Runway S/S20

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The original Runway magazine

YOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO THE NEW SEASON

UNWAY

AUTUMN

SPRING

SUMMER

W I N T E R

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2020 2019


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CONTENTS

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

06

TOP FIVE MOMENTS

Our pick of the best of the catwalk this S/S20

16

THE TRENDS

The searing-hot styles your fashion-forward clients will crave this season

22

HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Go behind the scenes at Bora Aksu, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi and Rose Danford-Phillips

30

RE:CREATE

The mini trends with the maximum gains

36

ANTHONY TURNER

The 2019 Most Wanted Session Stylist on hard work and grasping opportunities

38

MARC JACOBS

Dream team Guido Palau and Josh Wood backstage in New York

40

TEXTURE

We take an in-depth look at the need for textured hair skills backstage

44

JOHANNA CREE BROWN

The hair auteur on the way she approaches the avant-garde

46

WHITE SHOW

The proving ground for Central Saint Martins’ freshers and the L’Oréal Professionnel ID Artists

Cover image: Erdem S/S20, image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

04 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Hello dear Runway readers,

Welcome to a brand new issue and a brand new decade. So, what do the ’20s

have in store for us? Much to roar about judging by the fierce ’dos on the

catwalks as hairstylists looked to both the past and present for their inspiration,

a kind of follicular Back to the Future. Take the ’40s tissue set curls (yes, that’s

tissue of the Kleenex variety) at Miu Miu over on Re:Create (from page 32) or

the ’80s-esque wet-look coiffs on Trends (p16). We saw J.Lo break the internet

(again) as she paid homage to her Millennial self, while our inner child was

rewarded with a huge dollop of nostalgia thanks to the presence of Trolls and

Hello Kitty dolls – a couple of highlights in That Was The Season (p14).

In keeping with the theme of what’s to come, we celebrate the visionaries of

the hair world, including Guido and Josh Wood for their spectacular work on

the Marc Jacobs show (p38), as well as interviews with the fantastical and

Most Wanted award-winning Anthony Turner (p36). We also catch up with

the audaciously avant-garde Johanna Cree Brown of Trevor Sorbie fame, who

works on art projects and films, as well as shows such as Fyodor Golan (p44).

And we honour the mothership that is the Central Saint Martins White Show;

an elite training camp for future talent (p46). To finish, we dive into the need

for hairdressers working backstage to have the skills to work on absolutely ANY

hair texture (p40). And to that we say, here’s looking at you, S/S20.

Cassie Steer

Runway guest editor

Beauty editor

Editor in chief: Amanda Nottage Art: Graeme White Chief sub editor: Adam Wood Contributors:

Kelsey Dring, Deborah Murtha, Anna Samson, Eve Wagstaff Publisher: Catherine Handcock

RUNWAY, 21 THE TIMBERYARD, DRYSDALE STREET, LONDON N1 6ND

020 7324 7540 enquiries@alfol.co.uk

Runway is published twice a year by Alfol Ltd. CreativeHEAD is a registered trademark. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. All information correct at the time of going to press

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

05


TOP FIVE

MOMENTS

IN HAIR &

FASHION

Give it up for the designers that put the ‘show’ into Fashion Week

06 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


VIVA LA RE VOLUCIÓN

ERDEM

Image courtesy of Redken

GREETINGS COMRADES! This season Erdem

gave us a political figure – and wardrobe – to get

behind. Designer Erdem Moralioglu is a fan of

kick-ass women and, for S/S20 he chose to plunder

the life of Tina Modotti, “a romantic and

revolutionary woman of principle”, he claimed

backstage. Modotti was an Italian-born silent

movie star, who went from Hollywood to Mexico

and radical communism. Her eventful life (she met

an untimely death aged 45) was played out across a

tree-lined gravel catwalk like a sartorial This Is

Your Life. A riot of exaggerated puff sleeves and

opulent prints met yoke blouses and embroidered

dresses, all topped with a Cordovan hat. The hair

manifesto? Romance and revolution as Anthony

Turner for L’Oréal Professionnel turned to Modotti

for a clean boyish braid. “It feels quite tough

because of the strict centre-parting and tight braid

but the big bow makes it feel romantic,” he said.

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

07


JUNGLE FEVER

VERSACE

OVER AT CASA DI VERSACE, the designer

transformed the former velodrome Palazzo Delle

Scintille into a futuristic amphitheatre with digital

art projections made using Google’s Tilt Brush. A

huge bronze palm tree structure sat in the middle

as models sashayed down the catwalks in racy

black-belted blazer dresses, leather coat dresses

and miniskirts reminiscent of Versace circa 1992.

These then made way for a plume of green and red

jungle prints, before Donatella interrupted to say

“Okay Google, now show me the real jungle dress’

and the internet broke… Rapturous applause

heralded the arrival of J.Lo herself, wearing an

impossibly skimpy, cut to the navel incarnation of

the jungle print dress she wore to the Grammy

Awards back in 2000. Hair was equally sexy from

Redken global creative director, Guido Palau, who

described the finish as “wet-look hair that’s very

messy, very sexy and very Donatella”.

Image courtesy of James Cochrane

08 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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GENDER BLENDER

SHARON WAUCHOB

Image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

IF YOU WORSHIP at the altar of fashion, Sharon

Wauchob is sure to rank high in your estimations.

Earning her (pin)stripes as an in-house designer at

Louis Vuitton, the Irish designer is best known for

her contemporary take on femininity, admitting

that she has “always liked the androgynous style”.

Rather fittingly, her S/S20 show at the resplendent

St Cyprian’s Church in Marylebone was an equally

opulent ode to non-binary dressing. Her fabrics

were as diverse as the casting, which comprised a

trans-generational mix of actors and dancers of all

sexes. Flirty fringed flapper dresses cavorted with

insouciant drapes of fabric that adorned the more

masculine trench coats and blazers, while wispy

feathered dresses were paired with satin drainpipe

trousers. And for hair? Neil Moodie for L’Oréal

Professionnel stuck with androgyny and a strong

side-parting. “It’s contained and shiny. There’s a

hardness to it,” he divulged. Amen to that.

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

09


KOOKY CUTTER

PRADA

IT’S OFFICIAL: le geek, c’est chic. Haute nerds

aren’t joiners – they’re delightfully idiosyncratic

outliers – but if they were, Prada is the cult they’d

join. Eternally kooky, brimming with nostalgia

and always addled with irreverence, it’s the brand

that celebrates the individual. And this season

more than ever, Miuccia Prada’s directive was

about honing your personal style to reduce

throwaway fashion. The result was a joyfully

eclectic mélange of textures (think cheesecloth,

macramé and velvet) and colours (there were

strong nods to the ’70s in the retro palette of

browns, blues and tangerines). Over on hair,

Guido for Redken was also celebrating the

individual. “There’s a hint of strangeness to the

look which is classic Prada. I added sideburns to

each model to add a little boyishness,” he said.

“There’s a touch of uniformity while still allowing

each model’s personality to shine.”

Image courtesy of James Cochrane

10 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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ALL RISE

MOLLY GODDARD

Image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

LIKE THE PÂTISSERIE CHEF of the fashion

world, Molly Goddard inspires a crowd hungry

for her specialist creations, and this season the

queen of tulle didn’t disappoint. Silhouettes

were effortlessly inflated with the finesse of a

thrice-baked soufflé and frothy lemon yellow skirts

billowed from voluminous satin tops. But it was

Goddard’s first ever foray into the world of denim

that really whet the appetite. Indigo-hued,

ankle-grazing tiered gowns felt as light and airy as

her signature tulle, while the big, blousy 3D denim

flowers that adorned the top half were the icing on

the cake. To finish, the deliciously moreish

two-piece confection in raspberry cream and a

bright red trim sated the exacting FROW.

Meanwhile, over on hair, Luke Hersheson for

L’Oréal Professionnel whipped up an effortlessly

elegant ’do inspired by the elusive off-duty model.

We say: tulle throttle ahead!

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

11


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THAT WAS THE

From childhood toys to vintage J.Lo, nostalgia helped turn up the heat for S/S20

S E A S O N …

Ports 1961

Marc Jacobs

Victoria Beckham

THROWING SHADES

THE ’70S MAY get rather a bad rap in the taste stakes (shag

carpets, polyester suits and avocado bathroom suites spring to

mind) but when it came to eyewear they had it going on. As did

the fabulous sunnies at Ports 1961, Marc Jacobs, Victoria

Beckham, Chloé and Givenchy. Throw no shade…

H I G H

BROW

BROWS ARE literally

inching their way up

the make-up charts

this season. At Molly

Goddard black slivers

skimmed the tops of

the brows for a touch

of ’20s starlet.

Meanwhile at Daniel

Pascal Tanner at

On|Off, Lans

Nguyen-Grealis went

for pencil-thin daubs a

good few millimetres

above the models’

natural brows.

Molly Goddard

PRIM BRIMS

FORGET FOOTLOOSE floppy hats, brazen berets or flirty

fedoras, this season’s headgear was a nod to simpler times. Many

of the puritanical hats on show tended to be of the straw variety,

with cloche-like incarnations at Dior, flat sun hats at Erdem and

boaters at Daniel Pascal Tanner at On|Off. At Prada, the soft,

leather upturned hats had a hint of sou’wester perfect for British

summertime. Serf’s up.

Daniel Pascal Tanner at On|Off

Dior

14 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


THAT WAS THE SEASON

Joshua Kane at the Royal Exchange

LOCATION,

LOCATION

Fyodor Golan

ONE OF THE JOYS of session styling is that you gain exclusive

access to incredible venues – a hirsute Through the Keyhole if you

will – and this season there was everything from tunnels (Fyodor

Golan) and churches (Sharon Wauchob) to luxe shopping centres

(Joshua Kane). Institutional buildings were clearly de rigueur and

while whiffs of chlorine emanated from Molly Goddard’s venue of

choice (Seymour Leisure Centre in Marylebone), Rejina Pyo opted

for the bookish ’60s charm of Holborn Library. But it was Canada

Design’s showcase in Blighty that posed an actual security risk. Set

in Canada House, hair stylist for L’Oréal Professionnel, Daniel

Fiorio, based his team in Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau’s

private office and had to be accompanied up and down the stairs by

security guards. Don’t forget your AAA pass, guys…

Jimmy Paul at On|Off

Images courtesy of Simon Armstrong, L’Oréal Professionnel and Redken

JUST SLAYING…

ALL HAIL QUEEN J.Lo, the woman who

single-handedly took the crown for ruling the runways in

THAT dress. Not content with breaking the internet back

in 2000 (quite literally – her Versace dress at the Grammy

Awards spawned the birth of Google Images), Jenny

From The Block went and did it again at the Versace

show with 2020’s scantier and sexier navel-grazing

rendition. Another day, another slay!

Courtesy of Instagram @jlo

Sharon Wauchob

SOFT PLAY

PREPARE TO INDULGE in a little childhood nostalgia. At

Fyodor Golan, bags were accessorised with Trolls – those cute

cult dolls from a time when ‘troll’ had nothing to do with the

internet (come to think of it, the internet didn’t even exist!).

Meanwhile, at On|Off’s Jimmy Paul, Hello Kitty had everyone

feline joyous with his playful homage to the Japanese furball.

IN PLUME

IF BIRDS of a feather flock

together, the designers were

all roosting in the same tree

of inspiration this season as

feathers were everywhere.

While designers like Rose

Danford-Phillips at On|Off

and Guo Pei for the V&A’s

Fashion In Motion event

used them as chic

embellishments, Jimmy Paul

made them the focal point of

his Hello Kitty jumpers and

Sharon Wauchob got the

FROW in a flap with her

pastel pink gown. Shake

your tail feathers…

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

15


Erdem

THE TRENDS

From swashbuckling plaits to exploring undiscovered textures, S/S20 is a treasure trove of inspiration

16 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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TRENDS

Bora Aksu

V& A Fashion in Motion:

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

Alexander McQueen

BRAID HEART

WHEN THE GOING GETS tough, the tough get… braiding.

Or so it seems if this season’s power plaits are anything to go by.

From pirate-inspired pigtails to rebellious rope braids there was an

underlying air of cavalier mutiny. Take the wet-look pirate braids

at Alexander McQueen by Redken global creative director Guido,

with a small braid at the front that was pure Adam and the Ants.

Over at the V&A’s Fashion In Motion: Preen by Thornton

Bregazzi show, Jonny Engstrom at Guy Kremer for L’Oréal

Professionnel wove raw material haphazardly through the

distressed braids for a Celtic warrior vibe. Weathered was also the

order of the day at Bora Aksu where Tina Outen for L’Oréal

Professionnel was channelling some Frida Kahlo chutzpah with

her braids, spritzing L’Oréal Professionnel TECNI.ART 6-Fix

throughout the hair to define the texture. In keeping with the

empowered woman theme, Anthony Turner for L’Oréal

Professionnel found inspiration in silent movie star-turned

communist Tina Modotti for his boyish braid. He explained:

“It feels quite tough because of the strict centre-parting and tight

braid but the big bow softens the look and makes it feel romantic.”

Speaking of which, rebellion and romance are natural bedfellows

and the swoonsome braid by Guido at Dior gave us all the feels.

Bora Aksu

Dior

HAIRAnthony Turner for

L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK A clean, boyish braid

topped off with a big black bow –

quintessentially Erdem

HOW Hair was prepped with

L’Oréal Professionnel TECNI.ART

Pli and Mythic Oil then blow-dried

Alexander McQueen

Dior

GET THE LOOK – ERDEM

using a Dyson Professional Styling

Nozzle for a sleek finish. A strict

centre-parting was brushed to cover

the ears. A low, tight braid was made

at the back using Infinium Extreme

and the Dyson to smooth, perfected

with more Infinium Extreme before

finishing with a ribbon.

Bora Aksu

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SPRING/SUMMER 2020

17


Jimmy Paul at On|Off

18 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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TRENDS

Coach

Chloé

Givenchy

BLOWN AWAY

THERE WAS SOMETHING of a return to altogether more

high maintenance #juststeppedoutofasalon ’dos this season.

Central to the trend was of course the classic blow-out. Forget

‘carefree’, this is a woman who cares. A lot. And she’s got time

on her hands to hone her unequivocal aesthetic, that aesthetic

being one of unashamed luxury. “The hair is rich, glamorous

and dream-like, which perfectly compliments the Valentino

woman,” explained Redken’s Guido. Over at Coach there was

the hint of a well-heeled Sloane as Guido added in a big, bouncy

quiff to his blow-dry. Meanwhile, pushing the sumptuous texture

by Guido that was seen at shows like Ralph Lauren and Chloé a

little further, Tina Outen for L’Oréal Professionnel decided to

open up the face and reveal the models’ features by sweeping

the hair back at Rejina Pyo. “She’s quirky, intellectual,

expensive and put together so I’m focusing on the hairline to

give her a distinct personality,” she revealed. But it was

Jack Merrick-Thirlway’s take on the trend that we really put

our money behind. Stepping out from the Neville Hair & Beauty

salon to take the backstage helm at Jimmy Paul for L’Oréal

Professionnel he set about creating Hello Kitty meets Brigitte

Bardot beehives.

Valentino

Ralph Lauren

HAIR Guido for Redken

THE LOOK Tomboyish flair with

a well placed Coach barrette

HOW A 10p-sized amount of

Redken Extreme Play Safe was

applied to lengths and ends, the front

was dried with a round brush,

leaving it smooth, then blow-dried

Valentino

GET THE LOOK – COACH

Rejina Pyo

from right to left for lift. Hair was

side-parted in the opposite direction

to create added volume. The front

two-inch section was twisted back

towards the ear, separating during

styling for volume and secured above

the ear with a barrette, before being

finished with Redken Triple Dry 15.

Sacai

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

19


TRENDS

Ports 1961

Givenchy

EASY RIDER

THE AGE OF IDENTIKIT models stomping down the runway

like genetically blessed clones is officially over. After a few years

of championing the individual backstage it no longer appears to

be a trend so much as the norm. “We’re celebrating individuality

at Burberry this season,” confirmed Redken’s Guido Palau.

“The overall feeling is one of richness, a controlled naturalness;

it’s a modern, new texture.” This texture happened to be the

starting point at many other shows which each added in their

own nuances. At Ports 1961, French girls were the inspiration

for the tousled, cool-girl texture which Guido side-parted and

tucked behind the ears. The French also stormed the hair

stations at Givenchy, where Guido gave some a chop for a

“tomboyish, easy vibe”. At Joshua Kane, the theme of Mythical

Creatures lent every model their own character, and Darren

Fowler from Fowler35 used lashings of L’Oréal Professionnel

TECNI.ART to create myriad techniques and textures.

Over at Molly Goddard, Luke Hersheson for L’Oréal

Professionnel took effortless to the extreme with his

straight-from-the-shower half pony. “She’s carefree and fun

and wants her hair off her face but didn’t bother to pull the

ponytail through completely,” he explained.

Molly Goddard

Burberry

HAIR Luke Hersheson for

L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK The ultimate model

off-duty #iwokeuplikethis look

HOW Hair was misted with L’Oréal

Professionnel TECNI.ART Pli to

prep then dried with a diffuser.

TECNI.ART Full Volume Extra

Ports 1961

Ports 1961

GET THE LOOK – MOLLY GODDARD

Mousse was used for separation, then

hair was pulled back and secured in a

pony halfway between the crown and

the nape. On the final tie-through,

hair was pulled halfway through to

leave ends free, an undone feel

exaggerated by breaking hair apart

and pulling out random pieces.

Sacai

Joshua Kane

20 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


TRENDS

Sharon Wauchob

Christopher Kane

Daniel Pascal Tanner at On|Off

WET WET WET

RELUCTANT TO DIVE into a wet-look trend? Come on in,

the water’s fine! Better than fine if this season’s hydrophilic

looks are anything to go by. From damp (see the Kingston

University MA show by Electric’s Mark Woolley for L’Oréal

Professionnel), to drenched, there wasn’t a dry follicle in the

house. Take global Redken creative director Guido’s sexily

saturated look at Versace. “It’s meant to feel like you just got out

of the shower,” he revealed backstage. Gel was certainly the

product du jour, reflecting the ’80s influence that seemed to seep

into every fashion capital. Case in point the strict, almost S&M

ponytails at Proenza Schouler, which Guido bound in leather.

Over at Daniel Pascal Tanner at On|Off, the look was a little

more relaxed as Richard Phillipart from The Boutique Atelier for

L’Oréal Professionnel sought to reflect the ’80s echo of the

clothes. It was a look not dissimilar to the one sported at Carolina

Herrera, which Guido explained was also a nod to the decade of

power suits and power hair. Many of the other wet-look ’dos were

a more masculine affair with sideburns at Prada for a ‘boyish’

nuance, a strong side-parting at Sharon Wauchob for an

‘androgynous femininity’ and ‘shellacked’ ponytails at

Christopher Kane for a ‘futuristic boyishness’.

Images courtesy of Simon Armstrong,

L’Oréal Professionnel and Redken

Kingston Universtiy MA show

HAIR Guido for Redken

THE LOOK Just out of the shower –

‘messy, very sexy, very Donatella’

HOW A 10p-sized amount of Redken

Hardwear 16 Gel was raked back

through the hair with fingers, combing

through lengths for a wet appearance,

adding more of the gel as they styled.

Kingston University MA show

GET THE LOOK – VERSACE

Kingston University MA show

A few pieces of hair were then taken

from the hairline and brushed across

the forehead for a messy, fresh-fromthe-shower

appearance. Triple Pure

32 hairspray was spritzed all over for

high hold without crunch, then a little

Shine Flash 02 was spritzed over the

whole look to get a high-gloss finish.

Carolina Herrara

Proenza Schouler

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

21


F U L L

S T E A M

AHEAD

The revamped Steampod 3.0 from L’Oréal Professionnel is here to change how you look at heat styling… forever

Let off some styling steam with the new Steampod 3.0 from L’Oréal Professionnel.

To find out more, call 0800 030 4034 or visit lorealprofessionnel.co.uk/steampod-3

22 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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ADVERTORIAL

comfort as you work. And ‘Cool Girl’ waves really are effortless,

thanks to the new 360-degree rotating cord, so you’re never left in

a tangle. The integrated comb keeps things running smoothly

while the floating plates and high tech steam delivery make

styling both speedy and uniform across the whole head. Enjoy

intelligent heat controls that allow you to switch easily across hair

types, as well as constant and automatic heat monitoring.

L’Oréal Professionnel has developed exclusive product

formulas to work in tandem with the Steampod 3.0’s unique

design, to further reinforce the caring benefits of using steam.

The care routine helps to control frizz and ensure a smooth finish

for a soft and natural-looking glossy result. Choose from the

Steam-Activated Cream for thick or sensitised hair, or reach for

the Steam-Activated Milk when dealing with fine-to-normal hair

types. The Concentrated Serum is designed to give that beautiful

finish and works brilliantly for all clients.

DO YOU REMEMBER when you first heard about L’Oréal

Professionnel’s Steampod? Its use of steam to straighten hair

shook up the hot tools market, offering a gentler effect on strands

and an ultra-luxurious finish.

Like any great fashion fixture, the heart and soul of the

original can be found in the upgraded Steampod 3.0. The newest

iteration has been revamped with fresh technology to meet every

styling need. Forget frantically styling before the models hit the

runway – the Steampod 3.0 delivers results twice as fast as regular

straighteners, leaving hair twice as smooth.*

It transforms hair with steam technology, whether you’re

going for glossy curls or a sleek and straight finish.

We know models’ hair becomes more difficult to manage as

fashion weeks progress, due to repeated styling at multiple shows

– however the Steampod 3.0 offers 78 per cent less damage,**

ideal for S/S20’s trends of healthy, expensive-looking hair.

L’Oréal Professionnel is constantly evolving and adapting its

products based on the feedback of experts and artists. The result?

An improved ergonomic design so that you can style seamlessly

with minimal effort. The Steampod 3.0 is 14 per cent thinner and

37 per cent lighter than its predecessor, offering improved

Neil Moodie backstage

at Sharon Wauchob

NEIL MOODIE’S STYLING SECRETS

“THE UPDATED, STREAMLINED design,

integrated water feature and rotating cord

makes the Steampod 3.0 super-practical to

use backstage and has become a new

favourite in my kitbag – I am so amazed

by the results!

“I used it recently on a photoshoot

for a major fashion magazine and the hair

felt so much smoother and looked shinier, it’s

now virtually impossible for me to go back to

a traditional straightener.

“People are very aware of the damage heat

styling can do to the hair and I constantly have

models and consumers ask me about this, so

being able to offer them an alternative means

you can really build trust with them.”

*Instrumental test versus regular straightener **Instrumental test versus regular straightener after 15 uses

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SPRING/SUMMER 2020

23


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Head backstage with three visionary stylists and see them create the looks that count for S/S20

THE SHOW – BORA AKSU

THE LEAD – TINA OUTEN FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Tina misted

TECNI.ART

6-Fix to build a

weathered texture,

and TECNI.ART

Ring Light to add

luminosity through

the ends

Tina Outen layered

TECNI.ART Pli,

Transformer

Texture and Super

Dust from L’Oréal

Professionnel to add

definition to the

models’ hair before

loose, random curls

were created with a

medium hair tong

Tina then sectioned the

hair and began to plait

two skinny, tight braids

that were shaped behind

the ear and secured with

a clear band about one

inch from the ends

24 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Some models had

flowers added to

top of their heads,

to add a delicate

touch to their

worn-in braids

Strong red lips

and bold

eyebrows

contributed to

the fierce yet

feminine beauty

look, yet models

retained their

individual styles

For the models without

flowers, Tina paid extra

attention to the front of

their hair. She built

detail with a wispy,

flyaway texture that

pulled back from the

forehead and framed

the face

As models hit the

runway, the flyaway

hairs created a halo

effect that melded

perfectly with the

collection of coloured

lace and ruffled details

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SPRING/SUMMER 2020

25


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – V&A FASHION IN MOTION: PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

THE LEAD – JONNY ENGSTROM AT GUY KREMER

FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Jonny and the team built braids of all

different sizes – some were thick and

chunky, others slim and sleek, creating

depth and a variety of textures

Jonny Engstrom’s

plaited hairstyles

were inspired by

a dark take on

romance. Hair was

sectioned and

TECNI.ART Pli

from L’Oréal

Professionnel was

applied as a styling

primer to provide

hold and shape

Floral ribbons were

added to the plaits and

cut to size, with soft

tendrils pulled out to

make the look

perfectly imperfect

26 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Make-up was left

simple and fresh,

with glowing dewy

skin, sheer pink lips

and brushed up

eyebrows, letting

the hair and clothes

do the talking

The intricate yet organic

hairstyles were an ideal

accompaniment to the

opulent clothing,

covered in details such

as frills, covered buttons

and lace trims

Before the show began,

Jonny tweaked the styles

so they were personal to

each model and added a

spray of TECNI.ART

Ring Light for gloss

and shine

Shown on the catwalk

in the iconic V&A

Museum, the pieces

were a mixture of Preen

by Thornton Bregazzi

collections past and

present themed around

natural prints and

pagan celebrations

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – ROSE DANFORD-PHILLIPS AT ON|OFF

THE LEAD – CRISTIANO BASCIU AT RICHARD WARD

HAIR & METRO SPA FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Hair was pinned in at

the sides and tendrils

were pulled out at the

front. These pieces were

then moulded into finger

waves, clipped and

left to set

At the Rose

Danford-Phillips

show for On|Off,

the hair was

prepped with

TECNI.ART Pli

from L’Oréal

Professionnel,

roughly dried and

brushed through

The lengths of the hair

were tonged into soft

waves. Cristiano

worked TECNI.ART

Extreme Splash Gel

throughout to provide

shape and definition

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Designer Rose

Danford-Phillips

created a variety of

hair accessories from

materials such as

seashells. These were

secured as the

finishing touch

With their tendrils

curling over their

shoulders, models

walked in flowing

gowns accentuated with

bright, abstract prints –

a look that was both

modern and classic

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

To provide hold and

shine, Cristiano misted

TECNI.ART Fix

Design over the

mermaid-like hair

before removing

the clips

Bright pink blusher was

used to accentuate

models’ cheekbones

along with shimmering

pale blue eyeshadow

and pale, glossy lips

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Fyodor Golan

RE:CREATE

Introducing the mini trends with maximum gains

FAKE NEWS

NEWSFLASH – wigs don’t need to be seamlessly matched to

your natural hair colour or expertly blended. Sometimes, it’s

about showing off the wig itself. Case in point, the motley

medley of ’dos we were wigging out over at Fyodor Golan by

Trevor Sorbie’s Johanna Cree Brown for L’Oréal Professionnel.

From pastel crimps to XXL neon spikes, the idea was to make

it a feature in its own right. Mission accomplished.

HARD WEAR

MOHAWKS HAVE always been

associated with a tough, ‘don’t mess

with me’ attitude, but the metallic

iterations by Cristian Pignatta at

Neville Hair & Beauty for L’Oréal

Professionnel at the V&A’s Fashion

In Motion: Guo Pei show took

things to the next level. Forget hair

pins, these were skewers and were

designed to reflect the designer’s

‘angels and demons’ theme of the

collection. Spooky, ooky but

magical all the same, they’re sure to

go down in S/S20 hair folklore.

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RE:CREATE

LOVE ME TENDRIL

Atelier Zuhra Rose Danford-Phillips at On|Off

Marc Jacobs

GEL AT THE READY, baby (hairs) we are coming for you! Jamie

Stevens for L’Oréal Professionnel at Atelier Zuhra upped the ante

with his cyclical squiggles, Cristiano Basciu got wet and wavy at

Rose Danford-Phillips, but it was the diamante swirls at Marc

Jacobs by Guido for Redken that really stole our hearts.

Chloé

Canada Fashion

Chloé

SHE’S A LADY

IF ONE IS NOT amused by the more undignified ’dos on display this season, these genteel coiffs might be more to your

impeccable taste. Regally refined and ever-so-proper, it’s all about the chic chignon. Over at Chloé, Redken global creative

director Guido looked to the ’40s for his ‘boyish up-dos’, while Daniel Fiorio for L’Oréal Professionnel gave his elongated

chignons at Canada Fashion a twist with a Bride Of Frankenstein flash of waves.

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LOOP DE LOOP

THE HALF UP/HALF DOWN ’do by Electric

Hairdressing’s Mark Woolley for L’Oréal

Professionnel at the Kingston MA show was made a

whole lot more exciting by wrapping a length of hair

around the elastic. It might not sound like rocket

science, but this trick has the ability to elevate a

simple style into something that has an almost

Samurai-esque feel.

YOU OK, BUN?

HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? Pretty low,

judging by the controlled chignons at Victoria

Beckham. “The hair is chic, beautiful and

slightly masculine,” said Guido for Redken

backstage. “I’ve blow-dried and flat-ironed the

hair to get it very straight before raking it back

with my fingers. The overall feeling is very

groomed, pulled together, adult and rich.”

WHAT LIES

BENEATH

SOMETHING

SUPERNATURAL was

afoot over at Yan Dengyu

for On|Off. Seeming to

draw on classic Disney

villainesses (there was

one outfit that was pure

Maleficent) he favoured

sheer veils draped over

the models’ faces, which

meant that Jonny

Engstrom at Guy Kremer

for L’Oréal Professionnel

(pictured, inset) had his

work cut out to ensure

that the hair underneath

had sufficient structure

to it. The result was a

squared off beehive

with a whiff of

Marie Antoinette.

Don’t lose your head…

Prada

FEATHERED FRIENDS

FOR THOSE OF you who have mentally confined feathering to

the annals of retro cuts never to be revisited, a peek at Prada

and Givenchy may be enough to change your minds. Guido for

Redken was the scissor-happy brains behind both and, as seems

to have become a S/S20 signature, each model was treated as a

unique entity. “We cut some of the models’ hair at Givenchy to

give them a tomboyish, easy vibe which like Prada is a little bit

off-kilter,” he said.

34 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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RE:CREATE

PASS THE TISSUES

NO, WE’RE NOT talking about the dreaded Fashion Week Flu;

it was Guido going all retro on us at Miu Miu: “It’s a tissue-set,

’40s-inspired look that’s an old-school way of achieving airy

curls,” he revealed backstage. “You wrap individual sections of

hair with a tissue, heat them up with an iron, then allow them

to cool. Once you take out the tissues, the result is a soft curl.”

Images courtesy of Simon Armstrong, L’Oréal Professionnel and Redken

RAGS TO RICHES

HOW TO IMPROVE on perfection? Add a dollop of

imperfection, like the delightfully distressed braids at

the V&A’s Fashion in Motion: Preen By Thornton

Bregazzi show. Firmly dispelling school connotations,

these were plaits with rags of attitude by Jonny

Engstrom at Guy Kremer for L’Oréal Professionnel.

AT THE JOSHUA KANE Mythical Creatures show, the

Fowler35 team’s job was to create 42 individual hair looks.

“It was all about character creation,” explained Darren Fowler

backstage (pictured, inset), who used oodles of TECNI.ART

from L’Oréal Professionnel backstage. “We worked closely with

Joshua to understand the personality each of the creatures cast

would be playing, and designed looks to complement the clothes

and the make-up by Lan Nguyen-Grealis.” Utterly wild.

GIVE IT A WHORL

AT APUJAN IT was

‘business as usual’ at

the front and party at

the back (if that party

happens to involve a

whirlpool.) The result

was a natural, ‘caught

in the rain’ ’do with a

“time loop” of hair at

the back that Taku

Morimoto at Daniel

Galvin for L’Oréal

Professionnel called a

‘tornado effect’. We

were blown away…

URBAN MYTH

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DARK ROMANCE

A young boy in a Midlands

bedroom dreamed of a different

world; Anthony Turner, the Most

Wanted Session Stylist winner,

took a leap of faith and made it

happen. He tells Runway how he’s

delivering his brand of different

FROM THE INTENT STARE of his clear

blue eyes to the passion with which he

discusses his muses and inspirations, you

know very early on when meeting

Anthony Turner that he’s an artist with a

serious passion. A passion for hair, yes –

that’s evident in the incredible work seen

on runways, editorials and advertising

campaigns – but also a passion for words,

for stories. So it comes as no surprise to

learn that the Most Wanted Session Stylist

winner first wanted to be a journalist.

“From an early age, when I picked up

The Face magazine, I became obsessed

with fashion,” he recalls. “Through iD

and Dazed and those younger, cooler

magazines, I educated myself because I

came from a small town in the middle of

the country and there wasn’t really a lot.

Quite a predictable scenario because there

wasn’t really any other outlet, right?

“So I used to read these magazines like

they were my Bible and learn about

designers and fashion. I wanted to be a

journalist. I wanted to be a writer.

Hairdressing never came into it at all.”

That all changed when, as a media

studies student at the turn of the century

needing to find a job to pay his way

through his education, he became an

assistant at Toni&Guy in Stafford

Anthony Turner at Erdem

Mortal Remains @patriciaareina_

Mortal Remains @parma.ham

2019

Mortal Remains @mo.bw

36 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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ANTHONY TURNER

Mortal Remains photography by Sarah Piantadosi (@sarahpiantadosi). Erdem photography courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

Erdem

(alongside working the night shift at a

garage and stacking shelves at Kwiksave).

“I had this preconceived idea of what

hairdressing was in my town. Old ladies

would go and get a set and blow-dry.

Toni&Guy was the first time that I’d ever

seen hair done differently; it was edgy, it

pushed boundaries. It opened my eyes…”

He learned that this part-time job

could be combined with his love of

fashion; his salon manager told him about

a previous Toni&Guy employee who was

doing pretty well styling hair for fashion

shows, a guy called Guido. “Funnily

enough, I was obsessed with Alexander

McQueen and I found out that Guido did

the hair for his shows – it was a perfect

union! That made me decide to become a

hairdresser full time.”

Fast forward, and Anthony and a

bin bag full of his clothes moved to

London, setting up as an independent

stylist in an East London salon to allow

him to work on any shoots and shows he

managed to book, while obsessively

following Guido’s work.

On a night out in Shoreditch with

friends, Anthony saw a guy walk into a

bar… and that guy was Guido. “I’d had a

few shots, and I just went over and started

talking to him. He was my rock star!” He

left his number in case any opportunities

should arise, and went back to his friends.

Three weeks later, his phone rang, and he

was on his way to New York to assist

Guido at Fashion Week.

An incredible learning curve followed,

one where Anthony admits hair played a

smaller part. “When working session, it’s

actually learning how to be on set, how to

present yourself,” he explains. “The way

that Guido conducts himself and the

professionalism, the way he talks to

clients and photographers about the hair

and sells it. Watching him do that, my

jaw was on the floor. He has such a way

of explaining things, such intelligence.”

He also learned that his own way of

doing hair – a bit differently, something

that might get a funny look in a busy high

street salon – was something to embrace.

“When I was working with Guido, it made

me understand that I was never really

wrong. He’s got a very kind of punk

attitude towards hair and I love that.”

Having risen to the position of Guido’s

first assistant, he then took a risk: going it

alone as a session stylist gun for hire in

New York. “I was absolutely terrified,” he

remembers. “It’s a tough industry with

loads of competition. I didn’t know

whether I was going to do well or not, and

basically, I worked my butt off.” A piece

for Interview magazine made the cover,

which helped get the ball rolling.

But he admits that it’s only now, some

seven years later, that he’s really found his

feet. “I’m really coming into my own now.

I’m more calm; the experience is there, my

“I’m really coming into my own

now. I’m more calm; the experience

is there, my confidence is there”

ANTHONY TURNER

confidence is there. And I’m lucky enough

to have the most amazing assistants.”

“At the beginning of your session

career you kind of hope the designer just

wants natural hair,” he continues,

laughing. “But it’s all about owning it and

making people believe that what you’re

saying is right and true. And then to

follow it through you need to deliver.

Now I’m in control, I’m in charge. Let’s

push it, let’s do something different.”

One collaborator who embraces that

desire to push, to do something different is

Erdem, with whom Anthony has been

working for many seasons, alongside

L’Oréal Professionnel. “I adore Erdem and

we’re both Scorpios, so we have this deep

understanding of each other,” he says.

“He’s strong and challenging, and always

has a narrative to tell, every season. I look

forward to the test because we’ve always

got a story. It’s always completely bonkers

and there’s always a bit of darkness in

there somewhere.”

That love of narrative, of difference,

is evident also in Anthony’s own ’zine

Mortal Remains, a celebration of young

culture he published last year, with kids

identifying as non-binary and alternative

drag artists among the mix of subjects.

“I was a young goth in a mining town and

I never felt like I belonged anywhere. I

was a loner, got bullied, so I have a lot

of empathy for young people now who

are confident enough to be true to

themselves. I wanted to celebrate them,

put them on a platform and say ‘you

lot are amazing’.

“Also my hope was for that magazine

to find its way to a young kid somewhere

in their bedroom, to connect to somebody

out there looking at it, inspiring them to

go out and do the same and just live. Just

be free and have fun.”

That moment of connection, to be

told you’re amazing, was exactly what

Anthony experienced for himself at the

Most Wanted Grand Final, when he heard

his name called out as a winner. “That

was a highlight of my career, I’d never won

anything before,” he smiles. “But what

really got me that night was all the other

hairdressers in the room that came up to

my table, saying ‘hi, you don’t know who I

am but I really respect your work’. That

really hit me and I’ve never had that in

such a big way. It meant the world to me.

It’s really nice to hear that you’re

somebody else’s inspiration.”

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A CHARACTER STUDY

Redken dream team Guido Palau and Josh Wood once again created the magic at Marc Jacobs in

New York. The challenge this time? To celebrate individuality across nearly 60 highly-personalised looks…

“IT’S MARC’S IDEA of street life,” muses

Redken global creative director, Guido

Palau to reporters at the Marc Jacobs S/S20

show. “It’s not reality, it’s his reality.”

Taking place at Park Avenue Armory,

the beauty team had its work cut out to

create nearly 60 highly individual hair

and make-up looks to complement the

designer’s joyous runway of printed suits

paired with top hats and bowlers,

explosions of flowers and feathers, ruffled

sleeves and floaty organza gowns.

The collection – a tribute to the past,

a celebration of the present and a look to

the future – spanned the decades with

many of Jacobs’s signatures and favourite

references from over the years.

The only common denominator was

individuality, with each look as special as

the next. “Marc celebrated individuality in

his exuberant, very ’70s, but it was about

creating those individual people in a

playful, theatrical way,” says Guido,

reflecting back. “It was a lot of hard work,

very long fittings. Marc didn’t want to

turn up at the show to see what it looked

like, it was more like an editorial.”

One of the most-discussed looks from

the event was model Scarlett Costello’s

feathery shag, inspired by Jane Fonda’s

iconic crop in the 1971 film Klute.

According to Scarlett, when her agent told

her she was being considered for the show

and Guido wanted to cut her hair, she

replied: “Of course. Guido can do

whatever the hell he wants to my hair!”

Dotted throughout a show that saw

model Fei Fei Sun rocking a glossy page

38 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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MARC JACOBS

Images courtesy of Redken

boy bowl cut wig and Tessa Bruinsma with

side-sweeping ’80s tight spirals, many of

Jacobs’s characters were recognisable.

Model Joel Wolfe was transformed into an

homage to Marilyn Monroe, with Guido

setting platinum waves with clouds of

Redken Triple Pure 32 Hairspray.

The attention to detail is mesmerising

– model Kiki Willems even had intricate

swirls of gelled baby-hair peeping out

Fei Fei Sun

“The real work was in the consultations and

discussing every look, to create a character

for each model – it was like doing a play”

JOSH WOOD

from under a wide-brimmed hat. The

preparation process to come up with

every individual look was hard work,

admits Redken global color creative

director, Josh Wood. “Marc and stylist

Katie Grand were there pretty much 24

hours a day before the show,” he says.

“Each look was carefully curated to

deliver a unique persona. It meant every

model stood out in their own right to

Joel Wolfe

Scarlett Costello

celebrate the beauty of each individual.”

Using Redken Flash Lift Bonder Inside,

Redken Shades EQ and Redken Color

Gels Lacquers, Josh and his team created

an array of looks, from Fei Fei’s onyx bowl

cut to split dyes, skater blondes and

normcore naturals via light brown and

mid-blonde shades. “I worked with Guido

and Marc to create individual colours that

portray different personas on the models,”

he adds. Under pressure to deliver so many

unique looks on so many models, Josh

stresses how his symbiotic working

relationship with Guido made it all so

much easier.

“I have a great working pattern with

Guido. I know what he likes and doesn’t

like, so we work well together to get the

right end result,” he smiles. “There’s a lot

of fun along the way, although maybe not

the few hours immediately before the

show as things change and the pressure is

on to deliver, but it’s always a privilege to

work with him.”

Josh and his team were there on the

day of the fitting and the three days up to

the show in case they were needed to

consult on a look. “We worked in shifts to

ensure someone was always there,” he

adds. “We coloured several models and

wigs for Marc, but the real work was in

the consultations and discussing every

look, to create a character for each model

– it was like doing a play.”

He admits that one of his favourite

finishes was the Harajuku metallic copper

blonde created for model Issa Lish. “I

loved her outfit and the whole look – it

really felt culturally very different,” he

says. “Creating blondes in the West is all

about lightness and clean tones. In the

East it’s something very different, and

although this colour is a soft orange it’s

thought of as a light colour in Asia.”

Every detail was thought out and

meticulously executed – adding chipped

nail polish or tiny splashes of colour.

It was the perfect reflection of real-life

imperfections. “The ultimate message of

the show was individuality and expression

of who you are,” says Josh. “We used

everything in our kit bag as some of the

changes were very subtle. We dealt with

every look as an individual, unlike the

previous season, where we were looking

for uniformity.” Gentlemen, take a bow…

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ALL INCLUSIVE

Marc Jacobs

Fashion is finally embracing diversity in earnest as more models from black and minority ethnic (BAME)

backgrounds are cast in major shows and campaigns. With a range of hair textures to prep

under pressure backstage, the need for specific skills is greater than ever

40 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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TEXTURE

THE SPRING/SUMMER 2020 season was the most diverse one

yet, with more BAME, plus-size and over-50 models seen on the

catwalks. Yet reports of black models being asked to style or help

with their own hair have continued to crop up year after year.

How is this disconnect still happening in 2020?

The Fashion Spot, which tracks model casting each season,

reported that of 7,390 models at 215 major shows, 41.5 per cent

were from BAME backgrounds. The steady increase of racial

diversity has been reflected in all four fashion capitals, with

London second to New York in non-white model castings for

S/S20 – featuring a 5.3 per cent increase since A/W19.

“There has always been a little diversity within the fashion

industry, but recently it has increased greatly,” says session stylist

Neil Moodie. “Most shows and shoots now have a variety of

models from different countries and races as many fashion

companies wish to show that they are diverse and that their

clothes can be worn by anybody.”

This upward trend is bolstered by recent breakout stars of the

fashion world. Supermodel Adut Akech scooped Model of the

Year at the 2019 Fashion Awards and gave a rousing speech on

diversity in the fashion industry.

But numbers can only tell us so much. Charlotte Mensah,

founder of The Hair Lounge salon and advocate of natural hair,

points out that hiring more BAME models is only one part of the

diversity equation. “It’s refreshing to see models and celebrities

embracing their natural hair,” she says. “Brands are receiving

praise for being diverse and casting more black models. However

they’re not hiring stylists who are skilled enough to style it.”

“Being able to cater for all types of hair

is the only way forward at fashion shows

and in the salon”

CRISTIAN PIGNATTA

Marc Jacobs

“In a world where we are all united as one human race, the

hairdresser has to be able to cope with anything that comes their

way,” agrees Cristian Pignatta, who leads teams backstage for

Neville Hair & Beauty. “Being a one-trick pony was acceptable in

the ’90s when hairdressers could define themselves as haircutters

only. Today, being able to cater for all types of hair is the only

way forward at fashion shows and in the salon. This is why we

always have a specialist for every type of hair in our team.”

So often leading the way, Redken global creative director

Guido has been quoted backstage season after season at a host

of shows talking about embracing and celebrating models’

individualities and hair textures. This season it was evident

particularly at Marc Jacobs and Burberry.

In fact, at the most recent Burberry shows under chief creative

officer Ricardo Tisci’s direction, Marc Maciver and his Slidercuts

Atelier Zurha

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41


crew have been on hand backstage for their barbering and

textured hair skills, and his team could also be found at

Louis Vuitton.

The very nature of working backstage means you have to be

flexible – you might not know what the look will be until the day,

or which models you’ll be working on. The types of hair that you

will encounter backstage can vary so wildly that experience of

working with different hair textures has become essential.

Abigail Butler, founder of Strictly Xtended in Essex, honed her

skills working as a L’Oréal Professionnel ID Artist across a

multitude of shows. “You will face many challenges, so your skill

set has to be at a certain level,” she asserts. “Making sure you are

educated on the basics when styling textured hair means you

won’t let the team down. Being prepared by having the right tools

and products, having an understanding of how textured hair

works and being able to braid textured hair, will provide you with

the skills for any job.”

Neil Moodie agrees: “The skills that you’re required to master

are exactly the same – understanding the texture, how it reacts to

certain products, and also how it will react to certain types of

heat tools is essential. Like any hairdressing training, more

knowledge is key.”

Nicole Iroh, creative ambassador at Headmasters and lead

stylist for the Central Saint Martins White Show at the Fashion

Awards 2019 with the Headmasters Artistic Team for L’Oréal

Professionnel, set out to understand as many different hair types

and textures as possible when her initial formal training failed to

teach her. “During my training, textured hair wasn’t covered but I

wanted to learn it, so I did! I found that assisting a specialist is

key to really understanding textured hair.”

Every season we see plenty of ‘natural’ hair looks, but

textured hair needs the same amount of attention as white

models’ hair – which is one of Nicole’s main bugbears. “One of

the biggest misconceptions at Fashion Week is that because hair

is short or the brief is to leave it natural, then we shouldn’t do

anything to the hair. It still needs to be shaped, styled and

moisturised to look good,” she insists.

The other damning misconception? That you can only know

how to treat texture if you have it in your own hair. “While that

is definitely an advantage, it doesn’t mean that you can’t learn it,”

asserts Nicole. “There are so many different types of curl textures

and patterns, each with individual characteristics.”

Reading about all types of textured hair and gaining practical

experience is essential. Having friends or models to practise on is

a good way to learn. Feeling the hair and really understanding

its structure is key. There’s no shame in admitting that you don’t

know everything about textured hair – instead you can use the

opportunity to learn, especially from those who have a personal

understanding. “I learned by working closely with my

African-American assistants,” explains session stylist Tina Outen,

who is based in New York and is a regular Fashion Week lead.

“They have a very high standard for how they want their hair

finished and are super-knowledgeable. I talk to them a lot and try

to find what works and what doesn’t.”

Tina suggests relinquishing control and listening to advice.

“If you didn’t grow up with textured hair on your own head,

you need to be open to the expertise of those who did. Let them

Natasha Zinko

Atelier Zurha

42 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

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TEXTURE

Marc Jacobs

Central Saint Martins White Show

take the lead. Learning that textured hair has its own processes is

something that was achieved by spending time watching, talking

and asking questions – and being open to suggestions. Some of

the most important things I learnt were to be gentle, not to

overload the hair with products, to work with treatments, oils

and creams, and enjoy the beautiful form and proportions

textured hair gives.”

Formal training is also a great way to learn from some of the

best texture experts and build up your self-assurance before you

get on set. L’Oréal Professionnel runs courses that provide both

the theory and practical experience necessary to understand

textured hair, partnering with Charlotte Mensah on Curl Power,

which covers all curly hair types. “The course is designed to help

you build not only your skills and knowledge but also your

confidence,” Charlotte explains. “We incorporate techniques such

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel and Redken

“The more quality education you receive,

the more confident you will feel and the

better the results will be”

CHARLOTTE MENSAH

as twists, twist outs, Bantu knots, rod sets, straw sets and product

education. We also use a live model for demonstrations which

enhances the hands-on experience of this workshop. The more

quality education you receive, the more confident you will feel

and the better the results will be for your client.”

And the benefits of understanding and celebrating textured

hair go much further than just creating beautiful looks. Sabrina

Chappell, premier stylist at Richard Ward Hair & Metrospa,

believes that as more hairdressers educate themselves, models will

feel more comfortable. “Stylists need to be able to confidently

manage textured hair in a limited time, as well as maintain the

high standard of styling required for the runway,” she says.

“On a human level, it also allows models who have textured

hair to feel properly accepted and included – as they should – and

not to feel like their hair type is difficult or a challenge, which is

an attitude that can occasionally be found backstage as a result of

inexperience,” adds Nicole.

THE EDUCATION

YOU NEED TO KNOW

CURL POWER WITH

CHARLOTTE MENSAH

THIS L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL COURSE IS A

HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE THAT WILL GIVE YOU THE

KNOWLEDGE YOU NEED TO STYLE TEXTURED HAIR.

London Academy

lorealaccess.com/uk

THE STYLE SESSION

ANTHONY RAWLINGS, CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF

CHELSEA’S LOCKONEGO SALON, SHARES HIS TIPS

AND TRICKS ON HOW TO ELEVATE YOUR STYLING

SKILLS – ON ALL HAIR TYPES.

4 May, Manchester Academy

lorealaccess.com/uk

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43


Johanna Cree Brown at Fyodor Golan

WHEN

ART MEETS

FASHION

Trevor Sorbie’s Johanna Cree Brown is a trusted stylist to her salon clientele and an avant-garde visionary with

an unyielding attention to detail. She tells Runway how she blends art and session in her own unique way

JOHANNA CREE BROWN

has always embraced her

creative side. When she was a

teenager, an artistic future

seemed inevitable. In fact the

hairdressing world nearly lost

her to art school, but after

starting out in a salon it wasn’t

long before she caught the

hairdressing bug.

Never without a camera,

she snaps the world around her,

always looking for inspiration.

It’s this eye for detail and

ability to envisage work

through a lens that enables her

to transcend the fashion and

art worlds.

“When I first started out I

wanted to do everything all at

once,” remembers Johanna.

“I badgered my then boss to let

me train and in five months I

was qualified and on the salon

floor cutting and styling.”

On becoming creative

director of special projects at

Trevor Sorbie, Johanna threw

herself into working with

fashion designers and artists.

“I’m hugely grateful to

L’Oréal Professionnel for its

support throughout my career.

It was the brand’s belief in me

and encouragement that led me

to start working with several

fashion designers. In fact, it was

[L’Oréal Professionnel legend]

Catherine McMahon who

gave me my first opportunity

“I find it very grounding seeing my

regular clients and being part of

that environment”

JOHANNA CREE BROWN

to work with a fashion

designer – P4SH.”

Since her first foray into the

world fashion and art, Johanna

has worked with an array of

designers, including Stéphane

Rolland and Corrie Neilsen.

She’s also enjoyed an

ongoing collaboration with

design duo Fyodor Golan,

recently creating a series of

21 individual hair looks for its

S/S20 collection at Somerset

House. Best known for its

bright and playful work, the

label’s collection was divided

into three categories: Teddy

Boys/Girls, Historical and

Punk. “I’ve known Fyodor and

Golan for several years and

we’ve worked together on their

look books,” she explains.

“They’ve been really supportive

of my work and any time I do

my own hair shows they kindly

give me clothes for the models,

so I’ve got a really good

relationship with them.”

Fyodor Golan S/S20 images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

44 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


JOHANNA CREE BROWN

Golan Frydman

and Fyodor Podgorny

Exotica with

Roger Spy

L’Oréal Colour Trophy

Fyodor Golan

L’Oréal Colour

Trophy

For Johanna, backstage

work is about understanding

the brand and knowing where

the boundaries can be pushed

with her creations: “There was

something for everyone, from

beautiful renaissance pink wigs

to loud and colourful spikes for

the punks. Some of the styles

took weeks of construction by

the team at the Trevor Sorbie

Covent Garden salon, others

were created live – including

blue gel delicately being poured

onto a model’s head to create a

marbled look, and neon powder

being thrown onto a model’s

blonde wig seconds before she

went onto the catwalk.”

For each of the 21 looks,

Johanna had to take a unique

approach as the designers

wanted to bring the clothes

back a step and to shout the

theme through the hair.

“We wanted to mix

different cultures within the

three categories, and getting the

beauty aesthetic right was

really important,” she explains.

“So, if we had a really pretty

Marie Antoinette look, we

wanted to mess it up, destroy it,

melt it, pull it apart

a bit. And then if we had

something really strong, like

some of the punks, then

we would relax a little bit, and

have something more wearable.

This was Fyodor and Golan’s

mission for the collection.”

Her creative work allows

her to skip between fashion, art

and film, often with

collaborator Roger Spy. “It

pushes me totally out of my

comfort zone and can produce

the best results,” she admits.

“There’s a lot to consider when

working with film – how the

hair looks from all angles,

how it moves.”

And while all this allows

Johanna to bring her more

avant-garde and visionary ideas

to life, looking after her salon

clients in the salon is still what

she enjoys most about the job.

“The amount of time I spend

behind the chair varies from

week to week,” she says. “I find

it very grounding seeing my

regular clients and being part of

that environment.”

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45


The White Show at the 2019 Fashion Awards. Hair by Nicole Iroh

and the Headmasters Artistic Team for L’Oréal Professionnel

46 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


SHOW AND TELL

The White Show at Central Saint Martins is one of the most anticipated events of the fi rst term for fi rst-year

fashion design students and provides backstage education for up-and-coming hairdressers

THE WHITE SHOW shines the spotlight on emerging talent,

offering a collective message that champions new design and

innovation. The brief is simple: first-year fashion design students

at the iconic Central Saint Martins must create a single look, all

in white. The concept this year was to highlight messages of

change and protest through opera.

As part of its long-standing collaboration with the college, the

show also serves as an opportunity for L’Oréal Professionnel ID

Artists to get their first taste of backstage fashion styling.

“For ID Artists this show is a dream come true. They’re

working backstage on a major runway show, in the world’s

leading fashion college and with an amazing lead stylist – RUSH

Hair’s Tina Farey,” explains Stuart Chapman, education project

development manager at L’Oréal Professionnel. “Tina is not only

an exceptional session stylist, she’s also a first-rate educator who

genuinely cares about this show as an education opportunity.

That’s what makes this event so good.”

Stuart continues: “ID Artists get to experience the pressures,

the buzz, the discipline and above all the tips and techniques of

the session stylist. Many hairdressers working on the White Show

would never have had the chance to access opportunities as

unique as this without the ID Artist programme.”

ID Artists are selected from across the country – the 65-strong

team features stylists from large national franchise groups all the

way down to small regional salons – but they all share one

passion: to take their hairdressing careers to another level.

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47


TINA FAREY

RUSH HAIR

Lead hairstylist

“The ID Artists were very receptive and

easy to work with. They were extremely

professional, and we were a great team on

the day. Collectively we all pulled together

– the show models were split into three

groups, with the team working on the first

group together before moving to the next

one. Each ID Artist ran everything past

me before moving on, and I assigned one

to tick off the models so we knew how

many we’d worked on!”

ASHLEY WALLACE

COPPERFIELDS

ID Artist

CHARLI ELSEY

CUTTING ROOM CREATIVE

ID Artist

“I absolutely loved being part of such a

creative team and working in the hustle

and bustle of backstage madness! It was

great to see all the models lined up at the

end, showcasing beautiful white outfits

combined with different textures of hair

– from slicked-back wet looks to gorgeous

fuzzy textures – it’s L’Oréal Professionnel

at its very best.”

“It was amazing! I wasn’t expecting to

enjoy it as much as I did, as I knew how

much work it would be, but the energy

and atmosphere was incredible. I learnt to

have a little bit more faith in myself, I was

surrounded by a team of such talented and

supportive people who are all happy to

help. Tina Farey was so chilled and made

it such a pleasant learning experience.”

48 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


THE WHITE SHOW

AT THE FASHION

AWARDS 2019

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

BUNTY WICKENS

LAURA LEIGH HAIR & BEAUTY

ID Artist

“Working on the White Show felt like a

free flow of creativity that brought out an

amazing, expressive flair within the team

and in our work. What I learnt the most

was quick ways of prepping and styling

hair to create instant volume and texture,

which worked as a canvas for a versatile

range of looks and controlling the

fast-paced environment of the day.”

JAMES HOLROYD

YOKE THE SALON

ID Artist

“To be involved in the White Show was an

incredible experience. Around every

corner you can find someone in love with

their craft, producing really beautiful

work. Together with the designers,

make-up and the whole ID Artist team,

there was a real energy backstage. Biggest

lesson – timekeeping. Seventy models in

one hour? No worries!”

This year Central Saint Martins was

invited to open the star-studded

Fashion Awards at the Royal Albert

Hall to coincide with the White Show.

In association with L’Oréal

Professionnel, hair lead Nicole Iroh

worked with the Headmasters Artistic

Team to style a phenomenal 180

models in a showcase for the White

Show collection. Nicole explains:

“We have had new members join the

Headmasters Artistic Team and are

very proud of ensuring they are able

to share experiences such as these

alongside senior members.

“On the day we had a massive

increase in the number of models, so I

paired experienced team members with

those new to session styling. Everyone

was focused on getting the task done

to the best of their abilities and

ensuring each design student’s creation

was coming to life as they had

originally envisaged. There were 180

models so it was an extremely quick

turnaround, but the team adapted

quickly to time restraints along with

last minute changes to wigs, wefts and

headpieces. I am so proud of them.

“Teamwork is imperative in all

aspects of hairdressing, from working

on an award show to running a busy

column in the salon. Always do your

best, show your passion and never stop

improving your skills.”

For key dates and more information on the L’Oréal Professionnel ID Artist programme, follow @lorealeducationuki

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49


S/S20 HAIR IS…

“PLAYING WITH

A BOYISHNESS, AN

ATTITUDE. EVEN

IF HAIR’S LONG

IT’S UNDONE,

CENTRE-PARTED,

IT FEELS REALLY

COOL EVEN IF

IT’S BLOWN OUT”

Guido,

Redken global

creative director

“ROCKING A

SIMPLE VIBE, WITH

AN ELEMENT OF

SOMETHING

UNEXPECTED OR

VISUALLY A BIT

UNCOMFORTABLE”

Takuya Morimoto,

Daniel Galvin

“REFLECTIVE OF

THE SPIRIT OF OUR

TIME. NOMAD-

INSPIRED HAIR

AND CAREFREE

TEXTURES WITH

PRONOUNCED

BABY HAIRS ARE

SYMBOLIC OF

OUR URGE FOR

FREEDOM AND

A CLOSENESS

TO NATURE”

Nicole Iroh,

Headmasters

“POWERFUL,

WITH ECHOES OF

‘80S GLAMOUR

BOTH IN MEN’S

AND WOMEN’S

HAIR”

Richard Phillipart,

The Boutique

Atelier

“VINTAGE AND

ROMANTIC WITH

AN EDGY,

UNDONE FEEL.

THINK CLASSIC

HOLLYWOOD

STARLETS AND

‘80S ICONS WITH

A MODERN TWIST”

Cristiano Basciu,

Richard Ward Hair

& Beauty Metrospa

A summary of the season, in the words of the professionals

S/S20 HAIR IS…

“SIMPLE YET

BEAUTIFULLY SOFT

TEXTURE USING

CREATIVE STYLING

FOR A UNIQUE

STATEMENT LOOK.

SPRING IS A

CHANCE TO

REVITALISE – THINK

BEACH BALAYAGE,

BRAIDED WAVES

AND CURLY

TEXTURED BOBS”

Seung Ki Baek,

RUSH Hair

“ALL INCLUSIVE.

COLOURS RANGED

FROM SUBTLE,

DUTCH BLONDE

HIGHLIGHTS

ALL THE WAY

THROUGH TO

METALLIC COPPER

HARAJUKU

BLONDES”

Josh Wood,

Redken global color

creative director

“ABOUT

SHINE AND ROOT

LIFT WITH

STRAIGHT HAIR

THAT HAS A

SOFT FEEL”

Cristian Pignatta,

Neville Hair &

Beauty

“HEAVY ON

ACCESSORIES,

ESPECIALLY

PEARLS, BEADING

AND FEATHERS.

RIBBONS AND

BOWS IN THE HAIR

ARE POPULAR, AS

IS BRAIDING AND

LIVED-IN PASTEL

HAIR TONES”

Jamie Stevens,

Jamie Stevens Hair

“ALL ABOUT THE

GORGEOUS,

EFFORTLESS

‘SHAKE’ STYLE FOR

LONG HAIR,

WHICH

SHOWCASES A

FREE-MOVING

TEXTURE AND

SHAPE WITH A

CLEARLY DEFINED

PERIMETER”

Mark Woolley,

Electric

Hairdressing

50 SPRING/SUMMER 2020

RUNWAY


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