought along. That one spare was reportedly the only tire

they could find in the entire city of San Francisco.

The second night out Crocker stopped in Sacramento to

remove the side lanterns after both men agreed they were too

THE CROSS-COUNTRY QUEST WAS

THE RESULT OF A $50 WAGER ($1,200

TODAY’S DOLLARS).

42 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Courtesy of The National Museum of American History,

Smithsonian Institution


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The pair quickly became national celebrities

as news of their quest made the pages of

newspapers across the country.

dim. The lamps were replaced with a single spotlight mounted on the front of the vehicle. It was at that

point of the trip that a pair of bicyclists offered Jackson road maps. The maps were crude, but Jackson

and Crocker decided the basic maps were better than making the drive without any sort of written plan.

Unable to find a new tire for the Winton, the pair decided to purchase some used bicycle inner tubes in

case of an emergency before they left Sacramento. Noise from the road and the engine were apparently

so loud that neither Crocker nor Jackson noticed that all of their cooking gear had been tossed from the

Winton at some point along one of the bumpy roads.

The pair entertained the locals in the California town of Alturas with free rides in what was described

as a carnival atmosphere while Jackson and Crocker waited for three days for replacement tires. They

made the seemingly misguided decision to go ahead without the spare parts when the shipment did not

arrive as scheduled.

Somewhere near Caldwell in rural Idaho, Jackson fulfilled his desire to have a dog join them for the ride.

Various stories reported that that pit bull named Bud was either stolen or purchased for the sum of $15.

Jackson wrote to his wife that he had wanted a dog since he had left Sacramento.

Courtesy of University of Vermont,

Special Collections

The round expression of the small dog became the face of the well-publicized adventure. Bud’s face

appeared on magazine covers from coast to coast.

In early June, the men were forced to ask a cowboy to tow the car after a fuel leak had

drained their gas tank. Crocker was forced to rent a bicycle (which had its own flat tire)

while they waited for replacement parts and peddled 25 miles to purchase four gallons of

gasoline for the “outrageous” price of $20.

At one point of the trip, the crew of the Vermont ran out of supplies and went 36 hours

without food. They were rescued by a farmer who fed them stew while Crocker convinced

the generous man to give them the wheel bearings out of his mowing machine for an

emergency repair.

The good news is that newspapers across the country

had made the motorists into national celebrities.

Local newspaper reporters greeted them at virtually

every stop.

Sometime in mid-June, Jackson’s coat, along with

every penny of their cash, fell off the Winton.

Jackson was forced to wire his wife to send them

more money.

The pair followed the sage advice of locals in

Mountain Home, Idaho, to avoid a stretch of the

Oregon Trail and changed course through the

Sawtooth Mountains. In Hailey, Idaho, Jackson

agreed to wire the Winton Company for more spare

parts.

Courtesy of Division of Work and Industry, National Museum of American

History, Smithsonian Institution

The list of lost items continued to grow. While using

the block and tackle to cross a river, Jackson lost the

new money his wife had wired to him as well as his

glasses. It was at that point that a greedy landowner

forced them to pay $4 ($105 now) to cross, as Jackson

described the acreage as “bad, rocky, mountain

road.”

Courtesy of Division of Work and Industry, National Museum of

American

44 253 History, LIFESTYLE Smithsonian MAGAZINE Institution


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Courtesy of Division of Work and Industry, National

Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Crocker’s ingenuity came in handy when he used rope to

wrap around the wheels when they suffered another flat tire.

The trip became much easier beginning on July 12 when

they reached stretches of paved roads beginning in Omaha,

Nebraska. The only recorded mishap from that point of the

trip reportedly took place just outside Buffalo, New York,

when the Vermont hit a “hidden obstacle” in the road and

threw Jackson, Crocker and Bud out of the moving vehicle.

The trio arrived in New York on July 26, crossing the

country in a respectable 63 days, 12 hours and 30 minutes

to claim the title of the first automobile to go coast-to-coast.

The Vermont had consumed 800 gallons of gasoline along

the way.

Following the hero’s welcome at the end of their adventure,

Jackson joined his wife for the drive home while Crocker

headed West. Newspapers reported that the Vermont broke

down again shortly after Jackson was on the road without

a mechanic and that the car’s drive chain snapped at the

threshold of his own garage.

The drive chain was one of the few parts that had not been

changed over the two-month drive across the country.

More importantly, Jackson scoffed at the reality that he was

never able to collect his $50 wager.

The Man

Despite his acclaim as a national celebrity, Crocker returned

home to Tacoma in relative obscurity. There were no parades,

no newspaper reporters or magazine photographers lined

up at his door like Jackson had when he returned to New

England.

Following the adventure, Crocker attempted to capitalize on

his newfound fame by launching a search for sponsors for

an around-the-world auto tour. With his fame and his health

failing, Crocker finally settled down in Tacoma where he

died just two weeks after he turned 30 years old. Newspapers

at the time reported that the once famous mechanic died of

depression after suffering a nervous breakdown.

Not only was he not honored by the residents of Tacoma, he

died without any family or many friends at his bedside. The

“SOMEWHERE NEAR

CALDWELL IN RURAL

IDAHO, JACKSON

FULFILLED HIS

DESIRE TO HAVE A

DOG JOIN THEM FOR

THE RIDE.

46 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 47



THERE

WERE NO

PARADES

people in his hometown quickly turned their attention

to the latest news of the day.

More than a century later, his name has not been used

for the name of a street or any public venue associated

with his pioneering achievements. To some people, like

former Tacoma Mayor Bill Baarsma, that is a fact that

still needs to be corrected.

A film by documentary filmmaker Ken Burns was

produced to mark the 100th anniversary of the historic

crossing during the time Baarsma served as mayor. In

addition to his duties as mayor, Baarsma had hoped he

could use his elected position to raise the image of the

city’s forgotten luminary.

“He was lost in the pages of history,” Baarsma reflected

when contacted for this article. “Renaming a street

in his honor on his birthday (April 7) would be a

fitting and proper way to recognize his remarkable

accomplishment.”

Dan Aznoff is a freelance writer based in Mukilteo,

Washington, dedicated to preserving the stories of our

generation. He was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize and has

received acclamation for his work regarding sustainable

energy. He is the author of three books that document

colorful periods of history in Washington. He can be

reached at directly da@dajournalist.com.

48 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 49


Arts &

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50 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Hello Holidays!

GAGE ACADEMY OF ART GIFT GUIDE

By Joanne Levy

This coming new year will launch the full year of Gage Academy of

Art 30th anniversary! Thirty years ago, Gage was a two-person staff

operated out of our founders’ home. Today, we are a team of 20

dedicated faculty and staff and over 100 amazingly talented artist

instructors who, every day, bring the joy of painting, drawing, sculpting and

printmaking to the communities in and around Seattle.

Where were you 30 years ago? Were you searching for a place for your

creativity to call home? Did you have paint on your hands, charcoal under

your nails, a brush or two in your pocket and lots of ideas rolling around in

your head?

Gage Academy of Art co-founders Gary Faigin and Pamela Belyea did.

They were dreaming up a school that would touch, transform and empower

students.

Thank you for giving us the best gift this season, you, our community.

Our winter classes launch the full year of our 30th anniversary! New Yorkbased

guest instructor Patricia Watwood is an accomplished artist with a

successful fine arts career. Thirty years ago, when Gage was just starting out,

she took classes at Gage! Now you have the chance to study with her. Do

not miss her workshop, The Classical Approach to Figure Painting in Oil.

Our Winter Studio Concentration,

Using Color Now, will be taught

by the excellent Michael Howard,

who also started teaching at

Gage nearly 20 years ago. We are excited to have him back! Our co-founder

and artistic director, Gary Faigin, will be offering a weekend portrait drawing

workshop, something that does not happen very often. Do not miss the new

offerings in printmaking, like Cards for the Holidays! If you are interested

in illustration and journaling, check out our illustration classes with the

inimitable Brian Snoddy, the unique Steve Reddy and Gage’s new instructor

Brian Morser.

As far as our youth programming, there will be plenty of opportunities for

young artists to build foundational skills while also engaging their imagination

and individual voice. For the 11- to 14-year-old artists in the making, learn

what it takes to be a professional illustrator or concept artist by combining

hands-on learning in figure drawing, creature design and sculpture! Students

will gain everything they need to bring their imagination to life. For the 14-

to 16-year-old artists, we are offering two classes in contemporary painting

and design and introducing cool new classes in the epic culture of skateboard

art, plus so much more you will love!

Workshops for the holidays:

Sunday, December 8, Winter Watercolor Greetings with Willow Heath - Create

winter-themed watercolor cards for your holiday handouts. Learn simple

painting techniques in watercolor for illustrating the Holiday Season spirit

with your very own beautiful cards.

Paint evergreens in the snow,

winter woodland themes and birds

Willow Heath

Kara Glosova

52 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Arts &

Entertainment

THIRTY YEARS AGO, GAGE WAS A TWO-PERSON STAFF

OPERATED OUT OF OUR FOUNDERS’ HOME. TODAY,

WE ARE A TEAM OF 20 DEDICATED FACULTY AND

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND OVER 100 AMAZINGLY

TALENTED ARTIST INSTRUCTORS.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 53


“Just Ask Countess!”

Countess Stekovic | Student Services Manager

Countess@gageacademy.org | 206.323.4243

perched on a snowy branch in time to share with your friends and loved ones.

December 9 through 13, Portrait Drawing in Pencil: Block in Boot Camp with Tony

Ryder - The errors that distort a portrait drawing begin with the very first pencil

strokes, and express misconceptions about the subject of the drawing. Discover

an approach to basic block-in construction, including point-to-point vision,

measuring length and tilt by eye, looking for the non-parallelism of the two sides

of the form, avoidance of horizontals and verticals and more.

Saturday, December 14, Printmaking: Holiday Cards with Klara Glosova - Make

holiday cards with linocut relief prints. Linocut is a basic printmaking technique

where artists use tools to carve marks in the surface of a plate. Linocut produces

results similar to woodcut except plates are made of soft rubber or linoleum,

therefore easier to carve. This is both a great introduction to printmaking and a

creative way to personalize your holiday cards this year!

Give the gift of art this season!

As you make your resolutions for 2020, embark with us on shaping the next 30

years of Gage. The work continues only with the passion of our students and

our supporters. Be sure to check out our Gift Guide, plus Gage has released new

merchandise for sale including sweatshirts, mugs, beanies, paintbrushes and

much more! Find it all on GageAcademy.org.

From our family to yours, we wish you a happy, safe and healthy holiday & new

year! Together, let’s keep giving the gift of art this season.

For additional information about Gage Academy of Art, visit GageAcademy.org,

Facebook.com/GageAcademy, instagram @gageacademy, email

info@gageacademy.org or call 206.323.4243.

54 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Winter 2020 Class catalog and sign-up is now avaliable online at:

www.gageacademy.org/adult-programs

Gage is an innovative and accessible contemporary art school, based in personal

mentorship and skills-based studio instruction. Whether you are a curious newcomer or a

professional artist, a working creative or a retired passion-seeker, Gage is open to anyone

interested in learning. Gage gives both adults and kids hands-on art experience working

with talented instructors in fully-equipped art studios. We provide scholarships and

financial aid to families and youth that need it most. Gage is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated

to building a vibrant creative community.

artwork by instructor Riley Doyle

REGISTER

Atelier Programs

Adult Classes

Studio Art Intensive

Register Now at:

gageacademy.org

Mark Kang-O’Higgins Gary Faigin

Geoff Flack Tenaya Sims Juliette Aristides Kimberly Trowbridge

ADULT PROGRAMS

Gage offers numerous weekend and weeklong workshops as well as

five-week classes in drawing, sculpting, painting, and printmaking.

Apply now at: gageacademy.org/adult-programs/

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS & KIDS

Youth programs for kids at Gage inspire young artists with

challenging and fun opportunities for creative expression.

Apply now at: gageacademy.org/teens

GIVE THE GIFT OF

ART THIS SEASON:

Help support great

programs like these

by donating today!

gageacademy.org/donate

EVENTS

Holidaze Art

Market and Exhibition

Nov. 20, 2019

Drawing Jam

Dec. 7, 2019

Gary Faigin @ Town Hall

Forging a New Path: How

Young Artists are Navigating

Dec. 11, 2019

Lecture: Contemporary

Portraiture

Jan. 22, 2020

WORKSHOPS Enroll Now

GALA

May 2, 2020

:

:

::: :::: ::. :

DEVELOP YOUR PAINTING

CONCEPT FROM START TO FINISH

with Tiffany Dae

www.gageacademy.org

THE ART OF TRUE

EPHEMERA COLLAGE

with Patrick LoCicero

@gageacademy

DEMYSTIFYING WATERCOLOR: BASIC

TECHNIQUE

with Linda James

THE LANDSCAPE IN

WINTER

with Suze Woolf

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 55


Eat & Drink

56 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


KAENG THAI CURRY

Recipe Courtesy of Chef Jennifer Johnson, Happy Belly

VEGAN, GLUTEN FREE

SERVES: 5 - 7

This plant-based curry is quick and easy to make. It’s gluten free, hearty

and very satisfying. I suggest it be enjoyed over fresh spinach and brown

rice like we do at Happy Belly. This combination adds nutrients, energyproducing

carbohydrates and helps balance the creamy, hot curry with

cool, crisp spinach.

Riced cauliflower or steamed kale can be substituted if you’re going grainfree

or following the Keto diet. If cooking rice, etc., plan your cooking so

your accompaniments will be ready at the same time.

This curry pairs well with grilled prawns, seasoned baked tofu or pan-fried

chicken.

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 cups white or yellow onion, diced (1/4”)

1 tbsp. olive oil

2 cups coconut milk (16-oz. can of whole fat coconut milk)

2 cups hot water

1 tsp. turmeric powder

1 ½ tsp. granulated garlic

1 tbsp. curry powder

1 tbsp. Musmun curry paste

1 1/2 tsp. Tamarind

1 1/2 tsp. sea salt

1/4 tsp. black pepper

4 cups canned chickpea/garbanzo bean (two 16-oz. cans of chickpeas)

6 cups broccoli florets (fresh or frozen, though fresh is preferred)

METHOD:

• Preheat oven to 400˚F.

• Lightly coat diced onion in olive oil and an additional smidge of salt,

pepper, garlic and turmeric. Spread in a single layer on a parchmentor

foil-lined baking sheet. Bake 15 to 20 minutes.

• In a cooking pot on medium heat, combine the liquids and spices:

coconut milk, hot water, turmeric powder, granulated garlic, curry

powder, curry paste, tamarind, sea salt and black pepper. Mix.

• Add the onion (do not let cool after removing from the oven) to liquid

and spice blend in cooking pot.

• Drain chickpeas and keep the juice. Add 2 cups chickpeas to

cooking pot.

• In a blender, blend 2 cups chickpeas with all chickpea juice until

smooth. Add to cooking pot.

• Cut broccoli into quarter size pieces; thinly slice large sections of

stem. In a separate pot, steam until al dente.

• Drain thoroughly and add to cooking pot. Mix well.

• Garnish with green onion and toasted sesame seeds.

• Serve immediately, and enjoy!

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 57


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Now - December

24

Meet Me at Proctor’s

Peppermint Place!

HOLIDAY FESTIVITIES ABOUND ALL MONTH LONG

BY JILLIAN CHANDLER

The Proctor District invites the community and all of Tacoma as they

host their first ever Proctor’s Peppermint Place. The festivities kicked off

November 9 and continue through December 24.

Join the Proctor District’s more than 70 businesses as they celebrate the local

community and the spirit of the holidays with featured events running now through

the day before Christmas.

“Proctor just lends itself to celebration. It’s walkable, it speaks ‘community,’ is

family, pet and bicycle friendly, has such a variety of businesses to offer, is very

traditional in character, and has very supportive business owners that are pretty

much up for any event,” says Marva Pelander, district manager of the Proctor

District Association. “So what better time of year than to celebrate the holidays

in Proctor. We want to share with the greater community what we love so much.”

Children and adults alike will feel as though they are in a winter wonderland as

they take in the lights adorning the streets and rooftops. Windows display a variety

of wintery and holiday themed decorations and artwork as the local merchants

participate in the decorating contest and seasonal outdoor music to help set the

scene.

This year’s plans for Proctor’s Peppermint Place include a community tree lighting,

street musicians, a children’s holiday coloring contest, holiday movies and much

more!

HIGHLIGHT EVENT

According to Marva, the goal behind the event is “to share what we have

to offer; to strengthen our sense of community as business owners,

property owners and residents work toward a common goal; and to

build awareness of the Proctor Business District.”

For addition details about Proctor’s Peppermint Place and to view

the month’s event lineup, visit TheProctorDistrict.com/proctorspeppermint-place.

December

07

2019 Festival of Trees Gala

An incredible evening for a truly important cause, the annual Festival

of Trees is a black-tie holiday celebration featuring a spectacular live

tree auction, dinner and live entertainment to support Mary Bridge

Children’s Hospital’s patients and families through the Mary Bridge

Children’s Foundation. Join them Saturday, December 7, starting

at 6pm at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center for a memorable

night. Tickets are $300 per person and can be purchased online

at FestivalOfTreesTacoma.org. For additional information, visit

FestivalOfTreesTacoma.org or call 253.403.1387.

December

14

4th Annual Holiday

Haul Crawl

The shopping season is upon us! Join in the fun of this year’s annual

Holiday Haul Crawl to take place Saturday, December 14, from 10am

to 8pm. The community is invited to enjoy a full day of shopping,

dining and festivities at local boutiques and restaurants throughout

Downtown Tacoma. Support local businesses while getting a bit, if

not all, of your holiday shopping done. Whatever is on your holiday

gift list, you’ll find it as you explore more than 150 local shops,

restaurants and other unique businesses. For additional information

about this year’s event, visit DowntownTacomaPartnership.com.

58 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


December

DEC-JAN

01-

05

DECEMBER

ZOOLIGHTS

1 - JANUARY 5

5:00 to 9:00pm

Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium

PDZA.org

14-

24

A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS

DECEMBER 14 - 24

Showtimes Vary

Tacoma Musical Playhouse

TMP.org

06

DECEMBER

SANKTA LUCIA CELEBRATION

06

7:00 TO 9:00PM

Scandanavian Cultural Center at Pacific Lutheran University

PLU.edu/scancenter/events

19

DECEMBER

TACOMA 6TH AVENUE ART WALK

19

4:00 to 7:00pm

6th Avenue

TacomaArtWalk.com

13 DECEMBER

WIZARDS YULE FEAST

13

6:30 TO 11:00PM

Historic 1625 Tacoma Place

WeekendOfWizardry.com

24 DECEMBER

JINGLE BELL RUN

24

8:30am to 12:00pm

Wright Park

MetroParksTacoma.org

DON’T

MISS!

14

11TH ANNUAL SANTA

RUNS TACOMA

DECEMBER 14

7:00am to 12:00pm

A Street/10th Street

SantaRunsTacoma.com

31

FIRST NIGHT TACOMA 2020

DECEMBER 31

5:30 to 12:30am

Tacoma Arts Live

TacomaArtsLive.org

14 DECEMBER

LIGHTED BOAT PARADE

14

5:00 to 8:00pm

Tacoma Yacht Club

TacomaYachtClub.org

DON’T

MISS!

31

DECEMBER

1920’S NYE VARIETY BENEFIT SHOW

31

7:00 to 10:00pm

Urban Grace

BrownPaperTickets.com

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 59


Explore Phoenix and Mesa’s

Fresh Foodie Trail

A WARM-WEATHER WINTER GETAWAY THAT’S FAMILY FRIENDLY

PHOTOS AND STORY BY MARGUERITE CLEVELAND

60 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Travel

Phoenix and Mesa are the perfect holiday location for a winter getaway. Mild

temperatures and resort hotels that are destinations in themselves and a short

flight via Alaska Airlines (so you can utilize the free bag check for a case of

Arizona wine) make this an easy trip to enjoy. This is foodie heaven with an

up-and-coming wine region, farm-to-table restaurants, year-round fresh produce and

agritourism attractions.

Where To Stay

The Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort is a desert oasis with a

4-acre waterpark that makes it a great choice for families.

Room options are all suites, which gives families more

room to spread out. Casitas with one or two bedrooms

are also an option. There is a kids’ camp giving

parents with younger ones a childcare option.

They have dinner sessions so you can have

a date night on your vacation. Amenities

abound with a full-service spa and

multiple dining options.

For more economical options,

consider lodgings in Mesa like

the Residence Inn by Marriott,

which has larger accommodations

with kitchens—a great way to save

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 61


The foodie scene in

Mesa and Phoenix has

really evolved with local

restaurants serving farmto-table

food inspired

“diversity

by the vibrant cultural

in the area.

money while traveling. A substantial breakfast is offered each morning and

included in the room rate. If money is no object, you can step it up to the super

luxurious AAA Five Diamond Phoenician Resort, which has a three-story spa.

The resort began an extensive renovation in 2016 that was recently completed.

It is lovely with a fresh, contemporary vibe throughout the resort.

Where To Eat

The foodie scene in Mesa and Phoenix has really evolved with local restaurants

serving farm-to-table food inspired by the vibrant cultural diversity in the area.

The Bario Café is s smaller restaurant, so be sure to make a reservation. Chef

Silvana Salicido is a five-time James Beard-award nominee. Her food is authentic

traditional Mexican food and utilizes local producers as much as possible. It is

subtle little things like adding pomegranate seeds to a fresh simple guacamole

made from avocados left in big chunks, tomatoes, red onions, a hint of cilantro

and lime that turns this dish into something special. Chiles En Nogada is a

roasted stuffed poblano pepper filled with chicken, apple, pear, dried apricots

and pecans covered with a delicate almond cream sauce garnished with cilantro,

pomegranate seeds and queso fresco. It is an unusual dish packed with flavors

that just meld together. Perfection.

On the other end of the spectrum is Jalapeno Bucks, a dive joint built in old

shipping containers nestled in the midst of an orange grove. Don’t wear good

clothes because you are here to try the ooey, gooey, extremely messy peanut

butter and jelly brisket sandwich. OMG! So good. Words can’t describe how

something that sounds so strange can be so delicious! Don’t miss the excellent

salsas concocted by Buck. It’s how he started and earned the nickname Jalapeno.

Pick the size salsas that you want and order a bag of chips, served in a paper

bag. The medium was grocery-bag sized! The mango salsa is a favorite and has

a sweet and slightly spicy taste the goes well with the freshly made tortilla chips.

What To Do

The Fresh Foodie Trail is a great way to spend a day or two traveling to urban

and rural destinations for those who love food. There are 11 stops on this

culinary journey, and each will give you an insight into how food is produced.

Visit everything from a vertical urban farm at True Garden to the Hayden Flour

Mills at Sossaman Farms. The Windmill Winery is one of the furthest stops

and is in the town of Florence. The drive gets you out in the Sonoran Desert

with lots of old growth Saguaro Cacti. The farm is beautifully landscaped with

a lovely wine tasting room. After the drive through the desert, it feels like an

oasis. Most grapes are sourced from Wilcox, Arizona, but owner Harold Christ

can grow Barbera grapes on his farm. Arizona currently has two AVAs, and

the quality of the wine is very good. A case of Barbera can fly free if you fly on

Alaska Airlines.

The Desert Botanical Garden has more than 50,000 desert plants on five

thematic trails. The plants come from deserts all over the world, and the unique

displays are so lovely. Plan your day to arrive when the gardens open so you

can enjoy strolling before the heat of the day. For great views of the mountains,

the gardens and Phoenix, you’ll want to hike to the top of the Sonoran Desert

Nature Loop Trail. There are two shops, one a garden shop and the other a gift

shop, that are worth a visit. A grow-your-own cactus in a box makes a perfect

souvenir or gift.

The Musical Instrument Museum is an unexpected treasure. Rather than just

statically display the more than 6,800 musical instruments that come from all

over the world, the museum uses state-of-the-art audio and visual technologies

62 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Come Celebrate

life on the water.

Gig Harbor Gondola

Board the only authentic Venetian gondola

in the Pacific Northwest and let the stress melt away.

Let Gig Harbor’s beauty be the

backdrop of your celebration.

John Synco

Gig Harbor Marina & Boatyard

3117 Harborview Drive • Gig Harbor, Washington • 253.432.0052

8 gigharborgondola@gmail.com f Gig Harbor Gondola

5 gigharborgondola.com 5 gigharborgondola

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to enhance the experience. Each visitor is given a headset with an audio tour; as

you step up to each display you begin to hear a musician performing with the

instrument and can observe the video as well—a truly immersive experience

with incredible performances. Visit the Experience Gallery for a hands-on

opportunity to play instruments from around the world. Music buffs will love

the Artist Gallery with icons such as Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, John Lennon

and more modern artists such as Maroon 5.

A spa day at the Phoenician is a luxurious experience that will have you relaxed

for days. Treatments are available for both men and women in the new threestory

building which is home to the spa. Soothing music and soft lighting helps

set the mood before your treatment. Arrive at least 45 minutes before your

appointment so you can indulge in the Personal Spa Ritual, a 30-minute hotand-cold

contrast hydrotherapy which improves the benefits of your treatment.

There’s no need to rush after your spa treatment, as you’ll want to take advantage

of all the amenities such as an adult-only pool deck, where you can enjoy an

alfresco lunch.

The greater Phoenix and Mesa area will have you feeling relaxed and refreshed

after a nice winter break. Infusions of vitamin D from all the sunshine will chase

away your winter blues. With amenity-filled resorts, an eclectic food and craft

beverage scene, and tons of family friendly activities, it is the perfect destination.

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‘Tis the season to wish one

another joy, love and peace.

Happy Holidays!

recommendation for

Christmas

Tea Time - Gingerbread

Rooibos Tea

618 Regents Blvd, Fircrest | 253.820.8998 | MimisTeas.com

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2020 SUBARU OUTBACK

Come celebrate with us, it’s our 18th anniversary!

YOUR LOCALLY OWNED SUBARU DEALER.

JOHN DIONAS | President-Owner

Come meet Duke!

Peninsula Subaru in Bremerton, WA, treats the needs of each individual customer

with paramount concern. We know that you have high expectations, and as a car

dealer we enjoy the challenge of meeting and exceeding those standards each

and every time. Allow us to demonstrate our commitment to excellence!

Located in Bremerton, only a 20-minute drive and lower sales tax!

800.458.5808 | PeninsulaSubaru.com

3888 W. St. Hwy. 16, Bremerton, WA (between Bremerton & Port Orchard)

CLOSED ON SUNDAY FOR FAMILY DAY

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*****************ECRWSS****

Please Deliver By December 6, 2019

Local Postal Customer

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Post Falls, ID

PERMIT NO. 32

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