VUT_Report 2018_Finale

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS 1

LIST OF ACRONYMS 3

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION 4

SECTION 2: VUT’S GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 6

SECTION 3: MESSAGE FROM THE CHANCELLOR 12

SECTION 4: REPORT OF THE CHAIRPERSON ON GOVERNANCE 14

SECTION 5: THE STATEMENT OF COUNCIL ON GOVERNANCE 16

SECTION 6: THE STATEMENT OF COUNCIL ON SUSTAINABILITY 22

SECTION 7: STATEMENT ON WORKER AND STUDENT PARTICIPATION 28

SECTION 8: THE REPORT OF COUNCIL ON RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF RISK 29

SECTION 9: STATEMENT OF COUNCIL ON TRANSFORMATION 31

SECTION 10: REPORT OF THE VICE-CHANCELLOR AND PRINCIPAL ON MANAGEMENT AND

ADMINISTRATION FOR 2018 35

SECTION 11: THE REPORT OF SENATE TO THE COUNCIL 52

SECTION 12: THE PERFORMANCE REPORT ON SET OBJECTIVES FOR 2018 73

SECTION 13: THE REPORT OF THE INSTITUTIONAL FORUM TO THE COUNCIL 97

SECTION 14: THE STATEMENT OF THE FINANCE EXECUTIVE AND CHAIRPERSON OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 99

SECTION 15: THE STATEMENT OF THE CHAIRPERSON OF THE AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE 105

ANNEXURES:

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SUPPLEMENTARY FINANCIAL DATA


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Glossary Of Terms

Activity rate (LMS: Blackboard)

Academic support programmes

Admission Point Score (APS)

Degree Credit Success Rate

Disclosure

Enrolment Plan

Extended programme

User Activity Overview: Overall system and class activity for all users including average

logins, and time spent on task as well as statistics on user activity by class.

Programmes helping students successfully execute the tasks required to succeed in their

academic programme

A score calculated using matric results to determine whether prospective students meet

admission requirements

The number of degree credits passed relative to the degree credits enrolled. Degree credits

are calculated as FTEs per course.

The divulgence of an invention for which a patent may be sought

The 2014‐2019 Ministerial student enrolment plan targets as agreed upon between the

Minister and the University Council

An academic programme for which the curriculum is spread over an extended period

#FeesMustFall

FTE enrolment

A student led protest movement campaigning for free, quality and decolonised education

A numerical designator for the load of an enrolled student based on the weighting of their

modules in the curriculum. The product of the number of students registered for a module at

census date multiplied by the credit value of that module (within the curriculum)

The person

First time entering

FTE/headcount ratio

FTE Staff

(a) is effectively registered in the collection period for an undergraduate or pre-diplomat

course and

(b) in the past has not been effectively registered in any higher education course at the

institution or any other higher education institution.

ratio/relationship used in student HEMIS analyses whereby the relationship of enrolled FTE

loads to students registered for a qualification

Full-time-equivalent staff. The total number of full-time staff plus the full-time-equivalent

of the part-time staff. The result may be the actual calculation determined by the number

of hours worked by all part-time staff divided by the average number of hours worked by a

full-time employee (a numerical designator for an appointment based on 100% for full time)

Graduation Rate

Graduates

Headcount student

The proportion of total enrolments graduating in a given year.

A student who has successfully completed all the educational requirements for a specified

academic program of study - based on the year in which the student completed.

Total, unduplicated number of students enrolled in a post-secondary education institution at

a given census date, regardless of their course load.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Instruction/research staff

Media Impact Index

Non-academic support

Patent

Pedagogical plan

Permanent staff

Ratio of FTE students to FTE

instructional/research staff

Research outputs (DHET units)

Retention rate

SASSE survey

Success Rate

Throughput Rate

Total Headcount

Undergraduate (UG)

VUTELA

Work Integrated Learning (WIL)

Are academic staff who spend more than 50% of their official time on duty on instruction

and research activities

(Also called Average Value Equivalent) is the way we measure the effectiveness of brand

communication of our marketing and advertising initiatives in monetary terms. It gives the

value for money – a return on your investment in the publicity we receive

Programmes helping students successfully navigate the challenges associated with being a

university student and with life in general

Exclusive rights granted to the University by government to manufacture, use or sell an

invention

Plan defining learning strategies how each faculty will help students achieve the required

outcomes

A permanent staff member is defined as an employee who contributes to an institution

pension or retirement fund

This ratio is computed by comparing the FTE of students with the FTE of the staff

Is derived from research publication units in accredited journals and conference

proceedings, books and/or chapters

The retention rate for a particular programme (or group of students registered for a

programme) is the proportion of students registered in year n that re-registers in year n+ 1.

The South African Survey of Student Engagement (SASSE) is a survey that gathers

comprehensive information from universities relating to high-impact experiences and

behaviours identified as having an influence on the teaching and learning experience.

The number of degree credits passed relative to the degree credits enrolled. Degree credits

are calculated as FTEs per course.

The cumulative number of students from the baseline cohort who received the original

qualification within or before the specified time (minimum time, minimum time+1, etc.)

Total number of unduplicated count of students registered for a qualification. Unduplicated

count of students registered for a qualification with at least one uncancelled, unexempted

module at an appropriate census date, that excludes non-approved qualifications.

Courses that are coded as lower pre-diplomat/undergraduate, intermediate pre-diplomat /

undergraduate and higher undergraduate

VUT E-Learning Alive: The Learner Management System used by VUT

WIL refers to a departure point of applied learning that focuses on work experience (i.e.

acquiring work-related skills) under supervision and/or mentorship of the workplace. It is a

learning programme that focuses on the application of theory in an authentic,

workplace-based context

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

List Of Acronyms

APP

Annual Performance Plan

APS APP

Admissions Annual Performance Point Score Plan

AVE APS

Advertising Admissions Value Point Score Expenditure

CA AVE

Corporate Advertising Affairs Value Expenditure

CAD

Centre Corporate for Affairs Academic Development

CCMA CAD

Commission Centre for Academic for Conciliation, Development Mediation and Arbitration

CHE CCMA

Council Commission on Higher for Conciliation, Education Mediation and Arbitration

DHET CHE

Department Council on Higher of Higher Education Education and Training

EMC DHET

Executive Department Management of Higher Education Committee and Training

FTE EMC

Full Executive Time Equivalent, Management either Committee staff or student

FYE FTE

First-Year Full Time Equivalent, Experience either staff or student

FYE HEDA

First-Year Higher Education Experience Data Analyser

HEDA HOD

Head Higher of Education Department Data Analyser

HR HOD

Human Head of Resources Department

ICT HR

Information Human Resources and Communication Technology

IPMS ICT

Integrated Information Performance and Communication Management Technology System

IT IPMS

Information Integrated Performance Technology Management System

ITS

Integrated Information Tertiary Technology Software

KPI ITS

Key Integrated Performance Tertiary Indicator Software

LMS KPI

Learner Key Performance Management Indicator System

PG LMS

Post Learner Graduate Management System

PM PG

Performance Post GraduateManagement

PMS

Performance Management System

PQM PMS

Programme Performance Qualification Management Mix System

SASSE PQM

South Programme African Qualification Survey of Student Mix Engagement

SET SASSE

Science South African Engineering Survey and of Student Technology Engagement

SETA

Sectorial Science Engineering Education and and Training Technology Authority

SLP SETA

Short Sectorial Learning Education Programme and Training Authority

SSF SLP

Strategic Short Learning Success Programme Factor

STP SSF

Science Strategic and Success Technology Factor Park

TDG STP

Teaching Science and Development Technology Grant Park

TTI TDG

Technology Teaching Development Transfer & Innovation Grant

UG TTI

Under Technology Graduate Transfer & Innovation

WIL UG

Work Under Integrated Graduate Learning

VC WIL

Vice-Chancellor

Work Integrated Learning

VCR

Vaal Vice-Chancellor Community Radio

VUT VCR

Vaal University Community of Radio Technology

VUTELA

Vaal University of Technology E-Learning Alive

VUTELA

Vaal University of Technology E-Learning Alive

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 1

INTRODUCTION

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

In terms of the Higher Education Act 101 of 1997, as amended,

and the Regulations for Reporting by Public Higher Education

Institutions gazetted in 2014, the University submits to the

Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology, the Annual

Report detailing the activities, management and administration

of the University for the period 1 January to 31 December 2018.

This Annual Report meets the requirements of the Reporting

Regulations. The report therefore integrates significant information

about strategy, risks, and opportunities and correlates them

to social, environmental, economic and financial perspectives

with a view to enabling stakeholders to assess the University’s

performance and its ability to create and sustain value over the

short, medium and long term.

The University operates within the directives of the Auditor

General of South Africa and within the framework governed by

the general principles of governance as outlined in the King IV

Report on Governance, within which governance, strategy and

sustainability are inseparable.

The University embraces the idea of linking the experiences of

students, staff and the community to its public accountability

mandate as a transformational guide to ensure fitness of purpose

and relevance to a changing and ever complex environment. This

idea represents a business case for the University’s continuous

effort to create opportunities, possibilities and broaden access.

Finally, the Annual Report will highlight the effectiveness and/or

non‐effectiveness of the University’s Governance, Management,

Administration and Risks where these do occur, and how such

imponderables have been dealt with.

The Administrator, Prof Ihron Rensburg, appointed by the

Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology, Dr Blade

Nzimande, as per Government Gazette number 42639 of 15

August 2019, to take over the governance and management

functions of the University, is as per this status authorized to

sign‐off on the Report and to sign all relevant sections of the

report on behalf of the Chairperson of Council, as Council

members all resigned. The resignation of council members left a

void within the governance structures of the University and the

administrator by his authorized appointment by the Minister

is now fulfilling the role of Council and Management hence his

signature on the spaces provided for the Chairperson of

Council. Since the Administrator has also taken over the

management function of the University, he also signs all sections

of the Report, where appropriate, on behalf of the Vice Chancellor.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 2

VUT’S GOVERNANCE,

MANAGEMENT AND

ADMINISTRATION

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

University Governance

The Council of the Vaal University of Technology governs the University in accordance with the Higher Education Act, 101 of 1997, The

Institutional Statute and the Institutional Rules. Council is assisted in this function by the Senate of the University, management, the

Institutional Forum and the SRC. The University Council comprises lay councilors and professional members. Sixty seven percent of

the members of Council are neither students nor employees of the Vaal University of Technology. In 2018 the Council was composed

as follows:

2018 – Council Members

COUNCIL MEMBER Constituency Statutory Provision Term of Office

Internal Members

Zide, GN (Prof)

PhD (UPE), MA (Anthropology) (Fort

Hare), BA Hons, BA

Dzvimbo, TP (Prof)

PhD, M. Ed, PGD Education, BA

Machika, P (Dr)

PhD (UJ), M.Sc (Oxford)

Naidoo, B (Prof)

PhD (UP), MSc (UL), BSc (Hons)(UL), BSc

(Unisa)

Masu, L (Prof)

PhD. Mech.Eng., MSc. Mech.Eng. (UoN),

MBA (UFS), BSc (Hons) (Leeds), B Admin

(UDW), Pr.Eng (ECSA), FSAIMechE, REng

(EBK), MIEK.

Kungune, V (Mr)

MDP (Stellenbosch); B Juris (Fort Hare)

Bojabotsheha, T (Mr)

MPhil (Cum Laude) (Stellenbosch

University), BA Hons (History) (Wits),

BA (Education) (Wits).

Radebe, DJ (Mr)

PGDHE (VUT), B Tech: Labour Relations

(VUT) , ND: Labour Relations (VUT) ,

MDP (GIBS)

Vice-Chancellor & Principal S8(A)i Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Deputy Vice-Chancellor and

Vice-Principal

S8(A)ii Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Senate S8(A)iii Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Senate S8(A)iii Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Senate S8(A)iii Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Campus Principal: Ekurhuleni S8(A)iv Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Academic S8(A)v Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Non-Academic S8(A)vi Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

Medupe, L (Mr) SRC Member S8(A)vii Oct 2017 – Sept 2018

Ngoya, K (Mr) SRC Member S8(A)vii Oct 2017 – Sept 2018

External Members

Rakometsi, M (Mr)

PhD Philosophy, MA (History), BA Hons,

BA, MDP

UMALUSI S8(A)ix Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Hlapolosa, TT (Mr)

BA Procurations, LLB (UN), Articles

(Johannesburg Law School), N Dip

Sports Law (UJ)

Yende, F (Ms)

Masters: Pub & Dev Mng (Wits), BA

Social Work (UWC), Exec Dev Prog

(UCT), GRC,

Law Society S8(A)ix Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

FP & M SETA S8(A)ix Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

Vacant SAICA S8(A)ix Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Nyamane, DJ (Ms)

MBA (Nederlands), Advanced Mng

(Wits), Strat HRM (Wits)

Mahlangu, BM (Mr)

MSc (NATAL), BA Hons (US)

Ntwane, J (Ms)

BA (UWC), BA Honours (Anthropology)

(UFS), Diploma: HRM (Allenby in-Home

study), Programme: Certificate in Public

Service Management (WITS), Masters

in Development Studies: Tourism and

Business Development (UFS)

Manhe, P (Mr)

Advanced Management Programme

(Potchefstroom Business School)

Middle Management Programme

(Potchefstroom Business School),

Xaba, N (Dr)

PhD (Chemistry) (UKZN), BSc Hons

(Chemistry) (UKZN), BSc (Natal)

Motuku, M (Dr)

PhD (USA), MSc (USA), BSc Mechanical

Eng(USA), BSc Physics (USA)

Jacobs, K (Dr)

PhD (UCT), MBA (USB), Hons: BA(USB)

,Bachelor of Education (UWC) , NDip for

Technicians: Mechanical Engineering

(Pen Tech) , Higher NDip for Post School

Education (Pen Tech)

Exner, U (Ms)

BCom Informatics (UNISA), CISA (ISACA)

Kwinda, M (Dr)

MSc Med - Bioethics & Health Law

(Wits), MMed Fam Med (UL), MBChB

(Natal), BSc (UNIVEN)

Ministerial S8(A)viii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Ministerial S8(A)viii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Ministerial S8(A)viii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Ministerial S8(A)viii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Ministerial S8(A)viii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

CSIR S8(A)x Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

ECSA S8(A)x Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

IITPSA S8(A)x Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

HPCSA S8(A)x Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Mtshali, HA (Ms)

B.TECH Electrical Engineering (TUT),

N.DIP Electrical Engineering (TUT)

Kunene, N (Mr)

PGDM (UKZN), PGDE (UKZN), BSc

(Natal)

Mabusela, I (Mr)

MBA (NWU), BA Comm (UNISA), Fin

Mng (UNISA)

Thekiso, TR (Mr)

B.Tech Labour Relations (VUT), N.DIP

Labour Relations (VUT)

Maphalane, IS (Mr)

BTech: HRD (VUT), ND: Mngt of Training

(VUT), Municipal Fin Mngt Act Cert.

Modisakeng, BJ (Cllr)

Local Government Tertiary Qualification

(Technikon SA)

SAIEE S8(A)x Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Donor S8(A)xii Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

Donor S8(A)xii Oct 2015 – Sept 2019

Convocation S8(A)xiii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Convocation S8(A)xiii Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

District Municipality S8(A)xiv Oct 2017 – Sept 2019

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Lee (Sassenberg), A (Ms)

National Diploma N4 (Department of

National Education), Comprehensive

Project Management for Built

Environment (University of Pretoria)

Secretary

Mokoena, TD ( Dr), GradICSA

PhD (Vista), MSc (Leeds Beckett), MCom (Vista), BComHons (Vista), PGD:

Business Admin (Wales), PGD: Corporate Governance (Monash SA),

BCom (Vista), STD.

IODSA S8(A)xv Oct 2017 – Sept 2021

Attendance at Council and EXCO of Council meetings is reflected in the following tables:

2018 Council Meetings

Meeting Date Total Number of Members Attendance Percentage

08 March 2018 29 29 100%

23 March 2018 29 26 90%

22 June 2018 28 26 93%

21 September 2018 27 18 67%

01 November 2018 26 11 42%

23 November 2018 26 22 85%

30 November 2018 25 20 80%

2018 EXCO Meetings

Meeting Date Total Number of Members Attendance Percentage

20 March 2018 5 5 100%

17 May 2018 8 5 63%

20 June 2018 7 6 86%

16 August 2018 7 6 86%

20 September 2018 7 5 71%

15 November 2018 7 5 71%

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

University Management and Administration

The management and administration functions of the University are executed in compliance with the prescripts of the Higher Education

Act 101 of 1997, University Statute and institutional rules. The Vice-Chancellor and Principal is the Chief Accounting Officer in charge

of the overall management and administration of the University. In the performance of the management and administration functions

the Vice-Chancellor is assisted by the Management Committee (ManCom) and the Executive Management Committee (EMC). The

Vice-Chancellor and Principal is accountable to Council. The Vice-Chancellor and Principal and his management team are responsible

for the management functions of the University and Council for the governance functions. The roles and functions of the Vice-

Chancellor and Principal and those of the Chairperson of Council are clearly delineated and where confusion of roles occurred it was

dealt with effectively.

In 2018 the Council of the Vaal University of Technology embarked on the restructuring of senior management positions as part of

the strategy review process approved by Council. This structural review process saw a re-assignment of roles such that the erstwhile

positions of Deputy-Vice Chancellor, i.e DVC: Academic and Research; DVC: Governance and Organisational Transformation; and,

DVC: Technology Transfer and Innovation were reviewed to DVC: Teaching, Learning and Student Support; DVC: Resources and

Planning; and, DVC: Research, Innovation and Commercialization. Furthermore, a new management structure, ManCom was

established comprising the Vice-Chancellor and Principal, DVCs, Registrar, CFO and Executive Director: HR. The existing management

structure, EMC still exists consisting of members of ManCom, other Executive Directors, Directors and Executive Deans of various

divisions/units and faculties. It is a broad consultative management body, which deliberates on operational and tactical issues and

takes decisions pertaining to these areas.

VUT Council

Vice-Chancellor & Principal

DVC: Teaching

Learning & Student

Support

DVC: Resources

& Planning

DVC: Research,

Innovation &

Commercialisation

Registrar

Chief Financial

Officer

Executive Director:

Human Resources

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

DR TD MOKOENA

REGISTRAR

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 3

MESSAGE FROM THE

CHANCELLOR

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

I wish to express my gratitude to the Community of the Vaal University of Technology (Council, Senate, Students, Academic Staff,

Support Staff, Organised Labour and the Institutional Forum), for the confidence shown to me by appointing me as the Chancellor

of this illustrious University for a period of four years, starting from August 2017 to August 2021. During my term of office, and

indeed during the Inauguration Ceremony, I made a commitment of working with the University Community to bring change – at this

University, especially in the areas of Fund‐raising, Resource Mobilization, Friend‐raising and partnership.

This is a commitment I am passionate about and I will also be having regular meetings with the Vice‐Chancellor and Principal as well as

with the Director: Resource Mobilization in order to push and drive for the establishment of the VUT Foundation, as funders are more

prepared to make a contribution to an Academic Institution via a Foundation, where they are represented rather than directly to the

University. At the time of writing the Report, I was happy to learn that quite a substantial progress has been made towards achieving

this vision. The other area I am passionate about is that of the Student Accommodation and in this regard, I made a presentation both

at Council and at the meeting of the EMC, and I am still awaiting a response from these structures.

My commitment to VUT is to be an ACTIVE Chancellor rather than an ARMCHAIR and/or a CEREMONIAL figure and to this end, I am

making a passionate plea to all stakeholders to work with me to realise this Vision so that when my term ends, I should be able to look

back with pride and trace the legacy I have left behind.

I wish VUT well in its endeavours to be the best University of Technology in our Country.

MESSAGE FROM THE:

CHANCELLOR

DR X MKHWANAZI

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 4

REPORT OF THE

CHAIRPERSON OF

COUNCIL

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The Council of the Vaal University of Technology governs the

institution in accordance with the Higher Education Act 101 of

1997 and the Institutional Statute as gazetted on 3 April 2013.

The governance framework of the University is based on a

bicameral cooperative governance model that recognises the

contributions and participation of various stakeholders: civil

society, commerce, industry, government, alumni, academics,

workers and students. Whereas Council is responsible for the

overall governance of the University, Senate is responsible for

the academic governance of the University. In pursuance of

good and clean governance, Council has, inter alia, adopted

the principles and recommendations of King IV Code of Good

Governance in as far as is feasible and aligned to the higher

education act.

The year 2018 was the second year of Professor Gordon Zide

as the Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the Vaal University of

Technology and the second year of the chairperson of

Council, the tenure of the Chairperson of Council being two years

in accordance with the Statute. Council continued the work it

started in 2017, particularly receiving progress on the Strategy

Review process that was approved in 2017. Council approved

the implementation of what was termed the “Back-to-Basics”

Programme which was a list of key milestones and drivers that

would ensure success of the new strategy once approved and

implemented. Council also, particularly through its Finance

and Infrastructure Committee and the Audit and Risk Committee,

introduced keystone financial austerity measures aimed at

managing the financial challenges facing the University that

had seen a sustained and significantly growing deficit budget.

This led to the Fincom for example, approving a zero percent

increase in the 2019 budget.

Council also received the Executive Summary of the long-awaited

forensic investigation conducted by the SNG company instituted

by the Vice-Chancellor and Principal shortly after assumption of

duty in 2017. The Vice-Chancellor had reported at Council that

the institution suffered from a “multiple organ failure”, symptoms

of which ranged from an inordinate number of vacancies and

acting positions to a complete dysfunctionality of certain units

and departments. The year 2018 was also marked by several

challenges facing Council, particularly in the second half of the

year. The primary source of these challenges were allegations of

corruption, mismanagement and maladministration reported to

the Council and to the Minister of Higher Education and Training at

the time. This matter brought serious challenges at the Council

as there was no clear agreement as to how to deal with them.

These and other challenges led to the Governance Committee

postponing the Council self-evaluation exercise that was supposed

to have been undertaken in 2018, especially as part of the

Department of Higher Education and Training’s introduction

of the Governance Indicators Scorecard and implementation

thereof.

Despite these challenges, the Council, inter alia, made the following

approvals during the year 2018:

• The 2017 Annual Report and Financial Statements;

• The conferral of honorary degrees;

• Code of Conduct of Council members;

• Leave of absence form;

• Annual Council Work-Plan 2018/ 2019;

• Proposed Institutional Organogram;

• Annual Performance Plan 2019;

• The Annual Institutional Budget for 2019;

• Refurbishment of Laboratories (C block) and residences;

• Appointment of the Executive Director: Human Resources;

• Appointment of Acting DVCs positions;

• 2018 Mid-Year Performance Report;

• 2019 Vice-Chancellor and Principal’s Performance Contract;

• 2019 Committee and Academic Calendars; and

• Employment Equity Plan.

• Approval of Senior contract extensions;

• Renewal of month-to-month acting positions on levels 4 to 5;

• Approval of Salary increments of Post levels 1 to 4 for 2018;

• Security procurement issues;

• Infrastructure and Efficiency Funding;

• Reportable irregularities;

• Student-Debts write-offs;

• Insourcing Issues;

• Governance Issues; and

• The SNG Forensic Report.

Council is made up of many distinguished members of society

who contribute selflessly to the governance of the Vaal University

of Technology. Through their efforts, commitment and astute

governance acumen, Council has managed to achieve a number

of milestones during the year under review. It is for this reason

that it was sad to have to bid farewell to a few key members of

Council in 2018. These are: Mr C. Patel, Ms A. Lee-Sassenberg,

Dr M. Rakometsi, Dr M. Kwinda and Mr S. Thabane. Their departure

robbed Council of very crucial inputs and insights and they were

definitely missed.

I wish to thank all members of Council for their selfless contribution to

the governance of the Vaal University of Technology. I also wish

to thank Management for its strategic leadership and unremitting

support for Council under the leadership of the Vice-Chancellor

and Principal. I also wish to express my gratitude on behalf of

Council to all staff and students for their understanding and

contributions to the governance of the University. On behalf of

the University community I thank the Minister of Higher Education

and Training and the whole DHET for the constant support and

guidance.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 5

THE STATEMENT OF

COUNCIL ON

GOVERNANCE

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The Council of the Vaal University of Technology governs the

University in accordance with the Higher Education Act, 101

of 1997, The Institutional Statute and the Institutional Rules.

Council is assisted in this function by the Senate of the

University, management, the Institutional Forum and the

SRC. The University Council comprises lay councillors and

professional members. Sixty seven percent of the members of

Council are neither students nor employees of the Vaal University of

Technology. The role of the chairperson of Council, elected in

November 2017, is separated from the role of the Vice-Chancellor

and Principal, appointed in April 2017. The Council of the University

holds four ordinary meetings per year. The Council provides strategic

directions and plays oversight role over the work of management

and its own committees.

Council has established the following committees to assist it

in its role: Executive Committee, Audit and Risk Committee,

Finance and Infrastructure Committee, Human Resources

Committee, Governance Committee, Higher Education Committee,

and Student Services Committee. The role of each committee is

summarized as follows:

times a year. The EXCO comprises chairpersons of other

committees of Council, the chairperson of Council, the deputy

chairperson of Council, the Vice-Chancellor and Principal and

the Vice Principal. EXCO in turn has two sub-committees:

Remuneration Committee (REMCO), responsible for policy

development and implementation for remuneration of senior

management, and the Vice-Chancellor’s Performance Management

Committee (VCPMC), responsible for the performance management

of the Vice-Chancellor and principal. Over the year 2018, EXCO

held a number of meetings and dealt with wide-ranging matters.

These were reported at respective Council meetings.

Audit and Risk Committee

The Audit and Risk Committee is set up in accordance with the

Institutional Rules and functions in line with the principles and

recommendations of King IV. The Committee plays the primary

oversight role over both the audit and the risk functions of the

University. In addition, the Committee also considers matters of

compliance and IT oversight. Council was still to constitute the

IT Governance Committee as a separate committee, this has not

yet been achieved. Furthermore, the Committee considers the

appointment of external auditors and their fees, and discusses

the nature and scope of audits for each audit cycle. The Committee

also considers changes in auditing policies and practices, major

judgmental financial areas, significant adjustments resulting

from audits, the going concern statement and the compliance

with auditing standards. The Audit Committee could hold only

one quorate meeting during the year 2018.

Finance and Infrastructure Committee

The Finance and Infrastructure Committee of Council as reconstituted

in 2016 has the delegated function to provide oversight on

financial matters and infrastructural projects of the University on

behalf of the Council.

The Committee assesses the performance of financial management

of the University and reviews compliance with relevant regulations,

statutes, and accounting principles. The Committee also deals

with investments and commercial entities of the University.

Fincom held at least four quorate meetings over the year 2018.

Executive Committee of Council (EXCO)

The EXCO performs duties and makes such decisions as are

delegated to it by Council. EXCO holds meeting at least eight

Human Resources Committee

The scope of the Human Resources Committee of Council

includes the approval and monitoring of implementation of

human resources policies, monitoring of compliance with

applicable labour legislation and regulations and remuneration

policies and strategies of the University. The Committee also

plays oversight role over the development and implementation

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

of the Institutional Transformation Plan. The HR Committee held

all its scheduled meetings during the period under review.

Student Services Committee

The Student Services Committee of Council considers any

matter relating to student affairs and the well-being of students

on the Campus and in addition examines any matters referred to

it by the Council. The Student Services Committee held only two

quorate meetings over the period under review.

Governance Committee

The Governance Committee’s function is primarily to ensure

that Council functions properly. On behalf of Council, the

Committee deals with Council membership matters, Code of

Conduct, committees of Council and Institutional Rules. The

Committee is also responsible for the evaluation of Council and

for the Council Annual Work plan. The Governance Committee

held at least four quorate meetings over the year 2018.

Higher Education Committee

The Committee has been setup to firstly, advise Council on

higher education matters and on requests from various bodies

and regulators on matters related to higher education, and,

secondly, to bring lay governors of the University up to speed

with the higher education landscape and key issues in higher

education. The Higher Education Committee could not meet due

to lack of a quorum over the year 2018.

Remuneration Committee (Remcom)

The Remcom was part of the Executive Committee of Council

(made up of External Members of EXCO and the Vice-Chancellor

and Principal) until it was separated from EXCO during 2018. As a

separate Committee, chaired by Mr Mahlangu (who also chaired

the HRC), the committee held only one meeting which dealt

primarily with the terms of reference of the Committee.

In our pursuit to ingrain VUT institutional strategy and HR

strategy, we are committed to a fair, equitable, just and competitive

employee remuneration programmes. The primary objective of

these programmes is to attract, motivate and retain high performing

employees at all levels. Our philosophy strives to promote and

reward the right behaviours within the institution, that drives

a high performing institutional culture, supported by robust

performance management. To follow international standards,

VUT adopts a Total Rewards approach which offers employees

flexibility suiting their life-cycle choices.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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VUT rewards philosophy is a set of beliefs that underpin the

reward strategy. It governs reward policy and provides the

foundation for guiding principles which determine how VUT

reward processes operate. It covers the following defined

aspects:

1. The level of flexibility and choices

Currently on a basic plus add-ons ap (allowances and benefits)

with little choice and flexibility. The plan is to move to Total

Cost to Company approach where employees can make flexible

choices, in the near future.

2. Internal equity is defined by a Job Worth and not Individual

Worth

Employees doing the same job are paid at the same level

(internal equity). We further engage a reputable Audit firm

(Deloitte) to perform job evaluations (Peromnes).

3. External parity

VUT constantly manages a tight balancing act of providing

market related remuneration for its employees whilst effectively

managing the budget on payroll lift. Having accurate information

at the right time to fairly remunerate our employees is crucial

to the success of institutional business. For that reason, VUT

subscribes to a trustworthy survey house (PWC) for the use

of its Remchannel internet-based remuneration survey and

benchmarking system.

4. A remuneration market the we benchmark against

We use National Higher Education Industry and Gauteng Higher

Education markets, depending on where we lose and attract

employees from.

5. Positioning of salaries on the percentile of the market

VUT remuneration policy line is around the 50th percentile.

6. Reward culture

With the implementation of performance management, VUT

will reward employees based on performance.

Policy

The content of the Total Rewards Policy and Procedure are

derived from the Total Reward Strategy and Philosophy relating

to the monetary and non-monetary aspects that form part of

the VUT Employee Value Proposition that are applicable to all

permanent and fixed-term contract employees. The monetary

aspects form part of the Total Cost to Company remuneration

approach to be applied in future. The Policy incorporates the

various aspects, principles and criteria relating to remuneration

and monetary and non-monetary reward offerings and practices

within the Vaal University of Technology (VUT). Total rewards

are integrated to effectively attract, motivate and retain the

talent required to achieve strategy-supportive results within the

context to VUT. Total rewards include remuneration, benefits,

work-life balance, acting and secondment opportunities,

upward mobility possibilities, performance and recognition and

a rewarding work environment (including, study support, skills

development, wellness and career development).

State Of Governance In 2018

2018 was the continuation of the first year of the term of

the second Council which commenced in September 2017,

constituted post-administration of the University. The work of

this Council was a checkered one over the year, with an ‘aurora

borealis’ of good and challenging times. The following characterised

Council and governance in 2018.

Council

By March 2018 Council had between 95-97% membership. This

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

membership was quite diverse viewed from various angles:

Firstly, the mix of competencies brought in by the members

was very rich, from human resources, finance and audit, risk

management, to higher education and engineering,

governance and IT. Secondly, the mix of young with elderly

members ensured that there was a rich diversity of views based

on both experience and youth. Many members had board

experience whilst there were some who had very little

experience of board work. Thirdly, Council membership

was skewed in favour of males. There were only nine female

members on Council. As far as independence goes, over 60%

of the members were neither students nor employees of the

University. This does not necessarily ensure independence but

is a useful indicator. Attendance at meetings of Council was

good, with a quorum reached in all five meetings that sat over

the year.

Committees of Council

All committees of Council as determined by the Statute and the

Rules were fully constituted by February/March 2018. Most

committees managed to sit, although many struggled with a

quorum. Where committees became dysfunctional, their duties

reverted to the full Council until they could be reconstituted.

The Committees were chaired as follows (all chairpersons being

external members of Council):

Senate and its committees

The Senate of the University is constituted in terms of the Act,

the Statute and the Rules of the University. Senate also has

sub-committees that assists it in decision-making and in the

academic governance of the University. In 2018 Senate held all

4 ordinary meetings and some special meetings. Senate and its

committees were fully functional.

Decisions and compliance

Council (and its committees) performed its work as would be

expected over most of the year 2018. Due consideration has

always been taken to ensure that all meetings of Council and

Council committees meet the necessary quorum requirements

as per the Statute and the Rules. Even though the rules allow

for an inquorate meeting to be set within fourteen days of the

failed meeting, at which meeting such a meeting will be deemed

quorate, this provision was used very sparingly and in very

extreme circumstances. There has also been a reluctance on the

use of round-robin resolutions and these were held to the very

minimum.

Challenges

The main challenges that affected Council in 2018 were the

following:

Committee

Executive

Committee

Audit and Risk

Committee

Finance and

Infrastructure

Committee

Human Resources

Committee

Student Services

Committee

Governance

Committee

Higher Education

Committee

Chairperson

Mr TT Hlapolosa

Mr C. Patel until he resigned/ The

Deputy Chairperson,

Ms U. Exner, acted as chair whilst

nominations from SAICA were

awaited.

Dr K. Jacobs

Mr B. Mahlangu

Ms J. Ntwane

Ms U. Exner

Could not meet to elect a chair due to

lack of a quorum

a. Inquorate meetings

Many ordinary meetings of committees of Council could not sit

during 2018 due to lack of quorums. An example is the Audit

and Risk Committee which practically collapsed when Mr Patel

left in May 2018 followed by Ms Lee-Sassenberg only a month

later. The Higher Education Committee failed to hold a single

meeting over the period.

b. Matters raised with the Minister of Higher Education and

Training

The latter half of the year 2018 saw Council struggling to

deal with allegations of impropriety, mismanagement and

maladministration in the University. These had been reported

to Council as well as to the Minister of Higher Education and

Training. A letter from the Minister of Higher Education and

Training received in November 2018 directed Council to deal

with these allegations speedily. This was not to be, and this

signalled the beginning of a collapse in the governance of the

University.

c. Resignations from Council

Linked to the point above, some external Council members

started to resign from the Council in November/December

2018. This affected Council operations as there were some that

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

had left earlier in the year. The following members resigned

from Council in 2018: Mr Patel, Dr Rakometsi, Mr Thabane, Dr

Kwinda and Ms Lee-Sassenberg.

d. The Financial Health of the University

Following the reportable irregularity reported in the 2016/2017

as well as the salary increases in 2018, the finances of the

University took a heavy strain. The University had to dig deeper

into the reserves to stay afloat. The recovery plan that was put

in place did very little to turn the tide. Council was informed by

both PWC and Learning Strategies about the precarious nature

of the finances of the University. It will become important to focus

on a very strict recovery plan going forward.

Subsequent events

Subsequent to the matters as reported for 2018, other events

ensued in 2019 and are listed below:

a. More resignations from Council

Following on the members of Council that resigned in 2018, more

external members resigned during the first half of the year 2019.

This was primarily due to the issues raised with the Minister as

reported above. The following members resigned from Council

during this period: Ms. U Exner, Ms. J Ntwane, Mr. T Thekiso,

Ms. F Yende, Mr I Mabusela, Dr. K Jacobs, Mr. I Maphalane and

Dr. N Xaba. This left Council inquorate and unable to meet the

statutory 60:40 minimum composition. No meetings of Council

were possible.

b. Appointment of Independent Assessors

The Minister of Higher Education and Training, Dr. N Pandor,

after consulting with the Council of the Vaal University of

Technology (VUT), appointed Prof. B Pityana, assisted by Prof. R

Ralebipi-Simela, as Independent Assessors for VUT on 10 May

2019 in accordance with the relevant sections of the Act. The

overall purpose of the investigation was to advice the Minister

on:

• The source and nature of problems facing the institution,

including those relating to governance, management,

financial management and procurement practices, human

resources matters, administration matters, and any other

matters that may arise; and,

• Measures required to restore good governance and

management at the Vaal University of Technology.

The Independent Assessors’ Report is still awaited.

c. Intention to appoint an Administrator

On 31 July 2019 the Minister of Higher Education, Science

and Technology, Dr B Nzimande, wrote to the VUT Council

informing it of his intention to appoint and Administrator to

the Vaal University of Technology. The Minister, in terms of

the Higher Education Act of 1997 (as amended), solicited a

response from Council on this intended action. Following this

letter, the remaining members of Council met on 5 August 2019 to

consider the Minister’s letter. The remaining Council members

collectively elected to step down from Council and agreed with

the intended action by the Minister to appoint an administrator

for the University.

d. Appointment of an Administrator

On 15 August 2019, the Minister gazetted the appointment

of Prof. I Rensburg as Administrator for the Vaal University of

Technology. The general and specific terms of reference of the

Administrator are as follows:

• Take over the role, powers, functions and duties of the Vaal

University of Technology Council for a period of 24 months.

• Take over the role, powers, functions and duties of the Vaal

University of Technology Management, until a new Council

can appoint a new management team for the University.

• Identify and initiate processes and initiatives that will

restore proper governance and management at the

University including reviewing the statute if necessary.

• Ensure that a new council for the Vaal University of

Technology is appointed and constituted in accordance

with the institutional statute as soon as is practicable.

• Receive the report of the Independent Assessor and

initiate processes of implementing its recommendations.

e. Early Retirement of the Vice Chancellor and Principal

On assumption of duty, the Administrator announced the early

retirement of the Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Prof. ZN Zide,

with effect from 31 December 2019. Prof Zide would be on

sabbatical from 01 October 2019 to the end of the year.

Overall Conclusion

Despite the challenges raised above, care was taken to ensure

that there are no cases of deliberate non-compliance and

blatant disregard to rules and legislation. Care has also been

taken to ensure compliance with King 3 and 4 principles and

recommendations as far as possible.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

&

DR TD MOKOENA

REGISTRAR

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION

STATEMENT OF COUNCIL

ON SUSTAINABILITY

6

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The Vaal University of Technology is of the firm belief that

sustainable development is a long-term commitment and

remains committed to sustainable development practices that

contribute to a sound and healthy environment, economy and

society, thereby safeguarding the interest of present and future

generations. Therefore, Council is cognisant of the importance

of reducing its environmental footprint whilst enhancing the

social and economic development of the University.

Sustainability in the tertiary education sector comes about

through the relationship between its academic enhancement,

meeting the needs of the community it serves and its financial

viability. It needs to be noted that sustainability reporting is not

regarded by VUT as information and reporting at year end but

is integrated with other aspects of the business processes and

managed throughout the year.

The following aspects of sustainability have been included in the

report:

Inclusivity of stakeholders in achieving sustainability and the

legitimate interests and expectations of stakeholders is taken

into account in decision-making and strategy. Inclusivity also

means that we take a constructionist approach to decision

making at all levels. It also means that the process of decision

making adopts a team approach to ensure that all voices are

heard and contribute to decision making in a “bottom up”

approach. That way we are making use of collective intelligence

to achieve the vision, goals and objectives of the University.

This is not to obfuscate the view and practice that, all portfolio

managers must lead their units and take responsibility for

envisioning and strategy making. But the emphasis is on servant

leadership as we evolve and construct the genetic code of the

agile and innovative University.

epistemologies and ontologies of doing business similar to the

shifts in the tectonic plates of all our assumptions about our

managerial, educational, racial, pedagogical, technological and

linguistic transformation (Brookfiled, 2000:139).

Community engagement. The VUT is a University that is located

within it immediate, national and continental community.

The following questions guide our community engagement

initiatives:

1. Who is the community?

2. How do we engage with the community?

3. How does the community benefit, educationally,

socially, economically and technologically?

4. How does the community engagement and engaged scholarship

inform our tuition research and innovation and the manner

in which we engage with undergraduates, post graduates

and post-doctoral fellows in what we regard as engaged

scholarship?

Our Community Engagement projects are also critical in our

curriculum renewal programs so that we remain a relevant

University in terms of the graduates that we produce.

The VUT envisions sustainability in terms of the

following model:

Innovation, fairness and collaboration are key aspects of any

transition to sustainability. Innovation at VUT has provided

new ways of doing things; fairness is vital to the University

because social injustice is unsustainable; and, collaboration is a

prerequisite for large scale change, however, it should not

amount to anti-competitiveness.

Social transformation is being redressed from the past and is

integrated within the broader transition to sustainability.

VUT has realized that integrating sustainability and social

transformation in a strategic and coherent manner can give

rise to greater opportunities, efficiencies and benefits for both

VUT and society. For us, transformation is a transformation in

perspective, in a frame of reference, in personal and institutional

paradigms of those involved to change from the past to the

present and the future – it is a paradigmatic change of our

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Sustainability

The VUT has considered that certain Operational and Liquidity ratios best demonstrates:

Economic Sustainability:

Operational Efficiency Ratio

Compares expenses to revenue 2018 2017

A decreasing ratio is considered desirable since it generally indicates increased efficiency

Operating expense ratio = Operating Expenses Operating Expenses

Total revenue

Total revenue

= 1 572 181 565 1 419 816 154

1 480 730 923 1 294 630 107

= 1,06 1,10

Liquidity Ratio

2018 2017

The VUT considers that there are three applicable ratios that are pertinent at this time.

1) Determines the number of months the VUT could operate should all income streams dry up

Adequacy of resources = Cash + accounts receivable Cash + accounts receivable

Monthly expenses

Monthly expenses

= 778 626 175 661 559 982

131 015 130 118 318 012

= 5,9 months 5,6 months

2) Determines if the University’s current assets will be able to cover current liabilities

Current assets: Current liabilities = Current assets Current assets

Current liabilities

Current Liabilities

= 778 626 175 661 559 982

560 477 888 365 277 086

= 1,39 1,81

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

VUT would be able to cover its liabilities in the short-term.

3) Determines if the University’s cash & cash equivalent will be able to cover liabilities in short-term

Cash Ratio = Cash and cash equivalent Cash and cash equivalent

Current liabilities

Current liabilities

= 432 567 564 510 931 409

560 477 888 365 277 086

= 0,77 1,39

The University’s cash and cash equivalent covers only 77% of the short-term liabilities of the University.

Solvency Ratio

2018 2017

1) Determines if the University’s total equity will be able to cover total liabilities

Total equity: Total liabilities = Total liabilities Total liabilities

Total equity

Total equity

= 1 177 247 638 997 753 605

1 088 528 062 1 095 185 677

= 1,08 0,91

The University’s equity does not fully cover the total liabilities of the University. This ratio is in a declining trend which is a warning sign

for long-term sustainability especially when considering that it is unrestricted funds that are being depleted.

2) Determines if the University’s total assets will be able to cover total liabilities

Total liabilities: Total assets = Total assets Total assets

Total liabilities

Total liabilities

= 2 265 775 700 2 092 939 282

1 177 247 638 997 753 605

= 1,92 2,09

The University’s assets fully cover the total liabilities of the University.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Social And Environmental

Sustainability

Our Social and Environmental Sustainability approach is integral

to the broader institutional strategic direction. Through this

effort, the University expressly commits itself to the continuity,

primarily of the academic project of the University. The following

are sustainability activities which are aligned to the broader

institutional strategy:

1. The University continues with the re-curriculation project.

Thus far, several new programmes have been implemented.

The new cohorts enrolled in the new programmes are in

their second academic year. The re-curriculation project is

considered part of our commitment to the sustainability

of teaching and learning. With ever complex and changing

economic environment, Universities are expected to develop

and provide fitting student graduates to the economy. We

thus believe that continuous re-curriculation enables us to

constantly evaluate relevance and fitness of purpose of all

our offerings.

2. Quality teaching, learning and research relies heavily on

adequate infrastructure. Through our Campus Master Plan,

we have articulated our desired growth points to complement

the needs for teaching, learning and research.

Over the years, Vanderbijlpark Campus which is the seat of

the University has grown substantially. The impact of growth

on quality teaching and learning is considered substantial as

well as a risk for University sustainability. We have thus set our

focus and priorities on the growth path for the University. These

includes the recently acquired Quest Conference Centre as well

as prioritization of the Science and Technology Park in Sebokeng

as our future growth points. The construction of the new Faculty

of Education facilities is already underway in Sebokeng.

of the project will go a long a way to meeting our “Green

Initiative” commitments.

• With the support of the Local Government SETA, our

Centre for Renewable Energy has been engaged with

several local municipalities on waste-water treatment

solutions. The increasing scarcity of water is considered

one of the University’s sustainability risks.

4. To ensure continuous development of staff and opportunities

for growth, the University has, as part of its strategic focus,

adopted the Institutional Transformation Plan which is

considered the guiding map amongst others for: policy

review and development, training and development, student

support, and community engagement. The plan also expresses

the University’s overall commitment to transformation.

Given the complex nature of the sustainability challenges, the

University will have to consider several measures which may

include the review of the organizational efficiency and

effectiveness models, financial sustainability models as well as the

development of new models for the future of our sites of

delivery.

We are committed to ensure sustainability of the University.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

3. With the increasing cost of energy as well as associated

environmental risks, the University has adopted the

following initiatives:

• Through the campus master plan, the University has adopted

the “Green Initiative”. This initiative commits the University

to ensure all its future infrastructure projects will be “Green

Initiative” compliant with decreased reliance on coal-driven

energy and more aligned to alternative renewable energy.

• We have already initiated a pilot project on solar energy

support. The project is coordinated by the Faculty of

Engineering. We anticipate that the successful completion

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 7

STATEMENT ON WORKER

AND STUDENT

PARTICIPATION

The Association of Governing Bodies of Universities and Colleges describe shared governance as the process by which various

constituents (traditionally governing boards, senior administration, and faculty; possibly also staff, students, or others) contribute to

decision making related to college or University policy and procedure. In South Africa the concept of co‐operative governance was

adopted in the Education White Paper 3: A Programme for the Transformation of Higher Education, and other early conceptualizations of

the concept of shared governance. The Vaal University of Technology, in tandem with these and in keeping also with the King IV Code

on Corporate Governance, believes in stakeholder participation and involvement in transacting business. Unions and SRC involvement

in some key decision‐making processes is evidence of this. Human Resource policies on recruitment and selection also prescribe

involvement of Unions and the Institutional Forum in staff appointments. The Vaal University of Technology has also made it mandatory

that all policy approval processes and procedures are consulted widely with relevant stakeholders prior to approval by Council.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 8

THE REPORT OF COUNCIL

ON RISK ASSESSMENT &

MANAGEMENT OF RISK

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The University complies with King III principles, and endeavours

to meet all the new requirements for King IV. The University

also intends to employ the Assessment Template of the Code

of Good Governance in Higher Education as soon as Council is

in place. The risk assessment and management is conducted in

terms of the reporting regulations. The following constitutes the

management and assessment of risk:

• At the institution-wide level, risk is managed through the

use of an integrated risk register;

• At the divisional level, risk is managed through the divisional

risk registers;

• The Management Risk Committee is responsible for

the management oversight of the risk assessment and

management; and

• The Policy, Risk and Compliance Unit was established

in 2016 as a dedicated administrative function for the

day-to-day management and assessment of risks as well as

the institution-wide policy environment.

During 2018, Council and Management agreed on the following

as the major risks in the University:

• The declining enrolments

The University’s enrolment pattern has been unstable over

the last 3-4 years. As a sequel to this, the University has

suffered financial penalties. Council and management are

concerned about this trend and management is considering

interventions to over-turn the downward trend. Council

will be considering these interventions in 2019.

• Procurement challenges

The University continued to be plagued by a number

of incidences of non-compliance with and flouting of

procurement policy and procedures as approved by

Council. A number of investigations, for example the SNG

Forensic Report, have demonstrated instances of the

flagrant disregard for these policies. These matters are still

being dealt with, with a view to consequence management

where liability is proven.

• Financial position of the University

Low student fee increases, low debt collection rate and

inordinately high salary increases in 2017 and 2018 have

all led to the University experiencing fiscal problems. This

has led to the University dipping more and more into its

reserves, and even above the regulated 3% deficit

contained in the Reporting Regulations. This presents a

high risk for the University.

• Increasing student debt

During 2018, the University’s student debt recovery

continued to decline significantly due to the sector-wide

capped fee increases as well as the low payment commitment

culture by students. The University is still committed to

working with government to find amicable and sustainable

solutions to this fee impasse.

• Infrastructure and Maintenance deficit

This risk is carried over from the 2017 Annual Report and

remains. In the previous Annual Report (2017), it was reported

that, “The growth of the University as positive as it has

been over the years, has also in the recent period been

identified as one of the threats to quality teaching learning

and the general student life. Council is most appreciative of

the continued government support through infrastructure

grants. The University will be engaging the Department of

Higher Education and Training on various alternative ways

for infrastructure funding to be able to meet the required

infrastructure needs. These engagements will be focused

on the short to long term priorities”.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

• Letters from the Minister

In November 2018 Council received two letters from the

Minister of Higher Education and Training, Dr Naledi

Pandor, directing Council to investigate a list of issues

that had been raised with her that constituted a serious

risk to the University. By the end of 2018, Council was still

debating as to how to deal with these matters in an

appropriate manner.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION 9

2018 COUNCIL STATEMENT

ON TRANSFORMATION

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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Public higher education institutions like the Vaal University

of Technology (VUT) are regulated by policies and legislation

such as the Higher Education Act 101, of 1997 (as amended),

Education White Paper 3: A Programme for the Transformation

of Higher Education (1997), the White Paper for Post School

Education and Training (2013), and others.

The VUT is a public University that remains invested in the

social transformation of the country through its triad

mandate of teaching and learning, research and innovation, and

community engagement.

The VUT believes that its contribution to the national strategic

goals of addressing the triple challenges of unemployment,

poverty and inequality can only be meaningfully assessed

through the palpable outcomes it can realise through its three

missions.

Furthermore, the VUT is making its own contributions to

not only the realisation of the important resolutions of the

National Higher Education Transformation Summitts (2010 and

2015) but also through its Integrated Transformation Plan, which

contributes to the higher education goals contained in the

National Development Plan (Vision 2030).

Student access, support and success

The Vaal University of Technology is constantly broadening

student access to its programmes. As a result the majority of

registered students (i.e. 51%) are students who come from

quintiles 1 to 3 schools that serve the poorest in our nation. Of

these students, 8,811 receive NSFAS funding whilst 1,041 are

recipients of private funding.

SET: Human sciences

The Vaal University of Technology remains true to its mission

of having a greater proportion of its students enrolled in the

sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)

disciplines and fields. In 2018, the majority of VUT students

were enrolled in STEM disciplines; in excess of those enrolled in

the management and humanities faculties.

Student Accommodation

The Vaal University of Technology is committed to increased

provision of accommodation for students particularly first year

students. Figure 1 below indicates the distribution of student

accommodation based on year of study at both VUT and those in

private accommodation. It is pleasing that 45% of our first-year

students are accommodated at VUT residences, which is above

the 30% national policy norms and standards.

Level of Study

Allocation of students in internal and

external residences

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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Staff Demographics

Table: Workforce Analysis as Per Occupational Levels, December 2018

Level

Occupational Levels

MALE

FEMALE

Foreign

Nationals

A C I W A C I W Male Female

1-2 Top management 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

EE Goal 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

Current Gap 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 -1 0 1

3-4 Senior management 7 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 13

EE Goal 6 0 0 1 5 0 0 1 0 0 13

Current Gap -1 -1 -1 0 5 -1 0 0 -1 0 5

Permanent Total 8 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 14

Temporary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Grand Total 8 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 14

Total

EEP targets

The Vaal University of Technology has set equity targets in line

with its approved Employment Equity Plan, 2016-2020. Whilst

women constitute the majority of the staff complement, males

dominate the top and senior management levels (see Table 1).

Of the 13 Senior Management posts, only two were occupied by

women, whilst not a single woman is employed at top management

level.

Adverts for 3 Deputy Vice-Chancellors

During the reporting year, Council approved the advertisements

for three Deputy Vice-Chancellor positions. It is anticipated that

gender representation shall be a key consideration in the filling

of these positions thus ensuring gender equity at this strategic

appointment level.

nGAP Programme

The New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP) is a

prestigious programme funded by the Department of Higher

Education and Training which involves the recruitment of highly

capable scholars as new academics. The recruitment of these

academics is based on carefully designed and balanced equity

considerations and in light of the disciplinary areas of greatest

need in the higher education system. The programme operates

at the nexus of quality, equity and success in universities.

The most important features of the programme are that

successful applicants are appointed into permanent posts firmly

factored into long-term staffing plans right from the outset, and

appointments are governed by contracts which clearly spell out

the expectations, obligations, roles and responsibilities of the

employing University and of the newly appointed academic. The

nGAP covers a six-year period for each cohort taken onto the

programme, covering a 3-year development programme plus 3

years induction thereafter. The nGAP is structured as follows:

• a Development Programme of 3 years duration (with the

possibility of the programme being tailored to meet the

needs of individuals);

• three years induction after successful completion of the

Development Programme; and

• continuing permanent employment at the appointing

institution thereafter.

The VUT participation

The VUT joined this programme in 2016 with 5 appointments

and 2 more in 2017. Ms E Heuer was appointed as the nGap

Manager from 2018, reporting to the deputy DVC Teaching,

Learning and Student Support. The following lecturers were

appointed.

33


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

nGap Lecturers

nGap lecturer Commencement date Faculty

Ms T Erasmus 1 August 2016 Human Sciences

Ms A Doodnath 1 November 2016 Human Sciences

Mr M Lamola 1 April 2016 Engineering and Technology

Ms R Ramalisa 12 April 2016 Applied and Computer Sciences

Mr S Rayise 17 January 2017 Applied and Computer Sciences

Ms T Khumalo 1 November 2016 Management Sciences

Mr M Benson 1 April 2017 Engineering and Technology

The demographics of the appointees

MALE

FEMALE

A C I W A C I W

2 1 2 1 1

The benefits

The benefits to the VUT is the appointment of young, highly

competent staff in areas of our choice. Candidates’ requirements

include a Masters’ degree with a 70% pass rate and being younger

than 40. The appointees are not only competent subject specialists

but are able and ready to contribute to the research output

of the VUT. The DHET makes a significant contribution to the

development cost and remuneration of the appointees.

The way forward

The VUT is committed to the programme and one more

appointment was made in April 2019 in Legal Sciences. Four

additional positions have been approved for 2019. Two in the

Faculty of Engineering, one in Accountancy and one in ICT. The

positions have been advertised and the interviews will follow

shortly.

Disability Services

The number of registered students with disabilities continues to

grow albeit from a low base. During the 2018 academic year,

there were 45 registered students with disabilities ranging from

dyslexia to blind. The Disability Services Office assisted most

of the students with reasonable accommodation including

purchase of assistive devices, production of learning material

(i.e. braille and e-text) to facilitating concessions during tests

and examinations. Close to R1 million in continuing bursaries

was disbursed to students, the funding came from CBI-Electric

and Armscor.

Insourcing project

A project team has been appointed to resume the insourcing of

security services at the Vaal University of Technology. A phased

approach has been adopted with progress reports made to

council via relevant committees.

Broad-based Black Economic Empowerment

(BBBEE)

The Vaal University of Technology procures its goods and

services from local enterprises thus contributing to local economic

development. During 2018, VUT spent R45,377,261,983.00 on

procurement of goods and services from suppliers whilst 76%,

i.e. R34,535,351,100.00 of the total procurement spend went

to Black owned businesses (ranging from 0-100% black owned).

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

34


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

10

SECTION

REPORT OF THE VICE-

CHANCELLOR AND

PRINCIPAL ON MANAGEMENT

AND ADMINISTRATION FOR 2018

35


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The report of the Vice-Chancellor and Principal for the 2018 Annual Reporting period

is developed in terms of the requirements as set out in the Regulations for Reporting

by Public Higher Education Institutions, as published in Government Notice No. 10209,

Government Gazette No 37726 of 9 June 2014 effective as from 2015. In line with these

requirements, this report focuses on the management and administration of the Vaal

University of Technology for the 2018 academic year.

The Management of the Vaal University of Technology has set four strategic goals and

six strategic success factors as the thrust of the 2018 Annual Performance Plan. These

priorities were further expressed in the Institutional Implementation Plan (IIP2018) for

purposes of cascading these across the University as well as for effective management

and monitoring.

The complete 2018 audited report on the overall institutional performance against the

University’s Annual Performance Plans is incorporated in the report.

Institutional Management And Leadership

In 2018, notwithstanding the complex challenges facing the system, the University has

been undergoing changes at the various levels of the organisation. This follows the

commencement of the strategic review process initiated in 2018. As a sequel to this

process, we held several internal dialogues interrogating some of the assumptions

that have carried the 2015 - 2019 University strategy. This exercise afforded us the

opportunity to critically reflect on the position of the University in relation to the

changes and the new challenges facing the Higher Education Sector in general.

The uncertainty of the governance challenges facing the Institution, have only emphasized

and heightened the importance of risk management both at the institutional as well

as at the systems level. In view of the complexities as well as the new challenges

experienced by the system, Universities as “going – concern public entities”, are increasingly

required to carve and craft new sustainable approaches for the continuity of the academic

project. At VUT, we still hold the long-held commitment that public higher education

must at all times be for the good of all. This long-held belief which is engraved in our

Institutional values and organisational culture, remains the undergirding and overriding

value that continues to shape our internal discourse. Having said the above, we can state

that, as a public university, we understand the challenges that face many of our students

who are mostly drawn from poor families across the country. At VUT, we try our best

to see them through the system. It is always fulfilling when we meet with their parents

to celebrate their successes and achievements. Despite the difficulties and challenges

throughout their academic life at the University, it is that moment that gives meaning

and purpose to the many difficult decisions we make in the interest of education.

Through our strategy review process which was facilitated by a Company Learning

Strategy, we are beginning to conceptualize responses to the new challenges at

institutional systems and systemic level. Given the sensitive nature of some of these

challenges, universities would have to be agile and flexible in finding sustainable

solutions to the challenges which are responding to the complexities of the system as

well as appreciative of the perennial student demands we are faced with.

Given the context, management and administration of public higher education

institutions have become a delicate exercise of managing as well as protecting the

36


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

continuity of the academic project. These, we do with the same determination and commitment in engaging with the various issues

of interest from our stakeholders. While this has been a challenging task, it has also been fulfilling and rewarding as we crisscross the

country to graduate many of our previously disadvantaged students, and as we see many of our staff members achieve in their areas

of academic excellence. We do this enormous task because we deeply appreciate the impact education has in changing the lives of

many of our staff, students and their families in South Africa as well as in our neighboring communities.

The Management Committee (MANCOM) of the University in the reporting period:

Professor Gordon N Zide Vice-Chancellor and Principal (from 1/5/17)

Professor P Dzvimbo Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-Principal (up to 31/12/18)

Dr D Mokoena

Mr L Coetzee

Registrar

Chief Financial Officer

Professor P Radebe Acting Executive Director- Human Resources (1/11/2017)

Mr N Masudubele

Acting Executive Director: Finance

Mr J. Jooste Acting DVC ( Research, Innovation and Commercialization) Dec 2018- June 2019

Prof R Dhurup

Prof R Van der Bank

Acting DVC: Resources and Planning

Acting DVC: Teaching, Learning and Student Support Services

Strategic actions undertaken by management in the reporting period:

Strategic actions undertaken by management in the reporting period:

The strategic actions undertaken by management in the reporting period should be understood in the context of supporting the strategy

review process and interventions made following the institutional performance reviews and these include:

Progress on Strategy review process

The new Vice-Chancellor and Principal designate, Professor Gordon N Zide assumed work as from the 1st May 2017 and effectively as

the Vice-Chancellor and Principal as from the 1st July 2017. The new Vice-Chancellor and Principal was tasked with the responsibility of

leading the Strategy Review Process of the University. The review process was mapped-out to give effect to the following:

• To assess the University’s performance and challenges.

• To develop the vision of the new Vice-Chancellor and Principal.

• To determine the University’s strategic priorities for the next five years.

During 2018, the following phases of the strategy review process were completed with the assistance of the Learning Strategy:

• Setting of the context for the review. This is intended to assess the state of the sector, institutional challenges as well as higher education

international trends. Significant in our discussions, was the impact of declining funding in the sector and the associated risks, the

impact of the #FeesMustFall student protests, and institutional sustainability.

• Development of guiding themes for the review. The themes mentioned here-below were identified as pillars of the strategy review

and will be the guiding principles for the broader stakeholder engagement. The leaders of these themes will be engaging with the

various stakeholders across the University to complete the initial phase of the review:

37


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Theme

Academic Project

Governance Leadership

Financial Sustainability and

Viability

Technology Transfer and

Innovation

Human Capital Management

Cost Containment Measures

Leader

Professor K.P. Dzvimbo – DVC:

Academic Research

Dr Dan Mokoena - Registrar

Mr Les Coetzee – Chief

Financial Officer

Dr Joe Molete – Executive

Director: TTI

Professor Patrick Radebe –

Acting Executive Director: HR

Mr Athol Rhoda – Caretaker

CFO

The pre-strategy review discussions took cognisance of the

following unavoidable variables which impact on the sector and

the University:

• The impact of declining enrolments as well as associated

funding model: Given the fact that enrolment patterns

may also be influenced by external factors, the Executive

Management Committee (EMC) has considered a

discussion on the University’s size and shape as well as new

enrolment streams. These may include partnerships with

TVET colleges in the area.

• The re-positioning of the Science and Technology Park

(STP). The University is in the process of establishing

the VUT Business Enterprise as a business platform to

enhance commercialization and business opportunities. It has

become evident that, with the declining state funding due to

increasing new state priorities, the sustainability of the

University will in the nearer future depend heavily on

alternative sources of funding.

• Institutional Efficiency Model: The University has

undertaken various projects to develop the overall

Institutional Efficiency Model. Most of these projects

are still ongoing. It is the view of EMC that the outcome

of these projects will have a significant bearing on the

institution’s strategic direction in the next 10 -15 years.

1. University Enrolment Management

During 2018, the University finalised the review of its

enrolment plan. This process followed a rigorous exercise of

determining causes of unstable enrolment and its implications

on the University’s funding. In the last two reporting cycles, the

University experienced declining enrolments, particularly, in its

first time entering students. Management has undertaken to

conduct a long-term review to determine causes of this decline

as well as alternative streams of enrolment. This will include

establishing linkages with other Post School Education Partners

such the TVET colleges.

The new enrolment plan was approved by the Council in 2018

and was subsequently submitted to the Department of Higher

Education and Training.

2. Repositioning of the Science and Technology Park

(STP)

The Science and Technology Park (STP) has been the

flagship of the Institution as early as 2009. With the growing

complexities in our economy, discussions across the

system about the positioning of Universities of Technology

(UOT) and the need for UOTs to be positioned as the nexus of

articulation in the Post School Education environment, the

STP was conceptualised as a platform for interfacing the

University with business as well as enhancing and strengthening

new research opportunities with a specific focus on innovation

and commercialisation.

The STP has since its establishment recorded enormous

achievements including linkages with several public, private

and international partners. The Park employs about 108 staff

members. Given the new challenges, management has

undertaken to conduct a review of the STP as part of the

overall Institutional Strategy Review process. The review is

intended to enhance the work and positioning of the STP. This

will also include collaboration with our international partners to

exchange ideas and lessons on mutual areas of interest. Through

our engagement, we also intend to use lessons learned to

review the current operations of the STP.

We are optimistic in achieving an STP model which will enable us

to improve our engagement with business, increasing research

focusing on innovation and commercialisation, strengthened

collaborations with external partners and positioning the STP

as a focal point to enhance the University’s 3rd and 4th stream

income generation

3. Future of our Sites of Delivery

The University has three satellite Sites of Delivery; Upington,

Secunda and Ekurhuleni. The enrolment numbers at these

campuses have declined over the years. The impact of the

decline of numbers is considered significant on the costs of

operations at Sites of Delivery in comparison to the cost of

operations at the main campus with the same drop in numbers.

38


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

This is caused by un-subsidised Sites of Delivery in the current

funding model. The costs of operations of all our campuses is

drawn from the common source of funding. In view of the

obviously difficult task before us, management resolved to

initiate a feasibility study on the sustainability and viability of all

our campuses. This exercise is anticipated to be completed in

2018/2019. The feasibility study for the Ekurhuleni Campus has

begun and is completed, and the same methodology will now

be used for the other Sites of Delivery in order to have a holistic

view of their existence.

4. Management Information System

The success of every management depends greatly on the

quality of information provided for effective decision

making. Our review process focuses on strengthening the

Planning and Quality Promotion Unit as well as its support

systems. Critical for our University is the review of the

broader University business architecture. We have become

aware that some of the systems used do not meet our desired

performance levels and information support, thus we are

setting aside funding for the review of the University business

architecture. This process will cut across, both in the administration

and academic environments.

5. SNG Forensic Investigation

Given the serious challenges faced by the University, the

Vice-Chancellor asked permission from Council to initiate and

institute a forensic investigation in order to deal with a myriad of

reported and unreported cases of alleged fraud and corruption.

Council granted the permission for the investigation and the

Report has since been made available to the DHET, the

Chairperson of Council, Council as well as the Vice-Chancellor,

and latterly to the Administrator, Prof Rensburg for the review

and implementation of its recommendations.

6. The CHE Institutional Audit

Further to the above, the Vice-Chancellor took the initiative of

approaching the CHE to conduct an Institutional Audit in order

to provide a dipstick for the Institution’s effectiveness or noneffectiveness.

This was a bold move by the Vice-Chancellor and

the said Audit took place on 18 – 20 March 2019. The Report has

come up with a number of Commendations and Recommendations

which Management will now have to review and implement.

7. VUT Choir Records a Music CD

A resounding success for the period under review was the

recording of a CD by the VUT Choir. This has been a dream come

true from the Vice-Chancellor as he also acknowledges the

dream he shared in this regard with the Former Vice-Chancellor,

Prof IN Moutlana.

Student Enrolment And Support Services

As already stated above, the University has been experiencing a

declining enrolment pattern. Below we provide a diagrammatic

representation of our enrolments for the 2017/2018. Our numbers

for this period are beginning to reflect some stability. However,

this diagram will help provide much greater clarity of our enrolments

for these periods. For the 2018 academic year, below are the

enrolment numbers as well as distribution across the various

faculties. Our total enrolment for the academic year was 19 241.

Our enrolment for the period 2017/2018 seems to have stabilised.

7 000 --------------------------------------------

6 000 --------------------------------------------

5 000 --------------------------------------------

4 000 --------------------------------------------

6 298

3 000 --------------------------------------------

4 959

2 000 --------------------------------------------

4 060

3 890

1 000 --------------------------------------------

43

0

Faculty of Applied & Comp Science

Faculty of Engineering

Faculty of Human Sciences

Faculty of Management Sciences

Occasional Students

39


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

20 000 ------------------------------------------------------

15 000 ------------------------------------------------------

10 000 ------------------------------------------------------ 19218

5 000 ------------------------------------------------------

4 060 6 298 3 890 43

4 959

0

Faculty of Applied & Comp Science

Faculty of Engineering

Faculty of Human Sciences

Faculty of Management Sciences

Occasional Students

Grand Total

However, if read against the set of enrolment targets for 2017

academic year, it will reflect under-enrolment. The decline of

enrolments for the 2017/2018 period could be attributed

to various factors. Our internal assessment has pointed to

several areas of concern and some of which are driven by external

factors. In this regard, the University management is committed

to addressing identified internal weaknesses. Given the focus

of the University as a University of technology, we are pleased

with the stability of enrolment numbers in the STEM disciplines

and fields. Our commitment is to improve growth in enrolment

of female students in the STEM disciplines and fields. Below we

provide further enrolment distributions:

1. Appointment of the Director: Stakeholder Management

Given the complexity of the operations of the Vice-Chancellor’s

office, Council approved the creation and the filling of the

abovementioned position.

2. Appointment of the Director: Resource Mobilization and

Fundraising

Given the Strategic nature of Resource Mobilization and

Fund-raising (RM & FR), Council approved the resuscitation of the

position of Director: RM & FR. It was of great concern to Council

that Fund-raising last took place in 2011 and therefore Council

mandated the VC to move with speed in filing this position.

40


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

5 000 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4514

4 000 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3 000 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2559

2 000 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2087

2191

2051

1948

1993

1786

1 000 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0

20 29

The 2017/2018 headcount enrolment by gender reflects a worrying pattern of under-enrolment of female students in the Faculty of

Engineering. The variance between male and female students is considered significantly high. Management is taking steps, through

its recruitment unit, to improve the numbers of female students in the faculty.

41


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The racial profile of the University remains predominantly black across all faculties. There are efforts in place to increase enrolments

for other racial groups. We believe that diversity of student profile will go a long way in shaping the future citizenry we all aspire to

produce. Our curriculum is designed specifically to allow our students to work across the world, this is also reflected in the diversity

of our international students and our mission position. Our new recruitment strategy will give effect to these changes and priorities

for the future.

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

----------------------------------------------------------------------

75

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

44

40

----------------------------------------------------------------------

35

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

19

15

----------------------------------------------------------------------

3

4

Faculty of Applied

& Comp Science

Faculty of

Engineering

Faculty of Human

Sciences

Faculty of

Management

Sciences

42


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

59

----------------------------------------------------------------------

40

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

25

20

----------------------------------------------------------------------

20

11

----------------------------------------------------------------------

7

4

Faculty of Applied

& Comp Science

Faculty of

Engineering

Faculty of Human

Sciences

Faculty of

Management Sciences

Doctoral

Masters

The above graphs demonstrate our postgrads enrolments for the 2016/2017 academic years. There is a general improvement in

the Masters Enrolments for the 2017 reporting period. There is also a significant decline in the enrolment of Doctoral students for

the same period. In 2017, Management submitted a proposal to Council for the purchase of the Quest Conference Center. Council

approved the proposal; we are in the final stages to complete the purchase of the facility. The facility is designated to provide support

for Masters, Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Students. We believe this facility will go a long way in providing the much-needed support

for our Postgraduate students. We anticipate that the Department of Higher Education and Training will finalise the transfer of the

facility by mid-year of 2018.

Student Support Services

Our Student Support Services provides a range of professional support activities as well as Student Life, Culture and

Governance. The Student welfare and Residences are considered as some of the critical areas which interface with academic support.

Similarly, with the rest of the system, many of our first entering students experience difficulties to adapt to the University setting, in

particular, those who are unfortunately not accommodated at our residences are mostly affected. Over the years, the demand for student

accommodation has sharply risen due to various reasons, amongst others, the increasing costs of private accommodation in the

region.

6000 -------------------------------------------------

5000 -------------------------------------------------

5372

4862

4000 -------------------------------------------------

3706

3000 -------------------------------------------------

2000 -------------------------------------------------

1000 -------------------------------------------------

0

43


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The increase of demand for student residences has led to the

University acquiring additional privately-owned facilities to

augment the shortfall. The national guidelines for student

accommodation is set at a minimum of 33% accommodation for

first-entering students. To ensure that the University satisfies

the minimum requirements, additional student accommodation

was acquired. The University is involved in further engagements

with the Department of Higher Education and Training to find a

long-term solution to student accommodation shortfall. Some of

the conversations and discussions we are having with the DHET

are about securing our own accommodation as against renting.

Student Life, Culture and Governance

Student Life and Culture is considered an important and

integral part of the holistic student experience and development.

The University arranges and facilitates several extra-curricular

activities annually as part of the University’s culture and life.

These activities are designed to reflect the profile of our

students and their areas of interest, and indeed as part of the

University’s promotion of cultural diversity.

Some of the Highlights for 2018 includes:

• Established partnership with the Gauteng Department of

Social Development and the South African National Council on

Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. The partnership is part

of our effort to fight against drug abuse as well as interventions

for impoverished students.

• Students participated in the 2017 University Sports South

Africa National tournaments (USSA). Students received

various awards in Rugby, Netball, Dance, Softball, Volleyball,

Karate, Football and Hockey.

• Through the HIV/AIDS Unit, several outreach programmes

were initiated including: The Peer Education System Model

to reach out to students and staff on health awareness issues

and the “First things First Campaign” to educate students

on HIV/AIDS and services provided by VUT, the programme

was hosted at three Campuses of the University.

• The Student Life and Governance Unit conducted the SRC

Training in December 2017. The training covered the following

areas; emotional intelligence, conflict management and

meditation skills, leadership and controversies and student

leadership in HE.

• The Residence Department held the “Know your environment

Campaign” for all first entering students. This is an awareness

campaign that focuses on student’s safety, awareness of

various services and activities at the Residence Department

Student Governance is considered an important part of the

broader University Governance System. The SRC is established

in terms of the University statutes and the Higher Education Act

44


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

101, 1997 as amended. The SRC is constituted in terms of its

constitution developed in accordance with the University statutes.

In terms of the SRC Constitution, all students are entitled to

participate as candidates or electorates in the SRC elections. SRC

elections are held annually as required by the SRC constitution.

To give greater effect to the functioning of the SRC constitution,

the SRC and management have agreed to consider the review

of the current SRC constitution. The Student Support Services

Division will coordinate the process. It is expected that the

review of the constitution will be finalised in 2019.

Institutional financial position and Infrastructure

Support

Universities across the system suffered the same effect of the

student protests and the successive 0% fee increases. The

effects of these vary from one institution to the other.

VUT has over the years carried a substantial student debt

fluctuating between R 300 million – R 400 million. Management

considers the current student debt level as a high risk for the

University and is considering measures to mitigate and lower

the impact. There will be an intervention measure that will be

implemented over a period of 3-5 years. The successive 0% fee

increases for 2015/2016 had also significantly impacted on the

overall University’s financial position.

While the University is appreciative of government intervention

through compensatory grants, these allocations were below

our financial projections. The shortfall was carried through

internal budgetary adjustments to avert a potential disruption of

University strategic priorities and the academic project.

About 8 811 of our students were funded through NSFAS and

1041 funded by private companies and other governments

during 2017. A total of 9 852 were fully funded for the reporting

period. Our total enrolment for this period was sitting at 19

218. It is estimated that about 45% of our student population is

considered cash paying and some may be falling within the

bracket classified as “poor and working-class category”.

This category of students may be unable to access government

funding due to poor academic performance. We continue

to work hard on intervention measures as part of academic

support to ensure struggling students do not stay longer in the

system and are supported to succeed.

45


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

46


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

bracket classified as “poor and working-class category”. This

category of students may be unable to access government

funding due to poor academic performance. We continue

to work hard on intervention measures as part of academic

support to ensure struggling students do not stay longer in the

system and are supported to succeed.

0

About 8 811 of our students were funded through NSFAS and

1041 funded by private companies and other governments

during 2017. A total of 9 852 were fully funded for the reporting

period. Our total enrolment for this period was sitting at 19

218. It is estimated that about 45% of our student population is

considered cash paying and some may be falling within the

University Salary Costs

The University’s salary bill has reached a concerning level and

Management had undertaken to freeze vacancies at the total

cost of R 100 million. In terms of the DHET norms on salaries

versus income, Universities are advised not to exceed 63% of

the overall state funding. Our estimates at the beginning of

2017 indicated that we were already above the norm. Further

assessment indicated that, while there has been a sharp growth

in the contracts appointment budgets, our operational budget

has been managed effectively. Several measures have been

put in place, these include the directive given by Council at its

last meeting to conduct a review of the University’s salary bill.

Price Waterhouse Coopers was appointed to implement Council

directive. A complete report on the review of the salary bill was

submitted to Council in 2017.

0

As part of the strategy review, we are closely looking at sustainable ways of managing the risk of increasing salary bill. Both Council

and Management are committed to ensuring financial stability and sustainability of the University.

47


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

0

While our salary increase pattern has been on the decline since 2014, our salary bill has been on the increase. This may be indicative

of the fact that our staffing profile has been on the increase. In an effort to stabilise our financial position, in particular, costs

associated with salaries, the University is in the process of reviewing its financial position. We anticipate that a comprehensive review

will be completed in 2019.

Infrastructure Support

While growth of the University could be a positive signal, inadequate infrastructure funding and support could result in a negative growth that

is considered a risk for the University. The University is utilising a cross-subsidised model to meet the current operational requirements for all

its infrastructure requirements at its Sites of Delivery. The growth of student and staff population at the Vanderbijlpark campus has not been

supported by a consistent growth in infrastructure development and support. In the current form, the University is operating with a deficit in

infrastructure needs and land space. It could be considered that Vanderbijlpark campus has reached a state of saturation and cannot provide

for any further development.

It is also our view that infrastructure deficit impacts negatively on the quality of teaching and learning. We have in recent years initiated the

purchase of the Quest Conference Center from North West University. With the approval of the Department of Higher Education and Training,

we anticipate that the procurement and transfer process will be completed in 2018.

The following are ongoing DHET funded infrastructure projects for the 2018 reporting period:

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

FUNDING

APPROVED

PLANNED

COMPLETION

1 Teacher Education Building at EduCity Campus

FC8

2 Life and Physical

Sciences Building

FC5

3 Engineering Building Extension – Additional Floor on

Lab-wing

FC2

R33.735m November 2019

R124.91m September 2018

R15.063m January 2019

48


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

4 Turn-key Project: 300 bed Residence at

EduCity Campus

FC7A

5 Life and Phys. Sci. Chemistry Lab.

FC5

R54.386m September 2018

R3.050m September 2018

6 Teaching Equipment

FC2

FC5

FC1 +FC9 +FC8

R45.275m

R14.232m

R8.717m

November 2018

November 2019

The Infrastructure funding provided by the Department of

Higher Education and Training is classified as the Council committed

allocations. The Council plays an oversight responsibility for all

infrastructure funding and projects. We are in the process of

developing a University’s long-term infrastructure plan which will

be linked to the VUT 2030 Vision.

Human Resources Development

The University employs a total of 2400 staff inclusive of

contract employees across all our campuses. We consider human

resource development and welfare as a critical component

of the University strategy and business continuity. Linked to

the HR Development is the introduction of the Performance

Management System which will have to start with the Vice-

Chancellor’s Performance Contract.

Some of the highlights for the reporting period include:

• Future Leadership programme facilitated by Wits Business

School was held in 2017. A total of 20 staff members

attended the programme.

• Personal Mastery/ Emotional Intelligence programme was

conducted for 38 employees at Projects and Services from

project and services attended the program. The prgramme

was facilitated by Wits Business School.

• Employment Equity Training workshop was conducted for

the Employment Equity Committee members.

• A workshop on effective management was conducted for

Managers and HOD’s.

The following policies and guidelines were initiated and

presented to the Executive Management Committee:

• Performance Management Policy was presented to the

Executive Management Committee.

• Whistle blowing policy is under review and will be finalised

in 2018.

• Guidelines for contract renewal for P1 – P4 employees

were drafted. It is expected that the guidelines will be

finalised in 2018.

Technology Transfer and Innovation

The Technology Transfer and Innovation directorate achieved all

but one target for the 2018 financial year. Our official targets

included raising income (raised R31m on a target of R30 m),

producing prototypes (produced 12 prototypes against a

target of 10), signing MOUs (signed 14 MOUs against a target

of 7) and finally recording innovation disclosures (recorded 23

Innovation Disclosures against a target of 32). The team raised

R31m against a total of R90m worth of proposals that were

submitted to different organisations.

While we celebrate and congratulate those who put all the effort

to raise the funding, we note that the tough economic times

require a different model and approach. Our low performance

on innovation disclosures also indicate that we need a different

model to encourage our researchers to disclose their innovations.

Innovation disclosures should be one of the top research outputs,

with appropriate reward system, given the emphasis by government

to translate research outputs to tangible solutions for the people

of South Africa.

Besides the performance on our four official indicators, the TTI

delivered as expected on all our funded projects. Some of the

key achievements include:

• The Technology Station (TS) program has been funded by

The Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) since 2009 to improve

competitiveness of local industries and to train entrepreneurs,

staff and students. Grant received from TIA was R7,5m for

2018. TS worked on more than 10 projects and has trained

and serviced more than 200 clients.

• The Northern Cape Technology Station (NCTS) in Upington,

which focusses on rural sustainable development achieved

targets set by TIA and received the operational funding of

R2,9 m.

• The Idea2Product (I2P) laboratory has successfully signed

declaration of interests with various partners at the Central

University of Technology and the University of the Free

State. These partnerships will help the VUT I2P to open two

training incubators in the Free State. The I2P accredited

49


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

training program that has been accredited and registered

under merSETA; and will be offered as a short learning program.

• The Collaborative Program for Additive Manufacturing

(CPAM) is a consortium which aims to increase the

utilisation and the adoption of the Additive manufacturing

as an accepted advance manufacturing technology by

the South Africa manufacturing industry. The consortium

Supported 9 Btech students, 8Mtech and 2Dtech student

projects, registered 1 provisional patent ad submitted 1

Journal and 4 conference papers.

• FSASEC, which is a partnership between the VUT, the

French ministry of Education and Schneider Electric

re-affirmed the commitment from Schneider Electric to

support F’SASEC and VUT through singing a new MOU. Prof

Alexandre Sebastiani left F’SASEC in July 2018 after 9 years

of dedication and hardwork. Mr Riaan Greef is the current

coordinator of the program. Graduation of 2017 students

took place on 24 May 2018.

• The Tirelo Bosha e-waste project launched the VUT Science

Park E-Waste container project on the 7th of May 2018. A

community partner, Sky Vantage (Pty) Ltd partnered with

VUT Enterprise to operate the venture. A total of 5,45 tons

have been collected to date. Of the dismantled e-waste

the largest quantities consist of CRT monitors (330), Flat

screens (43), Desktops (1790), Printers (13) and keyboards

(12).

• The Centre of Footwear Entrepreneurship (COFE) has secured

funding from fp&M Seta to recruit and train a cohort of 20

community candidates who started in October 2018. The

learners will be at the VUT Science Park till September

2019.

• Centre for Entrepreneurship & Rapid Incubator (CfERI)

in Upington received support to the value of R6m for a

3-year period from the Department of Small Businesses

Development. In 2018 a 6-months Entrepreneurship

Programme was presented in Upington and Rietfontein. To

date, 779 trained, 148 SMMEs supported, 34 new SMME’s

have been established and 39 new jobs have been created

directly through the programmes and support.

• The enterprise development team has graduated 40

students who were trained for 6 months as part of the

VUT/Sasol Entrepreneurship program. The team also

initiated the VUT Student Enterprise development initiative

which received 32 entrepreneurial ideas from students,

with 12 students completing the workshops and finally 3

students were awarded prizes. The team also organised 11

monthly seminars attended by more than 700 participants.

The e-kasi Lab, hosted in partnership with the Innovation

Hub recruited 11 new companies for incubation, hosted 3

Boot camps with a total of 65 companies participating and

supported 6 companies to commercialize their products.

• The Public Relations, Marketing and Communications

Department hosted more than 30 different events as well

as participated in various events to showcase the Science

Park. Key events included the Rand Show, RAPDASA, SATN,

Sasol Techno X, Porche Business breakfast etc.

• The staff complement for the year 2018at the Science Park

was hundred and forty-one (141). There were eight (8)

resignations and three (3) staff members who went on

maternity leave. About nineteen (19) staff members are

undergoing professional development and about five (5)

staff members completed their qualifications for the year

2018.

The TTI directorate continue positioning the VUT Science Park

as a seed and a catalyst for regional economic development. It

is our hope that this strategy will provide the newly required

growth model for VUT.

Community Engagement

As a University of Technology, we consider Community

Engagement (CE) as a critical component of our strategy position.

We have thus positioned CE as an area of focus in the conceptual

framework for the establishment of our Science and

Technology Park (STP) in Sebokeng. The positioning of the STP

and the Faculty of Education are part of our flagship projects

that are deliberately located in Sebokeng to enhance our CE

work.

Statement of self-assessment

The Vice-Chancellor and Principal has already initiated the

following:

• Stakeholder engagements.

• Strategy review project. This project is anticipated to be

concluded by end of 2019.

• Audit and intervention of the Human Resource Division.

• Review of management structure to ensure greater

alignment and efficiency. This project will be finalised

hopefully by the end of 2019.

• Review of Sites of Delivery. This project was initiated to

determine the viability of the campuses. The project is also

anticipated to be completed in 2019.

• Review of all the four management divisions and

structure. Intervention measures were already initiated to

ensure continuity of the University programme. Given the

complexity of the project, this initiative may be completed

early in 2020.

• Introduction of extra-curricular programmes on Africanisation

and Decoloniality.

• Exploratory Discussions with the Sobukwe Family/

50


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Foundation with a view to establishing partnership and

collaboration which would be the creation of an African

Research Centre and a Human Rights Centre.

Given the enormity of the challenges and in particular, the financial

position of the University, the Vice-Chancellor and Principal

will be reviewing the University business architecture with the

intention of ensuring financial efficiency and effectiveness.

The Vice-Chancellor and Principal will continue to engage

with the various internal and external stakeholders as part of

positioning the University, building the new culture and forging

new linkages.

Together with the management team, we are committed in

ensuring success of the University, our staff, students and those

members of the community who continue to engage with us in

various ways.

Without the support of Council, we would not have been able

to record these achievements and so, our gratitude goes to all

members of Council in their various capacities.

PROF IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

The Vice-Chancellor and Principal is optimistic and committed to

the overall success of the University.

Conclusion

Our financial position remains a great concern, we are

however committed to finding financially sustainable

solutions. We remain committed to the academic project and the

overall transformation of the University. Our main commitment

is to contribute positively towards the nation building project.

We are however, very mindful of both the salary bill and the

income levels as well as the associated risks. We have also taken

particular note of the areas of underperformance and

management is committed in ensuring improvement in these

areas.

We have also taken special note of the University’s financial

situation arising from the external audit findings. These in

our viewpoint to weaknesses in internal control measures. As

directed by Council, we continue to take appropriate

measures to strengthen our systems. Management on its

own has already initiated financial review processes to look at

sustainable solutions.

To ensure quality and reliable information for management

decision making, we are continuing to implement the HEDA

system across the University. The system was adopted given

its ability to produce critical management information. The

Strategy review process has also afforded us the opportunity to

review and strengthen our management information systems.

Despite the challenges, our fulfillment is drawn from witnessing

many of our students who pass through the graduation stage

and many of our staff members who continue to work hard and

record significant achievements in their various academic fields.

The commitment of our administrative staff to the service of our

students and our community is mostly appreciated.

51


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION

THE REPORT OF SENATE

TO THE COUNCIL

11

52


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

The Senate is established in terms of the Higher Education Act 101, 1997 and the Statutes of the University. The report of Senate is

submitted in terms of the set requirements of the Reporting Regulations. Senate is the primary custodian of all academic, research

and community engagements matters. The Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Professor G.N. Zide is the chairperson of Senate.

Senate Membership

The following members constitute Senate:

Name Designation Gender

Zide, G.N. (Prof.) Vice-Chancellor and Principal Male

Alugongo, A. (Prof.) HOD – Mechanical Engineering Male

Dhurup, R. (Prof.) Executive Dean: Management Sciences Male

Britz H. (Dr.) Director: Quality Promotion Male

Dzvimbo, K.P. (Prof.) DVC: Academic and Research Male

Egal, A. (Prof.) Director: Centre For Sustainable Livelihood Male

Fouche C. (Ms.) HOD: Communication Female

Joubert P. (Dr.) HOD: Human Resource Management Male

Kungune, V.G. (Mr.) Acting Campus Principal: Ekurhuleni Male

Mabuza, B.R. (Prof.) Executive Dean: Faculty of Applied and Sciences Male

Machika, P. (Dr.) ED: Centre of Academic Development Female

Masulubele, N. (Mr.) Acting ED: Finance Department Male

Maleho, L.M. Dr. HOD: Hospitality, Tourism, and PR Male

Mokoena, T.D. (Dr.) Registrar Male

Molete, J. (Dr.) ED: Technology Transfer and Innovation Male

Mokoena, B.A. (Dr.) HOD: Marketing and Sport Male

Radebe, P.Q. (Prof.) Acting ED: Human Resources Male

Fouché, C.E. (Ms.) HOD: Communication Female

Naidoo, E.B. (Prof.) HOD: Chemistry Male

Nelana, S. (Dr.) ED: Research Male

Joubert, P. (Dr.) Acting HOD: Human Resources Male

Joubert, T. (Ms.) HOD: Power Engineering Female

Muswaka, L. (Prof.) HOD: Legal Sciences Female

Masu, L.M. (Prof.) Research Professor Male

Mendonidis, P. (Prof.) HOD: Metallurgical Engineering Male

HarMs.e, A. (Dr.) Acting HOD: ICT Female

Moletsane, A. (Ms.) Director: Work Integrated Learning Female

Moloi, K.C. (Prof.) Professor: Education Female

Mafini, C.(Prof.) HOD: Logistics Male

Maleho, L.M. (Dr.) Acting HOD: Hospitality and Tourism Male

53


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Ndege, M. (Prof.) Executive Dean: Faculty of Engineering and Technology Male

Ochieng, G. (Prof.) HOD: Civil and Building Engineering Male

Ohanga, M. (Prof.) HOD: Process Control and Computer Systems. Male

Osifo, P.O. (Prof.) Acting HOD: Chemical Engineering Male

Ramasodi, D. (Mr.) ED: IT Services Male

WalMs.ley, T. (Dr.) Acting HOD: Biotechnology Female

Pienaar, H.C. van Z (Prof.) HOD: Electronic Communication Male

Pienaar, W.J. van Z (Mr.) Senior Lecturer Male

Pinkoane, M. (Prof.) Associate Professor: Technology Transfer and Innovation Female

Chitumwa, C.C. (Dr.) Acting HOD: Education Male

Sikakana, I.Q. (Dr.) HOD: NDT and Physics Male

Tembe, B. (Ms.) Acting ED: Library Female

Tengen, T.B. (Prof.) Acting HOD: Industrial Engineering and Operations Male

Thabane, L.J. (Ms.) Acting HOD: Software Studies Female

Van Wyk, C..(Ms.) Principal Lecturer: Institute of Chemical and Biotechnology Female

Maseko, J. (Dr.) Acting HOD: Cost and Management Accounting Male

Van der Bank, C.M. (Prof.) Execute Dean: Faculty of Human Sciences Female

Van Staden, H. (Dr.) HOD: Visual Arts and Design Female

Mbongwe, J. (Mr.) Acting HOD: Mathematics Male

Sehume, O.M.M. (Dr.) Acting HOD: Health Sciences Female

32%

68%

54


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Decisions and activities of Senate for the 2018 academic year:

The following are selected matters considered by Senate during 2018:

Date of the Meeting

8 June 2018

Matters Considered

• Academic Policies and Rules

• The university needs to give students a special period, where they will be able

to write a special exam before graduation, to allow for the possibility of students

with only one module being able to graduate. This could increase the graduation

rate.

• Academic Records, the university should protect their students by not showing

the failed mark on their student records.

• The Student Representative Council should WRITE their submissions to the office

of the Registrar and copy the chairperson of the Senate Prof. G.N Zide.

• Implications of the shortfall in Teaching Development Grant.

7 September 2018

9 November 2018

• The CHE Institutional Audit. VUT will be one of 3 institutions taking part in the

pilot audit.

Policies approved:

• Research funding policy

• Language policy

• Extended programmes pass rate to be changed from 60% to 50%

• New programmes:

• Advanced Diploma in Mediation

• PhD in Metallurgical Engineering

• Diploma in Environmental Science

• Law clinic was approved in principle

New programmes:

• Advanced Diploma in Policing

• Assessment Policy was approved

55


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Profile of the Academic Portfolio: Permanent and Contract Staff

600

500

400

300

200

100

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

546

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

389

--------------------------------------------

0

This scenario continues to be a concern and is deteriorating from 2017 were 44% of academic staff were permanently employed

compared to 42% in 2018. This scenario is directly linked to overall student performance and success.

180

160

140

120

100

80

60

40

20

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

170

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

79

--------------------------------------------

116

75

--------------------------------------------

0

Although there is one more doctoral permanent staff member than in 2017, there is a decrease of 12 permanent staff members with

Masters. This is an indication of high staff turnover. This is an undesirable situation. We need to commit to the increase of doctoral

academic staff. The nGAP programme is designed to assist in this regard and should be supported and built upon.

There is a significant increase in contract staff with Doctoral degrees; from 87 in 2017 to 116 in 2018 and for Masters the increase is

from 68 in 2017 to 75 in 2018.

56


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

25 000 ----------------------------------------------------------------

20 000 ----------------------------------------------------------------

15 000 ----------------------------------------------------------------

10 000 ----------------------------------------------------------------

5 000 ----------------------------------------------------------------

Other Postgraduate

Occasional

Masters

Doctoral

Diplomas & Certificates

Degrees

Total

0

230 252 215 98 1710 3162 21067

There is an increase of 1849 students from 2017 to 2018. It is a positive sign to see that the increase is across all offerings and that

there is an increase of 27 doctoral students and an increase of 21 master’s students in 2018 compared with 2017.

Various efforts are implemented to support our students at undergraduate as well as post graduate level. The reports from the Centre

of Academic Development and the Research and Development Unit will elaborate on that.

25 000 ----------------------------------------------

20 000 ----------------------------------------------

15 000 ----------------------------------------------

21067

10 000 ----------------------------------------------

5 000

11526

9541

----------------------------------------------

0

Male Female Total

Although there is a slight increase in the enrolment of female students (45.3% in 2018 compared to 45% in 2017) this scenario is of

concern for the VUT.

57


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

25 000 --------------------------------------------------------

20 000 --------------------------------------------------------

15 000 --------------------------------------------------------

21067

10 000 --------------------------------------------------------

5 000 --------------------------------------------------------

6989

5131 4613

4281 53

0

Faculty of Management Sciences

Faculty of Human Science

Faculty of Engineering

Faculty of Applied & Compture Science

DVC: Academic & Research

Total

The Faculty of Engineering is the largest faculty with 33.2% of the students registered there, followed by Management Sciences with

24.4%, Human Sciences with 21.9% and Applied and Computer Science with 20.3%. This information, coupled with the pass and success

rates of the Engineering students, indicate to us that we need to invest resources in student and staff support and development in

that faculty.

25 000 -------------------------------------------------

20 000 -------------------------------------------------

15 000 -------------------------------------------------

10 000 -------------------------------------------------

5 000

-------------------------------------------------

0

201 40 102 20724 21067

More than 98% of our students are African and this percentage is increasing yearly. For our enrolment to be reflective of the national

demographic new strategies should be implemented.

58


VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Faculty Reports

The University has four faculties namely; Faculty of Applied and

Computer Sciences, Faculty of Management Sciences, Faculty

of Engineering and the Faculty of Humanities. The following are

performance highlights for the faculties:

Faculty Of Applied And Computer Sciences

The faculty consists of the following Departments:

• Biotechnology

• Chemistry

• Health Sciences (Biomedical Technology and Nursing)

• Information Communication Technology (ICT)

• Mathematics

• Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) and Physics

• Software Studies

The following are the faculty owned business entities:

• AMBIO Environmental Management PTY (LTD)

• Institute of Chemical and Biotechnology (ICBT)

• DIHLARE Remedy PTY (LTD)

Faculty significant breakthroughs

• Mr. I. Matshego has been invited to a conference taking

place in Cape Town by the Department of Component

Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI) at the end of

August 2018.

The theme of the conference was “Partnering for an agile

and a renewable public sector through innovation.” He has

been asked to be part of a panel of experts in discussing

how the government of the future will look, using innovation

to deliver services. Mr Matshego is currently collaborating

with VUT Enterprise on their e-waste project on how to

create content for a short course which will be offered at

the main campus. This endeavour is supported by industry

through the collaboration of Balunga IT.

Faculty Of Engineering And Technology

The faculty comprises of the following departments; Civil

Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Electronic Engineering,

Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, Mechanical

Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Power Engineering, and

Process Control & Computer Systems.

Faculty significant breakthroughs

• The last diplomates for National Diploma are expected to

complete in December 2022.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

• Advanced Diploma submission for approval in progress for

the first enrolment offering in January 2020.

• The last graduates for BTech are expected to complete in

December 2021 and the development of the new qualification

BEng Tech is in progress.

• The target for the Faculty of Engineering and Technology

examination success rate was 66% for the first semester.

However, the Faculty exceeded the set target and achieved

a success rate of 81%.

• The department of Chemical Engineering has achieved full

ECSA accreditation for Secunda.

• The new Diploma in Chemical Engineering has successfully

offered its first enrolment in January 2017 on both Vanderbijlpark

and Secunda campuses with the old National Diploma in its

first year of phasing out.

• Advanced Diploma submission for approval in progress for

the first enrolment offering in January 2020.

• A MOU was signed with Emerson and Dr. A Joubert and Ms.

E. Heuer presented a paper at the Emerson conference and

visited the company in the USA. This open the opportunity

for the VUT to initiate and develop an Emerson training and

research centre that can secure a substantial 3rd stream

income.

Faculty Of Human Sciences

The faculty comprises of the following departments; Centre for Sustainable Livelihoods, Communication, Education, Hospitality, Tourism

& Public Relations Management, Legal Sciences, and Visual Arts & Design.

EDUCTAION

LEGAL SCIENCE

• Exceeded the target research output of seven accredited units for 2018. We achieved 8.82 units.

• Implementation of the four-year bachelor’s degree: B Ed (SP and FET Teaching).

• Second semester pass and success rate was 93% for the B Ed.

• Second semester pass and success rate was 90% for the PG Dip HE.

• Funza Lushaka Bursaries for our B Ed students for 2019 academic year was increased to R5 306 000.

• R24 000 was raised to assist with marking of PGDHE assignments in December 2018. There is a

promise of another R24 000 in 2019.

R637 716.53 was received from DHET and EU in support of the Advanced Diploma in TVT that has

been sent to CHE for possible accreditation. So far, we have received R1,310,000.00.

• Ms. A. Doodnath participated at the 3rd BRICS Young Scientist Forum that took place in Durban from

the 24th to the 29th of June 2018. She presented a paper under the Social Sciences sub-theme –

The Impact and Challenges of Modern ICT Technologies on Youth Identity and Cultural Choices. Ms.

Doodnath’s paper is entitled, “The impact of social media on the identity of youth, cultural choices,

and sociability.”

• Ms.. M van der Bank, as a result of having won the Highest Recognition Award at the Rates Award

Ceremony in 2017, is this year participating in the Higher Education Learning and Teaching Association

of Southern Africa (HELTASA) National Excellence in Teaching and Learning Awards 2018.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Fashion:

• Fashion students participated in the French Day celebrations by hosting a fashion show.

• The third-year fashion students took place in three competitions during semester 2 of 2018 and had

many successes.

• Firstly, ten students attended the Durban July as accompanied by Ms.. S. Hugo and Ms. I. Wilken. Of

the 10, three were selected as semi-finalists and one was the runner up in the category ‘best Fascinator’.

• Secondly, the students took part in the prestigious national Bernina competition held during the September

holidays. A total of eight institutions and 53 students took part. Three of our VUT students were selected

to work in the company and to design and construct a garment. Our students won both first and second

place and received several Bernina machines (prizes to the value of R75,000.00).

• Lastly, five students were selected for the EDCON competition of which one was chosen to complete

their internship program (21 steps to retail).

VISUAL ARTS &

DESIGNS

Fine Art:

• Best 2017 Fine Art Students exhibition was held in February 2018.

• Faculty research seminar (Linda du Preez and Matshepo Thibudi).

• Lizamore presented a Professional practice workshop for 3rd and 4th year Fine Art.

• Hosted Art exhibition in celebration of women’s month and colloquium.

• B Tech Mini dissertation writing workshop.

• Alumni student Mlamli Zulu won the first prize at the Thami Mnyele fine art competition.

• Staff exhibition August Drawing Marathon.

• Springs Art gallery collaboration.

• Two B Tech Fine Art E, Thema, and Mamello participated in FNB Art fair.

• 3rd year Fine Art pop up art exhibition in celebration of heritage month.

• Fine Art section published a promotional article for Fine Art course at the Creative Feel Magazine in

both November 2018 and December 2018/2019 issues.

Graphic Design:

• Neston Kotze finalising MTech submission.

• Dorette van der Walt has made significant progress with M Tech studies.

• Reshma Maharajh has made significant progress with creative outputs towards Ph.D. studies at Wits.

Photography:

• Fujifilm viewed the exhibition by Anneke de Klerk in Bodutu Art Gallery and has subsequently selected

works from it to promote on their webpage and in an international publication published by them.

Further cooperation between Anneke de Klerk, as representative of the Visual Arts Department of

VUT, in the development of future projects has been agreed upon on an informal basis and needs to

be developed further.

• Mr. Jon Hess, contract lecturer in the Photography section, worked with social services to create a

documentary video for THE PHUMELELA STREET PROJECT. This footage was shown at the International

Association for Social Work with Groups (IASWG) in Kruger National Park, South Africa in June 2018.

The purpose of the Video was to show the International audience the reality of street life in South

Africa. The footage was a big favourite at the symposium. SANCA GREATER-HEIDELBERG thanked Mr.

Hess and VUT.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Faculty significant breakthroughs:

• The Marketing and Sport Departmental Advisory Committee

meetings took place on 01 November 2018 at Emerald Casino

Resort Centre.

• The Accountancy departmental advisory committee meetings

took place on 21 June 2018 at Quest Conference Centre.

• Indo-SA Trade and Investment Relations - Public Lecture

hosted by the Marketing and Sports Department on 07

March 2018.

• 3rd Annual Logistics Students Conference was successfully

held on the 16th of March 2018.

• PQM letters of the Advanced and Postgraduate Diplomas in

Logistics were received from the CHE.

• 80% of staff within the faculty are currently registered for

vertical qualifications.

• PR and Community Development Intervention – A programme

called “On the Table”. A slot on VUT FM radio station (96.9

MHz) for VUT academics every Tuesday night 19:00 – 21:00

pm where VUT departments/faculties host the show. The

live streaming site for those who reside outside the Vaal

area.

• Faculty Research Awards ceremony was held on 21 November

2018 at Quest Conference Centre.

• Advisory Committee Meeting and a Teambuilding session

for the Logistics Department were successfully held on the

27th September and 9th November 2018 respectively.

• Four doctoral degrees were awarded in the Department of

Logistics during the September 2018 graduations.

• Awarding an Honorary Doctoral Degree.

• Accreditation exercise completed.

• HRUF successfully hosted.

• Dr P.A. Joubert elected as Chair of Higher Education Committee

of SABPP and as board member of SABPP.

• Ms C. Marthinus obtained second place in the SABPP National

HR Excellence Award.

Academic Support Departments

The Unit for Preparatory Programmes

Given the history of our schooling system, many of the students

from the lowest quintile school are experiencing poor quality

of education. This, in turn, could often lead to unfair access

to post school education. As part of the transformation of the

post school education system, various efforts are made to try

improve access.

The Unit for Preparatory Programmes has offered the following

foundational programmes for the reporting:

Faculty

Faculty of

Applied and

Computer

Sciences

Faculty of

Engineering

and

Technology

Faculty of

Human

Sciences

Faculty of

Management

Sciences

Foundational Programme Offered for

Diplomas:

Diploma in Information Technology

Diploma in Chemical Engineering

Diploma in Civil Engineering

Diploma in Electrical Engineering: Computer

Systems.

Diploma in Electrical Engineering: Power

Diploma in Electrical Engineering: Process

Control

Diploma in Industrial Engineering

Diploma in Mechanical Engineering

Diploma in Metallurgical Engineering

Diploma in Fashion

Diploma in Fine Art

Diploma in Graphic Design

Diploma in Photography

Diploma in Labour Law

Diploma in Legal Assistance

Diploma in Policing

Diploma in Safety Management

Diploma in Ecotourism

Diploma in Food Service Management

Diploma in Public Relations Management.

Diploma in Tourism and Management

Diploma in Cost and Management Accounting

Diploma in Financial Information Systems.

Diploma in Internal Audit

Curriculum Development, Programme Accreditation

Unit

The unit’s primary focus is to provide the required support to

faculties in the design of both undergraduate and postgraduate

offerings. This is to ensure the relevance and appropriateness

of curricula. The unit undertakes the central coordination and

oversight on the overall University’s Programme Qualification

Mix (PQM).

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Academic programmes submitted to DHET for approval

• Advanced Diploma in Environmental Sciences

• Postgraduate Diploma in Policing

• Bachelor of Communication Studies

• Master of Education

• Master of Education in Higher Education

• Doctor of Philosophy in Metallurgical Engineering

Academic programmes submitted to Council on Higher

Education (HEQC-online submission)

• Advanced Diploma in Fine Art

• Advanced Diploma in Fashion

• Advanced Diploma in Internal Auditing

• Advanced Diploma in Computer Systems. Engineering

• Advanced Diploma in Electrical Engineering

• Advanced Diploma in Technical and Vocational Teaching

• Advanced Diploma in Chemistry

• Advanced Diploma in Biomedical Technology

• Advanced Diploma in Ecotourism Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Civil Engineering

• Postgraduate Diploma in Metallurgy Engineering

• Postgraduate Diploma in Chemical Engineering

• Postgraduate Diploma in Mechanical Engineering

• Postgraduate Diploma in Electrical Engineering

• Postgraduate Diploma in Industrial Engineering

• Postgraduate Diploma in Operations Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art

• Postgraduate Diploma in Fashion

• Postgraduate Diploma in Graphic Design

• Postgraduate Diploma in Cost and Management Accounting

• Postgraduate Diploma in Photography

• Postgraduate Diploma in Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Internal Auditing

• Postgraduate Diploma in Chemistry

• Postgraduate Diploma in Biomedical Technology

• Postgraduate Diploma in Ecotourism Management

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture

Academic programmes approved by the Council on Higher Education

• Advanced Diploma in Logistics

• Advanced Diploma in Non-Destructive Testing

• Advanced Diploma in Public Relations Management

• Advanced Diploma in Fine Art

• Advanced Diploma in Graphic Design

• Advanced Diploma in Fashion

• Advanced Diploma in Sport Management

• Advanced Diploma in Information Technology

• Advanced Diploma in Operations Management

• Advanced Diploma in Agricultural Operations and Management

• Advanced Diploma in Management

• Advanced Diploma in Retail Business Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Food Service Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Tourism Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art

• Postgraduate Diploma in Graphic Design

• Postgraduate Diploma in Retail Business Management

• Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management

• Postgraduate Diploma Logistics

Academic Programmes registered on the National

Qualifications Framework

• Advanced Diploma in Information Technology

• Advanced Diploma in Food Service Management

• Advanced Diploma in Food and Beverage Management

• Advanced Diploma in Biotechnology

• Postgraduate Diploma in Biotechnology

• Postgraduate Diploma in Logistics

• Postgraduate Diploma in Tourism Management

The Unit ensures the quality process in new and existing academic

programmes. In its effort, the Unit ensures that the structure of

the PQM provides student and learning centred construction of

knowledge both in theoretical information and practical application.

Center for Academic Development

The CAD is a leading research-informed centre that promotes

creative and innovative teaching and learning experiences by

developing all students and staff to reach their optimum

potential both locally and globally. The Center oversees

coordination of all academic development support initiatives

across the University. This is in an effort to enhance the quality

Teaching, Learning and Research. The Center has during the

reporting period initiated the following activities:

• E-learning training on content development following a

blended learning approach;

• Facilitation of online modules that involved the upskilling of

lecturers using online facilitations methods and tools;

• E-teacher training which led to certification that focused on

a blend of digital teaching theory and technical tool usage

within the Blackboard LMS;

• The 2018 E-learning Big Data Symposium was hosted for

the first time by the E-learning unit in collaboration with

The South African Sweden University Forum (SASUF). The

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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main theme of the symposium was Digital Technologies,

Big Data and Cyber Security. The keynote speakers were Dr

Yaseera Ismail (University of KwaZulu-Natal), Prof. Simone

Fischer-Hübner, (Karlstad University, Sweden), Prof Thomas

W. Thurner (Cape Peninsula University of Technology) and

Prof Paul Prinsloo (University of South Africa);

• Implementation of a VUT 101 pilot programme that supported

first year students’ transition from secondary school to

higher learning.

• Implementation of Communities of Practice for first year

student lecturers to assist with constructing their identities

as educators and in becoming skilled classroom facilitators.

• The 2018 African Languages Development in Institutions

of Higher Learning in South Africa Symposium was held for

the first time. The main theme of the conference was The

role of African Languages in Decolonizing the Curriculum in

Institutions of Higher Learning: Insights into Implications,

Lessons and Considerations. The keynote speakers were

Dr Rammala JR (University of Limpopo), Dr Langa Khumalo

(University of KwaZulu Natal), Prof Mbulungeni Madiba

(University of Cape Town) and Dr Monareng RGM (PanSALB).

In addition, the Centre

• Held an Annual Staff Development Conference on

Deconstructing Free Education: Language of Possibilities.

The keynote speakers were Prof Thomas Olsson (Lund

University of Sweden), Dr Kasthuri Belhar (University of

Cape Town), Prof Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni (University of

SA), Mr. Ruaan Visser (SA Heavyweight Champion) and Dr

Nomamesi Madikizela (University of SA).

• Held the Third First Year Experience Symposium for

lecturers teaching first year students. The main theme of

the Symposium was Unlocking Great Minds that focused on

the institutional system and asking what practices should

be changed in order to meet new students’ needs. The

keynote speakers were Dr Subethra Pather (University of

the Western Cape) and Dr Joey Serekoane (University of

the Free State).

As part of capacity building and training, the Center

offered the following workshops during 2018:

WORSHOP

TITLE

VuTela Academic Staff

Training

FACILITATORS

CAD Team

TOTAL

PARTICIPANTS

112 academics

Vutela Student Training CAD Team 1507 students

Vutela Expresso Project CAD Team 196 modules

E-learning Big Data

Symposium

Maths Centre Opening

Workshop

Maths Centre Closing

Workshop

Writing Centre January

Workshop

Writing Centre

November Workshop

African Languages

Symposium

Motivational Seminar

for First Year Students

First Year Student

Lecturer Symposium

Communities of

Practice for First Year

Student Lecturers

VUT 101 Pilot for First

Year Students

Learning communities

workshops – mentor

training

Programme specific

teaching and learning

workshop for Health

Sciences utilizing

National Benchmark

Tests results

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

132 academics

10 workshops

10 workshops

4 workshops

4 workshops

76 academics

200 first year

students

95 academics

46 academics

287 first year

students

40 senior

students

21 academics

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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Programme specific

teaching and learning

workshop for

Accountancy

Department utilizing

National Benchmark

Tests results

RATE Information

Session

RATE Portfolio

Development

Workshop

CAD Team

CAD Team

CAD Team

and External

Academic

20 academics

13 academics

7 workshops

RATE Award Ceremony CAD Team 50 academics

Vutela (Learner

Management System)

CAD

12 500 users

New Developments:

• African Languages Symposium held for the first time in VUT;

• UCDP Programmes were launched in 2018 and will be

concluded in 2020;

o Project 1: African Languages Development

o Project 2: Blended Learning

o Project 3: Learning Communities

o Project 4: First Year Experience

o Project 5: Maths, Science, Engineering and Technology

Centre

o Project 6: African Language Development and Academic

Reading and Writing

o Project 7: Tutor Development

o Project 8: Teaching development of Academic Staff

CAD Book under review: “Understanding Academic Development

in the 21st Century: Conceptions, Content and Context for

universities of technology” (Book under review by Unisia Press.)

Significant Breakthroughs

• Completion of the Blue Certification to ensure that teaching

quality of academics is able to be piloted amongst academics

by students.

• Blended Learning Policy passed by Senate

• Assessment Policy passed by Senate

• Academic Plan Submitted and presented to the EMC

• 3 VUT staff members participated in the Higher Education

Learning and Teaching Association of South Africa and

Council for Higher Education National awards. Dr Xaba received a

commendation award at the Heltasa /CHE National Awards.

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CAD Research and Publications

Dr Machika

Dr Machika

“Framework for a learning management system

at a University of technology with a weak

information technology maturity system”.

South African Journal of Higher Education.

Vol. 32(2).

“In search of graduate attributes: A survey of

flagship programmes across six programmes”.

South African Journal of Higher Education.

Vol. 32(1).

Research & Higher Degrees Directorate

The Research environment at the Vaal University of Technology

(VUT) has shown signs of maturing annually. The Research

Directorate is extremely excited to be a part of this contribution

towards the development of the research culture. As a research

development team, we remain committed to supporting staff

and students in developing their capacity to enhance their

research. There has been a steady growth with the research

units from 2015 – 2018.

2015 2016 2017 2018

76.16 101.95 126.76 162.00*

* submitted to DHET – not yet approved

For the reporting period, the Research Directorate has in total

submitted 162 units for the research outputs against a 110-unit

target for the year. The success of the growth in research units

follows hard work and continued efforts in enhancing capacity

and development of new researchers.

The main objective of the institution remains to strengthen its

staff qualification profile so that more staff members will be able

to develop their research, supervise students, and strengthen

the critical mass in stimulating a research culture. We have also

improved the success rate of our postgraduate students where

we had 53 graduates in 2018 compared to the 26 in 2017.

It is worth mentioning that in addition to the above achievements,

individual academics received widespread recognition for their

research work.

Kwena Pete was awarded the best presenter/paper at the

Sustainable Sanitation, Waste Management Conference in

Cape Town in November 2018. The award comes with a full

scholarship for her to attend the next conference to be held in

South Korea in 2020.

Dr. Qwebani-Ogunleye from the Faculty of Applied and Computer

Sciences, Institute of Traditional Knowledge and Traditional

Medicine, Dihlare Remedy Pty (Ltd) was selected by the South

African Young Academy of Science (SAYAS). This platform serves

as the voice of young researchers in South Africa and one serves

for three to five years.

Dr. Naser Feto received the Top Intellectual Property Creator

Award. The award is for the most actionable disclosures at Vaal

University of Technology during the period 2 August 2010 to 31

August 2018.

Regarding the external funding, researchers raised R33 213 495

from external sources such as the Water Research Commission,

DST, Eskom, TIA and NRF to name a few.

We look forward to further enhance and deepen research

participation at VUT. All indications are that this will happen

as more heads of departments become involved in research,

create opportunities for staff members, and support the

development of the institutional strategy in realising its capacity

to be a University with a technology focus.

Community engagement

VUT Enactus team managed to secure a place at finals for the

ENACTUS South Africa National Competitions and the following

were achieved:

• 1st Place for the Harmony Challenge with their Enviro-hab

Project;

• 1st Prize for the Nedbank Tripple Bottom Line Challenge

(Overall presentation in the league)

• 2nd Prize for the General Electric Challenge with the

Clorganic Project.

• Prize for Participation in the Final Competition.

Relationship with industry

• The Department of Marketing & Sport Management continues

to participate in the W&RSETA’s HET-QMB committee

with the aim of bridging the gap between the government,

industry and the University with regards to issues pertaining

to curriculum, teaching and learning, bursaries, student

placement, research and other related occupational

qualifications.

• The Department further continues to liaise with the

Shoprite Group with regards to granting the Retail Business

Management students at all levels bursaries as well as

Trainee Manager Graduate Programmes upon completion

of their qualifications.

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• Moreover, the Department’s liaison with the Pick n Pay

Group continued to its second year in 2018 with regards

to the intake of our students in their Graduate Training

Programme for key positions such as Buyer/Planner, Store

Manager, Warehouse & Logistics etc. This is in addition to

the annual Trainee Manager Programme which has been

running for the previous years.

• The Department further continues to engage with other industry

players such as Dis-Chem Pharmacy, Platinum Cash n Carry

Group, Edcon with regards to student placement as well as

a continued exploration of forging new partnerships with

other corporates within the industry.

Co-operative Education Department

Funding (2018 – 2019)

The Department managed to secure funding from

the following SETA’s:

SETA

No of

placed

learners

Monthly

Stipend

Duration

Bankseta 50 R3 500 12 months

ETDP SETA * 54 R2 500 12 months

GDARD 10 R5 000 12 months

HWSETA 100 R3 500 06 months

SACGC

(FoodBev) *

67 R5 000 12 months

SASCE TLIU * 21 R5 445 12 months

Remarks

Paid

directly to

students

Paid

directly to

students

Paid

directly to

students

Special Projects

• The JICA/DHET Project classes resumed in March 2018.

Classes are being conducted every Friday and Saturday.

The Project was facilitated by 4 Employability Improvement

Practitioners, managed by the Director of Co-operative

Education and administrative support provided by 1 EIP

Administrator and it ended in April 2019.

• Association of Accounting Technicians SA (AAT(SA)) tripartite

agreement between VUT, Bankseta and AAT(SA). A Learning

opportunity for unemployed matriculants to study towards

an AAT(SA) Accounting qualification at NQF Level 4 and 5.

Classes takes place from Monday to Friday. The program is

facilitated by Oxbridge Training Institute and coordinated

by Co-operative Education. Currently the project is handed

over by the Director of Co-operative Education to Management

Sciences so that it can be an accredited project for accounting

learners and in future it will bring the third stream income

for the Faculty.

• EMANZINI Staffing - 46 students were placed under this

project for Work Integrated Learning. Most of these students

were coming from our Secunda Campus and placed there,

while few from main campus were placed in Witbank and

Lethabo (Eskom).

• SA Council for Graduates Cooperative (SACGC) – Application

for funding for 75 students both Graduates and WIL students

was approved.

• SASCE (TLIU) – 21 Students have been placed for 12 months

at R5 445.00 per month stipend. The stipend was paid directly

to students.

• CHIETA Strategic Grant approval for VUT lab equipment upgrade

(R500 000.00) but currently they paid R300 000.00 and

when the project is fully implemented the remaining R200

000.00 will be paid.

The Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

(CIE)

Role and Strategic Contribution to VUT

The Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE) contributes

toward achieving the following strategic goals of the University:

• Expanding its income streams

• Diversifying its Programme Qualifications Mix (PQM)

• Broadening its curriculum framework and academic development

initiatives

• Developing the Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)

Income Stream Expansion Strategies

Research and scholarship, Skills Development Projects, Staff

consultancy, postgraduate supervision, commercialisation and

investments, strong partnerships and, expanded PQM form the

basis of diversifying the income stream for the University.

Research and Scholarship

The centre has contributed a research article in the

accredited Southern African Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small

Business Management (SAJESBM) which was published in 2019

entitled “Invigorating Innovation and entrepreneurship in higher

education: Insights from Scandinavian and South African

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Universities. Two book chapters have been contributed to two

international books by this centre in 2019. The book title is Toward

Super creativity: Creativity in Humans, Machines and Human-

Machines Collaborations and the title of our book chapter is Shared

Futures: An Exploration of the Collaborative Potential of

Intelligent Machines and Human Ingenuity in Co-creating Value.

The other book chapter is Innovations in Higher Education:

Cases on Transforming and Advancing Practice and our book

title is An Integrated Model for Invigorating Innovation and

Entrepreneurship in Higher Education. The total of three articles

will generate income for the University in 2019. The centre is

currently supervising three doctoral students who are at various

stages of their development. In 2019, the centre will graduate

their first doctor whose study focused on Intellectual Property

(IP) commercialisation. Two other doctoral students are at a

proposal stage. One of these students who also happens to be

a senior lecturer at one of our universities in South Africa has

already registered and his proposal is now undergoing review.

His study focuses on intrapreneurship in higher education.

The other student intends to register and submit her proposal over

the course of the next few weeks. Her study focuses on business

incubators and their role in developing SMEs entrepreneurship.

The centre contributes to scholarship through serving in the

Board of the Teaching and Learning Inquiry Journal which is the

publication of the International Society for the Scholarship of

Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) based in Canada. We also serve

as reviewers for various international journals and conferences

notably the Southern African Journal of Entrepreneurship and

Small Business Management and Teaching and Learning Inquiry

Journal.

The centre edited a book by the Centre for Academic Development

tentatively titled Academic Development in Higher Education:

Reflections on Practice: An Auto Ethnographic Account currently

under UNISA Press for possible publication.

The centre graduated a research mentee in 2019 under the

NRF-funded Mentoring Programme.

Skills Development Projects

The centre was able to secure a funding of more than R8 million

from Unemployed Insurance Fund (UIF) to develop skills of

creativity, innovation, entrepreneurship and business management.

In terms of this project, 30% of the beneficiaries must come

from VUT graduates. We have, however, canvassed children of

our own staff as an important category of beneficiaries.

This category of beneficiaries benefit from both the 30% of VUT

beneficiaries if they have a post-matric qualification or 70% of

the UIF beneficiaries especially if they have worked before but

have, at least, a Grade 10.

The centre is working on another Skills Development Programme

that amounts to more than R40 million and has been preapproved

under certain strict contractual conditions. This project

will lead to possible change in government policy. We intend

making a case that beneficiaries of social grants with a minimum of

a Grade 10 should be rerouted to Skills Development Programmes

where they will receive a stipend while gaining skills that could

make them gainfully employed. Recognition of Prior Learning

(RPL) and curriculum articulation between these Skills Development

Projects and higher education will have to be resolved. We are

working on making a contribution to this articulation.

Staff Consultancy

Three of our previous projects were designed to develop our

VUT lecturers and other staff members into business consultants.

The total capital generated in these projects was almost R6 million

and most staff members that participated in these projects

received more than R80 000 each. We intend to intensify this

area in the next decade and a policy has to be developed on

how such projects could benefit University third stream income,

the staff member and the projects finders. A research study is

also underway that seeks to determine how these consultancies

shaped their teaching.

Commercialisation and Investments

The Centre has already incubated six local community SMEs

who have successfully launched their businesses (You-Tube

video) over the course of three years. Three other students’

businesses are on the verge of scaling the business after one-year

of incubation. The first business relates to gown hiring which

could scale in less than a year. The second business venture

is that of beverages which is called Coffesidar which is also

scaling-ready. The waste to gas oil new venture is still at the

prototyping stage as well as the new public service app new

venture. The University holding company reserves the right

to invest in these companies. This will be one of our major

focus in the course of the next ten years. The findings of our

doctoral student who we are graduating this year will help shape

this area. We are also setting up a scoping reviews sub-unit

within the Centre that will contribute in converting extant

research into commercially viable ideas. We have already learned

one of its powerful protocols which is PRISMA-P. As soon as our

staffing is resolved then this sub-unit will start running.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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Strong partnerships

We have developed strong international links with innovation

hubs, science parks, entrepreneurship centres and niche-focused

innovation hubs such as the Lund University Engineering Innovation

Hub and the World Maritime University in Malmo, Sweden. We

are also linking up with MIT Innovation Hubs and a visit to MIT is

being worked out. We have linked up with government agencies

such as UIF, Gauteng Enterprise Propeller and have a link within

the Office of the Premier of Gauteng.

We have approached Standard Bank (setting up a regional innovation

hub, SAB (naming rights to the Centre plus SMEs development

Programme) and Vodacom and MTN (for SME data and Wi-Fi).

We are also working closely with local NPOs, NPCs and NGOs.

We are linking up with other universities to offer joint formal

programmes online in areas of innovation and entrepreneurship.

The formal entrepreneurship programmes will also offer new

income streams

PQM Diversification

We have been working on online accredited postgraduate

programmes and are linking up with Stanford University to

ensure that all programmes have an international character. Our

goal is to have jointly accredited innovation and entrepreneurship

formal programmes. We are also working on introducing formal

entrepreneurship programmes from a certificate through to a

doctoral degree as a well as a postgraduate formal programme

on innovation.

Broadening the Curriculum and AD Initiatives

Our research shows that critical thinking, creativity and innovation,

key pillars of entrepreneurship, have generally been marginalised

in the core curriculum and in Academic Development initiatives.

We are setting up a graduate attributes’ sub-unit to develop

these vital skills and contribute in defining graduateness within

VUT.

As notable international scholars in the Scholarship of Teaching

and Learning (SoTL) area, we have been working closely with the

Centre for Academic Development to promote staff development

within SoTL and are working on increasing staff publications in

teaching and learning. The main theme of our SoTL focus is on

changing teaching from its current pedagogic epistemology that

drives mimetic learning towards heutagogy, a self-determined

learning and we will be working closely with CAD on this score.

This heutagogic teaching approach has been designed and is being

tested in the UIF Generic Management course which also has

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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our master’s degree students. The heutagogy study will take two

years (2019-2020).

SMEs Development

We are using the UIF as the basis of developing the innovation

and entrepreneurship skills of SMEs owners as we move on the

premise that SMEs owners need these skills to remain sustainable

and competitive. The other area of SMEs development relates

to digitisation (alternative platforms for creating a market share)

and use of intelligent technologies to develop a competitive

edge (constant innovation).

Goldfields Library

New Developments in 2018

Moving of Knowledge Commons and Sebokeng

Library

The library always struggles with space allocation but have try to

work with what is available to give the library a new look as well

as making the library accessible. The knowledge commons is

moving to the ground floor. Staff from ground floor were moved

to the fourth floor to clear space in the ground floor. All shelves

from the ground floor moved to the first floor. Also, first floor

was moved offices to the fourth floor as well to crate space for

the book shelves from the ground floor. The library renovation

projects of the Knowledge Commons and Sebokeng. At some

point, the project members visited other academic libraries such

as WITS, UJ and UP libraries to do benchmarking. The projects

are ongoing and it is envisaged that the work will be completed

this year.

Book budget

In 2018, an amount of R 3 577 227 was allocated for the purchase

of books and audiovisual material. This amount included R 100

000 to grow the collection of Ekurhuleni Library. The general

books, for example prescribed books, reference works and general

information resources, were allocated R 700 000 for all the campuses

and the remainder of R 2 697 227 was allocated to the various

campuses and faculties according to the allocation formula.

The development of the e-book collection at VUT is ongoing and

the budget for e-books falls under the electronic resources budget.

Tabel below: New e-resources titles and costs

SABS standards 2 211 735.49

EDS 266 760.00

Cinahl 158 879.00

HeinOnline 268 916.69

SciFinder 440 249.56

Springer Option 3 1 979 520.30

Emerald e-Books 520 220.18

TOTAL R5 846 281.22

Digitization

Digitization mostly of exam papers and e-reserves are done

currently. This office also handles the administration of the

University’s copyright applications from DALRO. Moreover, this

office had been tasked with the administration of the Turnitin

anti-plagiarism software.

Tabel Below: Digitization and Turnitin statistics

Digitization of exam papers 3809

E-reserves/lecturer’s notes 921

DALRO copyright forms 2

Turnitin 210

Network

12 Aruba WIFI AP’s were purchased to improve the library WIFI

connectivity. We have always had a challenge of WIFI connectivity

in the library. We had limited AP’s per floor due to budget constraints.

There was a serious need for the library to purchase these new

technology AP’s to increase the strength of our WIFI. It becomes

a serious challenge for students to connect using their devices

due to weak strength of the connectivity, it goes the same as

well for staff in case the Ethernet is not accessible e.g. outside

the offices or outside the library.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

New e-resources

A range of electronic resources were reviewed or trialed for

purchasing in 2018. Therefore, the following databases were

purchased which the library is currently subscribing to.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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SECTION

THE PERFORMANCE

REPORT ON SET

OBJECTIVES FOR 2018

12

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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Introduction

This Annual Performance Report is compiled to comply with the “Regulations for Reporting by Public Higher Education Institutions”, as

published in Government Notice No. 10209, Government Gazette No 37726 of 9 June 2014 to be effective as from 2015. This report

provides the extent to which the 4 Strategic Goals and 6 Strategic Success factors outlined in the VUT Annual Performance Plan for

2018 have been achieved.

This report is outlined in four areas, namely:

1. Strategic Plan;

2. Performance Management Cycle;

3. Assessment of Key Performance Indicators; and

4. Council Commitments and/or Agreements made with the Minister;

• Enrolment Plan

• Funding Envelopes

Institutional Strategic Plan 2015-2019

1. Vaal University of Technology’s Vision, Mission and Values

The aspiration of the University is captured in its Vision, Mission and Values:

To be a University that leads

in innovative knowledge and

quality technology

education.

To produce employable graduates who

can make an impact in society by:

• Adopting cutting‐edge technology

and teaching methods;

• Creating a scholarly environment

conducive for knowledge creation,

learning and innovation; and

• Developing a Programme

Qualification Mix that meets the

needs of society.

Excellence, Creativity,

Mutual Respect, Collegiality,

Honesty and Integrity,

Tolerance and Diversity.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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1.1 Vaal University of Technology’s Strategic

Priorities

VUT remains committed to strengthening the country’s

social and economic fabric, the provision of a holistic learning

experience to its students and the creation of a non-discriminatory,

inclusive and enabling environment in which staff and students

can thrive. VUT has identified 12 strategic priorities that are

critical for the achievement of institutional performance. VUT

has identified four focus areas where we need to excel for the

achievement of our strategic priorities:

• Meeting the Access with Success imperative:

• To provide access for students through foundation

programmes;

• To increase student support for academic development;

and

• To produce top-quality, employable and entrepreneurial

graduates.

• Enhancing academic reputation:

• To attract and retain highly qualified academic staff;

• To offer programmes that meet society’s contemporary

needs;

• To enhance ICT and information services driving new

teaching and research practices; and

• To provide an infrastructure that supports the physical

and intellectual environment.

• Impact-driven research relevant to society:

• To generate innovative and relevant research;

• To grow the postgraduate programmes to form a

strong base for research, technology transfer and

innovation; and

• To strengthen strategic partnerships for the advancement

of industry, government and community.

• Strengthening and enhancing financial sustainability:

• To achieve an enrolment pattern for maximised subsidy

allocation; and

• To develop sustainable third-stream income through

innovation and commercialisation.

1.2 Vaal University of Technology’s Institutional

Goals

In our ambition to excel in our identified focus areas, four

goals were identified for the realisation of success. Institutional

performance is premised through the following goals:

• Goal 1: To optimise teaching and learning.

• Goal 2: To improve student access and success.

• Goal 3: To build a PQM and institutional curriculum of

excellence.

• Goal 4: To enhance research output, innovation and

commercialisation.

Our strategic goals are committed to achieving academic

excellence by strengthening the University’s core functions

relating to teaching and learning, research and engagement.

The institutional goals are supported by enabling Strategic

Success Factors (SSFs) that focus on leadership and administrative

functions. These SSFs should, therefore, enable the University

to be an agile organisation supported by effective leadership,

financial and operational models, infrastructure and a transformed

intercultural understanding in line with national norms and

expectations.

1.3 Vaal University of Technology’s Strategic

Success factors

The SSFs are critical areas identified as being absolutely essential to

achieving the University’s Strategic Goals. The SSF areas identified

by the University, which are informed by the Strategic Goals and

Objectives in the VUT Strategic Plan, are:

SSF1: To create an enabling environment for effective strategic

management.

SSF2: To achieve adequate levels of funding to sustain and grow

the University.

SSF3: To improve the corporate image of the University.

SSF4: To ensure effective management of human resources.

SSF5: To improve institutional effectiveness.

SSF6: To institutionalise transformation.

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2. The Performance Management Cycle

The link of the core elements of VUT’s performance management system is as indicated below:

Vaal University of Technology’s Strategic Priorities

Perfomance

Planning

Financial

Planning

Performance

Reporting

Performance

Agreements

Performance

Review

Performance

Evaluation

Performance

Measuring &

Monitoring

2.1 Performance Planning

The Performance Planning ensures that the VUT strategic direction

informs and aligns the Annual Performance with all planning

activities and resource decisions. This is the stage where

targets are set for the metrics which are aligned to the Goals and

Strategic Objectives.

2.2 Financial Planning

The integration of planning and resource allocation is central

to the realisation of the University’s Strategic Goals. This

integration supports the prioritisation of the allocation of the

University’s limited resources to enhance performance and

is a critical feature of the implementation of the 2018 Annual

Performance Plan. Overall, the pursuit of the University’s

Strategic Goals is predicated on the understanding that

strategy, performance and resources are closely linked. The

budget is therefore an important steering mechanism for

implementing strategic goals.

2.3 Performance Agreements

The University’s employee performance management system

supports the achievement of the University’s strategic objectives

by:

• Staff at all levels understand and contribute to the achievement

of the University’s key priorities;

• Driving accountability through their organization so that

there is clarity on individual accountabilities for a particular

role and people are consistently held accountable;

• Ensuring that ensure functions required to execute the

strategy are in place; and

• Aligning staff career development plans with the strategic

goals of the University.

2.4 Performance Measuring and Monitoring

The Performance Measuring and Monitoring occurs frequently

to monitor progress at operational level. This is to determine

whether future performance targets will be met, exceeded or

not met. These meetings are focused on:

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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• The review of progress on projects at operational level; and

• Escalation of issues that require Senior Management involvement

2.5 Performance Evaluation

Performance evaluation analyses is conducted to determine

why there is under-performance or what the factors were that

allowed good performance in a particular area. Where targets

have not been met, the reasons for this are examined and corrective

action are recommended.

2.6 Performance Review

Performance reviews is a key element of the monitoring and

evaluation process. Successful strategy management and execution

requires effective strategy review meetings.

Quarterly performance reviews occur at Senior Management

level to monitor progress of the University from a strategic level,

making sure that the objectives are on track. These meeting are

focused on:

• The review performance of key indicators; and

• Taking actions and adapt the plans when necessary.

2.7 Performance Reporting

Performance reports include reporting through the following

external accountability documents:

• The Annual Report on performance against the Annual

Performance Plan; and

• The Mid-Year Report on the Annual Performance Plan.

Evidence to support the status is also reviewed at these stages.

In addition, quarterly reports are also prepared for internal

reporting purposes. The Final performance report is audited by

the University external auditors and finally published in the VUT

Annual Report.

3. Relationship between plan and budget

VUT management attempts to ensure that VUT remains

financially sustainable. The annual budget process is considered a

significant event with vast implications on the continuity of

business of the institution. The budget process is a fair and

robust exercise supporting the goals of the University and the

objectives of each Faculty and Department.

VUT’s Budget Committee’s role is to oversee the appropriate

allocation within the available resources subject to elements

such as proper budget planning, applying budget parameters

and the Reporting Regulations for Public Higher Institutions.

The Budget Committee ensures that the core business of

teaching, learning and research improve through the budget

provision. In arriving at the final budget, the Committee considered

the following:

• The Minister’s approval of the revised VUT Enrolment Plan

(2017-2019);

• Requirements relating to salary improvements;

• Direct academic intervention and support for the academic

plan in terms of the need to address the issues raised by

the Higher Education Quality Committee;

• Direct academic intervention and support for the academic

plan in terms of the need to address the issues raised by

the Curriculum Development with regards to the HEQSF

alignment project;

• The projection in terms of the subsidy, based on the Medium

Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) as well as the

current funding framework; and

The audited Higher Education Management Information System

(HEMIS) data for 2017, subject to the provisions in the current

phase of the Department’s funding migration strategy.

4. 2018 Annual Performance Report

VUT has identified seven Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to

monitor progress and success in the realisation of our Strategic

Goals. Significant progress has been made with the implementation

of the Annual Performance Plan (APP), with special reference

to teaching and learning alignment of the PQM to the HEQSF

criteria.

Data provided in this report were audited by Ngubane & Co.

However, it must be noted that data for higher education

institutions (HEIs), HEMIS staff and students are subject to a

few potential standard minor amendments before auditing and

reporting to the Department of Higher Education and Training

(DHET), and to a further audit by external auditors Ngubane &

Co. in June. As a result, the final report to DHET in July 2018 may

contain slightly different figures on staff and students due to the

fluctuating nature of these indicators. The research output units

indicated was audited by the external auditors Ngubane & Co.,

but not yet DHET approved, therefore the final research output

report might have slightly different figures.

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4.1 Status Ratings to Track Performance

VUT has developed a performance evaluation scorecard to define the current desired levels of performance. Ranges on KPIs are set

to monitor performance within defined target tolerances. The target tolerances of an indicator target provide the thresholds within

which performance can be either above or below target (+/-). Each threshold is defined by one of three colour statuses: RED, AMBER

and GREEN. The proximity to target is calculated on a ‘variance’ of performance achieved against an expected result previously set.

The variance an all KPIs are normalised to 100%.

The defined threshold and status is indicated as per the table below:

The Defined Threshold and Status is indicated as per the table below:

Status % on Target Description

GREEN >=97%

AMBER 94%-96%

RED <=93%

• Target achieved;

• Acceptable result;

• Area performed to a good or higher standard; and

• Good evidence available to measure performance.

• There may be a problem;

• Further investigation may be required;

• Area requires support and improvement; and

• Limited evidence available.

• Unacceptable result;

• There is a problem that needs rectification;

• Area of relative weakness will require significant support

and improvement; and

• Little or no evidence available regarding measure of

performance.

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Report on the Achievement of the Institutional

Goals

Our strategic goals are committed to achieving academic excellence by

strengthening the University’s core functions relating to teaching and

learning, research and engagement. The KPIs are used to evaluate

the success of the Strategic Objectives that are crucial in the realisation

of VUT’s Goals.

KPI

TARGET

ACHIEVED

% on TARGET

1 74% 76% 103%

2 13603 14 307 105%

3 3621 4604 127%

4 37% 48.7% 132%

5 205 239 117%

6 32 23 72%

7 R30m R0 0%

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GOAL 1: Optimise Teaching and

Learning

KPI 1: Degree Credit Success Rate

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

1 74% 76% 103%

Comments

• Improved first year experience activities including a

symposium, communities of practice and motivational

seminars

• Instructional research staff with PhD qualifications

increased from 19% in 2017 to 20% in 2018

• Optimised use of blended learning platform by increasing

the number of modules populated on VUTELA (Learner

Management System).

• Increased number of academic support programmes for

students such as mentorships, tutor programmes etc.

• Tutorials assisting students in high-risk subjects.

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GOAL 2: Improve Student Access and Success

KPI 2: Total FTE Enrolment

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

2 13603 14307 105%

Comments

• Increased total headcount enrolment from 19 218 in 2017

to 21 067 in 2018 due to fee-free education

• Increase in students returning to complete National

Diploma due to phasing out of qualifications

• Increase in students registering for B.Tech due to phasing

out of qualification

• Aggressive marketing of the new HEQSF aligned qualifications

• Increase enrolments through second semester student

registrations

• Improved success rate of 76% (target 74%)

• Improvement in student FTE headcount to FTE ratio from

66% in 2017 to 68% in 2018

• Increased enrolment in extended programmes contributed

to the FTEs

Impact

Financial impact due to over enrolment against approved targets.

Corrective action

Strategic enrolment management.

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Improve Student Access and Success

KPI 3: Total No. of Graduates

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

3 3621 4604 127%

Comments

• Increased placement of students eligible for Work

Integrated Learning (WIL).

• Increased student success rates at 76%, exceeding the 74%

target.

• Faculties identified students with 1 or 2 modules outstanding.

These students were advised to register.

• Tutorials assisting Students in high-risk subjects.

• Increase National Diploma and B.Tech graduates due to

students returning to complete the qualifications before

phasing out.

GOAL 3: Build a PQM and Institutional Curriculum

of Excellence

KPI 4: % of Active Programmes on the PQM

Aligned to the HEQSF Criteria

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

4 37% 48.7% 132%

Comments

• Statutory bodies’ approval and accreditation rate

increased, resulting in more qualifications being approved

than anticipated.

• Increase in the phasing out of pre-HEQSF programmes.

• Continuous liaison with statutory bodies: DHET, CHE and

SAQA.

• Implementation of the new Advanced Diplomas.

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GOAL 4: Enhance Research Output, Innovation

and Commercialisation

KPI 5: Weighted Research Outputs

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

5 205 239 117%

* A 3% tolerance on target for achievements is set for all KPIs

Comments

• The targets for the number of research outputs and

Doctoral Graduates were achieved, but the target

set for Masters graduates was not achieved. (162.98

research output unit, 46 Masters graduates and 10

Doctoral graduates– weighting to 30 - graduated )

• The number of instruction/ research staff contributing

to accredited publications and conference proceedings

have increased.

• Increase in the number of research capacity building

programmes offered.

• The number of Postdoctoral Fellows were increased.

Corrective action:

• The systems and procedures for post graduate studies

need to be revisited.

• Provide publication guidelines for academic staff.

• Offer writing retreats for faculty specific staff and

students.

• Increase resources to improve research culture/

environment.

• Provide more support for PG students (Supervisors).

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Enhance Research Output, Innovation and

Commercialisation

KPI 6: No. of Innovation Disclosures/Patents

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

6 32 23 72%

Comments

Reason for negative variance:

• Changes in staff limited continuity, within the function and

administration of the processes.

Impact:

• Underachievement where achievement is possible.

Corrective actions:

• Training for staff new to a function on the administration

of processes.

• Workshops for the VUT staff, to encourage inventions to be

disclosed and explored for patenting.

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GOAL 4: Enhance Research Output, Innovation and Commercialisation

KPI 7: Total Revenue to the University Arising From Commercialisation

KPI TARGET ACHIEVED % on TARGET

7 R30m R0 0%

Comments

Reason for variance: R31.4 million in funds was generated through the efforts of Technology Transfer and Innovation (TTI) and the

Science Park, during 2018. The initial target for 2018 was set based on all funds generated by TTI. The funds generated cannot be

included in the amount achieved, as this is not in compliance with the definition of Revenue from commercialisation. The R31.4

million can be disaggregated by the following cost centres:

Impact: Financial

Corrective Action:

Going forward, the indicator will be re-defined into two measures, in order to clearly define the types of income. Additional marketing

initiatives will also be implemented to increase awareness of the Science Park and its services.

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Council Agreements with the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Enrolment Targets

The VUT’s Enrolment Plan for the 2015-2019 academic years was reviewed as per the DHET mid-term enrolment planning review. The

revised enrolment plan was approved by the VUT Council on 16 September 2016, and was submitted to the DHET, receiving approval

on 18 October 2018.

Below are the targets achieved against the revised enrolment plan, up to 31 December 2018:

Key Performance Indicator

Target % or

No.

Achieved

Comments

A. Access

Headcount totals

First-time entering

Undergraduates

5 111 4 988*

Headcount Enrolment 19 263 21 067

Headcount Enrolments

(Foundation Provisioning)

Headcount Enrolments: Total

UG

Headcount Enrolments: Total

PG

Enrolment by Major Field of Study

180 0

• Students entering for a qualification into Higher Education for

the first time.

• Fee-free education resulted in a spike in prospective students.

• Higher rate of students eligible for Higher Education from school

systems.

• Increased capacity in extended programmes.

• Growth in PQM eg. New B.Ed and Advanced Diploma in

Policing increasing the no.’s.

• Students returning to complete phasing out qualifications.

• The first intake for extended programmes in 2018 was 1 315

students.

• Students were able to enrol due to the programmes being

conditionally approved.

• Conditions were not met and as a result the target was not

achieved.

• For reporting purposes, and as per the request of DHET, the

foundation status of the students has not been changed on the

HEMIS database.

18 467 20 267 Students returning to complete phasing out qualifications.

539 548

Delayed completion of laboratory building in Applied and

Computer Sciences resulted in lower Postgraduate enrolment than

anticipated in the faculty.

Science, Engineering,

Technology

10 388 11 252

Business/Management 5 835 6 102

Fee-free education and the extended programmes resulted in

access for more students.

Fee-free education and the extended programmes resulted in

access for more students.

Education 300 368 The new B.Ed qualification was initiated in 2018.

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Key Performance Indicator

Target % or

No.

Achieved

Other Humanities 3 427 3 345*

Distance Education

Enrolments

B. Success

0 72

Graduates UG 3 427 4 395

Comments

The slight difference is meant to compensate for the B.Ed.

enrolment.

The programme is phasing out.

Outstanding students are returning to finish the programme before

it is phased out. Students that completed the National Diploma,

we were contractually obligated to register them for BTech. This is

anticipated to be last enrolment for the students involved.

• Faculties identified students with only 1 or 2 modules

outstanding, and encouraged them to complete their

qualifications.

• A number of pipeline students in the old ND programmes

graduating because of the teach-out dates and the introduction

of the new Diplomas in the different faculties.

Graduates PG 194 209

Success Rate 74% 76.2%

Total Output by Major Field of Study

Science, Engineering and Technology

Business/Management

Education

2 069 2 105

1 464 1 724

133 139

Comment for positive variance:

PG Dip in Higher Education was included in Postgraduate, which

had a positive impact.

Master’s Graduates:

• The feedback turn-around time with the external examiners is

very long.

• Shortage of supervisors.

Actions:

• Try to implement a publication guideline for academic staff.

• Writing retreats for faculty specific staff and students.

• Increase resources to improve research culture/environment.

• More support for Postgraduate students, through supervisors.

Interventions like tutors and peer assistants are yielding positive

results.

• Faculties identified students with only 1 or 2 modules

outstanding, and encouraged them to complete their

qualifications.

• A number of pipeline students in the old ND programmes

graduating because of the teach-out dates and the

introduction of the new Diplomas in the different faculties.

• Improved subject success rate.

• Faculties identifying students with 1 or 2 outstanding

modules and encouraged them to register.

• Increased academic and tutorial support.

• The high quality and enrolment in PGDHE has a positive

impact.

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Key Performance Indicator

Target % or

Number

Achieved

Other Humanities 514 636

Undergraduate Output by Scarce Skills

Comments

• Improved subject success rate.

• Faculties identifying students with 1 or 2 outstanding

modules and encouraged them to register.

• Increased academic and tutorial support.

Engineering 1 037 1 017

Life and Physical Sciences 303 455

Animal and Human health 103 129

• Faculties identified students with only 1 or 2 modules

outstanding and encouraged them to complete their

qualifications.

• A number of pipeline students in the old ND programmes

graduating because of the teach-out dates and the

introduction of the new Diplomas in the different faculties.

• Improved subject success rate.

• Faculties identifying students with 1 or 2 outstanding

modules and encouraged them to register.

• Increased academic and tutorial support.

• Increased number of academic support programmes for

students.

• Tutorials assisting students in high-risk subjects.

Teacher Education 0 0 The B.Ed. was approved in 2017. The first enrolment in 2018.

Success Rate 66% 65.4%

• Improved first year experience activities.

• Instructional research staff with PhD qualifications increased.

• Optimised use of blended learning platform by increasing the

number of modules populated on VUTELA (Learner

Management System).

• Increased number of academic support programmes for students.

• Tutorials assisting students in high-risk subjects.

C. Efficiency

Headcount of Permanent Instruction/Research

Professional Staff**

FTE of Instruction/Research

Professional Staff

434 389

577 550

% Staff with Doctoral Degrees 17% 20.3%

Ratio of FTE students to FTE Instructional/Research

Staff

23.6 : 1 26.0 : 1

Reason for Variance:

Freezing of academic posts.

Corrective Action:

Optimised staffing structure.

Reason for Variance:

Freezing of academic posts.

Corrective Action:

Optimised staffing structure.

Increase permanent appointments, Post doctoral fellows and

contract staff.

Sabbatical for staff to complete studies enable by replacement of

staff funded by RDG.

Increase in student workload.

Increase in the number of FTEs enrolled.

Students returning to complete pre-HEQSF aligned programmes,

due to phasing out.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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Key Performance Indicator

Target % or

Number

Achieved

Comments

D. Research output

Publication Units 110 162.98

Publication Units per FTE Staff 0.19 0.3

Publication Units per Staff

Headcount

0.25 0.42

• The number of Postdoctoral Fellows contributing to outputs

were increased.

• Non-instruction staff also contributing to research outputs.

• The number of instruction/research staff contributing to accredited

publications and conference proceedings have increased.

• Increase in the number of research capacity building

programmes offered.

• The number of instruction/research staff contributing to

accredited publications and conference proceedings have

increased.

• Increase in the number of research capacity building

programmes offered.

• Increase in the number of Postdoctoral fellows.

• The research outputs grew from the previous year.

• Non-academic staff contributing to output units.

• Freezing of academic positions.

• The number of Instruction/research staff contributing to

accredited publications and conference proceedings have

increased.

• Increase in the number of research capacity building

programmes offered.

Research Masters Graduates 60 46 A target of four was set for Doctoral Graduates and 10 graduates

were achieved.

Doctoral Graduates

(weighted)

12 30

Reasons for Variance on Master’s Graduates:

• The feedback turn-around time with the external examiners is

very long.

• Shortage of supervisors.

Impact of Negative Variance:

• Subsidy received by the University will be reduced.

Corrective Action:

• Try to implement a publication guideline for academic staff.

• Writing retreats for faculty specific staff and students.

• Increase resources to improve research culture/environment.

• More support for Postgraduate students, through supervisors.

*Within the 3% Variance for Achievement

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5.2 Earmarked Grants

University Capacity Development Grant (UCDG)

2018

Earmarked

Allocation (R)

2018

Budget

2018

Expenditure

Projects

Alignment to

Strategic Goals

Progress (Explain variance

and steps to improve if

target not met)

R 1 437 963 R 815 733.39

Project 1: African

Languages

Development

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• HR processes protracted

appointments were made

very late;

• HR processes were frozen

due to language issues.

R17 082 450

(R17 179 911 -

Error in

calculation of

allocation by

VUT identified in

October 2018)

R 1 452 784 R 1 211 900.61 Project 2

Blended Learning

R 1 152 597 R 1 094 793.68 Project 3:

Learning

Communities

R 764 277 R 658 080.74 Project 4:

First Year

Experience

R 1 612 654 R 1 403 846.00 Project 5:

Maths, Science,

Engineering and

Technology Centre

R 840 200 R 708 022.10 Project 6:

African Languages

Development

Academic Reading

and Writing

R 2 708 448 R 2 472 378 Project 7:

Tutor

Development

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• The adoption rate of 65%

was achieved.

• Mentors were appointed.

In future, the programme

will be incorporated into

VUT 101.

• Logistics problem were

experienced in terms of

the availability of first year

lecturers.

• Certain tutors resigned and

took up full time

appointment.

• Workshops were conducted

in-house, therefore there

was no need for catering or

payments for the

workshops held.

• Certain faculties did not

use the funding to employ

the required tutors.

R 3 120 611 R 2 274 040.47

Project 8:

Teaching

Development of

Academic staff

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

• Logistics problems were

experienced in terms of the

availability of lecturers.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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R 3 260 273 R 1 950 662.86

Project 9:

Research

Development

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning;

• Enhance research

output, Innovation

and commercialisation

Activity 1:

• 55 Staff members attended

3 different workshops. We

could assist more staff, as

we did not have to pay

venue costs;

• 23 Staff members were

assisted with tuition fees.

We could assist more staff,

as fees differ for different

courses;

• 12 staff members were

assisted with replacement/

Contract appointments,

to assist with workload

reduction;

• 15 staff members were

assisted to visit their

supervisors at other

institutions;

• 32 Staff members attended

2 Research Skills and

Techniques workshops;

• 16 Staff members attended

the Writing for Publication

workshop;

• 18 Staff members

attended 2Ethics in

Research workshops.

Activity 2:

16 staff members attended

three Supervisor Training

workshops.

Activity 3

Co-ordinated in November

2018, with payment being

made in 2019.

R 732 643 R 732 64.32

Project 10:

Management of

UCDG/P

• Improve student

access and success;

• Optimise teaching

and learning.

Expenditure as planned.

TOTAL R17 082 450 R13 322 101.17

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Clinical Training Grant

Earmarked

Allocation (R)

2018/2019

Budget (R)

2018

Expenditure

Projects

Comments/Reason for Variance

R 4 923 757

The proportionate allocation between Nursing

and Biomedical Technology was adjusted and

communicated to DHET.

Appointment of clinical

training facilitators,

technical and

administrative support

staff.

There was R 2,276,805 in committed funds

carried over from the previous cycle, and this

accounts for the variance.

R 4 857 000

R 2 717 977.20

(Nursing =

55.96%)

Clinical training

operational cost.

Establishing a state-ofthe-art

Virtual classroom

to optimise clinical

training.

Procurement of laptops,

desktops and simulation

equipment.

A total of R 274,970 remains, and will be spent

on consumables for student training.

No funding was allocated to this category.

R 2 139 022.80

(Biomedical

Technology =

44.04%)

Appointment of clinical

training facilitators.

Establishing a

state-of-the-art virtual

class room to optimise

clinical training.

Procure laboratory

equipment and laptops.

3 staff members were employed on

contract enhance training of Biomedical

Technology students.

R 1,044,633 remained unspent from the

previous cycle. Laboratory equipment was

purchased to enhance training, and R 725,521

was unspent because of the delay in tender

processes. The tender process has been

restarted in 2019 for the equipment which could

not be procured in 2018.

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Foundation Provision Grant Grants

Earmarked

Allocation 2018/19

(R)

Original Allocation:

R 1 906 000

Additional Allocation:

R 6 072 000

2018

Expenditure

R 17 620 000

Progress (Explain variance and steps to improve if target not met)

Of the original allocation of R 1 906 000, only R 762 000 (40%) was released and

received. This was due to DHET not releasing the remaining 60%, following the 2017/18

report.

In January 2019, an additional allocation was made by DHET for 2018/19.

The expenditure against the grant was predominantly for salaries of staff. The only

exception is R 28 975.00, which was paid for assistance of a student with a visual

disability.

VUT will not be offering any extended programmes during 2019, and will use this time to

develop extended programmes that meet all the criteria set by DHET.

Maintenance, Infrastructure and Efficiency Grants

Earmarked Allocation (R)

2012-2015

Infrastructure and Efficiency Fund

R 295,635,000

Over the period

2015/2016

Deferred Maintenance and

Refurbishment:

R 31 503 000

2016/2017

Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant:

R 36 894 000

2017/2018

Deferred Maintenance and

Refurbishment:

R 42 743 000

2018/19 – 2020/21

Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant

R 64 000 000

2016/2017 Student Housing Allocation

R 90,000,000

2018

Expenditure

R 6 640 821

R 14 531 421

-

-

Progress (Explain variance and steps to improve if target

not met)

Expenditure from the DHET contribution towards the projects

under this grant was for:

• R1 481 667 for equipment at the African Languages & Disability

Unit

• R751 350 for furniture at the African Languages & Disability Unit

• R4 407 804 for construction of the Life & Physical Science’s

Building

Further expenditure for the projects under this grant was paid for

from VUT funds.

During 2018 the following projects were funded from the grants:

• Implementation of the Electrical Plan

• Refurbishment of Ablutions

• Electric Security Fence

• Renovations to Laboratories

• Renovations to Residences

• Roof Repairs

Projects will continue in 2019.

No expenditure has been incurred yet for the projects approved

under this grant.

The purchase of Academia was negotiated in 2018, and will be

finalised in 2019.

A further allocation of R55 000 000 was made, leaving the balance

at the end of 2018 at R145 000 000.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION

THE REPORT OF THE

INSTITUTIONAL FORUM

TO THE COUNCIL

13

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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The Institutional Forum is established in terms of the Higher Education Act (section 31 (1) of Act 101 of 1997. The Institutional Forum

(IF) advises the University Council on policy matters, including the execution of the provision of the act and national policy on higher

education. The HE Act and the University Statutes sets out the following areas of focus for the IF:

a) The implementation of the HE Act and the national policy on higher education;

b) Race and gender equity policies;

c) The selection of candidates for senior executive management posts;

d) Codes of conduct, mediation and dispute resolution procedures, and the fostering of an institutional culture which promotes

tolerance and respect for fundamental human rights and creates an appropriate environment for teaching, research and learning,

and;

e) Perform such functions as determined by the council;

f) Advice Council on the Appointment of senior managers.

Composition of the Institutional Forum

The composition of the Institutional Forum is provided for in the Vaal University of Technology Statute of 2018 as follows:

Constituency

NTEU

Management

Senate

Council

SRC

Convocation

NEHAWU

ED: HR

Site of delivery

Director: Social Justice and Transformation

Registrar

Vice‐Chancellor and Principal

Representative

Mr M Joubert

Dzvimbo, K.P (Prof)

Thabane, L (Ms)

Mabusela, I (Mr), Rakometsi, M (Dr)

Mabunda, D (Mr), Medupe, L (Mr) Moabelo, J (Mr)

Thekiso, T (Mr)

Radebe J, (Mr), T Dlamini (Mr)

Radebe, P.Q (Prof)

Mr G Mvalo

Dr D Mokoena

Professor GN Zide

Meetings of the Institutional Forum

The Institutional Forum could not meet in 2018 due to a myriad of factors including failure to have requisite quorum.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION

THE STATEMENT OF THE

FINANCE EXECUTIVE AND

CHAIRPERSON OF

FINANCE COMMITTEE

14

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Introduction

The overarching responsibility for systematic sustainability at

the Vaal University of Technology (VUT) is the responsibility

of all its stakeholders. It is this fact that makes us adhere to a

consultative process in operations whereby management, staff

members and students interrelate with each other in key areas

aligned to the core business of the University.

VUT Management supports and commits consultative

engagements with staff, students and the various external partners

to achieve joint goals in taking education further to promote the

principles of inclusivity, representativity and transparency. The

University is committed to sound financial management and most

decisions are measured in financial terms. In addition,

control mechanisms include centralized control over assets,

procurement and the University’s bank account. Other

financial controls involve quarterly reporting to the Finance and

Infrastructure Committee of Council, as well as compliance to

the approved Procurement Policy and Procedures.

Budgeting Process

The aim during the budget process is to ensure through

proper processes and structures that the distribution of University

resources is aligned, equitable and transparent, thus

supporting the core business strategies of the VUT. Management

views the budget process as a serious and significant annual

event that has vast implications on the business continuity of the

Institution. This process at the VUT is an interactive process whereby

different levels of management take ownership of their budgets

and participate actively in compiling the budget for the next

year, taking into account the trends of the past as well as future

goals.

The Budget Committee (with representatives from Finance,

Faculties, Planning unit, Sites of delivery and IT) oversees

the budget process of the University. It recommends the

budget to the Executive Management Committee (EMC) which

in turn makes its recommendations to the Council Finance and

Infrastructure Committee (FINCOM). The University Council

finally approves the budget at the recommendation of the

FINCOM.

The EMC approved the budget parameters before the

Budget Committee started with the budget process. The Budget

Committee, as mandated by the Executive Management

Committee (EMC), ensured that the appropriate allocations

within the available resources were considered and the Committee

ensured that the core business of teaching, learning and

research improve through the budget provision. The following

parameters were considered:

• All contractual increases as per contract agreements;

• Provision for new/replacement teaching and instructional

equipment in the academic sector.

• New furniture and equipment for new employees only,

whilst a provision is made for the replacement of obsolete

capital items of existing employees;

• Additional infrastructure provision in terms of the Executive

Management and Finance and Infrastructure Committee’s

decision taken during the year and endorsed by Council;

and

• Staff cost as a percentage of income.

A rigorous process was followed with the participation of the

various Departments and Faculties in the development of the

final budget. The allocation of funds is guided by strict

methodology which is premised on prioritizing the objectives

set out in the Annual Performance Plan. The total budgeted

expenses for 2018 exceeded the total income by R39.5

million, which is 3% of the total income. Although this is

permissible, Council is concerned and has requested Management

to work on recovery strategies. Council is mindful of the financial

situation in the University sector and it is therefore aware that

such interventions or recovery measures may take longer as the

system improves.

Overview of financial results

The total income of the University increased by 14.1% to

R1,480.7 million (2017: R1,294.6 million) while the total

expenses increased by 10.7% to a total expenditure of R1,572.2

million for the financial year 2018 (2017: R1,419.8 million).

Therefore, the deficit for the University’s operations is R6.7 million

for 2018 (2017: R122.3 million). This is less than the budgeted

deficit of R39.5 due to the effect of IAS19 valuation (provision

for post-employment liabilities), thanks to the decision that was

taken in 2011. This is not a desirable situation although this is

better than the previous year. R13.8 million of the deficit is due

to sharply rising student accommodation costs. The achievement

of the headcount enrolment target in 2019 and the acquisition

of own student housing will assist in improving the situation in

future. The FTE numbers and management of enrolment need

to improve for the institution to optimise the subsidy income.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

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1 480 730 923 1 572 181 565 1 294 630 1071 419 816 154

Personnel costs is 60% (2017: 65 %) of the total income

meaning that this category of expense need to be seriously

contained before it adversely affects the University operations

and the sustainability of the institution. Comparatively this ratio

looks like there is an improvement but that is not the situation

because most vacant posts were frozen for the current year.

1 480 730 923

1 294 630 107

887 469 261

847 670 646

The three-year agreement (salary increase of inflation plus 2%)

with organised labour (which ended in 2018) and the salaries

adjustments that occurred in 2015 and 2016 have put a tremendous

strain on the financial health of the institution.

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Solvency

This is a measure of the ability of the University to meet its

long-term debts.

1 177 247 638

1 088 528 062 1 095 185 677

997 753 605

The total liabilities (R1,177 million) expressed over accumulated

reserves (R1,088 million) indicate the University’s ratio of debt

to equity as 1.1:1 (2017: 0.9:1). This ratio is in worse than

the previous year which is a bad sign for long-term measure

especially when considering that it is unrestricted funds that are

being depleted.

The decline is due to a decrease of 0.6% (2017: 9%) in equity

as a result of deficits in recent years, coupled with an increase

of 17.9% (2017: 22.4%) in total liabilities. The Deferred Asset

Liability of R257 million (2017: R246 million) and the government

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

grants of R344 million (2017: R197 million) under deferred income

are included in liabilities. Post-employment liabilities decreased

by R33.5 million (2017: R34.6 million increase) and are fully covered

with an investment asset at the moment.

778 626 175

567 923 582

661 559 982

2 265 775 700

2 092 939 282

365 277 086

1 184 693 332

997 753 605

Total assets increased by R172.8 million while the total liabilities

increased by R179.5 million in the current year.

Liquidity

The current ratio determines the extent to which current

liabilities are covered by current assets. This ratio indicates that

the University’s current liabilities are covered 1,39 times (2017:

1,74) by the current assets. The current assets increased by only

R117.1 million while the current liabilities increased by R195.2

million during the same period. This situation is acceptable and

should be maintained by improving the solvency ratio.

Student Debt

The student debt remains one of the greatest financial concern

for the Institution as it has a significant impact on the financial

sustainability and cash focus of the Institution in the long-term.

The student debt increased from R327.2 million to R501.2

million (53.2%) during the current year, compared to an increase

of 20.8% in the previous year. Much energy is focused on credit

management practice. The Debt Reduction Strategy was relaxed

in 2016 due to the “fees-must-fall” movement. In particular

the first payment was reduced from R3000 to R2000 and has

since not been increased as this issue is still sensitive until the

free education issue is finalised. Council and Management are

assessing the situation and further actions will be finalised in

2019.

Access to Financial Aid

The majority of Vaal University of Technology students are

from poor and working class rural and urban families, and this

situation has placed pressure on the financial resources of

the University. NSFAS funding remains the only source of

funding to many of our students. The increase of the NSFAS

qualifying limit from R122,000 to R350,000 from 2018 will

assist in future. The University also provides various forms of

assistance to deserving students. A total of R12,7 million was

allocated to needy students in 2018 (2017: R12,7 million). VUT

is also actively involved with other private bursary providers

to obtain more resources to assist students. R47.6 million was

provided in 2018 (2017: R49,2 million).

Infrastructure And Other

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VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018

Provisions

The progress during 2018 on the new building construction

projects are as follows:

• Teacher Education Building at EduCity Campus

The construction progress was delayed due to disruptions and

interference by the community, as well as subsequent legal

issues with the Main Building Contractor. The contract with

the Building Contractor was terminated. Council gave approval

to follow the procurement process to appoint a new Building

Contractor, which is currently in progress.

• Turn-key projects: 300 bed Residences at EduCity Campus

The 300 bed Residence at EduCity Campus was completed in

December 2015 but could not be utilized due to unavailability

of bulk services infrastructure. These services have become

available and connection is in progress. The perimeter fencing

is being constructed, and while the project is not yet completed,

we expect occupation to be effective from January 2019

• Engineering Building Extension – Additional Floor

The construction progress was delayed due to legal problems

of the Main Building Contractor. The contract was terminated.

Council gave approval to start with the procurement process of

appointing a new Building Contractor.

Council has also taken note of the rate of increase in operational

expenses especially personnel costs that is higher than the

increase in revenue over recent years as well as the decline

in debt collection due to the fees protest wave of 2015/2016.

Council is of the view that an urgent intervention is required if

we are to stabilize the system and the Institution.

Council and Management will continuously be committed to

managing the Vaal University of Technology in such a way that

VUT will be able to successfully execute its mandate for the

foreseeable future.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

MR NP MASUDUBELE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: FINANCE (ACTING)

• Life and Physical Sciences Building

The construction is in progress; however this was interrupted by

unappointed local contractors. Completion of the building will

be achieved before the end of 2019.

• Acquisition of Student housing

The tender process is in progress and the acquisition is expected

to be finalised before the end of 2019.

• ICT Infrastructure Upgrade

The tender process will be started in 2019 for phase one and this

first phase of the project is planned to be completed before the

end of 2019.

Conclusion

In general, the financial situation of the University needs

to be improved in order to render its services effectively.

Through sound financial management, planning and reporting,

supported by ethical financial practices, the University can

reverse this financial instability and strive to be a financially

stable and sustainable Institution. The University endeavours to

achieve this through constant monitoring of developments in

the sector and the financial position of the University.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2018

SECTION

THE STATEMENT OF THE

CHAIRPERSON OF THE

AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE

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Introduction

The University strives to manage and maintain systems of internal

control to provide reasonable assurance to Council, through its

Audit and Risk Committee. Such controls support an operational

environment that promotes the safeguarding of University assets,

the preparation and communication of reliable financial information.

Audit and Risk Committee Charter

The Audit and Risk Committee has adopted a formal charter

that in the prior year has been approved by the Audit and Risk

Committee of Council. The overall objective of the Audit and

Risk Committee Charter is to assist the VUT Council in fulfilling

its governance and oversight responsibilities for the:

• Financial reporting process;

• System of internal control and management of risks;

• Audit process; and

• The process of monitoring compliance with laws and regulations,

and the Code of Conduct.

Audit and Risk Committee Membership and

Meetings

The Audit and Risk Committee of Council, whose Chairperson

is an external member of Council (and an appointee of SAICA),

was established in terms of the Higher Education Act, 1997

(as amended). The constituencies of the external members

include appointees from CSIR, Donors, Convocation and the local

municipality, who are independent of the University’s executive

management.

The Charter specifies the Composition of the Committee as:

• Four external members of Council;

• The Vice-Chancellor and Principal;

• The Deputy Vice-Chancellor responsible for finances (Chief

Financial Officer);

• The Executive Director: Finance;

• The Secretary to the Committee is the Registrar;

• The Internal and External Auditors (on advisory and expert

capacity); and

• Office of the Auditor-General (on advisory and expert capacity).

The chairperson resigned after attending only one meeting,

while most meetings did not quorate and another member resigned

towards the end of the year.

Financial Management and Internal Controls

Organisational policies and procedures, structures and values

are some of the controls implemented by Management. The

initiatives taken by Management to improve the control

environment are ongoing and will continue into the future.

Information systems and internal controls are audited by

external and internal auditors on an annual basis.

Management is responsible for implementing internal and

transparent financial management controls which include

information systems on financial and operational matters,

compliance and sustainability issues. Quarterly financial

management reports are compiled and discussed by a properly

constituted Finance and Risk Committee of Council that meets

at least four times per annum to deliberate on the following:

• Assessment of all areas of financial risk and the management

thereof;

• Review/approval of external audit plans, findings, problems,

reports and fees;

• Compliance with the Code of Corporate Practises and Conduct,

and

• Compliance with Higher Education Institution’s Code of

Ethics.

The Audit and Risk Committee of Council serves both Management

and Council and evaluates the response on the abilities and

duties of the external and internal auditors, ensuring that all

major findings reported on have been satisfactory resolved and

that corrective measures are taken to address deficiencies. The

Audit and Risk Committee reports audit findings and risk related

matters to Council, in addition to matters considered necessary

for Council’s approval and/or action. In the current year the two

meetings were not chaired by an appointee of SAICA as required

by the statutes.

The auditors have unrestricted access to the financial records

of the Institution and the Audit and Risk Committee ensures

that their independence is in no way impaired. Meetings are

attended by external and internal auditors and designated

members of Council.

Internal Audit Function

The role of the Internal Audit Services is to provide independent

assurance on the adequacy and effectiveness of the internal

control systems, as well as financial controls on an ongoing basis.

Findings and recommendations are reported to Management

and the Audit and Risk Committee. Internal audit adjusts its

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ANNUAL REPORT 2018

planning accordingly to ensure that the testing of controls is directed

at areas where risk has been identified.

During 2018 PwC and Indyebo Consulting presented to the Audit

and Risk Committee reports to two meetings, and the Committee

placed reliance on the internal audit function performed.

External Audit Function

The role of the External Audit service is to provide an opinion on

the financial statements prepared in accordance with International

Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and the requirements of

the Higher Education Act of South Africa. The external audit

opinion is based on executing an audit in accordance with the

Public Audit Act of South Africa, the General Notice issued in

terms thereof, and International Standards on Auditing (ISAs).

In accordance with the Public Audit Act of South Africa (PAA),

and the General Notice issued in terms thereof, the External

Auditors are required to report findings relevant to the reported

performance against predetermined objectives, compliance

with laws and regulations as well as internal control.External

Audit conducts its audits in terms of the risk-based External Audit

Plan recommended by Management and approved by the Audit

and Risk Committee.

At the beginning of 2018 KPMG and Ngubane & Company presented

reports on the outcome of the audits performed. The External

Auditors had meetings with Managements and in addition, with

the Chairperson of the Audit and Risk Committee before he

resigned. The external audit function has a professional

responsibility to report Reportable Irregularities, in terms of

Section 45(1) of the Auditing Profession Act, 2005. Non-audit

services in the form of agreed-upon procedures in respect of

funding from Department of Higher Education and Training

and from other donors are performed with approval of the

Audit and Risk Committee. After the withdrawal of concurrence

on the appointment of KPMG as external auditors of VUT, the

Auditor General, on the 24th April 2018 made a decision to

allow KPMG to finalise the audit of the current year only and

indicated that audit arrangements for the 2018 financial period

will be discussed after the completion of the 2017 year’s audits.

The Council subsequently appointed Ngubane & Company to

audit the 2018 financial period.

Combined Assurance

Although there is no formal combined assurance model, all

assurance providers have a healthy working relationship. This

entails continuous sharing and collaboration with the aim of

ensuring full coverage.

Financial Statements

The Financial Statements are compiled by Management in

accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards

(IFRS) and in the manner required by the Minister of Higher

Education and Training in terms of Section 41 of the Higher

Education Act, 1997 (Act 101 of 1997). An unqualified audit

opinion for 2018 was issued by the external auditors.

Managing Risks

The VUT Council understands and takes accountability for all

risks that potentially affect the achievement of its strategic

priorities and has delegated the responsibility for overseeing the

adequacy and effectiveness of risk management to the Audit

and Risk Committee.

Risk Management supports Institutional management processes

through the operational risks identified. Operational risks are

linked to overarching strategic focusses to promote a strategy

supporting risk management programme. The University has

embarked on a process of formal risk management, which involves

the identification of strategic and operational risks, as well as

the rating of these risks and the development of strategies

to assist in the mitigation of risks to an acceptable level. The

objective, to ensure a more integrated approach to

managing risks that threaten the organisation is in line with the

requirements of King IV. The University is committed to compliance

with the recommendations of the King IV report.

The Risk and compliance function, on an ongoing basis, ensures

the following processes are in place:

• Maintenance of risk registers at a corporate level, as well as

at academic and support systems levels;

• Monitoring compliance to risk mitigation programmes; and

• Providing education and training on risk management

throughout the Institution.

The Risk Register, however, is a work in progress which needs

continuous monitoring to ensure effective and efficient controls.

The streamlining of the Risk Register and Risk Policy was an

extensive exercise and the Audit and Risk Committee played a

vital and leading role in the process.

Financial Risks

Financial and contractual risks are taken with delegated

authority limits approved by Council. Furthermore, changes

to the funding formula, enrolment and throughput targets and

student debt are areas of risk to which Management applies a

considerable amount of time. Management has been working

with the internal auditors to enhance controls across the system.

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Identified Risks

The Audit and Risk Committee exercises oversight of the

management of risks across the University. To achieve this,

Management has established the Governance, Risk and

Compliance Unit (GRC) which is responsible for the day to day

management of risks. The GRC is supported by the EMC’s

subcommittee on Risk Management Committee. The Audit

and Risk Committee has considered the 2017 Risk Register and

the measures that are in place. The Committee identified the

following high risks for the 2017 academic year:

• The unstable enrolments and the resultant effect on the

Institutional funding;

• The unfunded satellite Sites of Delivery and the overall

financial position of the University;

• The general decline in Institutional income against increasing

expenditure;

• The growth of the University and the general infrastructure

deficit; and

• The increase in salary expenditure.

The Committee is mindful of the general financial position of

the Higher Education Sector and is thus appreciative of various

actions undertaken by Management to ensure stability and

improve the situation. The Committee will be working with

Management to monitor and review the situation on an ongoing

basis.

General Observation

The Committee has noted the successes and significant

challenges faced by both Council and Management during

the 2018 academic year. The Committee has also taken note

of the risks and control deficiencies identified by the auditors

and has directed Management to develop action plans to be

implemented in 2019. The Committee has also noted

improvements reported in other control measures as well as

new policy developments.

In overall, the Committee appreciates the difficulties faced by

the sector during 2015/2016 and the subsequent resultant

impact on the system and on the University.

PROFESSOR IL RENSBURG

ADMINISTRATOR

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ANNUAL REPORT 2018

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