RideFast Magzine February 2020

RobRidefast

SA's Best Motorcycle magazine

FEBRUARY 2020 RSA R35.00

20002

9 772075 405004

FEBRUARY 2020

NEW

BIKE

BUYER’S

GUIDE INSIDE

Green

Power

Team Green are back in full force and we test their

top SA National Superbike ZX-10R contender.

A NO HOLDING BACK CHAT WITH

SCOTT

A NO HOLDING BACK CHAT WITH

REDDING

| TESTED: INDIAN FTR1200 /

HARLEY-DAVIDSON FORTY-EIGHT SPORTSTER & 114 STREET GLIDE

WSBK

TESTING

HONDA ROLLS OUT NEW

CBR1000RR-R MACHINE


K&N Style Filters

Available sizes 28, 35, 39, 42, 48,

52, 54 and 60mm R125.00

8000Ma

Jump Starter & Power Bank R1299.00

18L / min

RAC610 Inflator R449.00 RTG5 Gauge R249.00

ANOTHER

MOTOGP

RIDER JOINS

THE TEAM.

Bike and ATV Covers

Available sizes S - XL

From R270.00

WELCOME

DESCRIPTION PART NO. SRP Inc. Vat

SMART CHARGER 1 AMP DFC150 R599.00

SMART

BRAD

CHARGER 3.5 AMP DFC530 R899.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSA004 R999.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSA008 R1349.00

SMART

BINDER.

CHARGER 4 AMP PSD004 R1199.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSD008 R1499.00

Ring Globes

H7 150% Power R330.00

H4 150% Power R290.00

Rim Locks Front and Rear

From R48.00

EMGO Top Box

R990.00

R110.00 R465.00

Tubeless Puncture Kits

RPHA-11

CRUTCHLOW

REPLICA

License Disc Holders

R168.00

RPHA-11

IANNONE

REPLICA

Bar Ends

R100.00

Hand Guards

Various Colours available

R9995ABS Plastic R470.00

RRP incl

Alloy R990.00

R9995

RRP incl

Scooter V Belts

From R110.00

Tyre Levers

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RPHA-11

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Jerry Cans

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R7995

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PBA DEALER LISTING

PBA DEALER LISTING

PART NO. DESCRIPTION PRICE

50081406/L CARB CLEANER 400ML 50.00

50201414/L TERMINAL PROTECT RED 50.00

50201415/L TERMINAL PROTECT BLUE 50.00

50320400/L BRK,CLTCH,CHAIN CLEANER 44.00

50500192/L CHAIN LUBE 150ML 34.00

50500193/L CHAIN LUBE 400ML 69.00

50510403/L CHAIN WAX 400ML 71.00

50510404/L CHAIN WAX 150ML 34.00

51528262/L PETROL INJECTOR CLEANER 10.00

53203200/L AIR FILTER SPRAY 55.00

53203500/L AIR FILTER OIL 500ML 55.00

53204005/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 5l 325.00

53204400/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 400ML 47.00

53780300/L SPARK 300ML 44.00

55000314/L TYRE FIX 200ML 45.00

56000001/L FORK OIL SYN 5W 125.00

56000002/L FORK OIL SYN 10W 125.00

56000003/L FORK OIL SYN 2.5W 135.00

56000400/L MOUSSE LUBRICANT 100.00

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS GAUTENG MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ZEEMANS ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES 012 011 435 342 7177 7474

FAST BIKING KTM ACCESSORIES 011 012 867 342 0092 7474

GAME FAST KTM MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 867 7000 0092

MOTO-MATE GAME MOTOR RIVONIA SERVICES 011 234 849 5275 7000

MOTO-MATE EDENVALE RIVONIA 011 234 027 5275 0545

MOTO-MATE KCR MOTORCYCLE EDENVALE FANATIX 011 975 027 5405 0545

PRIMROSE JUST BIKING MOTORCYCLES 011 016 828 421 9091 1153

RANDBURG KCR MOTORCYCLE MOTORCYCLES FANATIX 011 792 975 6829 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

MPUMALANGA

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES

BIKE CITY

011 792 6829

013 244 2143

MPUMALANGA

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143

NORTHWEST

NORTHWEST

BIKERS PARADISE 018 297 4700

BIKERS INSANE PARADISE BIKERS 018 014 297 594 4700 2111

INSANE MOTOS @ BIKERS KLERKSDORP 014 018 594 468 2111 1800

MOTOS WATER RITE @ KLERKSDORP MOTORCYCLES 018 468 771 1800 5050

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

LIMPOPO K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

PERRY’S M/CYCLES BALITO 031 110 0056

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

RIDE PERRY HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA GLEN ANIL 035 031 789 566 1851 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

CAPE PERRY’S PROVINCE M/CYCLES HILLCREST

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT

031 765 2560

021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC CAPE PROVINCE BELVILLE 021 945 3724

TRAC-MAC CRAIGS M/CYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND FITMENT 021 510 939 2258 8944

TRAC-MAC WYNBURG

BELVILLE 021 761 945 4220 3724

NEVES TRAC-MAC MOTORCYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND WORLD CC 021 930 510 5917 2258

WICKED TRAC-MAC CYCLES WYNBURG 021 510 761 2968 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES FREESTATE MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC

SALLEYS YAMAHA

FREESTATE

021 930 5917

051 430 3326

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326


ED’S NOTES: TALKING MOTOGP

It’s happening again – time is flying by faster

than ever and we are already into February 2020.

Crazy I know, but this at least means we are

getting closer and closer to the start of the new

racing season.

Although time does feel, and is flying by, at the

same time it does feel like an eternity from the

last MotoGP race at Valencia in November to

the season opener in Qatar on the 8th of March.

Months and months of having no more excuses

but to do the garden on a Sunday or go to a family

lunch – don’t worry people, soon… soon life will

truly make sense once again!

Now, I normally get all kinds of silly and excited for

the first race of the new MotoGP season, but this

time my excitement has reached overload as for

the first time I will be watching the season opener

LIVE from trackside. Yes, I will be present at the

opening round of the new season under the lights

at the Losail International Circuit in Qatar.

Myself, and my good mate James Dent, will be

going over to experience this for the first time, but

our main reason for going was to show as much

support as we possibly could for our man Brad

Binder. This will be his first race in the MotoGP

class and we will be there right by his side to give

him as much support as he needs no matter what.

It’s going to be another bucket list moment for

sure and I am super excited and will make sure I

get as much great behind-the-scenes content as

I possibly can not only from Brad but also Darryn

Binder and others.

I will also try and get as much signed merchandise

from as many riders as possible as the auction we

did at the end of last year really went off well and I

get asked every day for more signed stuff so let me

see what I can do. Make sure you keep a look out on

the RideFast Facebook page and my personal page

for all the content and signed goodies.

I type this a few days before the first Sepang

MotoGP test of the year kicks off and like you

all I am foaming at the mouth waiting for it to

all start. This is always exciting as the teams

and riders roll out their new liveries, helmets

designs etc. I love watching the press pass on

the MotoGP site and seeing those bikes roll out

of the garages - gets me all kinds of excited!

The Sepang and other tests leading up to the

season opener aren’t always to accurate and we

can only take some key points from them as riders

and teams delve into as much as they possibly can

when it comes to setup etc. Some riders are more

worried about posting fast lap times while others,

like Marquez, rather focus on overall race setup

and time over race distance, which is something I

think the rest need to start doing more of as well.

I think the work that Marquez and his team get

done during the tests is what helps set him up for

the season and puts him in prime spot to tackle

any and all conditions. The others need to learn

that Marquez does not win races at the start, he

wins them towards the end when others fade

away and he is able to maintain or get stronger

and that has been a massive key point to his and

Honda’s success over the years.

The other riders and teams need to take these tests

more seriously and look at themselves and their

machines and where they can improve if they are

going to challenge the dominant Ant Man.

One thing that will give them some hope is the fact

that Marquez seems to be struggling more than

ever with his shoulder injury, which he went under

the knife at the end of last year to try and fix and

has since come out saying “it’s more complicated

than we expected”. But then again, this is Marquez

we are talking about, so I think this could all be mind

games ahead of the season giving false hope to all

those in the paddock. Or not, and he could really be

suffering with that injury and we could for the first

time ever see a more cautious Marc Marquez, if

such a thing exists.

Only time will tell but let’s hope that the others

step up their game and give him and Honda more

of a run for their money this time around as last

year was a bit of a joke in many ways as no rider

should really be dominating as much as Marquez

is at the minute.

It seems as if most hopes of stopping Marc

Marquez are being pinned on Fabio Quartararo

after his very impressive rookie season in MotoGP.

I agree that the kid is a superstar and have no

doubt that he will take the challenge to Marc at

many a race, my only question is can he do it over

a season? This is something the young French star

has failed to do in his Moto3 and Moto2 career.

We all know what a star he is, but to this day what

has he actually won? Yes, plenty of pole positions,

podiums and races, but a serious title challenge

has alluded him. In fact, a title challenge of any

kind has not been forth-coming so far so that’s

something he will have to fix himself if he is to be a

serious contender to the Marc thrown.

Another name is that of Alex Rins. The Suzuki rider

took the challenge to Marc and the rest on more

than one occasion last year and is now considered

one of the elite in the class. But just like Fabio he

is unable to put up a consistent fight and seems

to fall asleep at certain parts of the season, which

ultimately costs him a proper shot at the title. Yes,

he has the speed and the Suzuki is a package that

is improving every season but still he is unable to

string it all together.

Now, here is my argument once again with both

these men. Both men have one big factor in

common - both have not won a world title over

the years in Moto3 and Moto2. Both have won

plenty of races and podiums, and in the case of

Rins have come close to that number 1 plate but

never got their hands on it, and this for me is their

biggest limitation.

History shows that champions carry on being

champions – once they have that taste they want

it more and more – it becomes an addiction. If you

don’t have that taste there cannot be an addition,

right? Just look at the rider’s that are always at

the sharp end come the end of the season and

you’ll see what I mean - Marquez has won titles in

GP125, Moto2 and MotoGP. Rossi in GP125, GP250,

GP500 and MotoGP. Vinales is a Moto2 champ,

Dovi is a GP125 champ – so they all have the taste

and know what it takes to win titles.

It’s all well and good talking about it as many do,

like Quartararo and Rins, but pulling it off is a

whole new ball game and they need to get in the

game if they want to make it happen.

Now, this is what makes our Brad such a talent

and a wanted man in the paddock. He has that

taste, that addiction to win and take a number

1 plate. Yes, it’s most likely not going to happen

whilst on the orange machine but teams around

can see that he has got what it takes, as he has

proven it before!

It’s going to be a long, hard season no doubt for

Brad but he is in the big league’s now and he is

going to make the best of it no matter what and I

for one am supper excited and proud to see him

in action and like all will be supporting him to the

very end no matter what!

The 2020 MotoGP season is going to be another

cracker there is no doubt about it with so many

questions once again up in the air, the biggest

still being whether or not Rossi can finally get

title number 10. Sadly, and I’m going to upset a

lot of people here I’m sure, but I just can’t see

it happening. The man is a miracle there is no

doubt about that but age does catch up with us

all and it has an effect I don’t care what anyone

says. In the sport of MotoGP there is no ways a

40 plus year old can compete with a 20plus in a

high speed game of chess - it’s risk it all to get

the reward and youngsters are always willing

to risk more than elder statesman.

But then again, we can all

believe and live with that

glimmer of hope and can

never say never these days. It

would be something though

wouldn’t it, if the Doctor

could make it happen...

Until next month I hope

you all have a

happy and

healthy time

and please

stay safe out

there!

It’s time to sit

back, relax

and enjoy

another

great issue

of SA’s

premium

sportsbike

magazine... with some

Harley’s and other

non-sportsbike related

things this time around...

Cheers, Rob Portman.

EDITOR & DESIGNER:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

PUBLISHER:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sean Hendley

bestbikemagazines

@yahoo.com

071 684 4546

OFFICE &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@

mweb.co.za

011 979 5035

CONTRIBUTORS:

Sheridan Morais

Brad Binder

Darryn Binder

Gerrit Erasmus

Eugene Liebenberg

Niel Philipson

Greg Moloney

Daniella Kerby

Keith Botha

Brian Cheyne

Donovan Fourie

Shaun Portman

Mat Durrans

Copyright © RideFast Magazine: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed,

or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, articles, or other methods, without the

prior written permission of the publisher.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 1


ducati.com

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sophisticated electronics based on a 6-axis inertial platform and, thanks to a more comfortable rider seat and the suspension set-up,

offers better yet safer sports performance while making road riding more enjoyable and user-friendly than ever.

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#

BRUTAL BARE-METAL NIKEN CUSTOM

WINS “CRAZIEST BIKE” AWARD.

If the whole point of building a

custom motorcycle is to make people

point and stare, then this custom

Yamaha Niken from Game Over

Cycles in Poland knocks it out of the

park. A skeletal, bare-metal insect of a

thing, it just needs a Terminator riding

on its back to look like the ultimate

post-apocalyptic bike of doom.

Everything plastic has been replaced

with hard-angled aluminum, which

the head of Game Over, Stanislaw

Myszkowski, says makes it “cut

through the air almost like a samurai

sword.” Indeed, with its many spiky

protrusions, it may well cut through

pedestrians in the same way if ridden

with vigor and elan down a crowded

sidewalk.

The Niken itself, of course, is special

because of its elaborate tilting trike

suspension. Yamaha chose to bury

the most interesting bit of its bike

behind plastic, but it’s exposed here in

all its glory as a mechanical sculpture,

so those of a curious nature are no

longer forced to kneel before the bike

to figure out how the heck it all works.

What’s more, Game Over has

expanded on this fascinating piece

of engineering with a split headlight

system that allows each side’s

lights to move with the suspension.

Functionally, it’s probably no better

than the standard Yammy fairing, but

this is more like a fancy Swiss watch

where the mechanics of movement

are a pleasure all in themselves.

Machining all that metal took a

colossal 1,400 man-hours, making

this thing an absolute labor of love.

Look at the way the handlebar’s

been covered with a metal sheath,

including functional fluid reservoirs

and integrated metallic barkbusters.

Not to mention the work on the levers

themselves, which loosely recall sets

of elaborate knuckledusters.

The entire design is cohesive,

technical and intimidating. In between

the forks, printed in Japanese on

small plaques on the radiator cover,

is a thought Game Over borrowed

from Yamaha’s design philosophy:

“courage to set higher goals without

fear of failure.” That’s a very respectful

nod to the original design team’s

work, the kind we rarely see in the

custom world, and it gives us a warm

fuzzy feeling we might not normally

get from bikes with skulls hidden all

over them.

It’s already bringing Game Over some

recognition, in the form of a “Craziest

Bike” award at the Custom Bike Show

2019 in Bad Salzuflen, Germany,

where some 32,000 people had a

chance to see it in person.

4 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


GO

ADVENTURE

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: R. Schedl

KTM 390 ADVENTURE

ADVENTURE MORE

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every day. Discover KTM’s sporty attitude and

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the KTM 390 ADVENTURE. Versatile ergonomics,

smooth power delivery, and innovative technology

all come together in a comfortable, lightweight

package – created for those who want to fit more

adventure into their daily lives.


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

LITTLE MAN

AND YAMAHA SA

PARTNER UP FOR

PW RACING.

DAMON’S ELECTRIC

HYPERSPORT: 200 HP,

200 NM, 300 KM.

We’ve written before about the

Damon Hypersport and the ambitious

technologies it introduces, namely

electronically variable “Shift” ergonomics

and a 360-degree “Co-Pilot” advance

warning system designed to give riders

superior awareness of the traffic around

them using haptic feedback through the

handlebars and other bits.

Now, the bike has been unveiled in the

flesh at CES, along with some impressive

specs and a price tag. The Hypersport will

make a monstrous 200 peak horsepower,

with 200 Nm of torque available from

a standstill. Damon claims it’ll do 322

km/h flat out – a figure we’ll have to see

it achieve before we believe it, seeing as

combustion superbikes struggle to hit

those speeds, and electrics tend to taper

off in performance as speeds rise. Either

way, this thing will be frighteningly quick.

As for range, Damon is quoting “more

than 200 highway miles” in its press

release, which we assume is a mistake.

300km on a combined cycle, perhaps,

like it says on the Damon website. Our

friends at Asphalt & Rubber are saying

the battery holds a whopping 21.5 kWh of

energy, which is certainly impressive, but

it’ll also make the Hypersport a bit of a

porker. No weight figure is available.

Two versions are now available for

reservation, both of which get the full

haptic Co-Pilot system, the Shift variable

ergonomics and 4G/WiFi/Bluetooth

connectivity that connects all Damons

together so they can learn and improve

as a single connected brain.

The Hypersport HS will start at R320k,

which strikes us as very reasonable given

its power, range and fancy features. Mind

you, for that, you can expect no-name

componentry in the suspension and

braking areas, because the spec sheet

simply goes blank.

Should you want to be special and go

for the Hypersport Premier, you can kiss

R550k goodbye. But you get a one-ofa-kind

paint job, Brembo brakes, Ohlins

suspension, a fancy single-sided carbon

swingarm, twin 1080p cameras with

which to record your heroics. Only 25 will

be made, and according to the website, 14

of those have already been snapped up at

the time of writing.

Yamaha Motor South Africa is proud to

announce the appointment of its newest

and youngest brand ambassador Bohlale

Mafokate, the young racer who we

showcased in last month’s issue.

Bohlale, also known as ‘Little Man’, is

currently five years of age and has rapidly

made a name for himself in the short

circuit racing scene, beating the pack on

his Yamaha PW50.

“We are excited for the partnership with

Yamaha SA, it is a dream come true. Little

Man’s performance and exposure will be

boosted as a result of the support that

we will be receiving from the Yamaha SA

Family” says Zenzele Mafokate.

Little Man will be racing the short circuit

series as well as various Motocross

events through the 2020 season in order

to hone his young skills further, with the

help of the Yamaha SA family.

“We are constantly on the lookout

for future talent to be developed and

Little Man is the perfect candidate. He

is a wonderful young man, with great

character, and we look forward to seeing

what he achieves with our support” says

Robin van Rensburg, Managing Director of

Yamaha SA.

Little Man hopes and dreams to one day

line up on the MotoGP grid like his heroes,

Valentino Rossi and fellow South African,

Brad Binder.

6 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


ALL-NEW BIG BOY SUPERLIGHT

125 & 200cc ARRIVING

FEBRUARY 2020.

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SuperLight 200- R17,999.00

* Prices include VAT, excludes On-The-Road costs & Govt. Levy.

Due to popular demand, SA Motorcycles is

proud to announce the re-introduction of the Big

Boy Superlight.

This new addition to the Big Boy range will

come in both 125 and 200cc.

The upright riding position and

comfortable ergonomics make it

ideal for commuting in daily traffic

or running company deliveries

at a highly affordable price tag

compared to similar models in the market.

The pair of Superlights feature superior build

quality, both sporting counter-balanced 4-stroke

motors, 5-speed gearboxes, LCD displays, LED

lights, electric starts, front disc

brakes and other key features.

The first shipment

will be available in

Orange & Silver

and Black & Silver

colour schemes, both

equipped with 12-spoke

satin black sports wheels.

If you’d like a super-light feel in the traffic

with super-light fuel consumption, the Big Boy

SuperLight is the ride for you. Visit one of our 80+

dealers today for a closer look.

For the full scooter, motorcycle, ATV and commercial range visit: www.samotorcycles.co.za

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BBS_RideFast_Jan_'20.indd 1

2020/01/14 9:51 AM


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

NEW DUCATI V4S WITH

WINGS NOW AVAILABLE IN SA.

The refined 2020 Ducati

Panigale V4 S, now equipped

with wings and V4R fairings,

has arrived at Ducati South

Africa in very limited numbers

for now. The updated Italian

beast comes with a price tag of

R399,000.

Another new machine which

has just landed is the new V2

Panigale, also in very limited

numbers in this first shipment.

We featured the world launcg

test of the new 955cc Twin

Panigale in our December

2019 issue and we can’t wait

to swing our leg over it here in

SA to see if it is indeed as good

as they say. The V2 Panigale

retails for R255,000.

Back to the new V4S and our

mates over at MCN were

invited along to the world

luanch test of the new ‘winged’

machine over in Bahrain and

they sent us this little blurb on

the new bike.

“DUCATI’S

PANIGALE V4S

LEARNS SOME

MANNERS”

MCN’s 2018 Sportsbike of the

Year, the Ducati Panigale V4S,

is a stunner – if you have the

minerals for it. Over 200bhp

and MotoGP-derived designs

created a hugely fast bike that

can intimidate anyone short of

a MotoGP test rider when you

push it hard.

With the Panigale V4R

established as a front-running

WSB contender (and BSB

champion), Ducati have a lot of

experience with their new-age

four cylinder superbike, and

they’ve learnt how to get a grip

on that fearsome performance.

Moreover, the 2020 update

isn’t just about giving elbowdragging

racers reduced lap

times – Ducati say the lesser

The Panigale V4 is now equipped with

content taken from the V4 R. For example,

the aerodynamic package through-air

(aerofoils, plexiglas screen, nose fairing

and larger lateral fairings, more efficient

lateral vents for the radiator), which

provides enhanced airflow protection

and improves overall vehicle stability,

enhancing confidence.

8 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


to single them out as a definite

contributor to the newfound

manners.

What is noticeable is the reduced

heat – more vents in the fairing

duct heat away from the rider, and

when the bike is at idle in traffic, the

rear cylinder bank stops firing, and

generating heat right underneath

your most precious assets. It’s still

toasty, but not unbearable as it was

before.

The only criticism is that while it is

undoubtedly more effective and safer

for most people, if you’re expecting a

real firebrand, it’s lost a bit of the wild

edge the previous bike had.

For more info on this and any other

Ducati model call Ducati SA on 012

765 0600.

your track riding experience and ability, the

more beneficial the changes.

The Panigale V4 2.0 was launched on

Bahrain’s F1 circuit – which sounds glitzy

(and it is), but the circuit is decidedly

designed for cars, and has some fiendishly

technical corners and complexes. Not the

place for violent power or instability.

Thankfully, Ducati’s promise is delivered

upon – rather than leaping toward the

outside kerb, all the weight on the rear and

the front doing as it pleases, as was the

old bike’s habit in certain circumstances,

it picks up more smoothly, and with less

aggression.

As a result, you can ride the bike harder

– more throttle, more exit speed, which

you carry along the next straight. The new

traction control algorithms catch spin

earlier when it exceeds an acceptable level,

so it doesn’t have to cut as much, too.

It makes for a smoother intervention you

can learn to really play with and if you

have the stones and judgement for it, it’ll

happily spin up through the mid gears with

a little lean and opposite lock on, with the

computer exercising that final bit of subtle

control. Stunning.

When you get to a corner, the suspension

and geometry refinements make it even

easier to hit your apex. Switch the ABS

to Race Mode (controlling the front tyre

only), and it’ll only intervene if you’ve really

botched it. The Stylema calipers are still a

benchmark – the only limit is your ability to

brace and not slide forward, out of the seat

and over the nose.

Do the wings help? Maybe. It’s more stable

at speed, but it still weaves in the right

circumstances. With the scope of the

changes across the bike, it’s impossible


PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

SHOULDER

RECOVERY ‘MORE

COMPLICATED

THAN EXPECTED’

ADMITS MARQUEZ

LORENZO TO BECOME

MOTOGP LEGEND ALONGSIDE

BIAGGI AND ANDERSON

Jorge Lorenzo will become a MotoGP

Legend this season alongside four-time

world champions Max Biaggi and Hugh

Anderson.

It was decided on the day he announced

his retirement that Jorge Lorenzo would

become a MotoGP Legend this season,

and the Spaniard is the first of the three

riders who will be inducted in 2020.

Fittingly, the Circuito de Jerez-Angel

Nieto will play host – the venue at which

he made his grand prix debut on his 15th

birthday and where the final corner bears

his name.

Lorenzo is one of the most successful

riders of all time, taking his first win in

2003 and his 68th in 2018. He was backto-back

250cc champion in 2006 and

2007 before becoming MotoGP world

champion in 2010, 2012 and 2015.

“To be named a MotoGP Legend makes

me extremely happy,” said Lorenzo.

“When I began competing in this world,

what I really aspired to do was to get

into the world championship. To be

able to win races and then five world

championships is something that far

outweighs what I expected, and to be a

MotoGP Legend is something even more

difficult to achieve.

“To be named a Legend means, apart

from the titles, that you’ve left a mark on

the people and history of this sport. I’d

like to thank Dorna and the FIM for their

support all these years, and for having

included me in this special group of

select riders.”

Biaggi will become a MotoGP Legend at

the Mugello grand prix, while Anderson’s

venue of being inducted is still to be

determined.

Reigning MotoGP world champion Marc

Marquez admits his recovery from shoulder

surgery is more complicated than expected,

although he still intends to be back on the

bike at the Sepang test next month.

After experiencing some discomfort

with his right shoulder after crashing at

the Jerez test last November, the Repsol

Honda rider elected to have an operation

as a preventative measure after medical

consultation.

The operation was similar to the one

performed on his left shoulder at the end of

2018 but less aggressive in nature, however

the Spaniard says his recovery hasn’t been

easier or faster than what he anticipated.

“I would like the rehabilitation to proceed

better because it is more complicated than

expected,” Marquez commented. “Last year I

underwent surgery on my left shoulder and

the rehabilitation was different – this time it

seemed easier and faster, but it is not.

“I hope to succeed to get back in shape and

to be able to participate in the first test of the

season in Malaysia.”

The Sepang test in Malaysia is scheduled for

7-9 February, just three days after Repsol

Honda’s 2020 team launch in Jakarta.

10 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020



PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

“I WANT TO BE ROOKIE OF THE YEAR”

REVEALS ÁLEX MÁRQUEZ

With the Moto2 World

Championship secured and

adding to his Moto3 World

Championship title from 2014,

Alex Marquez moves to the

Repsol Honda Team in MotoGP

for the 2020 season. Racing

alongside eight-time world

champion and older brother

Marc Marquez, the rookie

outlines his ambitions for the

year and what it feels like to step

inside the garage of MotoGP’s

most iconic team.

This is the first time wearing

the Repsol Honda colours,

what does it mean to you?

Well it’s a dream come true, it’s

an incredible honour to have

these colours on and to have

this shirt on. I’m really happy

with this opportunity to go to

MotoGP with the Repsol Honda

Team. I’m really proud – it’s a

new situation for me, I’m used to

seeing Marc in these colours but

not me! It’s special.

What does it mean to you to

be a rookie in a historic team

like the Repsol Honda Team?

Well I think for every rookie it’s

a dream, or the target, to be in

a factory team. After winning

the Moto2 championship

your target or your wish is to

be a factory rider, so this has

come true for me. To be in the

Repsol Honda Team, a team

with the most history in the

MotoGP paddock is an honour.

I know it’s a challenge, but it’s

a nice challenge. From the first

moment I said I wanted this

opportunity, 100 percent and

now I try to enjoy it.

What is your goal for the

season?

I can say that I want to be the

Rookie of the Year – that’s the

first goal. But to put a goal

about positions or something

like this, right now I am focused

on understanding the bike and

aiming to have more feeling

to build my confidence. Before

the Qatar race, I will be able to

see a little better what our real

position is and what we can do

from the first race.

What was it like being in the

Repsol Honda garage for the

first time, knowing you’re a

factory rider?

It’s really special. In the stomach

you have butterflies when you

put on your leathers, you walk in

and you see your team and you

know it’s your team. Both bikes

sitting there, it’s like continuous

special feelings during the first

test. Now in Malaysia I think

everything will be more under

control, less nerves and more

relaxed but the team already

helped me to relax a lot in Jerez.

You will be one of the tallest

riders in MotoGP – do you

think it can help you?

Being tall can have some

advantages such as maybe

moving the body and how you

can use your weight. Maybe

in the wet it’s a bit easier but

maybe there are disadvantages

and some things can be a little

bit worse. But you know, you

need to live with this and be

strong where you can and lose

as little time as possible where

you are weaker.

You will be a rookie but being

a Repsol and an HRC rider

isn’t new for you, you’re back

after your past in the Spanish

championship and Moto3. Did

you ever imagine coming back

to Repsol and HRC?

When you start, you imagine

things like this can happen

in your best dreams but it’s

difficult. There are many hours

of training, many races, many

things that can happen in a

rider’s career. I started already in

the Spanish championship with

Repsol where we won in 2012

and it was really special. Then in

2014 we started a new project

with the Honda Moto3 and HRC,

the factory was behind me and it

was incredible that year to win in

the first year of the project. After

all these years to come back to

Honda is a dream, I’m looking

forward to working with these

amazing people, this factory and

of course Repsol.

It’s the first time in history

that two brothers will share a

garage in MotoGP.

It’s a special moment, a special

year but we need to be natural

and approach it like a normal

situation. We know we are

brothers but inside the team we

need to be professional, we are

different riders. We each have

our own teams, so we need to

work in our own way. For sure

for me it’s an advantage to

have a six-time MotoGP world

champion in my garage because

I can see a lot of data from him

and see how I need to ride this

Honda machine, to help find the

secrets. So, I will try to take all

the information from him and all

the Honda riders to try and learn

as much as possible.

12 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


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PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

ANDREA

IANNONE

DRUG BAN

JACK MILLER WARNS HE COULD

EXIT DUCATI WITHOUT 2021

MOTOGP PROMOTION

Jack Miller has warned he will look elsewhere

on the MotoGP grid if he doesn’t land the

opportunity to progress to the factory Ducati

team for the 2021 season amid increasing

competition for the seat.

The Australian enjoyed his strongest season

yet in 2019, recovering from a relatively slow

start to the year on the satellite Pramac

Ducati to secure five podiums and finish just

adrift of factory rider Danilo Petrucci in the

standings.

Indeed, Miller – riding a current-spec machine

for the first time – found himself in an indirect

competition with Petrucci over the 2020

factory Ducati ride after they were both

handed one-year deals on the premise they

could swap seats depending on form.

Petrucci’s win at Mugello ultimately led to him

being confirmed for 2020 though his fortunes

took a downturn thereafter compared with

Miller’s, raising speculation they could indeed

switch seats after all. However, this was

dismissed as ‘bullsh*t’ by Ducati.

Nonetheless, Miller has the factory Ducati

firmly in his sights for 2021 with both Petrucci

and Andrea Dovizioso out of contract. Even

so, with almost the entire field also up for

renewal, Miller says he will happily move to

another team if he isn’t promoted for 2021.

“My main goal is to go to the factory Ducati

(team),” said Miller. “If we can’t go there, for

sure there’s other seats.”

Miller goes on to say there are some riders ‘on

their last contracts’ without naming names

and that teams should be more interested in

investing in the newer generation

“I think it’s a necessary time, there’s a few

guys getting around now who are on their last

contracts.

“It’s quite good to see some fresh blood

coming – everyone wants to see the old guys,

but it’s also really nice to see some new guys

coming in and doing really well.”

JACK MILLER FACES BIG

COMPETITION FOR 2021 DUCATI SEAT

Miller’s words shouldn’t come as a surprise

given the mess Ducati created when it stalled

on agreeing the Australian’s 2020 MotoGP

contract because Jorge Lorenzo suddenly

became available.

Indeed, though Miller has built an excellent

rapport with the Pramac Racing team and is

clearly at home on the Ducati, there seems to

be some odds with top brass in Italy. As such,

if it quibbles over its plans for 2021, Miller

could be one of the first look elsewhere.

What doesn’t help him is that there is a lot of

competition for the two factory Ducati seats.

Assuming Andrea Dovizioso – runner-up for

the past three seasons and the cornerstone

of team’s fortunes – isn’t going anywhere,

Miller isn’t the only rider eyeing Petrucci’s ride.

While the pressure is definitely on the Italian

to perform after his odd slump in 2019, Miller

could face a threat from Pramac team-mate

Pecco Bagnaia, who will ride the current-spec

Ducati this time. Meanwhile, Johann Zarco has

also made his intentions very clear that he is

only riding the year-old Avintia bike because

he thinks he’ll impress enough to land a

factory deal.

Then there are the wild cards that could really

shake up the market. Insiders claim Ducati

are very keen on luring Maverick Vinales

to the team because his riding style suits

the Desmosedici, while Fabio Quartararo is

definitely a target if Yamaha can’t guarantee

him a factory seat for 2021.

In short, Miller may be favourite for the 2021

Ducati factory seat based on his 2019 form,

but the man himself may not wait around for

the decision to be made for him.

Source: Visordown

Andrea Iannone will definitely miss

the first round of 2020 MotoGP

World Championship testing after

the appeal hearing for his doping

suspension was dated for February 4.

The Aprilia MotoGP rider has been

provisionally suspended since

December after testing positive

for the banned anabolic steroid

drostanolone during a routine test

at the Malaysian MotoGP round in

Sepang. His B sample also came back

positive, according to his lawyer.

The Italian has always maintained

his innocence, claiming the steroid

was ingested accidentally through

contaminated meat.

It is the argument he is expected to

present at the appeal hearing on

February 4 at FIM’s International

Disciplinary Court in Switzerland.

With the suspension in place

until the hearing, it means he will

definitely miss Aprilia’s first Sepang

test on February 2-4. The Italian

manufacturer is able to take part

in a shakedown test as part of its

concession status before the full field

tests on February 7-9.

However, with panel having a

maximum 45 days from the appeal

hearing to make a decision on whether

to formally suspend him or clear him,

Iannone will probably miss the official

tests and even be unable to compete

in the opening round in Qatar.

Should that happen Bradley Smith will

take his place in the team as de facto

race rider alongside Aleix Espargaro,

though Aprilia is yet to confirm who will

ride the third RS-GP during the tests.

Max Biaggi was linked but has since

been ruled out by Fausto Gresini,

leaving the option of Karel Abraham or

– more likely – Lorenzo Savadori.

The test will see Aprilia pull the wraps

off its 2020 RS-GP, which is all-new

from the ground up as the Italian

manufacturer looks to close the gap

on its main rivals.

14 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020



TYRE TECH TALK

by Bruce de Kock, owner of Bike Tyre Warehouse Midrand

BATT’S HP SERIES II

A premium dual-compound radial with exceptional grip

and durability, the ideal affordable sport-commuting tyre.

Well that’s January done and dusted, and

with some cash back in the pocket, it’s time to

invest in new rubber for the new year – before

Valentine’s Day flatlines the credit card again!

February is normally about reassessing

finances and setting new budgets in the face

of increasing prices across all markets.

If you’re watching costs, allow me to introduce

you to the exciting new range of BATT road

bias tyres. Why? Because the quality to price

ratio really makes sense – especially if you

still need to buy roses from Netfl orist too (I

have four humans of the female persuasion at

home, so my only option come February 14th

is midnight shopping in Tannie’s rose garden

down the road!).

But back to the new BATTS… The road range

was launched in May 2019 and the track slicks

in July of the same year. As with any new

product on the market, motor journos were

keen to put them to the test, taking BATT

tyres out onto the open road and around the

track. I’m convinced they do this more for

the adrenalin rush of not knowing if the tyre

is going to hold at 299km/hour than for the

actual assessment and write-up that must

follow – assuming they survive their time in

the saddle, of course! Fortunately for us, the

test pilots who were brave enough to try the

new rubber all lived to tell the tale – so it was

a great start for the BATTS!

The range we’ll look at here are the BATT HP2s

i.e. the Batt High Performance Series 2 which

are described on the website as:

This tyre’s design and development focus was

on providing the serious sport commuter with

a product that caters for weekday commuting,

with a highly durable dual compound that’s

harder in the middle to improve mileage and

a tread design that ensures grip in the wet

and dry. The construction was also planned

to give confidence to hit twisties hard on

weekends with a steel belt radial construction

that improves stability at high speed, plus the

side walls are flexural to increase comfort on

bumpier roads.

The infamous Donovan Fourie and Harry Fisher

from the popular Bike Show ran this road tyre

on a KTM in the Phakisa MRA 8 Hour Endurance

Race against top race pilots on the latest track

tyre offerings and achieved a very respectable 5th

podium finish, which clearly proves a point about

the capability of this purely road-biased tyre.

Obviously, there’s not much on the net about

new products that are still establishing

themselves in the marketplace, so we went

looking for riders who’ve been using the HP2s

to get their feedback. Clint Vosloo – who lives

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ALL THE PREMIUM BRANDS

THAT COUNT UNDER ONE ROOF

where we’d all love to spend a lot of time, close

to the infamous Sabie Long Tom Pass and 22 –

had this to say:

“I have used mostly the Pirelli Angel ST, then GT

tires and a Metzler occasionally.

Just a word on the Pirelli and Metzler: the

former especially is fantastic on the Busa with

very predictable slide characteristics; it gives

the best grip in the dry on sport touring tyres

with good life span.

The Metzler too gives good grip, a little less

in the dry but slightly better in the wet, also

with around 2000kms of really hard riding, with

slightly less feel than the Pirellis though.

I was hesitant to purchase

the BATT tyres, you know

how we bikers tend to stick

to what we know, but at

the price I would have been

foolish not to try them.

On the first run on the infamous 22 I was almost

instantly satisfied with them, the smaller bikes

would normally give me a very hard time on

the touring tyres, but with the BATT tyres I had

instantly more grip with lean angles I would

normally avoid on the Bus.

The true test though was the mileage I would

get, always a secondary concern when living

in the curvaceous Slowveld, but at the price of

the tyres it had to be considered as there are no

prizes or cash waiting at the finish line.

Well the tyres did the talking and more than a

few guys, mostly already converted to the fair

offerings on tyres, made the move to BATT tyres.

I mostly run 2 up, yup even on the 22 at full

flight, and of course the longer more flowing

bends that tend to eat the middle away, which

was more the case over the festive season as

my fiancé wanted to enjoy the time off rather

than hang on for dear life.

The pics you see are my first set, since I will be

getting another set for sure, and are around the

2000km mark.

Please keep in mind we hardly ever cruise with

this crazy bunch up here, naturally of course,

you just can’t help it on these roads.

The pic of the fairing scrapes are a scary

testimony to the grip at lean, I couldn’t believe

it either, but it sure converted a fair few of the

sceptics in the Fastveld.”

Always good to get unbiased rider feedback as

opposed to just relying on the marketing angle

of the brand!

So, bottom line, the versatility of this tyre fulfils

more than one riding style and requirement i.e.

they are a good choice for the daily commuter

due to the longevity and street performance,

and for the riders who want to put the knee

down on the turns or take the bike round the

track on a fun day, they could be an option.

These tyres are also very well priced in the

market for what you get, so I’m going to pop a

set on the RC8R and go and test Clint’s feedback

on them on the 22.

Enjoy and ride safe out there.

Contact BATT Holdings on 083 467 1349 or

email sales@battholdings.com for more info on

the range; www.battholdings.com

Facebook @BikeTyreWarehouse • Twitter @biketyrewhse

www.biketyrewarehouse.com


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SUNGLASSES

DOVIZIOSO DUCATI

Andrea Dovizioso, the brand

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Available from Ducati SA @ R4,122.

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18 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


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20 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Green

Power

Team Green are back in SA National racing with Team HBC Radiomatic Kawasaki and

Rob went out to Redstar Raceway to catch up with the new team while testing and

get a chance to sample the new ZX10-R racer for himself.

Words Rob Portman | Pics Beam Productions & Ryno Albrecht

The start of the new SA SBK

season is about to kick off and

there is a new player in the

game for the 2020 season.

Team Green are back in full

force with a factory line-up

which includes two of the best

men SA motorcycle has ever

seen both on and off the bike.

Team HBC Radiomatic

Kawasaki will be showing off

the green machines in this

year’s SA SBK championship,

which is now supported by

Bridgestone tyres and the two

iconic names behind the team

are that of Sheridan and Ricky

Morais – one of the most

formidable partnerships ever

seen in SA motorcycle racing.

The father and son pair have

racked up 5 SA titles in their

time working together here in

SA and after a long spell out

the Shez Show is back to try

and take title number six.

It’s great having Shez

back home racing once again

and he has always had his

best times on a Kawasaki –

who could forget his double

winning 2009 season taking

both the SA SBK and SA SSP

titles on green machines.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 21


Meet Team HBC Radiomatic Kawasaki - Fromt left to right: Byron Bester (rider),

Shaun Bester (team manager), Paul Cutbert (team sponsor), Ricky Morais (team

technician), Paul Barcelos (team Sponsor) and sheridan Morais (rider).

Shez will spearhead

the attack for the new HBC

Radiomatic sponsored team

alongside young superstar

Byron Bester, who will now

compete in his second season

in the 1000cc class after an

impressive rookie year in 2019.

Ricky Morais is the Master

Chef behind it all and will no doubt

cook up some recipes to help both

riders compete at the sharp end

come every race. Ricky has been

hard at work getting the new

Kawasaki ZX10-R machines up

and running and as close to fully

race-prepped as he possibly can

come the season opener (which

as you read this has already taken

place at Zwartkops Raceway on

Sunday the 2nd of Feb).

I call Ricky a Master

Chef because he is just that

– the Master at creating

mouthwatering dishes using

all kinds of delightful recipes. I

have been fortunate enough to

have sampled some of his best

creations over the year’s and

get to do so here once again,

but before I get into testing the

bike let me go through what has

been done and a bit more about

this exciting new team.

It’s been a couple of years

since we have seen a proper

Kawasaki team assembled in

the National series, which over

the past couple of years has

been dominated by Yamaha and

their mighty R1 machine. The

ZX10-R, until now, hasn’t been

able to hold a candle to the big

banger, but with the constant

development and upgrades

being made by the very

successful and dominant Johnny

Rea and Kawasaki WSBK team,

the updated 2019 version of the

ZX10-R is the best yet and in the

hands of the HBC Radiomatic

team will no doubt once again

bring back the glory days from

years gone by.

I’m sure you read my test

report on the updated ZX10-R

model a couple of issues back

where I was left speechless with

the new machines power and

the way it delivered it – a big

improvement on the previous

model that’s for sure.

The rules for the National

championship allows some

mods to be made on the bikes,

a costly exercise for sure but

ones that really do improve the

bikes and bring them in-line with

what’s happening in classes

around the world. The list of

mods allowed looks like this;

• Thinner head gasket allowed

• Front internals to suspension

can be modified or changed

• Complete rear shock modified

or changed

22 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Shez doing what Shez

does best - going fast and

putting on a “Shez Show”

• Full exhaust system

• BST Carbon wheels allowed

• Flashed or racing ECU can be

installed

• Cam timing adjustment allowed

That’s pretty much it in a nut

shell. As I said a costly exercise

for sure and one that will take

the overall price of a top-spec

National machine to around the

R500k mark.

Another rule is that the

production model bike used

has to be within a certain price

cap – that being set at R350k –

anything over that is not allowed

so the Ducati V4R is a no go,

having said that it did get special

permission to be used in last

year’s series, not sure if that

rule has carried over to this year,

nevertheless there is no team

brave enough or rich enough to

be running a big red V4 anyways.

The current 2019 spec

Kawasaki ZX10-R, which is

used here is priced at R259,000

and is the best priced 1000cc

production machine on the

market today, and one of the

best performing making it the

prime choice for the team. Ricky

tested the new spec bike along

with me last year and was also

blown away by its improved

performance, hence why they

are now racing them.

Ricky has spent many a

week and hour getting these

Byron Bester

adapting

really well to

the ZX-10R.

bikes prepped and ready for the

season and both Shez and Byron

have had some decent saddle

time. Ricky had this to say when

I asked him about the bikes and

season ahead;

“We started off running in

the bikes at Redstar Raceway

on a used set of race tyres and

in standard trim we were super

impressed with the overall

performance, especially the

front end and brakes. Back at

the workshop, the bikes were

torn down and all the road

parts removed including the

standard wiring harness, ABS

system etc. The standard shock

was replaced with an Ohlins

TTX and the fork cartridges

too. A Kawasaki kit race ECU

and harness went in as well as

lithium Motobatt lightweight

batteries. The standard brake

lines were replaced with race

hoses and the latest Arata

Racetec exhaust systems went

on. Motul V300 engine oil along

with Mocool and RBF660 brake

fluid were put in. SBS Sintered

brake pads were also fitted.

So far on the dyno the bikes

are making great power with

both Shez and Byron saying the

bikes are super-fast. Because

the first race was so close and

the motors are so good standard

we left them stock for now and

concentrated on developing the

whole package leaving the kit

head gasket and cam degreeing

for later. So far in testing both

riders are very happy with their

ZX10-R weapons and can’t wait

for the first race.”

So, plenty time and work

has already gone into these

machines and they are going to

need all of it as it won’t be easy

prying the crown away from

Clint Seller and his Yamaha.

Speaking of Seller, 2019 saw him

bag his 6th SA title, putting him

one ahead of Shez now who has

5 to his name, so not only is this

about Kawasaki taking it away

from Yamaha but also Shez

getting back on terms with Seller

as one of the most successful

riders here in SA. It’s going to be

a cracker of a season watching

these two bash fairings and with

the likes of Byron Bester, 2018

and 19 Supersport champ Blaze

Baker also on a new Kawasaki

and Lance Isaacs on the all-new

Beemer, it can only be just that –

a cracker of a season.

Riding the HBC Radiomatic,

Ricky Morais master-piece

As I said I was left very impressed

with the stock version of the

new Kawasaki ZX10-R machine

and knew that the race-prepped

machine was going to blow my

mind even more. Anyone who

has had the privilege of riding/

racing a Ricky Morais special

will know that there is not much

better out there and the thrill one

gets is priceless.

There is still work to be done

as Ricky mentioned earlier but

to me not much more needs

to be done as these bikes felt

incredible just as they were.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 23


I tested Shezzas’ bike,

something I have done many

times before in my life and after

only a few seconds on the bike

I could feel it was a Shez/Ricky

special. Shez has always liked

his bike setup firm and very

ridged, setup to get into corners,

scrub off and blast out – very

much Marc Marquez style.

The front suspension is solid

and you really have to hammer

the brakes on to get the bike

stopped. A bit of “Shez Shuffle”

is needed when heading into

the turns as the rear end does

like to step out. This is perfect

for me as I like to ride a bike

that lets me do the steering, too

many machines these days are

controlled by the electronics, so

backing in at will is not always in

the hands of the rider but rather

the electronic aids.

For the 2020 season

Bridgestone has come on as

the main title sponsor and tyre

supplier to the National series

so all riders will be using the

new Bridgestone R11 cut-slicks.

I tested these tyres for the first

time at the end of 2019 and was

impressed with the huge leap

they made over the previous

R10 tyre. A lot more grip and

stability especially from the

front. The rear still does not

fully get along with full lean

angle and does move around

quite a bit when on the edge of

the tyre for a few seconds. The

sidewall is harder than most,

which means one will get this

movement but will also get a

lot more longevity compared to

some of its faster rivals. Getting

“Shez has always liked his bike

setup firm and very ridged,

setup to get into corners, scrub

off and blast out – very much

Marc Marquez style.”

tyre pressures right is key with

these R11’s and makes a huge

difference, something Shez and

the team have found crucial in

testing so far.

Although the bikes overall

setup was a bit too stiff and

ridged for me, it still felt dialed

in and ideal for fast lap times

and good tyre wear more

importantly. Over the 2-days of

testing Shez managed to post

his fastest time on day two with

close on 75-laps on the tyres –

now that’s impressive!

The front end felt solid

heading into corners, but I did

get a bit of a folding feeling mid

turn whilst trying to get the bike

to the apex. Shez had the same

feeling but has bigger balls than

me so this did not phase him too

much, plus the front suspension

is still the stock Sachs so once

the full cartridge kit has been

installed they should be able to

get this sorted.

To say this bike is still pretty

much “stock standard” is

amazing and a testament to

how good Ricky and Shez are at

setting up bikes.

The stock motors are

ridiculously fast and with the

addition of the race harness

and ECU these bikes are now on

steroids. The punch out of the

turns and the way it just keeps

making power through every

gear at every RPM is impressive.

24 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


It screams in anger - a sound

that does get every part of the

body excited. Locally made Panther

rearsets have been fitted and work

seamlessly with the bikes gearbox.

Quick-shift and auto-blip assist is silky

smooth, another big improvement from

Kawasaki over previous gen models.

Traction control has been setup

perfectly to get the job done quietly in the

background while the rest like wheelie

control have been turned off, something

I found out for myself coming out of turn

3 for the first time when the front wheel

was quickly thrown into the air.

Overall a very impressive package

and one that will no doubt be winning

races and potentially even a title this

year. I wish the team the best of luck and

thank them for letting me sample their

amazing creation. We as RideFast are

pleased to be the official media partner

for the team in 2020 and will bring as

much coverage as possible both in the

mag and on our Facebook page so keep

a look out. Make sure you also like and

share the teams Facebook page - HI-

TECH Racing – which is run by BronCo

who also looks after all graphic design

work for the pits and team apparel.

One last big shout out to HBC

Radiomatic for sponsoring the team and

putting money back into the sport. We

need more companies like them!

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 25


Bautista and the new

Honda CBR1000RR-R

out on track for the first

time publicly.

BACK ON TRACK - WSBK TESTING

Despite four different

manufacturers topping the

timesheets, the HRC Team

– fielding Leon Haslam and

Alvaro Bautista – led the way

on the first day of testing with

Leon Haslam topping the

timesheets by a narrow margin.

With four red flags,

numerous crashes and rain

falling harder, Haslam fended

off Michael van der Mark

(Pata Yamaha) and American

sensation Garrett Gerloff

(GRT Yamaha WorldSBK Junior

Team) as day one concluded.

Back in action as a full

factory effort, Team HRC

did just about everything on

their first public appearance.

Haslam topped the timesheets

at various points throughout

the day, whilst Bautista

crashed at turn six earlier in

the morning.

In his second season

back in WorldSBK, ‘Pocket

Rocket’ Haslam pulled off a

memorable story from day

one at Jerez, placing Honda on

top of the timesheets in wet

conditions.

Leon

Haslam on

the new

Honda.

The HRC Team sport a

slender 0.031s advantage

over Yamaha going into day

two, but it is an advantage

nonetheless. For Haslam’s

teammate Bautista, he was

back out on track in the

afternoon after a lengthy time

in the garage following his

small morning crash, coming

up to ninth on the timesheets

before finishing the afternoon

in tenth.

The Yamaha contingency

was looking strong at Jerez,

a circuit they enjoyed wins

and podiums at in 2019. Van

der Mark was top at lunch but

crashed not long after – the

Dutchman being one of many

riders to crash at turn one

through the course of the day.

Toprak Razgatliolgu bounced

back from his morning crash

and was hovering in the top

10 before finishing eighth,

continuing his adaptation to

the YZF R1 and the new engine.

Leading the charge from

the Independent teams was

Gerloff, with the American

impressing on his second visit

to Jerez and finishing third,

setting 35 laps. Teammate

Federico Caricasulo joined

Gerloff inside the top 10 and

was ninth, his best showing in

WorldSBK to-date. The Italian

made the most the wet track

time and just under two tenths

behind Razgatlioglu.

Aruba.it Racing – Ducati

showed strong pace throughout

the opening day of the test,

as Scott Redding was a firm

fixture inside of the top four,

hitting top spot early in the

day before settling down and

dialling in a good number of

laps. Racking up more than 45 in

total, Redding was utilising the

test well, with new chassis and

engine parts seeing him placed

nicely in fourth.

After two crashes for Chaz

Davies (Aruba.it Racing –

Ducati), the Welshman had

an afternoon to get back

on track – both literally and

metaphorically. However, with

the rain coming down harder

than ever, he was rooted to

15th in the class.

Loris Baz (Ten Kate Racing

Yamaha) was enjoying his

time on track at the Jerez test

and was making sure that the

YZF R1 Yamaha was working


well around the famous

Spanish venue. Having been

first across various parts of

the day, the Frenchman was

pushed back to fifth come the

end of the day.

A quiet morning for BMW

turned into a busier afternoon,

with 2013 WorldSBK Champion

Tom Sykes (BMW Motorrad

WorldSBK Team) hitting the

top six as the rain eased off.

Parts they wanted to test in

dry conditions consisted of

chassis updates, swingarm

configurations and rear shocks.

However, with the wet

circuit, there was very little

they could try. On the other side

of the garage, Eugene Laverty

beavered away and improved

throughout the day – Sykes and

Laverty finished sixth and 13th

respectively as the rain came

back with a vengeance.

With Jonathan Rea

(Kawasaki Racing Team

WorldSBK) opting not to go out

at all on day one, Alex Lowes

was flying the Kawasaki flag

at Jerez. The British rider

will switch to the Japanese

manufacturer in 2020 and is

looking to use the Jerez test to

his advantage, with this being

their last track action until

Phillip Island’s test in February.

Utilising wet weather track

time to the best he could,

Lowes wasted no time in going

top just after 14:00, before

finishing in seventh.

Sandro Cortese (Barni

Racing Team) deputised for

Leon Camier and finished

16th in the WorldSBK class.

One place behind him was

Michael Ruben Rinaldi (Team

GOELEVEN), who suffered

a turn seven crash which

brought out the fourth red flag

of the day.

get ahead of the opposition

come the season’s start.

Taking advantage of difficult

conditions, it was Federico

Fuligni (MV Agusta Reparto

Corse) who led the way, ahead

of Steven Odendaal (EAB

Ten Kate Racing) and Randy

Bautista has some adjusting

to do to get comfortable on

the new Honda.

Krummenacher (MV Agusta

Reparto Corse).

With heavy rain drenching

the Spanish circuit in the

morning, track action was

initially very little for the World

Supersport field. On top of

the test back in November,

WSBK rookie Garrett

Gerloff ahead of Loris Baz.

Michael van

der Mark

WorldSSP rookie Andrea

Locatelli (BARDAHL Evan Bros.

WorldSSP Team) elected not to

take to the circuit all day, with

the rain proving too much for

the Italian’s liking.

Federico Fuligni (MV Agusta

Reparto Corse) had plenty

to shout about as he got his

head around tricky, inclement

conditions. The Italian will

be eager to make a step in

2020, remaining with the team

he joined in 2019. Spending

much of the afternoon as top

WorldSSP runner and setting

a good number of laps during

wet weather running, Fuligni

ended day one in top spot.

Vital data gathering and wet

weather riding mean Fuligni

first day of testing in 2020 was

a success.

Italian youngster

blasts clear whilst

Steven Odendaal and

reigning Champion

Krummenacher

complete the top three

After the 2018 and 2019

WorldSSP seasons went down

to the final round of the year,

testing provides opportunities

to gain critical advantages and


Steven Odendaal is going

to be a top contender

in this year’s WSS

championship for sure.

he ventured out on day two.

With little to try because he

already knows the ZX-10RR

so comprehensively, new

teammate Alex Lowes did

more work.

The WorldSBK race winner

experimented with launch

control settings and wasn’t

worried about the lack of dry

time, as he was fast in testing

in years gone by but then got

to the first round and it had

been a different story. Heading

to Portugal, Rea is on top and

Lowes is fourth.

Two-time race winner

Toprak Razgatlioglu was in

fine form across the test

and despite suffering a turn

one crash on Wednesday, he

bounced back to lead the way

for the majority of the second

day. However, once Jonathan

Rea had gone out, Razgatlioglu

South African

representation returns to

WorldSSP in 2020, as Steven

Odendaal (EAB Ten Kate

Racing) moves over from the

Moto2 World Championship.

Back on track and eager to

impress in 2020, the 26-yearold

set more laps than any

other WorldSSP Yamaha rider

on his way to second at the end

of the day. The Ten Kate Racing

team return to the World

Supersport grid in 2020 and

have 73 wins in their time in the

class before; important testing

will prove pivotal on whether

they can add to that tally.

Randy Krummenacher

enjoyed a successful day as

he got his first wet track time

in on the MV Agusta F3 675.

The Swiss rider, who clinched

the WorldSSP title in 2019,

featured inside the top ten on

combined times early in the

day and was top WorldSSP

rider at lunch time, before

placing third come the close

of business. Krummenacher

was second in the race at

Jerez in 2019, beaten only by

then-teammate, Federico

Caricasulo.

The GMT94 Yamaha duo

of Jules Cluzel and Corentin

Perolari were also out on

track at Jerez, garnering vital

data and track time in tricky

conditions in order to be

prepared for the 2020 season.

Setting 35 laps between them

and being split by just 0.195s,

Cluzel pipped Perolari and they

finished fourth and fifth in

their class respectively.

The only other two

WorldSSP riders on track

were Dutchman Jaimie van

Sikkelerus (MPM Routz Racing

Team), who only took to the

track for 22 laps during the

afternoon. He was joined

on track by fellow Yamaha

rider Loris Cresson (OXXO

Yamaha Team Toth), who

didn’t complete a flying lap.

The Belgian rider’s teammate,

Peter Sebestyen, was not

present at the test, whilst

Kawasaki Puccetti Racing were

also absent from Jerez.

Champion Rea

fastest on final day

with Razgatlioglu

and Redding

rounding out the top

three on day two.

The final day of Jerez testing

brought the only sunshine

available out to play for a

handful of hours before more

rain meant that most teams

remained in their garages with

a couple of hours to go.

Johnny Rea back

on top... again.

With Honda on top of

day one, it was Jonathan

Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team

WorldSBK) and Kawasaki

who were on top after doing

19 laps across the two days.

Behind him, 2019 rival Toprak

Razgatlioglu (Pata Yamaha)

and Scott Redding (ARUBA.

IT Racing – Ducati), making it

three manufacturers inside

the top three.

There was very little track

action across both days

for the Kawasaki Racing

Team WorldSBK outfit, as

they vowed to keep their

reigning WorldSBK champion

Jonathan Rea in the box for

the entirety of day one, before

was pushed back to second,

although just over two tenths

behind the Ulsterman. Michael

van der Mark (Pata Yamaha)

joined his teammate at the

sharp end and completed the

top five, 1.7s behind Rea.

Making it three

manufacturers inside the top

three, Scott Redding (Aruba.

it Racing – Ducati) took his

Ducati Panigale V4 R around

the Circuito de Jerez – Angel

Nieto track.

Having raced at the

track more than most of his

competitors from his MotoGP

paddock days, the 27-yearold

British ace had a good run


Krummenacher

heads MV Agusta 1-2

at a circuit he knows well in

order to learn the WorldSBKspec

of the V4 R’s intricacies.

Chaz Davies (Aruba.it Racing

– Ducati) had a tough test and

was 15th at the end of it all,

crashing twice on the first day

and completing less than 30

laps on day two.

Day one saw the

highly awaited first public

appearance of the all-new

Honda CBR1000RR-R and it

ended the day on top of the

WorldSBK pile in the hands of

Leon Haslam (HRC Team). On

Thursday, the bike couldn’t

quite replicate the position,

but it was a good indicator of

what the bike was capable of

in drying conditions.

The ‘Pocket Rocket’ finished

in sixth come the end of play

and hailed the support of HRC,

giving him the confidence

to achieve great things. For

Bautista, the objective is still

to find a good base setting

and to learn the technicalities

of an in-line four-cylinder

motorcycle, something he has

never ridden before. Bautista

ended day two in eighth.

In seventh place was the

first of the Independent riders

and Loris Baz (Ten Kate Racing

Yamaha). The 26-year-old

WorldSBK race winner was

right in the mix across the two

days of testing, testing with

the new 2020 Yamaha YZF R1.

The wet weather running

was confirmation that the

team have improved the setup

of the bike in general, whilst

they also practiced race starts

and refined their electronics.

Along with Baz in the top ten

were other Independent riders

were Michael Ruben Rinaldi

(Team GoEleven) and Federico

Caricasulo (GRT Yamaha

WorldSBK Junior Team), the

latter of which suffered two

crashes.

Outside the top 10 was

Tom Sykes (BMW Motorrad

WorldSBK Team) in eleventh,

as the BMW squad didn’t try

too much during the second

day. Combined with teammate

Eugene Laverty, the two did 65

laps in total across the second

day with a primary focus

on Laverty, who hailed the

chassis but has engine desires

in order to move forward. With

two chassis to test, the Shaun

Muir Racing team will be busy

with more development at

Portimao; ‘Norge’ was 18th.

Toprak

Razgatlioglu

Scott Redding

ORELAC Racing Verdnatura

were up in 12th place with

WorldSBK rookie Maximilian

Scheib, who quietly impressed

around the WorldSBK paddock

at Jerez. The Chilean rider’s

main aim was to familiarise

his way with the ZX-10RR,

whilst placing fourth out of the

Independent riders.

Third on day one, it was

13th for Garrett Gerloff (GRT

Yamaha WorldSBK Junior

Team) on day two, whilst

Sandro Cortese (Barni Racing

Team) was 14th on his

deputising duty. The German

rider, who liked the feeling

from his Ducati Panigale V4

R, is still without a ride on

the 2020 grid. Sylvain Barrier

(Brixx Performance) was

16th on his Ducati, ahead of

Leandro Mercado (Motocorsa

Racing).

The title defence is off to a

good start for the Swiss rider,

although there’s plenty of

unpredictability in the air…

The FIM Supersport World

Championship testing at Jerez

has been completed, with the

top riders taking to the circuit

on the final day of action. With

sunshine blazing through in

the middle of the day, times

improved significantly, and it

was Randy Krummenacher (MV

Agusta Reparto Corse) who

clinched top slot aboard his MV

Agusta F3 675, whilst teammate

Raffaele De Rosa and Jules

Cluzel (GMT94 Yamaha)

completed the top three.

De Rosa was one of the

first riders out on track

and soon set the early

pace, but teammate Randy

Krummenacher was soon on

the pace and got ahead of the

Italian before the weather

closed in on the Circuito

de Jerez – Angel Nieto. The

Swiss rider needs to focus

on garnering as much track

time as possible with his new

bike, whilst De Rosa looked to

push on and challenge his new

teammate. Jules Cluzel was up

at the sharp end of things on

the overall timesheets early

on before slipping down later

on, finishing third in the class.

Cluzel didn’t manage to get out

on slick tyres.

Behind them was South

African rookie Steven

Odendaal (EAB Ten Kate

Racing) and was pushing

on in the morning. Entering

his first season in the class

and with very little dry track

time to help him, it will be

an interesting opening few

rounds for the former CEV

Moto2 Junior Champion.

Corentin Perolari (GMT94

Yamaha) was fifth in the

WorldSSP class and, like

teammate Cluzel, didn’t

venture out on slick rubber,

whilst Jaimie van Sikkelerus

(MPM Routz Racing Team was

sixth. Loris Cresson (OXXO

Yamaha Team Toth) elected to

stay off the Jerez circuit.


WSBK’S

Boy

Bad

The WorldSBK rookie talks us through life as a racer,

money, near retirement and his 2019 revival in the

first half of this two-part interview.

When Scott Redding (Aruba.it Racing -

Ducati) won his first World Championship

race, he wasn’t old enough to apply for a

moped licence in the UK – and still wasn’t six

months later. This is someone who seems

to have been around forever yet is younger

than Jonathan Rea or Carl Fogarty when

they won their first world title. Since that

famous Donington 125cc victory, Redding

has hit highs that most riders can only

dream of. But many would be relieved to

have been spared the lows.

Speaking with WorldSBK.com minutes

after sundown at the November Jerez test

and hours before jetting away to California

for the holidays, the man from Gloucester,

Aruba.it Racing - Ducati’s star signing for

2020, opens up on the turbulent last few

years of his career, through fame, falls and

his final resurgence. This is Scott Redding, in

his own words.

Who is Scott Redding? That’s a good

one… Scott Redding is a kid with talent and

dedication from Gloucester. No ego, out to

have fun and enjoy my life as well as trying

to be successful with racing… And I don’t

really give a f***. That’s me!

Last year [2018], my career was more

or less finished. I was over it, I didn’t want

to race anymore. I was 25 and thinking ‘I’m

done with this sport’. It wasn’t giving me

anything in my life; I didn’t feel happy and I

didn’t feel like I was succeeding. I’ll try to do

something else, that was my vision.

Burnout is a good way of putting it,

because there was no light at the end

of the tunnel. There was no future to go

forward. I was just struggling, suffering,

really hating it. And it just kind of wore me

down. I’d come from fighting for a world title

in Moto2, which I lost due to injury. That hurt

me enough, but I had a new challenge to go

to MotoGP and trying to be World Champion

was my goal, it’s what I believed I could

do. But I just felt at the wrong place, at the

wrong time from there on in. Everywhere I

went to, it was not the right time.

Aprilia was like that

last stab at it. A factory

team, the bike the year

before wasn’t too bad… But

it was all the same. When I went

there, they changed the bike, or

they changed some rules or whatever, and

suddenly the bike didn’t work. It just wore

me down, knowing that there’s something

that can be better, but I can’t get it.

There’s so much pressure in MotoGP,

millions of people around the world

watching you. For me, finishing 15th,

16th, 17th is humiliating. Some riders

will say they’re quite happy with that,

they’re in MotoGP… That’s not me.

After that, I was over it. But

then I thought: ‘actually, let’s give

this a go’. I’ll try and get a good bike,

in a good team. Because I know that

I’m a good rider, and I know there’s

more potential than what I’ve been

showing.

When I decided I was going to

continue to race, I said to my manager:

‘Find me a bike and a team that can win’. I

don’t give a f*** if its quads, skis, jet skis,

tractor racing… Just give me something so I

can prove to people!

30 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 31


I ended up doing the British

Superbike Championship

and that kind of kickstarted me

again, emotionally. I got that fire

for winning again.

I didn’t go there thinking

that I needed to finish in the

top five. I needed to win. A lot

of people thought: ‘well, that’s it,

Scott’s finished, he ain’t gonna

manage them tracks, he ain’t

gonna do this’... I’m still that kid

from Gloucester. If I need to race,

I’ll do the best I can.

It was the first time in

my career that something

actually went to plan. It was

an amazing feeling that fired me

up to come into World Superbike

and try to do the same thing

here.

Now I do see that I have

a longer career. And the

experiences I have had in the

past, even the hard times, are

going to come into my strength

in this paddock.

Racing bikes for me is not

fun. Risking your life is not

fun. I don’t care what anyone

says. Having a little ride around

on a track day – lovely! Risking

the limit on every corner is not

“I ended up doing the British

Superbike Championship and

that kind of kickstarted me

again, emotionally. I got that

fire for winning again.”

fun and I think every other guy

here would tell you the same

thing. If I’m not getting results, it

doesn’t really feel worth the risk.

I didn’t grow up around

money. I don’t have money

– if I want to retire, I’m not a

multimillionaire. I do this to earn

money and to thrive for the sport.

I always said, I don’t have money

to put in a team. We don’t have it,

end of story. If I can’t get a ride for

free, I can’t race, that’s it!

That’s what happened in

2009. I had a really bad season;

the bike broke down 24 times.

I was fast, but with no results

on paper – and that was me

washed up, done. The teams

were then asking for 200,000€,

180,000€ – I didn’t have

18,000€!

And then Michael

Barthelemy, from the Marc

VDS Racing team, took me

under his wing. He saved my

career, there’s no doubt about it.

I haven’t worked this hard

all my life to then have to pay

to do it. The problem is, there’s

so many people out there now

who do pay. That’s the way it is.

It did make it hard for me but,

at the end, beggars can’t be

choosers.

The good thing at the

start is that I just had mad

bags of talent. I was riding

average bikes and putting them

in positions they shouldn’t have

been in. When I was riding for

BQR, I don’t think they had ever

got a top-10 finish – I won a

race for them! First race I went

to, I qualified on the front row

and was in the top five, first

round. That was helping me, I

got where I was because of pure

talent and hard work.

I’ve got a big season ahead

of me and I want to be ready

100%. If you want to fight to be

the best, you’ve got to be ready

for the best. And for me the best

person is myself, so I want to

try and beat myself every day.

32 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020



That’s all I can do from my side.

I’ve got a team behind me and a

bike manufacturer that has the

potential to put us on the top.

I’ve been out of the UK my

whole life. It never bothered

me, I don’t get homesick. As soon

as I turned 19, 20, I went to Spain

and never really came back. I

grew up like that.

I’ve got a great connection

with my dad, my uncle and

my sisters, but I don’t need to

see them all the time. That’s the

way it is.

My dad comes to a lot of

the races, he was driving the

motorhome for me in MotoGP.

He just likes watching the racing,

he doesn’t really get involved.

You won’t see him in the

paddock at all throughout the

day, he’ll come in the evening.

My uncle’s been by my side

a lot of the time. He doesn’t

like travelling so he wasn’t with

me in MotoGP, it’ll be a similar

thing this year. It doesn’t make

a difference to me if I’ve got a

big clan or not. If people want

to come and watch, there’s no

pressure to me.

I’ve known Chaz for a few

years. I used to race on his kart

track when I was younger. He

used to hand trophies out to me!

We get along really well. I really

like the kid, he’s down-to-earth,

normal, no ego. I can’t say a bad

word about him at all.

He had a similar situation

to me, with really no money

behind, working with average

material. I maybe had that bit of a

breakthrough where I just caught

the eye; when I was just about to

fall off the cliff, I got help.

I’ve had some d***head

teammates and I’ve had some

good teammates. It’s one

of those things. Off-track, we

can be civil; if I beat you, shake

my hand and say, ‘well done’,

because if you beat me, I’ll do the

same. Some riders can’t do that,

and we don’t get along well, but

“I’ve had some d***head

teammates and I’ve had

some good teammates.

It’s one of those things.”

most of my teammates have

been, within range, pretty okay.

I only started vlogging

because I liked it. People

would say that I should vlog,

that I’m a character, I do mad

s***… 80% of it I can’t show

you! People want to see that. I’m

trying to show to people that

you don’t have to be this square

robot, that can’t do anything to

be successful.

When I went to BSB it was

blowing people’s minds. I was

staying out late at night, having

parties in the motorhome,

everyone having fun, dancing

around – and winning the next

day! People couldn’t get their

heads around it!

Last year was so clear,

I could be myself and still

get results. I don’t want to

change that. I want to show

people how you can be and still

be successful.

With the vlogs, if people

look back to that now they’ll

be like, ‘what motivated that

kid to do it?’. And it’s probably

that mix of hunger-slash-anger

of not being able to show myself

in MotoGP. As much as the

vlogging wasn’t ideal, it probably

helped me to be successful again.

I do work hard, I still train.

I broke ligaments in my leg last

January; one month out. After

three days training, I broke my

femur. The team said: ‘you ain’t

much use to us, see you later’,

but I went: ‘hold up, I’ll be back

for the first test’. It was in three

weeks, but I didn’t care. Doctors

said I needed 8-9 weeks. I didn’t

have 8-9 weeks! I needed three

weeks to be back. That was my

mindset. I could only just about

walk, but I could do it.

A lot of it’s in your mind,

how much you want to be

successful. You have to keep

working away. A lot of people

in that position would take 8-9

weeks off as an excuse. I was

like: no, I can’t, I need to win

that championship, I need to

start now!

When I leave the

racetrack, I don’t want to talk

about racing anymore. When

it’s done and the door’s closed,

give it an hour and I’m done.

People keep asking me the same

questions, what about this,

what about that… I get that it’s

an entertainment thing, people

like to talk about it. But racing is

my job.

I have a mad passion for

boxing. When I finished racing

in 2018, there was a big part of

me that thought, if I don’t race,

I want to try and make it was a

professional boxer. I can’t do the

two, so I just do it for fun.

I love the way the

technique is involved, the

graft and hard work. It’s about

you and the other guy. Racing

is about you and your machine;

your machine can play a big part

in your results. In boxing it’s oneto-one

in the ring – end of story.

For training it’s the best

thing. It keeps you level, it keeps

your feet on the ground. If you’re

getting bashed about, it makes

you think, ‘keep it real, keep it

down’. It just makes you feel a

calmer person, I like that.

I also do a lot of cycling

and motocross, I enjoy that

more, it gives me a lot of

adrenaline. I also like to party

a couple of times, don’t get me

wrong. To be out with my friends

and just send it real hard, have a

good night. I want to go out and

enjoy my life, I risk it enough!

Spending time with my

girlfriend has been the

biggest thing for me. Since I

found her, she’s helped me a lot.

I feel very content, grownup. I

feel quite ready to be calm and

grow up in a way where I can

focus my attention on my other

things, like the boxing and my

racing. I don’t have to worry

about other stuff around me. I

feel safe.

34 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020





Kawasaki

H2R

Still the maddest, most brutal

homicidal maniac to ever to

ravage the motoring world.

Three years ago, Donovan rode an H2R around Phakisa for

The Bike Show. To date, it has 3.2 million views on YouTube,

and he is still frequently questioned about it both in South

Africa and when he goes overseas. There have been some

impressive feats in sportbike progress in the three years

since then, but nothing yet comes close in terms of pure

madness, pure terror and pure adrenaline junkie thrills. And

isn’t that what motorcycling is all about? Story:

Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Meghan McCabe

When the track-only H2R was

first unveiled at the Intermot

Show in 2014, there were

many questions swarming

through the ethereal social

media plane. One such

question fielded on my

Facebook wall was from an

outspoken gentleman from

the racing fraternity: “How is

anyone going to put 326hp on

the ground? What is anyone

going to do with 326hp?”

My answer was simple,

concise and straightforward:

“Open the throttle.”

It’s true that as a track

machine, the H2R is lacking –

it will not do the lap times of

even the 2014 litre superbikes,

and will be wholly outpaced

around a track by the

subsequent models especially

the likes of the Ducati V4R

and the Aprilia RSV4 Factory.

However, this is presuming

that the rider’s goal is to set

lap times. Sometimes, the

rider wants to scream in

delightful terror. Until this

day, no such motorcycle has

proffered anything close to

the H2R.

The usual procedure

for shooting a road test for

The Bike Show happens like

this – firstly, I will research

the bike and ride it, and from

this, a script will magically

appear in my head. From the

script, we can work out the

location and what shots we

need. Sometimes, I cannot

ride the bike before the shoot,

38 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


“Until this day, no such

motorcycle has proffered

anything close to the H2R.”

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 3 9


so I’ll do the research before and

then ride the bike in the morning

getting some onboard shots and

perhaps some ride-bys. The crew

will then get on with shooting

details of the bike while I furiously

attempt to throw together a

believable script, distinguishing

between stand-up links to

camera, voice-overs and onboard

comments.

me riding so I could do the usual

procedure of figure out a script.

“Guys, I want to do this

differently. Put an onboard mic

on me now.”

There was a moment of

bewildered silence as the

team digested what I had just

suggested. It would mean no

script, no direction and making

it up as we go along. In other

“The H2R wants to rip your liver

out and force you to watch as it

devours it slowly and messily.

That’s why it looks more like

something out of an Alien movie,

and you should be afraid.”

Some people like shooting off

the cuff, making up what they’re

saying as they shoot. You can tell

which videos are shot like this

because they are universally sh*t.

The H2R we rode was a friend

of mine’s who looked at his bank

account and saw that he had the

R850,000 needed to buy one. He

had booked Phakisa for a Friday,

invited us to join and film his

new baby, a baby that could very

legitimately be named Chuck.

We arrived at Phakisa, got the kit

set up, and the crew got ready

to start filming some shots of

words, sh*t. Still, I insisted. This

bike isn’t about numbers, about

functions and logic. It’s about

emotions, mostly terror. And that

has to happen in real-time.

The emotion was made clear

when the bike was first unveiled

in 2014 to mixed reactions. As

you would imagine, there were

people stunned and thrilled at

the idea of 326hp available to us

mere mortals. However, there

was also a school of thought –

from similar people critical of its

lap time prowess – that it was

just ugly, citing the likes of the

40 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Italian and Japanese litre bikes

that did things to them in their

underpants. My answer to these

criticisms is simple – the H2R is

not a bikini model that wants to

tickle you in your happy places.

The H2R wants to rip your liver

out and force you to watch as it

devours it slowly and messily.

That’s why it looks more like

something out of an Alien movie,

and you should be afraid.

After leathers were zipped

up, mics were running and a

short plea to whichever deities

happen to be paying attention,

I climbed aboard, started it up

and . . . holy sh*t! It barked into

life like a rabid bear. The short

but sharp “yip” stemming from

my inner soul was drowned out

by the exploding megaphone

exhaust – this is not a streetlegal

motorcycle so why use a

street-legal exhaust?

Fine. Okay. Keep your head,

Donovan. Click it into gear and

let’s see if we can at least make

it down pitlane. After pulling off

without stalling – always a relief

when the cameras are rolling,

and there’s a small crowd – the

H2R growled its way ominously

down the pitlane, its passenger

shaking to the core despite failing

efforts to be brave and manly.

The first lap was a warm-up

lap. Obviously. It’s a good idea

to let the engine warm-up, the

tyres warm-up, the brakes

warm-up, the frame warm-up,

the electronics warm-up and

it definitely isn’t an excuse for

the sweating rider to delay the

inevitable opening of the throttle.

After a full lap of vailed

procrastination, it eventually

pointed down the pit straight

where cameras and crowds were

awaiting, expecting a full-throttle

blast. Like a coward standing on

the edge of a bungee bridge with

peer pressure breathing down his

neck, I opened the throttle. After

all, like the bungee bridge, once

you take the plunge, you find that

it’s not so bad and you’re glad you

did it, right? Honestly, what’s the

worst that could happen?

Two seconds later, the tiny

stub of tar that was previously

a full straight was over, and my

breath was gasping desperately

to keep up with my heart rate

that was now clocking five

million beats per minute.

“Holy, bloody, #$#$$%,

#$$%$%$%%$, #@$#,

#$$%$%, #@@##$$%,

On the plus side, I was now

knee-down in a corner that

meant, in stark opposition to

the norm, I could rest a bit. The

next “straight” was no better,

nor the one after that, as they

all disappeared in a nefarious

howl of insanity. These

“straights” that we usually enjoy

on normal superbikes as the

bit of resting between corners

were now the tiny little dots

between rest in corners.

If you don’t believe me, look at

it like this – most people reading

this have experienced a litre

superbike pushing in the region

of 200hp and know the burden

of attempting to tame one of

these machines. Well, the H2R

is one of these litre superbikes

with the power a slightly tuned

600cc added on to it. We all laud

MotoGP bikes for their power

and acceleration, and yet here

we are with 46hp more than

them. And we are not toned,

fearless MotoGP superheroes

but slightly overweight, mortals

with a mortgage and work on

Monday.

The video on YouTube

was not scripted, but it was

emotional, and that is what

this motorcycle is all about.

Compared to litre superbikes,

the H2R is slow and clumsy

around corners and will never

get close to doing their lap

times, but that is not why you

buy one of these. You buy it to

get to one of the straights, take

a deep breath and then open

the throttle.

And at that stage, who scares

what your bloody lap time is?

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 41


Words: Sean Hendley & Shado Alston / Pics: Glenn Foley, Shado Alston & Sean HendleY

Going Nowhere

SLOWLY

Harley Davidson 114 Street Glide & Forty-Eight (1200 Sportster)

“Going Nowhere Slowly” was

the name of a travel show back

in the day where a bunch of

like-minded people jumped

into a big American muscle

cruiser type car, aimed it in a

general direction and went

wandering along to see

what our beautiful country

had to offer. The idea was

to experience South Africa

organically and get the vibe of

a place instead of just tearing

through it at break neck speeds

with some kind of destination

or goal in mind.

So, when we finally

managed to shake up some

Harley Davidson demo’s

after much bowing, scraping,

begging and pleading, we

decided that would be our plan.

A couple of proper American

muscle cruisers and some

like-minded lads we would

head out and explore south

of Jo’burg. We decided on the

south for two reasons, firstly

the new kids in H.D. fold,

ROC Harley Davidson, who

gladly loaned us the bikes,

are based in Alberton which

is basically the start of “The

South”. Secondly, we haven’t

really been out that way for

a while and there is some

brilliant cruising to be done

between the mountains of the

Suikerbosrand.

42 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 43


The R.O.C Harley-Davidson store

is a real treat for all fans of the

American brand and the staff make

the experience extra special.

Arriving at R.O.C., (Ride of

Choice), Harley Davidson in

Alberton we were presented

with a 2019 ‘Street Glide’ which

is a 1800cc and a 1200cc

2019 ‘Forty-Eight’ by their

exceptionally friendly and

professional staff. We were

given a proper run down on

both bikes, with all the multitude

of features explained and

pleasantries exchanged with

the bosses we aimed the ‘Cycles

South’ … (look that up on You

Tube … coolest biking movie

ever), and went in search of

adventure. Swinging your leg

over a Harley, any Harley, soon

has you feeling like a teenage

rock god … no matter your age.

There is just something about

the brand, something so cool

that you just want to hammer

down on the gas and go off

looking for some ass.

So, there we were a couple of

older ‘gents’ cruising southern

Gauteng visiting our old haunts

and reminiscing about our glory

days. Our route took us past an

old abandoned building with

some brilliant graffiti for a photo

shoot and a quick bite to eat at

the local Engen 1-stop, where

the 2 Harleys attracted a lot of

attention from “Selfie” hunters.

Then it was onto the old Lido

Hotel near Walkerville, which

has been revamped into a really

nice wedding venue, for some

more pics, then into Henley-on-

Klip with a quick swing past Bass

Lake. We then decided to follow

the road through Suikerbosrand

to Heidelberg and do a bit of

highway cruising down the N3

back to R.o.C. Harley Davidson in

Alberton.

Harley Davidson

114 Street Glide

These are by no means smooth,

high performance corner carvers

and I think that is their major

appeal. Even though the Street

Glide is running the all new and

smoother Milwaukee 8 gearbox

it still gives a very definite thud

into each gear, you can still feel

the heartbeat of the engine

through the handle bars and the

ever present grumble for the

exhaust is all consuming. The

seating position is undoubtedly

very comfortable and the

cockpit behind the fairing and

windshield is a very nice place to

be. I particularly enjoyed the fact

that I could connect my phone

to on-board sound system and

You meet some very cool

people and find most

interesting places in the

saddle of Harley.

blast out some Motorhead and

Rob Zombie while cruising the

highways and byways adding

to my teenage rock god fantasy.

I opted for an open face lid for

the day to be true to the spirit of

the bikes we were riding fulling

expecting to have my teeth

and beard properly splattered

with bugs and my eyes dried

out by the wind, the fairing and

windshield worked perfectly

to keep me protected from the

wind and bugs …… However!!!

….. When I ducked down behind

the screen to be a bit more

aerodynamic for a bit of a top

speed run I ended up with my

beard flapping in my eyes from

the wind coming in from below

the fairing into the cockpit,

this necessitated some rapid

deceleration testing the Street

Glides stability under quite harsh

braking from about 180kmh with

only one hand on the bars and

she performed perfectly. This

too was the case when we found

some long open sweeping bend

between the Suikerbosrand

Mountains, because of a bit

of traffic I couldn’t quite get

enough speed to drag the foot

pegs/floorboards on the deck,

but I could get some fun lean

angle out of the big girl with

perfect stability. My issue came

with manoeuvrability in tight

spots, I found the Street Glide

to be uncomfortably heavy and

cumbersome, especially in off

camber situations … and I am

not a small person. All in all it

is a great bike to head out on a

Sunday cruise to the dam or the

occasional trip to ET.

44 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Shado says:

When you think of a Harley

Davidson, images of cruising

open roads, tassels and chrome

are probably the first things that

come to mind. The 114 Street

Glide Special is a machine that

ticks all of those boxes, and then

some. Admittedly, a pilot of 63kg

and the Street Glide are not the

ideal combination; it proved

to be an interesting challenge

to right the bike off of the side

stand. And well, turning the

machine around is also not as

easy as apple pie either.

Technically, the Street Glide

is a glorified couch with a fully

interactive colour TFT touch

screen interface that replaces

needles and gauges. The

system allows for full Bluetooth

connectivity, USB interface and a

‘proper’ navigation system. The

connectivity is complimented

with two 6.5in BOOM standard

25W speakers to ensure you

can hear whatever you want

to, at any speed, clearly! Once

I became accustomed to the

controls situated on the left and

right switchgear, operation and

moving between applications on

the infotainment was easy. Albeit

a lot to take in, it is a breeze, once

you’re in it! The same keyless

transponder tech used in the 48

Sportster is employed with the

114 Street Glide.

The ride, well… Being a 380kg

machine, you can imagine that

when this thunder rolls, it rolls

with intent. The intent, as I see it,

is to get you to your destination

comfortably, stylishly and

entertained. You’re guaranteed to

turn heads, and garner envy with

the Street Glide Special, wherever

it is you may find yourself.

The motor is a pearler at

just over 1800cc; it’s kind of in

the league of a Boulevard, but

not quite. It’s all-American iron,

and gets you rocketing down

the road quicker than you’d

imagine, for its size and mass.

Massive, that’s the word. It is

not a machine that you would

want to drop in front of your

mates, or anywhere for that

matter. I found the 114 motor

to be a little more refined than

the Sportster, with a hydraulic

clutch and a much smoother,

effortless power delivery

available all the way through

the gears. The gearbox features

a 6-speed transmission with

gears a long as a Texas ranch.

The shifting is smooth and as

“The ride, well... Being a

380kg machine, you can

imagine that when this

thunder rolls, it rolls with

intent. The intent, as I see

it, is to get you to your

destination comfortably,

stylishly and entertained.”

refined as one could get on such

a large machine. Heel-toe shift

lever makes it easy to select

and the feedback from the box

when shifting through the gears

is much less than the sportster,

but not as clinical as a Japanese

Boulevard, for example. Very low

revving engine and masses of

torque at your disposal will also

get in the range of 20km per litre

of the liquid gold.

The road manners of the

machine are great, and it is a

planted as can be. It’s an easy

ride, and comfortable as the

lazy-boy your dad had when you

were a young lad. It effortlessly

swept through the Vaal meander

toward Heidelberg and never

once presented itself as an

unruly beast. I mentioned

earlier about the weight being

a factor on the Street Glide, so

it goes without saying that you

don’t park the machine where

you’d have to turn it around,

or perform a 76 point turn.

The Street Glide has adequate

braking available at all speeds

and is responsive , with the

ABS available to stop you in

precarious situations. But let’s

face it, you have to really grab

a handful of lever or stomp the

pedal to get the ABS close to

working. It’s a heavy machine, no

two ways about it.

The suspension is

adjustable, but in the limited

time we had the machine, I

didn’t bother tinkering with it.

I did note that it was a little on

the rigid side, a little too much

so for my liking. But, IF, you’re

going to drop the dollars on

this beast, it stands to reason

that you let your friendly

local Harley Mechanic do the

adjustments when you take

delivery of the machine to set

it up for your weight. The only

recommendation I can really

make for this machine is that

there isn’t a sissy bar in its

standard trim. I discovered that

the pillion seat has a sloping

angle and sitting behind the

behemoth Hendley, I found

myself sliding to the rear,

having my hands occupied all

the time to stay put and control

a camera. It would be a nice

standard trim item.

All in all, the street glide is a

great machine; I wouldn’t have a

second thought about hitting a

long road trip on this guy, at all.

There is ample packing space in

the panniers and you’d probably

be able to pack your side-chick

in the pannier, and your fresh

jeans and jocks in the other. It

is purpose built, and fulfils that

purpose, with ease. But, you will

only know what that purpose

is, once you have one in your

garage, now won’t you?!

SOME NUMBERS

Engine: Milwaukee-Eight® 107

Displacement: 1745cc

Torque: 150Nm / 3250rpm

Length: 2450mm

Seat height: 695mm

Fuel capacity: 22.7l

Dry weight: 361.0kg

Price: From R383,000

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 45


Harley Davidson

Forty-Eight (1200

Sportster)

Then it was my turn to ride the

‘Forty-Eight’ which did concern

me because of its diminutive

size, I thought I might end up

wearing it like a G-string. I

needn’t have worried though,

it seems they have built this

bike for the taller person and

was immediately comfortable

dropping down onto the seat

which is barely knee high to a

grasshopper. My two vertically

challenged riding mates for the

day complained that the Forty-

Eight felt awkward and quite

uncomfortable to them.

I really enjoyed the seating

and riding position on the Forty-

Eight, it is low and aggressive

but really quite comfortable for

this style of bike. Being a naked

bike, wind does become a bit of

a problem from about 150kmh

onwards, and does require a bit

of grit to corner quickly … but it

was not designed for that type

of riding. This is a cruiser for

heading down to your favourite

hangout spot, a Sunday morning

breakfast run or being trailered

to your favourite bit of the

country to do a bit of cruising

along the mountain passes. It

would take a very dedicated

and hard-core biker to do long

distance touring on the Forty-

Eight as it is more suited to day

to day commuting and shorter

rides, the wind and seating

position would tire your arms

and quite back quickly and the

small fuel tank would require

very regular top-ups, even at

a very reasonable 20km’s to

a litre of fuel. The Forty-Eight

is a simple, easy to ride, good

looking bike that is a lot of fun

to ride.

“...it seems they have

built this bike for the

taller person and was

immediately comfortable

dropping down onto the

seat which is barely knee

high to a grasshopper.”

Shado says:

Tough as it may be for a sport

bike rider to throw a leg over

this iconic iron … it was done.

A sunny Tuesday morning saw

us arrive at the ROC Harley

Davidson to take the 48 sporty

and the 114 Street Glide out

for a day. To get a good feel of

the machines, we first headed

into the suburbs for some

photographs and unabashedly

spirited suburban riding. The

Southern suburbs of Jozi are

littered with short streets and

hills that in short, teach you the

command of a machine like a

252kg Harley Davidson quicker

than jumping in the deep end

of a croc-infested stream in

the DRC.

That being said, once one

comes to terms with the weight

of this American cast iron, it

46 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


becomes a lot easier to handle,

and once you have done a few

stop-starts on the hilly terrain

around Bassonia. Personally,

I found the 48 to have decent

manners in the parking lot, as

well as on the streets. However,

it was a little nervous on the

highway and on bumpy streets,

when the taps are open. I found

the comfortable cruising speed

to be around the 130km/h mark

on the open road. The air and oilcooled

Sportster only enjoyed

five gears in the transmission,

put to the floor by the belt drive

system we know on Harleys.

The motor does exactly what

it was intended to do; plenty

of torque and low rpm range

of use. When the rpm’s picked

up, the machine behaved like a

tractor on ‘roids, slowly going

through the motions, with

an expected taper of power

in the upper rev range. The

transmission is also classic

Harley and good solid shifts are

the order of the day, with chunky

responses to any shift. Put it

this way, you know for sure that

you’re changing gears.

Ergonomics of the machine

are better suited to the taller

rider and I found myself a little

hunched over and two fists

literally forward, into the breeze.

On the cruise, I was able to rest

the back of my ankles on the

foot pegs as opposed to keeping

pressure on the soles of my

boots so that they stayed on the

pegs. The machine is quite low

so there were no issues with

tip-toeing at the lights. The seat

height is 710mm. At our first fuel

stop in the quaint little ‘dorpie’

of Henley-on-Klip, the sporty

returned about 20km/l, which

was under quite spirited riding

conditions. Not too terrible for

a machine of its weight and

the five-speed transmission. I

surmise that the machine could

do a lot better if fuel-economy

was the order of the day. The

tank is quite small at a little

shy of 8 litres and possibly

managing 150km on a tank.

Reserve is about 2.3 litres.

Controls are standard and the

dash is plain, with a speedo only.

There are the direction indicators

and oil, neutral and high beam

indicators. And, chrome, let’s not

forget the chrome. There is also

no longer need for a key to turn

the machine on as they have

transponders, which should be

kept on the rider’s person for the

machine to activate. Keys are

used for locking the steering.

In my humble opinion, the

48 is a classic ride, and more

focussed at moving around

town than going out on the

open road. Suspension suits

the machine, and I only saw it

become rude on the bars after

meeting with a bridge-bump at

speed. But for the rest, it was

enjoyable; not my first choice,

but I could have it for a lap to

the local and possibly, a cruise

around JHB on the N1.

SOME NUMBERS

Engine: Air-cooled, Evolution®

Displacement: 1202cc

Torque: 94Nm / 3750rpm

Length: 2165mm

Seat height: 710mm

Fuel capacity: 7.9l

Dry weight: 247.0kg

Price: From R164,500

In conclusion

Harley Davidson is a lifestyle

with cult status in the biking

fraternity. These were two really

enjoyable bikes to ride if they

are used for that which they are

designed and would be a nice

addition to any biker’s garage.

R.O.C, (Ride of Choice), Harley

Davidson kindly loaned us these

two from their demo fleet. Give

them a call on 010 492 4300,

or pop into their very upmarket

dealership on the corner of

Voortrekker and Louis Trichardt

streets, Alberton, (just off the

N12 at Voortrekker rd), with your

bike licence and ask for a demo

ride … you will be hooked.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 47


Lust

Worthy

THE INDIAN FTR 1200

Finally we’ve got our hands on the new Indian FTR1200 flattracker

inspired machine. Hype surrounding this machine has been

immense and we’ve heard nothing but praise about it from the lucky

journos who sampled it at the World Launch test earlier this year. It

was now Rob’s turn to found out if it was worth the wait...

Pics by Beam Productions.

48 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


The streets around Melrose Arch in

JHB will never be the same. They have

been tainted and harassed by one

very excited, semi-hooligan SA journo

on a very excitable, happy to be allout-hooligan

motorcycle.

Yes, the journo I am speaking of

is myself and the motorcycle is the

all-new flat-tack inspired machine by

Indian Motorcycles – the FTR 1200.

FTR stands for “flat track racer”,

but even the Indian FTR 1200 Race

Replica I tested here is much more

than that and not the narrowfocused

bike many might think.

I have been excited to ride this

machine ever since I first laid eyes

on the concept version released a

few years back. That excitement

grew to desperation when the first

official pics of the production model

surfaced and even more so after

reading Donovan Fourie’s world

launch test which we feature a few

months back. Jealous? For sure, so

ever since then I have been hounding

the team at Indian Motorcycles

SA for my shot at riding this very

impressive looking machine.

Finally, the call came and I was

handed the keys to the FTR12000 Race

Replica, which is the top spec version

of the FTR1200 range, equipped with

mean looking double Akro pipes and

fully adjustable Sachs suspension,

among other pleasantries.

Motoring out of the very

impressive Indian Motorcycles

dealership in Melrose Arch I was

surprised at how well the big 1200cc

bike handled the tame duties of riding

through traffic and tight, twisty roads.

It immediately got me thinking that

this could very well be a reasonable

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 4 9


It’s a very

impressive piece of

kit - build quality

is sensational and

features like the

touch screen dash

are a real treat.

commuter with its high riding position, easy to use

clutch and gearbox.

The suspension felt very adaptable, soaking up the

endless speed bumps and other imperfections in the

roads around Melrose with ease. It did get a bit spongy

and washy when I started pushing full tilt around fast

corners, but after a few clicks on the suspension she

was steering and carving through the twisty’s with

more determination and conviction. Even the standard

fitted Dunlop ‘knobblies’ really impressed me having

felt very hesitant to push too hard on the tar with them.

An all-round very impressive handling package!

Braking from the big Brembo brakes is sublime and

the ABS was there but did not interfere unnecessarily.

I quickly put the bikes braking system into Supermoto

mode and this not only brought out the hooligan in me

but also the FTR. Sideways smoking rear tyre heading

into turns soon became the order of the day, and this is

when the terrorizing of the neighborhood began.

The 120hp power and 120Nm punch from the

1203cc 60-degree V-twin motor just made the smile on

my face grow bigger and bigger every time I thrashed

the throttle. Yes, one has the option of the nanny

electronic aids to baby sit you along, but a machine like

this thrives when all of that is switched off and set free

to enjoy. Plus it’s really easy to use the power on hand.

Like a proper gym bunny high on NPL pre-workout,

the throttle response packs a mean punch and just adds

even more flavour to the thrilling riding experience.

It’s a versatile machine that fits in many cultures

and adapts. The business man looks right at home

riding it through Melrose Arch and Sandton dressed

in his suit and tie, while the hooligan all-action freak

will drool at just how well the FTR transforms from

everyday brilliance to hooligan supreme.

It goes from town terrorists to town lover at the touch

of a button, using the delightful touch screen dash to

50 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Contact Jannie Krynauw on 084 011 1844 today for a free highly competitive quote, or alternatively contact

Quicksure on 011 748 4700.


THE RIVALS

The Indian FTR 1200 faces stiff

competition in what is now the

ever growing popular flat-tracker /

scrambler market.

Triumph offers their new Scrambler

1200 while Ducati has their

Scrambler 1100 and BMW their R

Nine T Scrambler.

We have tested all these new

models and can say it’s tough to

call which one is the best, but what

we can say for sure is that we had a

blast on all of them and can highly

recommend getting either. To help

you out a bit, here is a recap of some

specs and prices of the others.

change riding modes. It’s a

hooligan bike for hooligans

– an everyday delight for

everyday delight riders and a

‘get me to work in style and

fast’ for those wanting that – in

other words, it’s a machine

that a wide variety of riders will

appreciate.

It’s a machine that

demands attention - from

reading the very impressive

spec sheet to the first second

your eyes gaze in awe upon

its beauty, boldness and

supreme build quality for the

first time. This is all amplified

the moment your lucky ass

hits that oh-so-comfy seat!!!

The lack of quick-shift

and auto-blip as standard

is the only blemish in what

was otherwise a perfect

portrait. Luckily the clutch

and gearbox are so smooth

and easy to operate making it

just that, a tiny blemish.

I suggest you contact

Indian Motorcycles SA

immediately to book a test

ride if you are in the market

for a new thrilling ride this

year. There is not much else

out there that looks and

thrills as much as the FTR

1200 as an everyday ride I can

promise you that much.

It’s a true Lust Worthy

machine in every way!

INDIAN FTR 1200

Engine: 1203cc Liquid Cooled

V-Twin

Power: 120hp @8,250rpm

Torque: 120 Nm @ 6000 rpm

Wheelbase: 1524mm

Seat height: 805/840mm

Fuel capacity: 13l

Dry weight: 225kg

Price: From R209,900

TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER 1200 XE

Engine: 1200cc Liquid-cooled,

8 valve, SOHC, 270° crank angle

parallel-twin

Power: 90hp @7,400rpm

Torque: 110 Nm @ 3950 rpm

Wheelbase: 1570mm

Seat height: 870mm

Fuel capacity: 16l

Dry weight: 207kg

Price: From R209,000

DUCATI SCRAMBLER 1100

Engine: 1079cc L-Twin, Desmodromic

distribution, 2 valves per

cylinder, air cooled

Power: 86 hp @ 7,500 rpm

Torque: 88 Nm @ 4,750 rpm

Wheelbase: 1514mm

Seat height: 810mm

Fuel capacity: 15l

Dry weight: 189kg

Price: From R199,000

BMW R NINE T SCRAMBLER

Engine: 1170cc air-cooled twincylinder

boxer engine

Power: 108 hp @ 7750 rpm

Torque: 116 Nm @ 6000 rpm

Wheelbase: 1522mm

Seat height: 820mm

Fuel capacity: 17l

Dry weight: 210kg

Price: From R204,400

52 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


THE ROAD ISN’T CALLING.

IT’S BEGGING.

THE FLAT TRACKER FOR THE STREET HAS ARRIVED. Call now for more information. FINANCE AVAILABLE. TRADE-INS ACCEPTED.

JOHANNESBURG

Indian Motorcycle Melrose Arch

5 The High Street,

Melrose Arch

010 020 6195

melrose@indianmotorcycle.co.za

www.indianmotorcycle.co.za


Big Bro Lil Sis

EuroTour

Our Kurt Beine took off on a 2700KM trip through 5 countries

in Europe. His choice of bike, of course, a KTM 1290 S and his

little sister chose the smaller 790 S. What a cool way to spend a

Heartaversary… highly recommended… read on!

54 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


The idea of doing a Europe

trip by bike started last year

when I thought it to be a cool

idea to celebrate my 2nd heart

attack anniversary, known to

those who’ve had serious heart

attacks as a ‘Heartaversary’. It is

a 2nd chance at life and this day

is the 3rd of July for me…

It started out as just a trip

to Germany to meet family I’d

never met and some I’d already

met. The trip then migrated into

family get-togethers followed by

a bike tour to as many countries

as I could include in 2 weeks. I

ran this idea by my sister, Anne,

who lives in Germany, who was

all fired up as she’s been trying

to get me to Germany for years.

I then got hold of KTM SA and

took a wild chance by asking

if KTM Austria would be kind

enough to lend me a bike. Riaan

Neveling organised a KTM 1290

S but few weeks later it dawned

on me that Anne could ride as

well, so another call was made

and she was promised the newly

launched KTM 790 S.

A basic route was discussed

and Austria, Germany, Italy,

Switzerland and Liechtenstein

were decided on. We agreed not

to book any accommodation,

uncertain of where we would be

each night and would just wing

it. Booking.com was the source

of accommodation each night

and that worked very well. I

purchased a Garmin Europe Map

for my Garmin 595, but given the

cost of this map, Garmin really

needs to up its game. There

were a lot of errors, speed limits

being the biggest one!

Had I obeyed Garmin, I would

have been locked up!

I arrived in Düsseldorf,

Germany on 26th June, spent 5

days acclimatising spent time

with my family and popped off

to Venlo in Holland, just down

the road.

Day 1

July the 1st saw Anne and I

flying to Salzburg in Austria,

catching a very expensive taxi, a

Mercedes station wagon no less,

to Mattighofen, the birthplace of

all KTMs. To give you an idea, 40

kilometres cost us eighty euro’s.

In Rands, that is a lot…

Harald, the PR guy from KTM

handed over our two KTMs and

gave Anne a quick rundown of

all the wonderful features on

her 790 S. She used to ride a

Suzuki DR 650 years ago which

is archaic by today’s standards.

My bike in SA is a KTM 1290 R, so

I needed no rundown.

We packed our luggage into

the panniers on the 1290 and

Roxstrapped our ATG 40L dry

bags onto the rear luggage racks

on both bikes and left KTM.

It was the first time that

I’d ever legally ridden on the

‘wrong’ side of the road, so I

thought it best to tape a white

arrow pointing to the right on

the screen, just in case. Anne

and I had Sena Bluetooth units

for comms which came in handy

because riding on the right

side takes getting used to and

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 55


Anne shouted at me quite a few

times…

I lived to tell the tale and

only messed up a few times

throughout the trip.

We headed towards

Innsbruck in Austria; bad

weather had us looking for

shelter in Rosenheim and the

friendly staff at a large Hilti

dealer took us in, served us hot

coffee and gave me a Hilti pocket

knife which came in handy over

the next 2 weeks. Germany is

too cool!

When the rain let up, we

headed off again, purchased a

14 day toll ticket before turning

onto the highway. We decided

to call it a day in Schwaz

(Austria) and as we’d been up

since 3.30am, been in 2 taxi’s,

1 aeroplane and ridden over

200km on the KTMs. We were

exhausted! Travelling in Europe

is so different to SA, 200km

can take the whole day, their

speed limits are either 50kmh or

30kmh off the highway, but 130

km/h on highways. EVERYONE

obeys the law as speeding fines

are heavy in Europe. Besides, we

were there to enjoy the scenery

and not rush everywhere which

would have resulted in us seeing

very little.

We found suitable

accommodation at Haus

Alpenblick, had pizzas and

retired for the night, it had been

a long day!

Day 2

I’d heard a lot about Stelvio

Pass (Italy) after which bikes

and cars have been named. We

just had to see what it was all

about! After a ‘slight’ detour due

to my still learning how things

work regarding road signs in

Europe and a slight altercation

with Garmin, we detoured to

Landeck in Austria, had lunch,

rode over Resia Pass and then

headed towards Stelvio. Boy,

it was everything I’d been told

it was - hairpin bends and you

half expect to see your own

taillight in front of you. Steep

ascents, breathtaking views into

the valley and snow-capped

mountains all around. We

climbed to 2760m above sea

level in about 27km and we were

welcomed at the top with hot

coffee and German hotdogs,

featuring Reindeer meat no

less. Stelvio Pass had been

conquered!

Anne was in her element,

just loving the capabilities of the

KTM 790 S. Stelvio Pass just has

to be done on a bike, even better

on a KTM - awesome bikes,

awesome Pass! Put it onto your

bucket list. Go on!!

We then descended into a

small village, Bormio in Italy

which was like being at Monte

Casino in Johannesburg, just

a whole lot better. Centuries

old, cobblestone roads, little

alleys, solid wooden doors still

in use and themed restaurants

everywhere.

Hotel Gufo was our

accommodation for the night

after an amazing day.

Day 3

A very special date for me! After

breakfast, we packed and left

Bormio riding through tunnel

after tunnel, not my sister’s

favourite, but we found it helped

a lot that I coaxed her through

each one via the comms.

Claustrophobia is not a good

thing to suffer from with all

these tunnels. We stopped in

Tirano at a friendly KTM dealer,

Pensini, where Angelo quickly

checked and adjusted our

chains at no charge. It was now

almost midday, an ice-cream

shop was found and my 2nd

‘Heartaversary’ was celebrated

in style, sparklers and all. It was

great to be alive, in Europe, in

good company and riding KTMs.

Life is good!

56 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


Our plan was to hit Venice. After

some spectacular villages, riding over

Aprica Pass to Edolo, then over the

Di Tonale Pass to Trento we stopped

for refreshments. There we wound

up at a toll gate leading onto the

A22 highway… Having never seen

unmanned toll gates before we had

to enquire how they work which was

quite a task. Anne was exhausted

and wanted to go no further! After

learning that you simply stop at

the boom, press a button, take your

ticket, and pay the (expensive) fee

wherever you exit the highway. Also

unmanned. Would it work here?

I convinced my sister that we

could still go a bit further towards

Venice. The weather wasn’t good

but on we soldiered and at Verona

Anne had had enough. To push her

any further would have been foolish

as she was physically finished, but

she’d done so well the last few days.

We found accommodation in Verona

down some one-way back alley road.

There was a little brass plaque

outside a door, ‘Forever B&B’, and our

fears were allayed when the owner

arrived with keys in hand. He showed

us up to this beautiful apartment on

the 1st floor overlooking the one-way

street and our bikes.

It had marble floors, comfortable

beds and a restaurant right outside

on the pavement where we ate that

night. What more could we ask for?

Day 4

We were up early even though

it was not far to Venice. Back on

the highway, we went and arrived

in Venice mid-morning, found

accommodation at the Primavera

Hotel in Mestre on the mainland

close to the bridge which takes you

to Venice. We changed and caught

a bus to Venice. It was sweltering

hot, high 30s once again, but we

nevertheless enjoyed the city. My

Fitbit recorded just over 20 000

steps for the day! Google Maps on

my phone helped us navigate Venice

which is just a maze of little streets.

There are hundreds of souvenir

shops, selling everything any tourist

would want. We walked to San

Marco Square which was quite

crowded, took in the sights, watched

pigeons land on people’s arms that

were being rewarded with food as

there were restaurants everywhere

and saw seagulls the size of turkeys,

simply breathtaking!

After dinner in Venice and being

serenaded by musicians, which

just has to be done, we caught the

bus back to our hotel and enjoyed

refreshments on the terrace.

Day 5/6

After an early breakfast, we made a

quick trip to the German Consulate

in Venice to report Anne’s loss of her

backpack, complete with passport,

ID, license and all her money the

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 57


previous day. We did get it

back… a friendly waiter found

it, minus the cash. Happens

everywhere.

The bikes packed, we headed

off towards Lake Garda, riding

most of the route we’d done the

previous day. Garmin having

a mind of its own again, sent

us up the wrong side of Lake

Garda but we eventually found

our way across to the top of the

lake, then rode along the lake

edge, through tunnels and just

savoured the sheer beauty of

Italy. We found ourselves in a

quaint little town called Limone

Sul Garda.

Garmin failed to find our

accommodation and I doubt

whether a mountain goat would

have either. We negotiated some

narrow, steep pathways up

the mountain with a KTM 1290

loaded with panniers. It was

quite a challenge!

I left Anne on an easier road

further down the mountain but

then we gave up and headed

back to town and found Hotel

Susy right on the main road

where we booked in. It was now

around 38°C, late afternoon and

ice-creams were the only way to

cure this issue!

We elected to take the next

day off, to just chill out and

recharge our batteries. Limone

is centuries old and a church

nearby had its bells ringing every

half hour but thankfully not at

night. We meandered down to

the waterfront through narrow

alleys littered with souvenir

shops and little restaurants.

The waterfront was gorgeous,

flowers and Oleander trees

everywhere, restaurants and

various shops as far as the

eye could see and crystal clear

water in which you could see

fish a few metres deep. SA could

use a lesson or two on how to

look after our natural heritage.

Limone should be on everyone’s

bucket list of places to go!

Day 7

Had us looking for a Western

Union outlet where we could

draw replacement funds for

the money my sister had lost.

After cruising along through

endless mountains on the

right, Lake Garda on the left,

we found Western Union in a

tiny tobacco shop.

With finances sorted we

headed towards Lake Como,

another beautiful lake in

Northern Italy. We went via

Brescia, Bergamo and had

burgers at McDonalds in

Lecco. The Italian countryside

is fantastic, snow-capped

mountains, green farmlands,

winding countryside roads,

tunnel after tunnel and for most

of the journey my GPS was set

to avoid motorways to take

twisty roads.

The best way to tour Europe,

no doubt.

We wound up in Abbadia

Lariana and booked into the

Park Hotel. It was Sunday and

everyone in town was on the

beach, or stone beach as we

later saw, but who cares! The

scenery was magnificent.

We had dinner with Anne’s

friends from Bergamo that night.

Day 8

We packed and rode quite early,

it was to be a long day.

We rode to the top of Lake

Como, then on to Lake Lugano

in Switzerland. Such fantastic

scenery. We rode back into Italy

towards Lake Maggiore and

stopped in Laveno-Mombello

inItaly, where we found Hotel

Meuble Moderno, quite a small

hotel with a lift that 2 people

could barely fit into. Later on

we had a street café supper

and parked off next to the lake

and watched the sunset which

at this time of year, is around

10pm. People were still walking

their dogs and children riding

bicycles; it’s a whole different

world!

Day 9

We awoke to the noise of street

stalls being erected below our

hotel window and upon further

inspection discovered a huge

event; street stalls stretched for

blocks, a flea market on a grand

scale, so we were lucky to be

able to get our bikes out from

the underground parking.

We’d seen the hotel brochure

of things to see in Laveno-

Mombello and there was an

ancient monastery, S Caterina

del Sasso, just up the road. It is

built into the cliff face and is still

in use but open to the public.

Well worth a visit!

Left: The middle

of summer with

snow on top of

the mountains.

58 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


We then boarded a ferry and

crossed Lake Maggiore to Intra

rather than taking the long way

round by road. Switzerland was

next! We went through our

first manned border control.

Switzerland is not of the EU, they

do their own thing. Simplon Pass

stretches from the border. Too

beautiful. The Swiss Alps still

had snow on the peaks – it is

picture book scenery all around!

Our destination for the day

was Crans-Montana where our

mother had nursed at a TB clinic

in the 50’s after twice recovering

from TB herself. We now had to

adjust to French, the common

language used here, and we

managed to find accommodation

at a reasonable price at the

Robinson Hotel. Lucky for us, the

receptionist was from Uganda

and spoke English!

Day 10

They had a horse event

happening nearby and we saw

some fancy trailers carrying

horses pass by. Even the horses

live the high life in Switzerland.

We found and walked through

Hotel Valaisia where our mother

nursed, now a Spa and Wellness

Centre. We then travelled to Vex

not far away and again enjoyed

the Swiss mountain passes

before having lunch. Our parents

actually met each other in Vex in

1957 so it was great to be where

it all started.

What made our parents

leave Switzerland and move to

South Africa makes us wonder

to this day. Our next stop

was Leysin where our mother

nursed at Alexander House,

now a residence. Occupants

invited us in to show us around

and the original lift is still in

use. We booked into the Castel

du Park, fully self-catering,

managed to get supplies from

the local supermarket and have

a more affordable dinner and

breakfast the next morning.

We took a walk around town,

listened to the cow bells as the

cows went about their business

late into the night. I wondered if

the cows had hearing problems

from these bells!

Day 11

We caught the cable car up to

La Berneuse, 2045m above sea

level, which in winter is covered

in snow, skiing heaven! For

now there were people using it

as a parasail launch. The views

are simply breath taking! We

then headed towards Stans via

Schönried, Thun and Luzern. We

intended to stop over in Luzern

but accommodation rates were

astronomical, so we continued

on to Stans, a small village

nearby.

Booking.com took us to

the William Tell Lodge where

our room was right next to

a pavement restaurant. It

was a very old building but

comfortable with everything

we needed. I enquired about the

safety of our 2 KTMs and was

told, “this is Switzerland, nothing

gets stolen here”! After dinner

we took a stroll around town

until after dark, listening to more

cow bells.

Day 12

Took us to Engelberg, a popular

skiing town not far from Stans.

We rode over a twisty mountain

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 5 9


pass en route, just right to whet

the appetite for breakfast. After

bacon and eggs (R740.00 gulp)

we took a walk around the town

where my sister had been in her

teens, but things have changed

and she had no recollection

of anything. We then headed

towards the 5th country on

our route, Liechtenstein via

Beckenried and boarded a ferry

to cross the Vierwaldstädtersee

(Lake) to be greeted by heavy

rain in Gersau. We rode via

Schwyz and Buchs to Vaduz,

the capital of Liechtenstein, a

country the size of a shoe box

and a tax haven for many, so

I’m told. Booking.com found us

heading up a very twisty 12 km

mountain pass in heavy rain.

We were very thankful for the

traction control and excellent

ABS on our KTMs - and we

finally arrived in a ski resort

village called Maldun where

we checked in to the Walserhof

Hotel. The Fräulein in charge,

offered us schnapps to warm

up as we were wet and cold. A

mandatory walk around the

town listening to more cow bells

took place after the rain stopped

followed by more schnapps and

dinner at the hotel.

Day 13

Saw me at the local tiny

supermarket getting breakfast

supplies which were much

cheaper than the hotels. We

found an easier route down

the mountain and the view was

amazing. We could see for miles

into the valley below which had

acres of greenery surrounded by

mountains. We headed towards

Starnberg in Germany where our

cousin and her husband live and

rode via Feldkirch, Bregenz and

Kempten. It rained heavily for

the last 20km and we just didn’t

feel like stopping and putting on

our rain suits with such a short

distance to go.

Thanks to yet another

misunderstanding with Garmin,

we finally arrived at our cousin

dripping wet. We changed and

were taken out to see Lake

Starnberg and thereafter spoilt

with a sumptuous dinner.

Their pet dog joined us

as dogs are allowed in most

restaurants in Germany because

they are literally part of the

family.

Day 14

A sad but good day. We

headed back to Mattighofen via

Salzburg, where we dropped off

our luggage at the Hotel. We

were sad that our trip was at an

end, 2712.7 km later.

As a finale to this amazing

trip, KTM organised a free tour

with our own personal guide,

Vlad, around the KTM Motohall

in Mattighofen, truly a biking

pilgrimage for any KTM rider

who finds him/herself in Austria.

With heavy hearts, we

returned to Salzburg by train and

took a bus back to the hotel. We

60 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


changed out of our biking gear

for the last time and took a walk

around the city and dinner next

to the Salzach river.

We came across traditional

folk dancing in the city centre and

then headed back to the hotel for

some well earned sleep.

On the last day we caught at

train to Munich and then the ICE

(Inter City Express) train back to

Dusseldorf which I clocked at

265 km/h on my phone. Almost

as fast as my KTM.

We popped over to

Amsterdam the next day, a very

interesting and amusing city and

I flew back to SA the following

day, the trip of a lifetime behind

me. The biggest question is…

Where to next?’

For anyone thinking of doing a

motorcycle trip in Europe, KTMs

are widely available as rentals at

similar prices to any other brand

and, to me it is a perfect choice.

I was determined to do this

tour on a 1290 and the S suited

the tar conditions just as well as

the R which I own in SA.

The 790 S is such a cool

bike - it suited Anne well and

although she is very tall, she

was totally comfortable on the

790 even though she had not

ridden a motorcycle for many

years. She was comfortable on

the tight twisties, steep ascents

and descents, at slow suburban

speeds, highway speeds, wet

roads, very high temperatures,

all conditions.

The 1290 S’ capabilities are

legendary by now, this bike

will go anywhere. Given the

envious looks we got all along

the route and the amount of

bikers on other brands who

engaged us in conversation

everywhere bears witness to

the popularity of the brand.

Language was not a problem

because my sister is fluent in

German which helped in Austria,

Germany and Liechtenstein. We

got by in Italy, and Switzerland

(French on the west side) as

people there can speak and

understand English albeit at

times very little. Sign language

and Google Translate works

everywhere.

We got by on various

restaurant menus by looking for

the cheapest price, then deciding

if we could eat it. Europe is

pricey, but mostly because the

ZAR is so pathetic. People obey

the road rules there, making it

obvious how lawless we actually

are in SA. Accommodation was

easy to find, even though it was

summer and holiday season.

A GPS is essential, although

Garmin needs to up its game

regarding accuracy. Riding

on the ‘right’ side of the road

becomes easy. you just have

to concentrate when turning at

intersections but most towns

have traffic circles instead

of traffic lights, which keeps

traffic flowing. Lane splitting

didn’t seem to be a problem

either, people are friendly and

everything works!

To anyone thinking of doing a

bike trip in Europe, go for it, and

ride a KTM, it’ll make your trip

just that much better.

Many thanks to KTM SA and

KTM Austria.

This was the best

‘heartaversary’ and celebration

of life I’ve ever had….

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 6 1


POL

ESPARGARO

INTERVIEW

Future

Bright

At the final round of the 2019 MotoGP season held at the Valencia circuit in

Spain, Rob got to sit down with Factory Red Bull KTM rider Pol Espargaró

to chat about his season, the 2020 bike and his new team-mate.

What are your feelings for the

2019 season? Are you happy

with the progress made?

If we look at the overall

championship we reached 100

points, this is a lot more massive

than we reached last year (2018)

so for that I am happy and also to

be very close to the top ten, just

behind riders and teams like SRT

Yamaha and Franco Morbidelli,

which is a team with a rider fighting

for victories, this for me is good.

We have also managed to race and

fight with some factory teams so I

am pleased for this. Of course we

always want more but for the small

amount of time we have been in

this category it’s not bad.

What changes do you think

still need to be made to the bike

to make it more competitive?

For sure the chassis, maybe

it’s a bit weak and is not ready for

all the power, the electronics as

well need to be improved to let me

ride the bike more the way I want

to. The electronics need to adapt

more to the engine, which is getting

more power and torque, but these

things take time for the electronics

to understand the situation so at

the moment we are missing quite

a lot of time on the acceleration,

on the initial throttle opening we

don’t have enough traction or the

traction we wish to have. We also

need to turn the bike faster. We

have to fight very hard to get the

bike into the corner where we want

it and this is a problem at this level.

At this moment, we have to

adapt and take different lines to try

make it work, but at the end this is

not as fast so we need to fix this.

Have you seen progress since Dani

Pedrosa has become test rider?

This is a much better situation for

us. Before we had parts coming

to the track to test during racing

conditions and this was not always

perfect for me. It was not easy for

me to be the test rider and race on

the same weekend, so now that we

have Dani for sure this will make a

big difference.

62 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 6 3


We now have the winning

mentality to have a full test team

with a winning mind like Dani –

this is good for me and the team.

With Dani, they have

developed a completely new

bike for 2020, which until the

testing starts I have not yet seen

or been on. The bike we will have

for next year will be the “Dani”

bike as we are calling it. This is

when we will feel Dani’s input for

the first time and I am looking

forward to it and for sure a rider

like Dani will make a difference.

Dani is not just changing

things with the bike, but also

how the company does things.

He will help guide them to more

winning ways for sure. He will

also help us riders with giving

us tips and advice, which can

only be a good thing as he is

one of the best ever so it’s very

important to have him.

Over the years on the KTM, do

you think you have improved

the bike more or changed your

riding style to adapt to the

problems of the bike?

For sure the bike is much better

and is getting better every

year, but I do also think it’s a

combination of both. To be fast

in MotoGP for sure you need a

fast bike and need to be fast

with it. It’s a very competitive

class and the best riders and

bikes in the world so you need

to work together to get the

best. It’s not enough to just be

a fast rider, you need to learn

to adapt to the bike and the

bike also needs to be able to

adapt to you, so it’s very tricky

to get perfect combination. The

rider needs to know how the

bike needs to be ridden to be

fast because every bike has its

“It’s not enough to just be a

fast rider, you need to learn to

adapt to the bike and the bike

also needs to be able to adapt

to you, so it’s very tricky to get

perfect combination.”

64 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


own character and every bike needs to

be ridden in its own way.

If the rider is very fast, but is not

adapting to the riding system or bike

then the results will not come as we have

seen in the past with Lorenzo, or even

Valentino. This category is at a very high

level, so every second counts and you

need to be one with the team and bike

and this is at the end what matters most.

So why do you think at the 2018 race in

the rain you were able to get the first

podium? Do you think the conditions

suited the bike more because the pace

was made a bit slower?

Actually, we were fast that year in all

conditions, much faster than we were this

year (2019).

In 2018 the track surface was a little

bit more new and this helped us a lot

because the grip was very, very good. One

year later and the grip was not as good

and this made us suffer a bit. For sure in

the 2018 race the rain was huge and not

easy but we could get the result by risking

a bit more than the other riders.

The bike and grip was very good that

year, the tyres are changing every year so

we need to make sure we can adapt to

that as well.

What do you think of Brad Binder

joining you in 2020, and do you think

he will be able to make even more

progress with the bike?

That’s going to be the surprise for

everyone to see. We can all see how he

was riding the Moto2 bike, it’s not that

it’s just better or worse, it’s just that he

has something a bit more. You can see it

when he is riding you feel his aggressive

way of riding is on a whole new level and

this is what we need, especially with the

KTM MotoGP bike as it needs to be ridden

in this way. It’s not an easy bike we know,

but I think Brad has this kind of style,

talent and mentality right now that we

need to make it work better.

Just like Miguel has come in and made

it a bit more better with new input being

a young, fresh new rider with fresh new

views. The youngsters like Brad and

Miguel will for sure bring a fresh new

approach which will change it. I really am

looking forward to riding with Brad to see

what he will do to ride the bike fast and to

compare things with him and see if I can

learn something from that.

Last question. I have my brother here

with me and we are very competitive.

Are you and Aleix the same way?

Do you want to beat each other at

everything you do even if it’s just

scrabble or soccer? Do you come into

a race weekend and think the “first

thing I must do is beat my brother?”

Yeah for sure, always when I come in

after every session and check the TV I

look to see where my brother is and then

it hurts a little more if he is ahead, but you

know this is kind of normal. I have been

fighting against my brother from day one,

he is my big brother so he has always

been the guy I wanted to beat more.

We did everything together so I always

wanted to do it better than him and that’s

what pushed me, so to him I will always

be grateful for being so good to me and

teaching me to be more.

He was my first rival and is still now.

So now how are you going to beat

him? He has had twin babies, so you

need to have three now…?

No, No, I think I will let him win in that

department. When he had the twins I

thought wow, you did even that good,

two in a row, boom straight away job

done. It was such a big one that I say

straight away man, you win, I will go oneby-one

and take the easy life.

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The Rookie

Project 2019

We chat to Keith Botha, the Rookie Racer who completed his first

year of racing in the Bridgestone Challenge class.

Words Rob Portman | Pics Eugene Liebenberg & others

Motorcycle racing is a very

expensive sport/hobby and

to get started is not very easy,

especially when one decides to

give it a bash later on in life.

It’s a sport and passion that

grips you from the word go and

never lets go, no matter how

many obstacles are thrown in

your way, one always makes a

plan to carry on finding ways to

entertain this addiction.

It’s a drug like no other and

we were introduced to a new

addict to the sport of motorcycle

racing early last year and we

formed a great friendship and

working relationship.

Keith Botha is the addict

mentioned above and 2019

was his first crack at racing a

motorcycle in the Bridgestone

Challenge racing series, at

the tender age of 34. We did a

few articles on him last year

showing off his “Rookie Project”

and now we managed to sit

down with the man and ask him

a few questions about his first

full season in the greatest sport

on earth.

RP: So let’s get straight into

it Keith. Who are you? Where

did come from and what is

“The Rookie Project” ?

KB: Firstly, what a blast to

hang out with the “RideFast” Rob

Portman, thank you for having

me! So yeah, where to start….

My name Is Keith Botha,

I’m now 35 years old, grew

up in Centurion, travelled

the world whilst making TV

shows and now live in Melville,

Johannesburg.

For work, I create and design

reality and games shows, I also

manage a production company

Catch22Media that specialises in

branded storytelling and visual

content.

The Rookie Project started

as a concept that consists of a

series of documentary films,

in each film “We” as producers

enable people aged 30 and up to

live out the dreams they could

not do earlier on in life. We just

give them an opportunity to get

what they have always wanted

and then see how it plays out.

In this introduction year

to their dream, they will

essentiality all be “Rookies” for

12 months. They will be getting

one-on-one training in the

field and we also provide them

with professional mentors

and coaches to fast track their

progression and skill levels.

We then document the whole

journey and package it as a

documentary film. Some dreams

stretch from Bodybuilding,

music performance, flying

planes and a few other

things people really want to

experience.

RP: Okay, now we know

your story, but we still don’t

know the reason you, as Keith,

started racing superbikes.

KB: Well, we needed to start

somewhere, we needed to film a

pilot project before anyone took

us seriously for future funding

of the series. So, to save costs It

had to be someone close to the

project and someone that can

kind of film and be the subject all

at once. So it made sense for us,

that it was me and I decided on

Superbike racing.

RP: So, let me get this right,

you decided to literally put

your “life” on the line to proof

a concept?

KB: Yeah, and I’d do it over

again - a million times over!

It was amazing to have to

wear these two caps the whole

66 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


“I managed to have 3 months of

pre-season training at which

time I managed to crash my

bike 4 times... it was not giving

me much hope to be honest.”

time, you know? Like on the

one and the main side, I needed

to be a producer and director

making sure we were getting

all the shots and logistics of the

gear. I had to make sure we were

getting as much as we could

from a story line.

On the other hand, I was a 34

year old dude shitting myself

because now I had to learn how

to ride a bike properly and on top

of that, I had to learn how to race

a bike against other riders.

RP: In reality that sounds

crazy, but I can relate...

editor, race bikes, design,

produce, sell media and ride.

Okay, but back to the reason

of it being biking?

KB: Look, I grew up with bikes

in my life, my Dad, the uncles did

a bit of off-road racing and my

cousins all raced karts and offroad

bikes at that time. When I

was 12 I got my first bike, it was

a post office CB200 Honda and

started riding with my Dad who

had his Z1300 Kawa.

Growing up in Wierda Park

we always had bikes around us

as kids growing up and my Dad

always used to take us camping

at Zwartkops back in the day.

So, long story short, I’ve always

loved racing and had it in my

blood even if my family did not

race superbikes themselves.

RP: When and how did you

approach this project? Did you

do training or get pro classes?

KB: Terrified! No, the reality

set in that it’s all or nothing and

we had to act very fast!

Leroy Rich introduced me

to Action Gareth Jackson #21

and his wife/Boss Zoe, I still to

the end blame them for all of

this, they quickly jumped at the

opportunity to assist me and

linked me up with the owner of

Morphine Racing, Rob Morf.

We also had to quickly build

some sort of a Rookie team and

get some partners on board, so

we as Catch22Media had to ask

some of our clients and friends

to assist.

So the first guys to jump

at the opportunity was Jono

Kirby from Hells Kitchen and

DeadRabbit Distillery, and

also Bradley Leech from

Dream Graphics - Team

Catch22DeadRabbit Racing

was born.

With that being all done, we

needed a place to race. The best

suitable and known option at

that time was the Bridgestone

Challenge - this championship

is open to all new comers to the

sport and the internal support

of the teams, organisers and

the riders was fantastic, it made

sense to use that platform as the

beginning of a project like this.

The training was intense and

scary to be very honest, my street

riding ability is and always has

been legible and I’ve been lucky

to have never been involved in

serious crashes over the years,

but the track riding was a wild

beast! The time came and the

cameras started rolling.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 67


I managed to have 3 months

of pre-season training at which

time I managed to crash my bike

4 times... it was not giving me

much hope to be honest.

But with the step-by-step

training and long hard hours

put in by Rob Morf and Jozi from

Morphine, I managed to start

getting my knee down, and

times were dropping fast.

The so called bug had bitten!

RP: Yes, in racing it’s never

a question “if your going to

fall” but rather when you will

fall. So then, the season, how

did that go?

KB: Rob, all I can say is WOW.

But really, we came in here

with this idea of just piloting

our concept and then once we

started racing it all just changed.

I honestly don’t want to give

away to much, but I can tell you

that a project that was initially

focused on a Rookie rider in

superbike racing very quickly

changed to a person seeing

what racing is really all about.

As a producer of the film, I’m

super excited to show the world

what we did and I’m very proud

of the footage we have.

We have about 30% more

filming and tons of editing to

do, so we hope to get the film

no later than the end of June

2020. But let me just tell you,

the narrative of just following

the Rookie changed very quickly

when we became part of this

insanely close community. The

focus will be the sport in SA as

a whole!

I’ve been so fortunate to

have had the support in this

experiment from the riders, our

team mates Rob, the Jacksons,

the Ogles and our partners

Jono and Brad - they’ve made

this happen.

And you, Rob Portman, you

and your brother Shaun took

me to The Monocle series, that

with all the extra invitations to

get more into it all, just changed

everything, rubbing shoulders

and getting some quality time

with all our local superstars

was just an added bonus, riding

Kyalami and being passed

by Darryn Binder and Steven

Odendaal was definitely some of

the highlights of 2019.

I’d like to say a massive thank

you to ALL the riders out there,

you guys are absolute gladiators

in my eyes and you most

definitely are all hero’s!

As a rider all I can say is,

“I’M NOT DONE”! But seriously,

filming aside, this life changing

experience has completely lured

me into the sport and we will

race both in the Red Square ZX10

championships and also in the

Street class in Monocle series

in 2020.

We fell in love with the sport

so much, that we now also

started a motorsport content

platform called RacedayTV, so

go check it out for updates and

videos relating to the sport.

This will also be the platform

where we launch “The Rookie

Project 2019” so go subscribe

and stay up to date with all our

movements.

RB: Thank you for your time

and the inside of your Rookie

Project, we will see you on

track.

KB: NO, thank you for

having me Rob, and thank you

once again for all the help and

opportunity you have given us

to speak about what we are

busy with.

The things you do for the sport

are great and the industry is very

lucky to have you. There are way

too many people to mention here

so go watch “The Rookie project

2019” for the full story.

68 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


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R173,100

Tuono V4 1100

Tuono V4 1100 Factory

RSV4 1100 FACTORY

G 310 R

G 310 GS

C 400 X Scooter

C 400 GT Scooter

F 750 GS

F 850 GS

F 850 GS Adventure

R 1250 GS

R 1250 GS Adventure

R 1250 R

R 1250 RS

R 1250 RT

R NineT Pure

R NineT

R NineT Scrambler

R NineT Urban GS

R NineT Racer

K 1600 GT

K 1600 GTL

K 1600 B

S 1000 R

S 1000 RR Red

S 1000 RR M Sport

HP4 Race

APRILIA

DUCATI

BMW

R258,000 Monster 821 Stealth R184,700

R288,000 Monster 1200

R209,900

Monster 1200 S

R245,600

Monster 1200 R

Monster 1200 Black

R257,900

R248,600

Hypermotard 950

R194,100

Hypermotard 950 SP R230,900

Supersport

Supersport S

R192,200

R216,200

Multistrada 950

R207,900

R69,300 Multistrada 950 S

R253,200

R80,400

Multistrada 1260

R232,000

R125,000 Multistrada 1260 S R284,700

R136,000 Multistrada 1260 Enduro R283,400

R190,500 Multistrada Pikes Peak R345,300

R202,500 Multistrada Grand Tour R312,900

R223,300

Diavel 1260

R279,900

R269,300

R288,900

Diavel 1260 S

X Diavel

R313,900

R295,900

R212,000

X Diavel S

R339,900

R227,000

959 Panigale

R229,900

R252,400

R175,300

959 Panigale Corse

Panigale V2

R264,900

R255,900

R196,700

Panigale V4 base

R334,800

R204,000

Panigale V4 S

R399,900

R180,350 Panigale V4 Speciale R669,900

R180,200 Panigale V4 R (2019) R669,900

R288,700 Panigale V4 25° 916 R720,000

R311,900 Panigale Superleggera R1,690m

R348,100 1299 Panigale R FE R669,900

R213,600 Streetfighter V4

R292,900

R311,400 Streetfighter V4 S

R342,900

R352,400

R1,3m

STREETFIGHTER V4

Sixty 2 Scrambler

Icon Scrambler

R119,500

R144,900

Full Throttle Scrambler R172,900

Classic Scrambler

R164,900

Desert Sled Scrambler R187,900

Cafe Racer

R187,900

1100 Scrambler

R199,900

1100 Scrambler Special R216,900

1100 Scrambler Sport R230,900

HARLEY-DAVIDSON

Street 750

Street Rod

R109,000

R120,000

Iron 1200

R153,000

Superlow

R147,500

Iron 833

1200 Custom

R151,500

R163,900

Superlow 1200T

R169,000

FortyEight Special

R163,000

FortyEight

Roadster

R163,000

R171,500

StreetBob

R191,000

LowRider

R218,500

Deluxe

Sport Glide

R276,900

R234,500

Fat Bob

R229,500

Fat Bob 114

R263,000

Soft Tail Slim

R249,900

Fat Boy

R280,500

Fat Boy 114

R316,500

Brak Out 114

R316,000

Break Out

Heritage Classic 114

R281,000

R319,500

Heritage Classic

R286,900

Ultra Limited Low

R385,000

Road King

R323,500

Road King Classic

R281,000

Road King Classic

R323,500

Road King Special

R344,500

Street Glide

R354,000

70 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Prices may change so please contact local dealer.


FIRE IT UP IS THE MOST TRUSTED PURCHASER IN SA!

WE PAY INSTANTLY, WE COLLECT, WE COME TO YOU!

www.fireitup.co.za

MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE MODEL

PRICE

Street Glide Special

Road Glide Special

Road Glide

Road Glide Ultra

Ultra Limited

CVO Street Glide

CVO Limited

Free Wheeler

TRI Glide Ultra

FXDR114

HONDA

ACE 125

Elite 125 Scooter

NC750X

NC750X DCT

Africa Twin 1100 Manual

Africa Twin 1100 DCT

Africa Twin 1100 AS Man

Africa Twin 1100 AS ES

XR190

XR150L

XR125L

CRF250L

CRF250 Rally

CBR 1000 RR 2019

CBR 1000 RR-R 2020

CBR 1000 RR-R SP 2020

GL1800 Goldwing M

GL 1800 Goldwinh DCT

HUSQVARNA

R371,000

R375,000

R355,000

R379,000

R385,000

R510,000

R544,000

R407,000

R514,000

R299,900

R24,300

R23,399

R114,480

R123,120

R210,000

R222,499

R236,000

R269,000

R49,620

R32,960

R30,000

R74,999

R85,000

R209,999

TBA

TBA

R367,000

R432,200

FS 450

R122,699

701 Enduro

R141,699

701 Supermotard

R141,699

Vitpilen 401

R89,699

Svartpilen 401

R89,699

Vitpilen 701

R129,699

Svartpilen 701

R149,699

FTR 1200

FTR 1200 Race Replica

Scout Sixty

Scout 1133

Scout Bobber

Chief Dark Horse

Chief Classic

Chief Vintage

Springfield

Springfield Darkhorse

Chieftan Dark Horse

Chieftan

Roadmaster

Z300

Z400 ABS

Ninja 400 ABS

Z650

Z900 ABS

Z900 RS

Z900 Cafe Racer

Z1000R

Z1000SX

Ninja 650

Versys X300

Versys 650

Versys 1000

ZX10R WSB 2018

ZX10R WSB 2019

H2 SX SE

ZZR1400 Ohlins

NINJA H2 SX SE

INDIAN

KAWASAKI

R209,900 125 DUKE

R58,999

R269,900 RC125

R59,999

R169,900 390 DUKE

R76,999

R199,900 RC390

R74,999

R199,900

R299,900

R419,900

R379,900

R389,900

R369,900

R399,900

R399,900

R449,900

R61,995

R79,995

R86,995

R110,995

R145,995

R175,995

R168,995

R179,995

R179,995

R122,995

R85,995

R115,995

R159,995

R229,995

R259,995

R310,995

390 Adventure

790 DUKE

790 Adventure

790 Adventure R

690 Enduro R

890 DUKE

1090 Adventure R

1290 Super ADV S

1290 Super ADV R

1290 SuperDuke R (2019)

1290 SuperDuke R (2020)

1290 SUPER DUKE R

Agility RS 125

Like 125l ABS

G-Dink 300l

Xciting 400l

AK550

KTM

KYMCO

MOTO GUZZI

TBA

R149,999

R179,999

R185,999

R152,999

TBA

R198,999

R234,999

R239,999

R229,999

TBA

R19,950

R34,950

R54,950

R99,950

R154,950

R249,995 V85 TT

R209,000

California 1400 Touring R405,000

MGX 21 Flying Fortress R489,000

V7 Stone lll ABS

R171,150

V7 Rough

R175,875

V7 Milano

R191,625

V7 Carbon lll

R201,950

V7 lll Racer

R208,950

Prices may change so please contact local dealer.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 7 1


SELLING YOUR BIKE? FIRE IT UP IS THE MOST TRUSTED PURCHASER IN SA!

WE PAY INSTANTLY, WE COLLECT, WE COME TO YOU!

www.fireitup.co.za

MODEL PRICE MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE

Dragster Pirelli LE

Dragster 800RR

Dragster 800 RC Limited

Super Veloce 800RR

Brutale 1000RR 208HP

RUSH 1000RR 212hp

MV AGUSTA

Turismo Veloce 800 160HP

R329,900

R299,900

R359,900

R379,900

R479,900

R549,900

R299,900

GTS 300l EV

Max Sym 600l ABS

Crox 125

Fiddle ll 150

Jet14 200

Orbit ii 125

Symphony 150

X-Pro 125

R63,995

R98,995

R17,995

R17,495

R23,995

R14,995

R19,995

R18,995

FJR1300

XMax 300 Scooter

YZF R3

YZF R6

YZF R1 2020

YZF R1M 2020

Niken 3-wheeler

NIKEN 3-WHEELER

R229,950

R89,950

R78,950

R209,950

R319,950

R399,950

R275,000

SUPERVELOCE 800

TRIUMPH

Street Triple RS

R170,000

Speed Triple RS

R219,000

Street Twin

R144,000

Bonneville T100

R145,000

Bonneville T120

R169,000

Bonneville Bobber

R169,000

Bonneville Bobber Black

R184,000

UR110

UB125

GS150

GSX150F

DL650XA L9

DL1000XA L9

SV650A

SUZUKI

R17,950

R19,950

R27,800

R32,900

R124,900

R172,900

R99,500

Bonneville Speed Master

Street Scrambler

Thruxton 1200 R

Tiger 800 XCX

Tiger 800 XCA

Tiger 1200 XCX

Tiger 1200 XCA

Tiger 900

Tiger 900 Rally Pro

Rocket R

R179,000

R169,000

R192,000

R186,000

R205,000

R226,000

R260,000

R192,000

R215,000

R299,000

ZT250 R

ZT310R

ZT310X

ZT310T

ZONTES

R44,900

R63,900

R68,900

R74,900

DEALERS CONTACTS WHO

ADVERTISE WITH US

GSXR750 L9

GSXR1000 L9

GSXS1000 R L9

GSXS1000 L9

Katana

VZR1800

Hyabusa 1300

XS125 K Delivery

NH125

XS200 Blaze

XS200 Trail Blaze

Citycom 300l

SYM

R161,950

R271,900

R327,500

R162,500

R187,500

R194,900

R211,900

R16,495

R25,995

R18,495

R19,995

R54,995

Rocket GT

XTZ125

YBR125G

TW200

XT250

XT1200Z

XT1200ZE

MT07 ABS

MT09 ABS

MT07 Tracer

MT09 Tracer

MT09 Tracer GT

YAMAHA

R315,000

R35,950

R28,950

R59,950

R69,950

R194,950

R228,950

R124,950

R152,950

R144,950

R159,950

R189,950

Aprilia SA (IMI) Tel: 010 443 4596

BMW West Rand Tel: 011 761 3500

Ducati SA Tel: 012 765 0600

R.O.C Harley Tel: 010 492 4300

Honda East Tel: 011 826 4444

Holeshot Husqvarna Tel: 011 823 5830

Indian Motorcycles SA Tel: 010 020 6195

TRD Kawasaki Tel: 011 051 9104

Fire it Up Kawasaki Tel: 011 467 0737

RAD KTM Tel: 011 234 5007

TRAX KTM Tel: 012 111 0190

Moto Guzzi SA (IMI) Tel: 010 443 4596

Fire it Up MV Agusta Tel: 011 467 0737

KCR Suzuki Tel: 011 975 5545

SYM TRD Motorcycles Tel: 011 051 9104

Linex Yamaha Randburg Tel: 011 251 4000

Linex Yamaha Lynnwood Tel: 012 501 0120

Zontes SA Tel: 012 565 6730

72 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Prices may change so please contact local dealer.



ROAD

TRACK

DIRT

GET A GRIP ON 2020!

///RACE

///TRACK

KR451

D213 PRO

///TRACK

///ROAD

GPR 300

ROADSMART 3 ROADSPORT 2

Q3+ Q4

S594/A

///OFFROAD

///TRAIL

AT81 & AT81EX

MX33 MX53 EN91 TRAILMAX MISSION

50/50

DUNLOPTYRESSA

Get a Grip on 2020! Email Nicole Swanepoel at

nicole.swanepoel@srigroup.co.za or contact our call centre on 011 418 3088.

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