NZPhotographer Issue 28, February 2020

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Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners

ISSUE 28, February 2020

FROM NURSERY

WORKER TO FULL TIME

PHOTOGRAPHER

INTERVIEW WITH JO LAMMAS

HOW LENSBABY

LIT UP MY LIFE

BY HEATHER MAREE OWENS

UNLEASHED COMPETITION

WINNERS & BEST ENTRIES

February 2020 1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 28 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

We hope 2020 is going well for

you so far and you're out taking

lots of photos.

As you flick or click your way

through the following pages you'll

see that we have introduced

a special section of news and

features as well as Editors' Choice

Top 10 most interesting photos of

the month from our Excio Photo

Community. We have also given

Readers' Submissions a redesign

to allow us to bring you more

articles over the coming months

that allow you to grow your

photography skills even more.

The first of our new features

comes from Peter Laurenson

who is sharing his 'worth the effort photo locations', kick-starting his bimonthly

articles by taking us up Mount Taranaki to admire the view.

We have all the old favourite features too – Behind The Shot, Brendon

Gilchrist's photo adventures, and tips and tricks from Richard Young. Our

feature interview this month is with Jo Lammas, an inspirational woman

who went from being a nursery worker to full-time photographer. We

also take a trip with Bex Ammos to Africa, learn how playing with a

Lensbaby helped Heather Maree Owens find a new lease of creativity

during a tough time, and we reveal the winners and best entries from

the Unleashed photo competition.

OUR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man behind

ESB Photography. He is an

avid tramper who treks

from sea to mountain, and

back again, capturing the

uniqueness of New Zealand’s

unforgiving landscape.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

NZPhotographer Issue 28

February 2020

Cover Photo

Mount Sunrise,

Jo Lammas

Publisher:

Foto Lifestyle Ltd

Website:

www.excio.io/

nzphotographer

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email hello@excio.io

FOLLOW US

Richard Young

Richard is an award-winning

landscape and wildlife

photographer who teaches

photography workshops and

runs photography tours. He is

the founder of New Zealand

Photography Workshops.

© 2020 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in any form is forbidden without prior

consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine.

2

NZPhotographer


CONTENTS

BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH BRENDON PUTT

4

BEALEY SPUR – ARTHURS PASS

NATIONAL PARK

BY BRENDON GILCHRIST

4

6

9

10

14

20

24

30

34

41

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Brendon Putt

BEALEY SPUR – ARTHURS PASS NATIONAL PARK

by Brendon Gilchrist

WHAT'S ON

@EXCIO PHOTO COMMUNITY

EXCIO TOP 10

FROM NURSERY WORKER TO FULL TIME

PHOTOGRAPHER INTERVIEW WITH JO LAMMAS

HOW LENSBABY LIT UP MY LIFE

By Heather Maree Owens

THE BEST WEATHER FOR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

By Richard Young

PHOTOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS WORTH SWEATING FOR

by Peter Laurenson

AFRICAN ADVENTURES

with Bex Amos

PHOTOGRAPHY UNLEASHED COMPETITION

WINNERS & BEST ENTRIES

56 PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

6

14

34

AFRICAN ADVENTURES

WITH BEX AMOS

FROM NURSERY

WORKER TO FULL TIME

PHOTOGRAPHER INTERVIEW

WITH JO LAMMAS


WAIHI BEACH SUNSET

F1.4, 1/1000s, ISO400

Behind The Shot

with Brendon Putt

BRENDON, TELL US ABOUT YOU AND YOUR

JOURNEY WITH PHOTOGRAPHY SO FAR…

Born and bred in Tokoroa, I always had a strong

passion for music and the creative aspects of

school. I graduated at 19 with a Bachelor of Media

Arts in Commercial Music and as life would have

it, I landed a career in Management instead and

developed a passion for photography!

I met my wife, Charlotte, in 2009, and we are about

to celebrate our 6 th wedding anniversary in March.

We have two beautiful kids, Brodie (4) and Thea

(18 months), and together we live in Charlotte’s

hometown of Te Aroha, a small town nestled under

a mountain, which itself is a great subject for my

photography.

When Charlotte and I married in 2014, we purchased a

DSLR. If I remember correctly it was a Canon 600D with

two kit lenses. We travelled overseas for our honeymoon

and I fell in love with the art of photography. A few years

went by and I hadn’t managed a lot of photography

due to life being so busy and then, in 2017, I shot my

Brother-in-law’s wedding at a moment’s notice using

a borrowed Canon 7D from a friend. This camera blew

mine out of the water. I upgraded this past November

to a Canon 5D Mark IV in preparation for that same

friend’s wedding in January. After many debates about

which camera I would upgrade to, the decision to get

the 5D was made with the intent to create an income

from my photography and pursue the art with more

commitment. Since upgrading I have completed

some family portraits, a wedding, and vast amounts of

landscape imagery for my own enjoyment.

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TELL US ABOUT THE 35MM SIGMA ARTS LENS

THAT YOU USED TO TAKE THIS SHOT…

I remember looking at the beautiful 50mm lens

from Sigma that our wedding photographer had –

you could tell the quality of the lens without even

touching it. When looking at the photos he captured

on this lens, the colours so beautiful, smooth, and

sharp. I have had a soft spot for Sigma lenses ever

since.

When I decided to buy the 5D I knew I needed a

Sigma – a great camera needs great glass and the

price point was spot on where I had budgeted. I did

a lot of research as to the wide-angle I wanted and

landed on the 35mm as I can use it for both portrait

and landscape work. With an F stop of 1.4 it really

allows me to have creative control over the shot.

Has it bettered my photography? Maybe not. But I do

feel with the combo that I am getting sharper, better

quality images and it has definitely made me learn

more and to push myself to be a better photographer.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR WAIHI BEACH PHOTO AND

WHAT WAS HAPPENING BEHIND THE CAMERA…

I am always thinking about new places to explore

and shoot, and like to try and have an idea of what

I am setting out to capture prior to heading out. On

the 2/1/2020 (first shot of the new decade) right on

sunset at about 8.30pm I had gone out knowing what

I wanted to achieve. Every year we spend some of

our time off work at Waihi Beach, and our Summer

holiday provided a perfect opportunity to attempt to

complete my vision. On this particular evening, I was

able to sneak away from the family as I could see the

sky lighting up the way I had hoped, the only issue was

that the wind was blowing hard!

My vision for this shot was to be able to compose it

so that I was overlooking Waihi beach with the hills in

the background and the beach stretching through

the middle. I didn’t want to have any of the hill I was

actually standing on in the shot, giving the illusion that

I was either using a drone or on the edge of a cliff

looking down. I wanted the sky to have real interest

and colour to it too and had planned on pushing the

exposure out as slow as I could to create a blurred effect

on the water and sky – I really wanted this shot to be the

kind of image people would print and display in their

bach (holiday home), or better yet in their permanent

home, reminding them of their favourite beach.

When I went up to the top of Bowentown the wind

was horrendous. There was no way I could do any

long exposure as I couldn’t get the camera sturdy

enough on my sub-par tripod. So, I worked with what

was happening around me and managed to pull

off an image I was really happy with. I didn’t get the

long exposure I had originally set out to get, but I am

content with the image I captured.

This image took A LOT of moving around to compose

it the way I wanted it. The hill and the amount of

bush on the side of it was enough to be in the shot,

however, I really wanted to make sure it wasn't in the

shot. I must have looked mad bouncing around the

hillside trying to compose this image!

DID YOU DO ANY POST-PROCESSING?

I shoot all my images in RAW so post-processing is an

integral part of my creative process. I edit all my work in

Lightroom. This shot has not been cropped at all except

for minimal straightening of the horizon. I always feel that

post-processing is important to be able to enhance the

natural dynamics of an image and bring your style or

vision to life. The final image has quite a cool nostalgic

vibe, as my wife would say, fitting well with my idea of

reminding someone of their favourite beach.

HOW DOES YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY CREATE

#PHOTOGRAPHYFORGOOD?

When out photographing, I always feel I need to

leave the environment the way I found it. I spend

a lot of free time outdoors and take great care

with nature. With this shot, I made sure when I was

bouncing around the hillside that I wasn’t destroying

the environment around me. Our photographs will be

around for good, but it is important we are good by

our photographs and encourage an appreciation for

our natural landscapes.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/brendonputtphotography

www.facebook.com/brendonputtphotography

www.brendonputt.com

albums.excio.io/brendonputtphotography

BEHIND THE SHOT IS PROUDLY

SUPPORTED BY

February 2020 5


Bealey Spur – Arthurs Pass

National Park

by Brendon Gilchrist

This is one of the greatest and easier day or

overnight walks close to Christchurch. It’s a place

to refresh and rewind, to forget about the world,

and to take some beautiful photos of wide-open

fields, river beds, high-rising mountains, and the wildlife

that rules the land.

A treasure of Canterbury, Arthurs Park is a place that

people from all over the country come to explore.

The Canterbury rivers are well known for being

braided, and I myself was super excited to be able to

photograph these.

Bealey Spur is rich in history and was even farmed as

part of the Cora Lynn Station in 1935, a high country

muster which grazed up to 6000 sheep until 1978 when

farming in the area was retired due to the expansion

of Arthurs Pass National Park.

The iconic Bealey Spur Hut, also known as Top Hut,

was built by Walter Taylor and Harry Faulkner in 1935

from beech saplings and can still be used today

though we didn’t stay here, wanting to take in the

view over the river valley instead.

In no great hurry, myself and 2 others started off on our

1 hour 30 minute walk uphill around mid-afternoon. It

was hot and we had our full water bladders with us

due to there being no streams near where we were

going to be camping out under the stars. The start of

the track was a little steep, winding up Bealey Spur for

a bit before opening up with a decent view up the

Bruce and Power Stream which I recommend as a

detour as there are some nice cascades in the bush.

We carried on walking up, I was carrying all of my

lenses and 2 camera bodies which I soon regretted,

6

NZPhotographer


F16, 1/10s, ISO100

carrying too much gear in the heat is not a good

combination! However, it felt like the hardest part of

the walk was behind us as we started to get out into

the clearing that overlooks the valley.

Upon reaching the top, I looked out and over the

valley and realised, with a shock, that there was no

water in the river. The river looked as if it entered out

from Turkey Flat which, in a way, was very cool but

I was disappointed as all I could see was the gravel

braids that the water had shaped with just one stream

of water flowing. Don’t get me wrong, my first view of

this place was still pretty special, but it wasn’t what

I had thought I’d be seeing.

I pitched the tent I’d been carrying, using it purely for

photographic purposes this time as I took a time-lapse

that started inside the tent before slowly sliding out of

the tent to get the view in all its glory.

I could see mount Bealey on the other side of the

valley which I have previously climbed, and I could

see right up into the Arthurs Pass area and up the River

Waimak – It’s some really big country, and I can now

appreciate why so many climbers come here as you

have instant access to height without having to walk

in, even Sir Edmond Hillary used Arthurs Pass for this

very reason.

As the sun started to set, we were limited to what

we could shoot in this big open space as there were

very few clouds around but we had the bridge over

the Waimak and the golden glow on the mountains.

Sunset itself was a bit of a fizzer but with good

company, we enjoyed some banter.

February 2020 7


F16, 1/125s, ISO100

Despite it being summer, it got cold fast once that sun

went with a strong wind blowing right off the snowcapped

peaks. There wasn’t much else to do so I had

my dinner and then found a nice sheltered spot for

my bedroll, climbing into my sleeping bag to stay

warm. I did not get out again until sunrise, I should

have packed some warmer clothes, but thankfully

my new Macpac sleeping bag is good for some very

chilly temperatures.

Usually the warmth of my sleeping bag makes it hard

to get out of come morning and truth be known,

sometimes I do shoot the scene whilst sitting in my

sleeping bag but on this particular morning, with the

light hitting the mountains in the distance and the

Anticrepuscular rays shining, I jumped out of bed to

capture the scene before me.

This was just a short trip to a stunning location with no

plan for the rest of the day other than to complete

the walk back down which took just under an hour.

However, every photography / hiking trip teaches you

something – I now know that personally, I am happiest

hiking either in the rain or after a lot of rain has fallen.

Had I done that here I would have been able to

capture the headwaters of the Waimakariri River.

Before I make a future trip here I’ll be checking the

web cameras to ensure the river is in full flow!

3 TRAMPING PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS

• Have an ultra-wide to wide-angle lens. I take a 14–

24mm plus either a 50mm or a mid-range zoom,

either 24–70mm or 35–70mm. These will cover most

of your needs on tramping trips – Don’t do as I did

and take everything!

• Take filters, at a minimum you’ll want a CPL – Make

sure they are not being squashed by your back or

other items in your bag as you hike!

• A tripod is a must, despite the awkwardness of

carrying it, you will regret it if you don’t take one.

www.instagram.com/esbphotography_

www.facebook.com/ESB23Photography

www.esbphotography.co.nz

8

NZPhotographer


What's On

@excio photo community

The first month of the new decade

saw us diving straight into a

whirlwind of events, welcoming

new members and enjoying new

collections on Excio. It’s truly inspiring to

see more and more people joining our

#PhotographyForGood movement. For

our members it’s not only about sharing

the same values but also advocating

for good – good photography

practices and better understanding of

one's self through photography while

creating more positive vibes.

We are excited to announce our new

gallery of Top 10 Excio Photos which

you can see on the following pages –

these showcase the most interesting

images published by our members in

the previous month with our editorial

team selecting the images based

on different factors such as the story

behind the photo, its uniqueness,

creativity and most importantly how

it makes you feel as a viewer. Our

Top 10 selection this month is a great

illustration of photographs that make

you pause, think, and feel.

We are also launching a series of

offline events entitled “Walk+” in

Wellington and Christchurch (coming

to more places soon) that not only

combine a photo walk and networking

opportunities, but also aim to help

you develop as a photographer and

provide you with a safe and friendly

environment to share and discuss your

photos after the walks.

All events are listed on the Excio Photo

Community Facebook page so make

sure you follow us to stay in the loop

and to learn more.

We hope you enjoy the interviews

on the next pages with our members

and we hope to see your photos and

stories in the next issue! You can read

more stories on our Blog (www.excio.

io/blog) and to join us, simply go to

www.excio.io/membership.

www.excio.io

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio,

Ana's photography

journey started many

years ago with one of the

first Kodak film cameras.

She loves exploring the

unseen macro world

and capturing people's

genuine emotions.

@excionz

9 February 2020


10

Excio Top 10

MARINA DE WIT

DAHLIA MAGNIFICA

“A bright and colourful Penhill Watermelon Dahlia – I love

the mood and the flowing petals.”

LYNN FOTHERGILL

COLOURS OF THE TAKAHE

VANDY POLLARD

MONARCH BUTTERFLY CATERPILLARS

“Every year I grow swan plants to encourage

Monarchs into my garden to lay eggs. I love how

the caterpillars can simultaneously make their way

up the branches while feeding.”


DIONNE S

MOUNTAIN LUPINS

“For about 4–5 weeks of the year (mid-November)

the centre of NZ’s South Island bursts into colour.

Purple and pink plus blue and yellow Lupins sprout

up along lakes and river beds in the Mackenzie

Country making the views even more stunning!!”

CHARLOTTE E. JOHNSON

R STUDY 4

“A collaboration between myself, our anonymous

model, and makeup Artist Holly B.”

TANIA MACKIE

INVERCARGILLS CIVIC THEATRE AT NIGHT

“Night photography is one of my most favourite

genres… it’s like a different world at night time…”

RUDOLPH KOTZE

GNU IN DUST STORM

“I noticed these Gnu standing in a dust storm

looking at us.”

11 February 2020


12

TONY ELKINS

OPIKI BRIDGE FRAMED BY

THE TREES

“On this beautiful evening I took

the family out to the Opiki Bridge,

one of my favorite places to

shoot. The Sunset light on this

particular evening was just

incredible. The colours being

produced were something else.

In this image I’ve taken inspiration

from another photographer and

I love the framing of the bridge

between the two trees.”

ANITA RUGGLE

SHOOTING STAR

“At 4.30am a few of us very

keen photographers headed

down to Te Karo Bay for some

astrophotography. l was lucky

enough to capture a shooting

star.”

GRAHAM JONES

F8, 6s, ISO100

CATHEDRAL COVE

“Hahei in the Coromandel is a

favourite spot for tourists both

local and international visitors –

you need to be up at sparrows

fart to have it pristine. I took this

at low tide at 6am after a 45min

walk so that I could photograph

the dawn light and avoid the

many tourists that arrive via Water

Taxi. ”


Photo Community

YOU

CAN BE FEATURED

HERE

NEXT

MONTH

Passionate about #PhotographyForGood?

We want to see your work, hear your story and

share it with as many people as we can.

Find Out More

www.excio.io/membership

13 February 2020


14

From Nursery Worker to

Full Time Photographer

Interview with Jo Lammas

JO, TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF AND YOUR

JOURNEY INTO FULL-TIME PHOTOGRAPHY...

I am 43 years old and have a nearly 17 year old

daughter. I recently left an unhappy marriage, so I

now live in Tamahere.

I have always been interested in photography, initially

using it as a way of showing people what I saw on my

travels being that I am not very good at explaining

my trips with words. I started taking a lot more photos

after having a baby, as you do. It was still film cameras

at this time so you were limited in the number of

images you could afford to take. Then my brother

bought me my first digital camera - I was able to see

what I had taken before printing and seemed to be a

natural at finding the right composition in landscape

photos.

I loved capturing the great outdoors, travelling, and

visiting new places but I wanted to learn more, to

make full use of my camera from people who knew

what they were doing. I started a correspondence

course in photography but didn’t finish it, life as I knew

it had changed, I now had step-children to look after.

I moved back to Cambridge and eventually started

back at my old job of picking flowers in a nursery.

One day I had an email about joining The

Photography Institute to gain a diploma in

photography. My husband said I should do it and

he would pay for it. I joined and paid for it myself, I

could budget better. I liked my job at the nursery as

it was something I was good at, but I had a passion

for photography that I wanted to develop further.

Everyone including my boss supported me and

helped how they could, usually by giving me things

to photograph. I completed the course in less than 6

months, gaining my diploma. I knew that even though

I had a certificate, I had so much more to learn so I

continued to push myself to get better by practising

and testing out new ideas.

I kept doing my best at work, then my husband

started working with me. Things always seemed tense

at work and then at home, so photography was my

escape. Things got worse when my step-son also

began working with me. I started looking for other

work as I was no longer happy with my job at the

nursery and was suffering with anxiety and bouts of

depression and PTSD.

I took myself on holiday to surprise my mum and have

an adventure with my camera, when I got back I

was more determined than ever to get a new job. I

patiently waited, earning a year’s worth of holiday

pay. Then a job was advertised for an individual

photographer to travel to schools around the country

taking photos. I thought it sounded perfect, and with

some nights away due to travel time, it might also

help my relationship in the process. So I applied and

to my complete delight I was interviewed and then

eventually offered the job.

I was thrilled and scared because I was going into the

complete unknown. I gave notice to my employer

who knew I must have been going to do something

in photography. My work life got so much better but

my home life didn’t and I was not safe. I have only

recently moved into my own place and although I am


FENCED IN

F6.3, 1/125s, ISO100

lonely at times, I love it. I have absolutely no regrets in

changing my work and home life. I am in my opinion,

living the dream. I love my new found freedom. Of

course the job has some pressures, sometimes I have

to leave for work a day earlier or get up extra early to

be at work on time but I absolutely love smiling all day.

Thanks to this job I have travelled to some far off

places and if I’m away for the night, I get to go off

exploring the area with my camera after work, taking

landscape, nature, and wildlife photos.

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH?

I still use the gear I bought when I was studying with

The Photography Institute. I have a Canon 700D with

a 50mm and 2 kit lenses, the 18-55mm and 55-200mm.

For filters, I have a polarising filter (my favourite) as well

as an ND8, ND4, ND2, and a UV filter.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE

IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND HOW HAVE YOU

OVERCOME THAT?

My biggest challenge is shyness, and speaking

confidently in public, something I have had to do for

work, talking to classes of children and the teachers.

I don’t think I have completely overcome it, but I am

getting there with determination and just doing it

anyway.

WHAT DOES #PHOTOGRAPHYFORGOOD

MEAN TO YOU AND HOW DO YOU IMPLEMENT

THAT IN YOUR WORK?

To me #photographyforgood means showing the best

of the landscape we are given. Beauty can be found

everywhere in the most diverse of places, in the faces

we see and in the places we visit. In my photographs, I

want viewers to see the beauty that I see.

WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU GIVE OTHERS ABOUT

TURNING PHOTOGRAPHY INTO THEIR FULL-TIME

CAREER?

Keep learning, and practising there is always

something new to learn. Then go for it, chase your

dreams achieve your goals, but keep being humble

and help others.

15 February 2020


16

REFLECTIONS

F/7.1, 1/13s, ISO400

WESTERN COASTLINE

F/7.1, 1/400s, ISO200


RAGLAN HILLS

F/16, 1/6s, ISO100

RANGITOTO LIGHTHOUSE

F/6.3, 1/1250s, ISO100

17 February 2020


18

FANTAIL

F5.6, 1/2000s, ISO5000

HOW DO YOU PROMOTE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I try to promote my work through my

friends and family, I also enter online

photography competitions. I struggle a lot

with self-promotion, its not something I’m very

comfortable with. What comes naturally is

my friendliness and openness to learning new

things. I take pride in my work so I am very

critical with myself. Its a work in progress always.

WHEN DO YOU THINK A PHOTOGRAPHER

GOES FROM BEING AN AMATEUR TO A

PRO?

I think you become a professional when all or

most of your income comes from photography,

simply because you are being paid to take

photos, whether you work for yourself or

someone else. To complete the in between

steps from amateur to pro I recommend setting

up a website or a shop on Facebook to show

your work, entering photography competitions,

selling your printed work at markets, and getting

involved with local camera clubs.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU?

I plan to keep growing my photography, travelling,

and enjoying my peaceful times while pushing

myself to achieve personal goals.

ANY INSPIRATIONAL WORDS TO LEAVE US WITH?

You are not in competition with anyone, just try to be

better than you were the day before, make mistakes

but learn from them.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/jolammasphotography

www.facebook.com/jolammasphotos

www.viewbug.com/member/joannalammas

www.picfair.com/users/Jolammas

albums.excio.io/profile/jo


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19 February 2020


20

HEAVENLY

LENSBABY VELVET 56

1/750s, ISO200

How Lensbaby Lit Up My Life

By Heather Maree Owens

My background is in the arts with Diplomas in

applied arts majoring in jewellery, painting,

and sculpture which I studied at Hungry Creek

Art School in Puhoi. Later, I went on to teach Jewellery

there for a couple of years before having my son.

When I first left Grammar school back in the ‘80’s

I did a photography course for a few months and

bought my first camera, a Pentax Spotmatic if

I remember correctly. I didn’t really do much more

with photography until by a series of events I found

my way back to it around 2014. It was a hard time in

my life dealing with family bereavements and I feel

photography literally saved me by bringing joy and

showing me the beauty in nature around me.

Since then I have completely fallen in love with it –

Photography gets under your skin, once it becomes

your passion everything you see and experience

feeds it. I find photography to be more freeing than

the traditional arts as you go out into the world rather

than into your studio. I look at photography as if the

camera and lens are a net to catch not just the

moment and what is seen, but also the feeling.

My approach to photography is much the same

as it has been for my formal art training; I follow

my eyes and heart with a focus on experimental,

non-traditional methods with the thought that if you

don’t know you can’t do something, sometimes you

can. I think this philosophy has served me well over the

years – I firmly believe that the knowledge you gain

from experimenting and finding things out for yourself

is the most valuable advice.

The Lensbaby Velvet 56 was one of the first lenses

I bought, which was very exciting if not a little

daunting at the time considering I didn’t have a huge

amount of experience. Admittedly it took some time

to get to know the lens and to get the best out of her.

The aha moment came when I upgraded to fullframe,

going from my beginners Canon 1200D to the 6D.

I remember the moment well, taking a photograph

of a camellia bud (something I had shot many times

before) at wide open and the wow feeling of being

let into some other dreamlike world! It made me

realise how much of an impact changing your lens

could have on your photography.

The avid collector in me led me on a bit of a lens

buying journey, hunting down vintage glass (and

filters) from obscure places via eBay as well as

purchasing other art lenses like the Petzval plus more

Lensbabies. My especial love is vintage and unusual

lenses, some of which I have modified myself.


STAINED GLASS AUTUMN WITH

REVERSE FRONT ELEMENT

HELIOS 44-2

1/750s, ISO800

21 February 2020


ORCHID PINK

HELIOS 44-2

1/500s, ISO200

PAINTED YELLOW ROSES

HELIOS 44-2 ‘THE BEAST’

22

1/180s, ISO100


The Jupiter 11 was my first vintage lens buy, I had to

wait 2 months for that exotic package to arrive from

the USSR. More vintage lenses followed; Industars,

Heilios, Jupiter’s, and then Vivitar’s and SMC Takumar

along with a mystery box of mixed vintage filters (prism

filters, half field, soft focus, and many more) – If I am

ever feeling a little uninspired I pull that box out and

have a play, I still haven’t used all of them!

The old lenses are designed to work on film cameras

so the distance between the back of the lens and the

sensor can have a big effect on how they perform

depending on their mount and which lens-cameraadapter

combo you are using.

My first Helios 44–2 came to me pre-modified, some of

its blades had been removed to give it square bokeh.

I then did a very simple mod of reversing the front

element of another Helios to affect how it caught the

light.

The next modification I did was more extensive, and

to be honest a bit extreme. Called the glow mod, it

called for removing all the glass elements and depolishing

them with metal polish then sanding the

black paint off of the inside tube. It shouldn’t have

been so bad but when I undid the lens (another

Helios 44–2) someone had obviously done some work

on it before and they hadn’t put one of the holding

screws back in so everything, guts and all, came

out in a gush! I carried on with the mod and put it

back together as best I could work out, which may

not have been 100% correct. When I started playing

around with shooting, I found she gives everything an

impressionist painterly look, so I decided to leave what

I’d done and I christened her ‘The Beast’ because she

is a one of a kind and quite tricky to use!

All of my lenses are different in one way or another

and it’s exciting finding out what they each have to

offer. My most favoured lens is the Lensbaby Velvet 56

as well as my vintage Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 2/58 and

my good old Helios 44–2.

I think that the skills I picked up using the old and

quirky (sometimes difficult) manual lenses helped me

a lot in handling the art lenses especially with manual

focusing with very shallow DOF.

Editing wise I mostly use Lightroom, but I have found

that I prefer to try and catch effects in-camera,

simply for the reason that I’d rather spend time with

the camera than on my computer editing. However,

I do still enjoy playing around with editing, especially

creating mirrored otherworldly images.

I mostly shoot for myself and my own enjoyment but

it pleases me no end that others find pleasure in my

images. I really enjoy seeing peoples differing styles

of work and being part of the Excio community that

supports and promotes NZ photographers like myself.

www.instagram.com/

heathermareeowensphotography

www.facebook.com/heather.m.owens.92

albums.excio.io/profile/heather maree owens

JOYFUL DANCE OF THE DAISIES

CARL ZEISS JENA BIOTAR 2/58

1/2000s, ISO100

23 February 2020


FIORDLAND PEAKS,

DUSKY SOUND

F8, 1/2000s, ISO800

24

NZPhotographer


The Best Weather For Landscape Photography

Picking The Best Landscapes To Shoot For The Conditions.

By Richard Young

February 2020 25


MILFORD SOUND

F11, 8s, ISO100

There is a common misconception among nonphotographers

that the best photography weather

is a bright, sunny day. The reality is quite the

opposite; a sunny day for landscape photography

is often the worst weather you can have! Good

photography comes from a mix of weather – interesting

weather, along with its light, will add more drama to a

landscape. A bright, sunny day means boring, empty

blue sky and a flat image with deep shadows.

One of my favourite places to photograph in New

Zealand is in Fiordland. I love the scale and drama

offered by its impressive forest, mountain, and fiordcovered

landscapes. Each time I run a workshop there,

I see the disappointment in my group when the forecast

predicts rain for Milford and Doubtful Sound – which is

the case more often than not! This is a place where it

rains 300 days a year, so you’re lucky (or unlucky!) to

arrive here on a clear day. It is the rain that makes this

landscape so lush, and the weather is as much a part

of the landscape here as its geographical features:

without one, the other would not exist. So when I see

the forecast showing what many would consider

challenging conditions, I know that this is some of the

best weather for capturing the landscapes – both

in dramatic images and in telling the story of the

landscape through the weather that forms it.

A few years ago, when I was visiting Milford Sound in

winter, I had what you might call a curse of fine

weather: three cloudless days. That’s right, it did not

rain once in three days at Milford Sound! I stayed for

four nights with a friend to capture the “perfect shot”

of sunrise over Mitre Peak. Finally (after three boring,

cloudless mornings), the fourth morning brought some

high cloud – the edge of an approaching front, sitting

out in the Tasman sea. Of course, clouds can be as

much a curse and not a cure for the perfect sunrise if

they are in the wrong part of the sky! Luckily for us on

this particular morning, the weather front was

approaching from the west. The far eastern sky was

clear, turning the clouds above us purple, while the

sun’s first rays ignited the tips of the mountain peaks. If

it were sunset, it would have been a different story

altogether: the cloud bank on the western horizon

would have acted as a giant filter, preventing the sun

from lighting up the clouds.

Last year, a very different forecast awaited me as

I headed into Milford to spend the night on a boat –

200mm of rain was expected to fall overnight. I could

26

NZPhotographer


MILFORD SOUND

F4, 1/30s, ISO3200

not have been more excited to be heading out here

to experience this much rain and the photography

opportunities it might bring. The forecast rang true: it

rained heavily throughout the evening. Lying awake

for most of the night, I could hear it lashing against

the side of the boat, and I could not have been more

excited to get up for sunrise. I say sunrise, although it

was not the display of epic colours one might expect.

Instead, it was a very slow penetration of light into

the darkness of the fiord. The darkness seemed to

be trapped in against its deep cliff, not allowing the

light in until way past a time that it should have been

daylight. That morning, I managed to shelter under

the top deck of the boat and capture one of my

favourite shots of Milford Sound. With the torrential

rain, the waterfalls were huge. Every face of the

fiord had turned into a cascade of water. So while

most people would have been still sheltering in their

beds, I was out photographing in the rain and halflight.

I have lots of shots I like from that morning, but

the one I love the most was of another boat: the

Milford Wanderer, just as it passed towards a huge

waterfall. I had to shoot at 3200 ISO for just 1/30th of a

second to capture this in the low light, but had it been

any brighter, the drama of the image would have

been lost. For me, this shot captures the Fiordland

landscape (and weather) and the inclusion of the

boat within the landscape offers both a sense of scale

and a human connection to it.

Some of the most dramatic light is achieved through

cloud cover, when rays of light break through holes in

the clouds and light up parts of the landscape below,

offering a sense of depth to an image. The shot at the

start of this article was taken in just these conditions

while flying back from Dusky Sound in a helicopter.

The sun, low in the western sky, sneaked through a

small gap in the cloud, lighting up the mountain layers

and offering separation between the peaks.

When shooting in “bad weather”, it is important to pick

the right subject. There is little point going after an epic

sunrise shoot on a morning of full cloud cover, but this

does not mean there is nothing to shoot. Two subjects

that work brilliantly, perhaps even best, on an overcast

or wet day are forests and waterfalls. Photographing

a waterfall on a sunny day can be difficult, because

direct sunlight can result in uneven exposure. Cloudy

days offer better conditions, both for even exposure

and to facilitate longer shutter speeds to capture

movement in the water. Photographing in the forest

on a bright day is also hard, as the harsh light creates

a great deal of contrast – again making exposure

February 2020 27


FIORDLAND FOREST

F11, 0.4s, ISO200

DOUBTFUL SOUND

28

NZPhotographer

F8, 1/640s, ISO400


difficult. An overcast sky will fix this. Rain also adds a

level of lushness to the forest: after rain, the forest floor

and mosses spring to life. Leaves glow green with a

level of saturation you will never find when they are dry.

One of the more difficult tasks of shooting in the rain

is making sure your camera gear stays dry (ish) and

that you stay comfortable enough to stay out and

brave the conditions. It might not be the easiest

photography, but you will be rewarded for your

efforts. There is also something about being out in wild

conditions which makes you feel alive! For me, this

alone is a good enough reason to go. Photography

does not always have to be about coming back with

a “winning shot”; on its own, it is a great excuse to get

out and experience some wild places. I can think of

many times I have headed into a landscape in wild

weather – never once firing my shutter but returning

very happy from the experience alone.

Of course, there are times when a blue sky day will also

work. In this shot of Doubtful Sound, the empty blue

sky offers negative space which, along with the deep

shadow area, is mirrored in the fiord’s dark waters.

Here, the clear skies help to simplify the landscape.

So, the next time you plan to go out shooting and it looks

like it might rain, I dare you to go anyway; you might be

pleased with what you return with! After all, landscape

photography is not solely about capturing every iconic

vista bathed in golden colours at sunset and sunrise.

Capturing a landscape in all weather conditions will add

a lot more depth and contrast to your portfolio.

FIORDLAND PHOTOGRAPHY TOUR – JOIN RICHARD YOUNG ON A 4-DAY FIORDLAND

PHOTOGRAPHY TOUR THIS YEAR. DESIGNED AS THE ULTIMATE FIORDLAND EXPERIENCE, YOU

WILL CAPTURE SUNRISE AND SUNSET OVER MILFORD SOUND, STAY OVERNIGHT ON A BOAT ON

DOUBTFUL SOUND, AND HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE A HELICOPTER FLIGHT OVER DUSKY

SOUND. CLICK HERE

Capture to Print

4 Day Masterclass

Central Otago & Wanaka

18th - 21st April 2020

Autumn Masterclass Workshop

Our Central Otago photography tour is programmed in for the month

of April when the Autumn colours are at their best. With landscape

photographers Rob Brown and Richard Young as your guides, and

utilising comfortable 4WD vehicles, we will be able to take you into some

of the most interesting and photogenic places of Central Otago.

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

021 0845 7322

February 2020 29


Ifirst became aware of the impact we travellers

and tourists have on both natural and urban

environments when I set off to see the world in 1988.

Since then, as each year has passed, that impact

has become more and more apparent. It’s not

good. Yes, I know the jobs and wealth created are

appreciated by locals and businesses, but it’s a finite

planet we live on. Mantras like ‘growth is essential’,

‘it’s only business’ and ‘a healthy economy looks after

everything else’ have always sat uneasily with me. But

today, as we gaze (still too often blindly, so it seems)

down the gapping double barrels of climate change,

the dark side of those claims is undeniable.

Even if our planet wasn’t warming at an alarming rate,

too many people in one spot at one time still have

a disturbing impact – environmentally, logistically,

emotionally, spiritually, and aesthetically. So it’s with

caution that I agreed to write about some wonderful

photographic locations I’ve been privileged to enjoy.

By showing you them, will I destine these places to

also one day become over-run like the Tongariro

Crossing, Roys Peak or the ‘Lone Willow’ at Wanaka?

Perhaps not – if I chose places that demand a little

pain in order to enjoy the gain. Places that take more

effort to reach than the immediate-gratification-selfieseeking

hordes are prepared to make. Well, that’s the

plan at least.

To begin then. A favourite for me is a winter sunrise at

Syme Hut. Perched on the northern edge of Fanthams

Peak, the secondary cone on the southern side of

30

NZPhotographer


Here comes the sun, viewed from the southern edge of

Fanthams Peak, with Mount Taranaki and Syme Hut left

Photographic Locations

Worth Sweating For

by Peter Laurenson

Mount Taranaki, Syme Hut is a basic 10 bunk DOC

hut. At 1,950m and well above the tree line, there’s

no fuel for a stove up there, but a tap and sink in the

sheltered entrance alcove give access to rain water

when the pipes aren’t frozen.

Access to the hut is from Manaia Road, which ends

at a car park and DOC visitor centre, near Dawson

Falls. From there it’s a relentless climb from 900m, on

a well defined track up through native forest. As you

clear the tree line at 1,400m it steepens and a series

of steps make the going a little easier to begin with,

before you reach the bare eastern flanks of Fanthams

Peak. To reach the hut only requires about 3 hours of

climbing, so access is relatively easy by New Zealand

backcountry standards.

But here’s the catch – the ultimate time to

photograph this location is in full winter conditions.

While Syme Hut and Fanthams Peak are an

impressive location at any time of year, it’s when

snow and fantastic rime ice encase everything that

the magic really happens. Even from the hut door,

you can watch the eastern horizon redden. As the

dawn sun’s light intensifies through mauve, blood

red, orange and yellow, distant Mounts Ruapehu,

Ngauruhoe and Tongariro are silhouetted on the

eastern skyline. Meanwhile, all around you the snow

and ice become a fine art canvass, reflecting all

the drama of the changing light.

February 2020 31


Mount Taranaki and Syme Hut, early

morning from Fanthams Peak

The upper 600m of Mount Taranaki, bathed in

glorious dawn hues, loom larger than life directly

above to the north and, sometimes, if you walk

across to the southern edge of Fanthams Peak,

you can even see the mountain’s shadow cast out

across the lowlands to the southwest.

Syme Hut (and its separate loo) become partially

buried in snow and sometimes completely encased

in magnificent rime ice in mid winter. The hut’s

single door is split horizontally in the middle so that

entry and exit are possible just through the upper

half when required. I was able to crampon up rime

encased weather stabiliser cables on to the hut’s

roof on one winter visit. The evening before, when

we arrived we had to hack our way through a

coating of ice to even see the upper half of the hut

door. When the hut is encased like this, inside it’s

a cool 2 °C and the soft turquoise light is a bit like

what you might see from inside a glacial crevasse.

It’s an amazing place, perhaps the single best

place to photograph Mount Taranaki in my opinion.

But don’t even think about going there unless

you’re comfortable on exposed frozen terrain kitted

out with crampons and ice axe. While the terrain is

not technically difficult – free climbing has always

been how I’ve climbed up to Syme Hut and then

on to the main summit – a fall could be deadly. This

place is not friendly in bad weather either, so you

need a fine weather window, both for your safety

and also so you can enjoy the full photographic

potential.

For these reasons, I don’t think the selfie horde

will ever reach Syme Hut, but if you’re a keen

landscape photographer, I suggest you add this

place to your bucket list.

The dawn view north to Mount Taranaki and east to

Mounts Ruapehu, Ngauruhoe and Tongariro, from near

Syme Hut, Fanthams Peak

32

NZPhotographer


PM

Mounts Ruapehu, Ngauruhoe and Tongariro at dawn,

from near Syme Hut, Fanthams Peak

New to photography? Looking to improve your knowledge of

the essentials and take your photography to the next step?

Check out our upcoming Nikon NZ School events

in partnership with New Zealand Photography Workshops

Learn more at

www.mynikonlife.co.nz/school

February 2020 33


African Adventures

with Bex Amos

7D and my 100D entry-level body to make sure I

didn’t miss a shot. It was lucky I had my 100D as a

back-up because only a few days into the trip my

second-hand 7D stopped working! This was extremely

disappointing, but I was glad that I still had a DSLR to

capture the important moments. I used my Canon

50mm 1.8mm for portraits, my 70-300mm USM II

for getting up close and personal with Tanzania’s

wildlife, and a 10-18mm for some gorgeous beach

landscapes. My 18-55mm kit lens also came in handy

for day-to-day use. Finally, I took my Polaroid camera

as well - such a great way of connecting with people,

and being able to gift them the captured moments

that they may otherwise never get to see!

I am a 29 year old social worker and hobbyist

photographer. I absolutely love being a social worker

however, the reality of my job is that I see the darkest

side of humanity: people at their lowest where

hopelessness and despair are rife. Photography is one

of my passions because it allows me to turn my lens

towards the light in this world; to capture moments of

natural beauty, joy, and hope. I love photographing

wildlife, people, and the beautiful landscapes of our

world.

In November of last year, I went on a whirlwind of

a trip to Kenya and Tanzania. It was all inspired by

my amazing mum who has been sponsoring a child,

Joyce, in Kenya for the last 14 years. It has always

been a dream of hers to visit Joyce and see the

project that ChildFund operates. Joyce is now 18

years old and the time was right for us to set off and

make my mum’s dream come true but of course, a

trip to Africa wouldn’t be complete without a Safari

and beach getaway too!

Because I wanted to capture the special moments

of our sponsor trip, the wildlife on safari, and the

beautiful island of Zanzibar, I needed to travel with

a little more equipment than usual! I took both my

34

NZPhotographer

MEETING JOYCE

We arrived in Nairobi early afternoon and the next

morning we were picked up at 8am by the lovely

staff of ChildFund Kenya. After going to their National

Office for a security briefing (due to some recent

civil-conflict and terrorism), we set off on a 5 hour car

journey to a town called Isiolo. It was from here that

we made the two-hour walk through mud and rivers,

to reach Joyce’s village – all made possible by some

makeshift gumboots found at a local market! During

the rainy season, it gets so flooded that vehicles are

not able to pass through. This makes it extremely

challenging for the families to get into town for

supplies, or to get drinking water from the nearest

borehole that ChildFund has installed. It was amazing

and humbling to meet Joyce and her family who

welcomed us in with open arms. It was such a special

moment to be able to capture my mum embrace the

girl she has been writing to for the past 14 years. Joyce

was shy at first, but soon warmed up after a game

of balloons! Using the ChildFund social worker as an

interpreter, we learnt about Joyce’s aspirations to

become a teacher, alongside some of the challenges

that this family faces in accessing education, due to

their extreme state of poverty. Mum has supported

Joyce with her school fees as well as providing for

basic items such as food and water. The family were

even able to buy a donkey from the money mum

gave them one year, he is used to carry their water

back from the borehole which is invaluable. After an

amazing and humbling day spent with Joyce and her

family, we set off on our walk back into town, albeit

a lot shorter on the return leg as the hot African sun

had dried up some of the mud and water that once

anchored our gumboots to the ground with every

step.


F5.6, 1/500s, ISO125

F5.6, 1/500s, ISO200

NEXT STOP: TANZANIA!

As an animal lover and photography

enthusiast – our Safari adventure felt like

a dream come true. The only way I can

describe it is: Heaven on Earth. Mum and

I were joined by 2 other travellers on our

5 Day Safari tour and we explored the

Serengeti including the Ngorogoro Crater.

Our tenacious tour guide, Jackson, lead us

along the bumpy and dusty roads of the

Serengeti, surrounded by lush bush gifted

to us by the rainy season. Some of our

highlights were seeing gorgeous lion cubs

cuddling and playing together, capturing a

majestic leopard up in the shade of a tree,

and witnessing the wildebeest migration.

We were also fortunate enough to visit

a Masaai village and learn about their

fascinating way of life. There were so many

beautiful sights and moments that it was

hard to take everything in. But after 5 days

of excitement, adventure and memories

we will cherish forever, we moved on to the

last leg of our trip – a relaxing few days on

the Island of Zanzibar.

February 2020 35


F5.6, 1/1250s, ISO100

F5.6, 1/1250s, ISO100

36

NZPhotographer


F11, 1/100s, ISO100

F5.6, 1/1250Ss, ISO100

February 2020 37


F4, 1/1600s, ISO100

F4, 1/4000s, ISO100

EXPLORING ZANZIBAR, THE ‘SPICE ISLAND’

Zanzibar sits off the east coast of Tanzania and

remains a beautiful island, with an ugly and

tormenting history. Zanzibar, was the epicentre

for the slave trade market in Eastern Africa, with

thousands of locals captured by the Arabs,

auctioned off and then sold as slaves for the

British colonies, as well as other European nations.

Stone Town, the island’s capital, is an exotic

maze of alleyways, coral walls, spice markets,

and large wooden doors with articulate carvings

and brass studs. The mix of Arab, Indian and

African influences makes it an interesting place

to explore while learning about its history.

Once we arrived at our final destination of

Kendwa, we were blown away by the white

stretch of sand and turquoise waters. The ocean

felt like a bath, which didn’t bring much relief

from the unrelenting sun, but we had the pool for

that. Kendwa is on the northern tip, and one of

the most beautiful beaches on Zanzibar which is

why we chose this location to end our amazing

trip, it certainly did not disappoint!

CLOSING THOUGHTS

This may sound awfully cliché, but Africa truly

did capture my heart: the people and their

resilience, the beautiful landscapes and the

majestic animals. I know that I will go back oneday,

without a doubt. For now, I will be grateful

that I was born in Aotearoa, and I will think of

those who have the misfortune of being born into

a poverty-stricken land still recovering from the

generation impacts of slavery, colonisation and

poverty. These are some of the bravest people

you will ever meet, yet also the friendliest and

most hospitable. Their beaming white smiles will

stay imprinted on my heart for a long time.

If my images and words inspire you to go on

safari, be sure to use a local tour company who

are operating ethically by paying the local

staff a fair wage and ensuring appropriate

working conditions. This along with taking the

time to learn about the history and culture

of the places I visit are how I use my camera

for #photographyforgood. I believe we as

photographers should use our talent to capture

the beauty alongside reality, so that we can

understand the plight of others.

www.instagram.com/bexamosphotography

www.facebook.com/bex.amosphotography

38

NZPhotographer


1 Day Workshops

Learn how to take full creative control

and capture your own unique images.

Different one day options:

Basic Photography

Creative Photography

Long Exposure

Fine Art Printing

2 Day Workshops

Small Group Photography Weekends

Lightroom Processing

Tongariro Landscapes

Kaimai Waterfalls

Cape Palliser

BOP Seascapes & Waterfalls

4 Day Masterclass

Be inspired with our master class

workshops, which are designed to be

educational vacations, where you are

immersed in a specific area

of photography.

Long Exposure - Coromandel.

Landscapes - Aoraki, Mt Cook.

Astro - Aoraki, Mt Cook.

Autumn Colours - Wanaka.

Wildlife - Otago Peninsular

Photography Tours

Taking you to the best locations

the country has to offer.

Draw inspiration from capturing

New Zealand’s most iconic

landscapes alongside some of

our more hidden gems.

20 Day: South Island Highlights

20 Day: North Island Highlights

17 Day: Ultimate New Zealand

12 Day: New Zealand Icons

15 Day: New Zealand

Coastal Landscapes

15 Day: North Island Landscapes

7 Day: Wild South Island

7 Day: West Coast Wilderness

7 Day: South Island Beaches

& Bays

7 Day: Volcanic North Island

7 Day: Northland & Bay of Islands

4 Day: Fiordland

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

February 2020 39

021 0845 7322


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Photography Unleashed

Winners and Best Entries from the Long Exposure

Photography Competition

WINNERS:

1ST PLACE: THE REWARD OF SUNRISE BY SARAH SMITH

2ND PLACE: THE BEACH ROCKS BY JANA LUO

3RD PLACE: NOT AN ISLAND BY PADRAIC CALLANAN

HIGHLY COMMENDED:

The Birds by Rob Gale

Low Tide Meets Breaking Dawn by Scott Cushman

Colourful Centre of the Universe by Anita Ruggle

Haunting by Tanya Rowe

PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD:

Emotional Expression by Paul Heads

February 2020 41


1st Place

42

NZPhotographer


THE REWARD OF SUNRISE

I often struggle to get out of bed to catch the sunrise, however, when

I do I am always rewarded. On this morning, at my local beach, the

light was subtle and infused everything. I used a 10 stop ND filter to

smooth out the sea which also created the streaky clouds.

Sarah Smith

February 2020 43


2ND PLACE

THE BEACH ROCKS

F18, 30s, ISO64, 16mm

Taken at Muriwai Beach, Auckland.

Jana Luo

44

NZPhotographer


3RD PLACE

NOT AN ISLAND

F8, 117s, ISO100, 56mm

The remains of an old timber pole at Corsair Bay, Christchurch shot on a Nikon

D750 with Tamron SP 24-70mm and NISI V5 ND filter.

The timber pole had interesting texture and there was a nice shadow on the water.

I had to wait until the tide came in enough to cover the rock in the foreground but

by then the tide had almost covered the timber pole and lost the shadow as well. I

find this photo interesting as it is not immediately apparent what it is a photo of - is

it an aerial photo of a small island, or a rocky outcrop?

Padraic Callanan

February 2020 45


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

46

NZPhotographer


THE BIRDS

F18, 30s, ISO64, 16mm

Taken at the Gannet colony at Muriwai Auckland,

I wanted to show some movement in the birds to

reflect the long exposure.

Rob Gale

February 2020 47


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

48

NZPhotographer


LOW TIDE MEETS BREAKING DAWN

I was looking for a decent section of interesting foreshore that

would break up the water and provide nice soft white patches

around the rocks during the long exposure. A first look proved very

boring however, moving closer to the water line produced a better

composition and final image. Shot with the Nikon D810 with Tamron

15-30mm and a 10 stop ND filter with a 30 second exposure time.

Scott Cushman

February 2020 49


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

50

NZPhotographer


COLOURFUL CENTER

OF THE UNIVERSE

This image was taken at Wharekaho beach

looking towards Whitianga township. About

40 min exposure time, it was a very cold

night down at the beach and a challenge to

keep the camera lens fog free.

Anita Ruggle

February 2020 51


HAUNTING

F11, 30s, ISO800,18mm

During the day, I came across an ornate gate

standing alone on the edge of the forest on Stewart

Island. I felt that it would be quite interesting

to photograph at night. So I created this photo

which makes the gate look quite haunted with the

assistance of a white jacket and lights.

Tanya Rowe

52

NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

February 2020 53


EMOTIONAL EXPRESSION

F11, 4s, ISO100

In 2019 I found light painting was a great way to

express my emotions on good and bad days. Ever

since then I haven't stopped creating different

images that come to mind, this photo was taken at

Awarua bay on the 5th November 2019.

Paul Heads

54

NZPhotographer


PEOPLE'S

CHOICE

February 2020 55


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

56

NZPhotographer


BIO-LUMINESCENT WAVE

F2.8, 5s, ISO1600

ARKLES BAY

I was in bed when I noticed a post on our local FB page that a bit of bio-luminescence had been spotted in

our area so I jumped out of bed, woke our 8 year old, and off we went hunting for it - this was at midnight!! We

found a little and after an hour or so the little guy was tired so we decided to call it a night. Once home and

climbing back into bed, I noticed another post from earlier with someone saying they saw bio-luminescence

at another beach so, me being me, I jumped out of bed again and this time headed out on my own - it

was 1:30 in the morning by now! When I got there I noticed a little directly in front of me on the beach but

as Murphy would have it, as I set up my camera up, it started fading and then disappeared completely. I

decided to call it a night (again) and started walking to the car. As I was virtually at the car, I saw a blue

flicker up against the cliffs out of the corner of my eye so I decided to head across for one more look! It was

so bright I could see it going off but only on certain waves!! I had to get pretty wet wading in knee deep

water, in the pitch dark, trying to get to the spot at high tide but I was going to try capture this no matter what!!

It was very sporadic and trying to capture it proved very difficult - for me anyway! However, this was a big

highlight in my short photographic career and I suspect a once in a lifetime opportunity. In all the time I was

there the bio-luminescence only went off a handful of times. The colour was generated by mother nature - I

did not have to disturb the water in any way myself to "activate" the amazing colour!!

Grant Birley

February 2020 57


THE JUMP

I was watching some children having fun jumping off the

Whitianga wharf, so I asked the mother if it was ok to take

some photos, she agreed and I grabbed the opportunity to

shoot a series, later merging them together.

Anita Ruggle

KAIKOURA PENINSULAR WALK

Made with the iPhone11 pro of family members walking on the

Kaikoura Peninsular walk and disappearing over the horizon.

Ann Wheatley

58

NZPhotographer


February 2020 59


60

NZPhotographer


SUMMER WEDDING

F2.8, ISO200, 38mm

Photographer / Retoucher : Anupama S. Wijesundara

Model / Makeup Artist : Zenia

Anupama S. Wijesundara

OVERLOOKING HAHEI

F10, 1/250s, ISO200, 44mm

It's taken 21 years, but finally friends from the UK came to visit

over Christmas. One of the trips we took them on was around

the Coromandel. We stayed at Hahei for a few days in a bach

looking over the beach. Happy times, creating new memories.

Carole Garside

February 2020 61


AHURIRI

HARBOUR

F9, 1/200s, ISO200, 18mm

Whilst visiting Napier, we caught

this view at sunset with interesting

light.

Rudolph Kotze

LANDING SPOT!

F9, 1/200s, ISO200, 18mm

I visited the Gannets at Cape

Kidnappers over New Year and

captured many birds in flight -

some landed gracefully and others

not so much. I captured this one on

the approach, still looking for an

open spot.

Rudolph Kotze

TE MATA

F10, 1/320s, ISO100, 18mm

While on holiday this year we went

to Napier and while enjoying great

wine we also had great weather.

Taken with Canon D80.

Rudolph Kotze


ISABELLA AT GOLDEN HOUR

F1.2, 1/1250s, ISO100

I wanted to encapsulate summer by shooting a portrait

session of my best friend's daughter at golden hour. The

evening was still warm and beautiful. I took a number of

portraits of Isabella, which are also lovely, but this image

of her spontaneously running ahead of me through the

shimmering grass, lavender in hand, into the lowering

summer sun speaks to me of summer evenings. The tones

are true to the light on the night. It was perfect. Shot with

a Canon 5DMkiv, 85mm f/1.2L II USM.

Lynn Fothergill

February 2020 63


AITUTAKI - LOVE

A LITTLE PARADISE

F11, 1/800s, ISO160

Aitutaki, Cook Islands is known as one of the most

heavenly places on Earth. From the air, Aitutaki has to be

one of the most beautiful sights in the world and it is just as

stunning from the ground.

Maria Ligaya Bumanglag

64

NZPhotographer


SERENITY

During the summer holidays, while out walking with

friends, I identified this location as a great place to

develop a better understanding of how to use ND filters

with water. Planning to come back with my camera,

I checked the sunrise, tide times, and weather then

marked the day in my calendar. On the day, I woke

at 5am then drove and walked through the dark to the

location. My planning paid off. The sunrise was subtle

and brief, but I still managed to capture some great

light and a variety of effects using the action of the

waves. One of my best 2020 summer memories so far!!

Sarah K Smith

February 2020 65


66

NZPhotographer


A LIFE WORTH LIVING

A picnic at the end of the jetty by Lake Mahinapua, just

south of Hokitika, epitomises the New Zealand way of life

and the slower pace of the West Coast.

Peter Kurdulija

February 2020 67


"IN A GENTLE

WAY, YOU

CAN SHAKE

THE WORLD."

MAHATMA

GANDHI

68

NZPhotographer

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